Dr Matthew Griffith

Dr Matthew Griffith

Lecturer

School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

Career Summary

Biography

The future belongs to those who create it! Dr Matthew Griffith is working to build a future with electronic devices can sense the world and then interface with and control functionality in the human body. To achieve this vision he is developing a series of sensing and stimulation platform technologies by printing clever electroactive inks into functional and flexible devices.

Research Overview

Life is short, so build things that matter. A continuing theme of Dr Griffith's research since he received a PhD in physical chemistry from the University of Wollongong has been the links between molecular structure and electronic functionality in organic and inorganic semiconducting devices. His research spans a broad area of applications, from the fundamental science of optical processes and charge carrier behavior in semiconductors to the fabrication of printed sensors and bioelectronic devices on the roll to roll scale scale for industry.

Energy Generation

The Sun produces more energy in an hour than the entire global population will use in a year. The future will require renewable energy generation technologies, and Dr Griffith has a plan to create these devices using specialized polymer materials. In 2010 he secured a Prime Minister's Asia Australia Award to conduct work across three different countries focused on understanding how control of molecular structure can manipulate charge carrier transport and recombination processes in the next generation of advanced solar cells. This work allowed him to develop a deep understanding of how fundamental processes occurring at the nanoscale can direct the important device performance metrics observed on the macroscopic scale. This allowed intelligent design processes to replace educated guessing in the design of advanced solar cells. This process was achieved by creating molecular design principles and strategies to control charge carrier kinetics for maximizing solar energy power conversion. In a post-doctoral fellowship in Japan he extended these studies to examine ionic movement in organic electronic mixed conduction devices and demonstrated how this could be controlled to create efficient 3‐D light sensors. The molecular design principles and charge carrier manipulation strategies developed by Dr Griffith have been heavily employed through the dye-sensitized community and have led to porphyrin dyes being widely adopted by other world-leading researchers and currently holding the record for the solar conversion efficiency in these devices. This has in turn provided significant tangible benefits to companies attempting to commercialise these devices, including DyeSol and G24i Power.

Printable Sensors

To control the world you live in, first you must detect and understand the signals by which that world communicates. In 2013 Dr Griffith moved to the University of Newcastle to establish a new research program in printed electronics. He has developed new innovative manufacturing techniques focused on solution‐based coating of organic electronic components for energy generation, light sensing and initiation of explosives in revolutionary large area printing facilities that have produced industrially relevant prototype devices. The ability to transfer fundamental physical stimuli such as pressure, light and chemical reaction products into electrical signals using a low cost printed organic semiconductors has proven to be a major technological breakthrough, and has led to the deployment of Australia's first commercial organic photovoltaic and sensing devices.

Biomaterials Science and Bioelectronic Devices

Carbon-based problems require a carbon-based solution. In his most recent research, Dr Griffith has continued exploring his passion for multidisciplinary research by working to interface the world of biology with his background in materials chemistry and device physics. The work has involved interfacing printed electronics with biomedical applications, and in some exciting instances, talking directly to living cells. The human body uses sensory neurons to communicate with the brain, which operate in a very similar manner to electronic devices with the added complication that they operate through the exchange of both ions and electrons. In comparison, standard silicon semiconductor technology operates purely through the exchange of electrons alone. However, the carbon-based organic electronic materials that Dr Griffith has been developing over the past decade offer a revolutionary platform that are uniquely capable of both ion and charge transport. Furthermore, these soft and pliable organic semiconductors are seamlessly biocompatible with the soft carbon-based tissue of the human body. These materials therefore offer exciting potential as the first electronic devices that can interface directly to the human body.

Dr Griffith is passionate in his belief that these organic semiconducting materials hold the key to unlocking next-generation biomedical devices that has always been at the forefront of the human imagination. He is currently developing fully printable devices that can detect ionizing radiation for interfacing to medical X-ray and nuclear medicine procedures, light activated neurostimulation devices for artificial retina implants, and electrically stimulated devices for implantable smart drug delivery systems. He was awarded an Early Career Researcher Strategic Pathway Grant and a Early Career Researcher Equipment Grant to develop the device physics of these new biomaterials device and currently leads the medical physics and bioelectronics research efforts in the Priority Research Centre for Organic Electronics.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Wollongong
  • Bachelor of Nanotechnology (Advanced) (Honours), University of Wollongong
  • Graduate Certificate in Business Administration, University of Wollongong

Keywords

  • Functional materials
  • Medical physics
  • Organic electronics
  • Printable electronics
  • Radiation dosimetry
  • Sensors
  • Time resolved spectroscopy

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
090303 Biomedical Instrumentation 20
091208 Organic Semiconductors 40
030304 Physical Chemistry of Materials 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
30/04/2012 - 3/05/2013 NEDO Postdoctoral Fellow Shinshu University
Faculty of Textile Science and Technology
Japan

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
PHYS2240 Atomic and Nuclear Physics
University of Newcastle
This course explores the nature of atoms using the basic quantum mechanical model for the electronic structure of atoms. The structure of an atom is then further unpacked by focusing on the nucleus. The basic concepts and theories of nuclear physics are developed as well as an understanding of the applications of nuclear science.
Course Coordinator and Lecturer 3/07/2017 - 6/07/2020
PHYS1200 Introductory Physics for the Life Sciences
University of Newcastle

This course provides an overview of topics in physics that are of particular importance to the life and medical sciences. The course is non-calculus based and covers mechanics (units, motion, biomechanics, energy), electricity and magnetism, heat, nuclear physics, fluids, and waves.

Lecturer 26/02/2018 - 6/07/2020
PHYS1250 MRS Physics & Radiation Protection
The University of Newcastle
This course develops foundation knowledge of physics and instrumentation, radiobiology & radiation protection associated with Medical Radiation Science (MRS).
Course Coordinator and Lecturer 3/07/2017 - 6/07/2020
MRSC1010 Medical Radiation Science 1A
University of Newcastle
The course explores the practice and science of MRS and its role in modern health care; its use in the diagnosis, staging, treatment and monitoring of acute and chronic illness and injury; the physical, radiobiological and radiation safety principles underlying imaging and therapy.
Lecturer 26/02/2018 - 6/07/2020
PHYS2000 Second Year Physics (All)
University of Newcastle
Academic management of all 2nd year physics laboratory courses.
Lab Coordinator 1/01/2018 - 6/07/2020
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Griffith MJ, Mozer AJ, 'Porphyrin Based Dye Sensitized Solar Cells', Dye Sensitized Devices, Intech Publishing, . 373-398 (2011)
DOI 10.5772/23955

Journal article (25 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Ameri M, Al-Mudhaffer MF, Almyahi F, Fardell GC, Marks M, Al-Ahmad A, et al., 'Role of Stabilizing Surfactants on Capacitance, Charge, and Ion Transport in Organic Nanoparticle-Based Electronic Devices', ACS APPLIED MATERIALS & INTERFACES, 11 10074-10088 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acsami.8b19820
Co-authors Paul Dastoor, Krishna Feron, Michael Dickinson
2019 Marks M, Holmes NP, Sharma A, Pan X, Chowdhury R, Barr MG, et al., 'Building intermixed donor-acceptor architectures for water-processable organic photovoltaics', Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 21 5705-5715 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/c8cp07137c
Co-authors Warwick Belcher, Krishna Feron, Paul Dastoor
2018 Al-Mudhaffer MF, Griffith MJ, Feron K, Nicolaidis NC, Cooling NA, Zhou X, et al., 'The origin of performance limitations in miniemulsion nanoparticulate organic photovoltaic devices', SOLAR ENERGY MATERIALS AND SOLAR CELLS, 175 77-88 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.solmat.2017.09.007
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors John Holdsworth, Paul Dastoor, Xiaojing Zhou, Warwick Belcher, Krishna Feron
2018 Almyahi F, Andersen TR, Cooling NA, Holmes NP, Griffith MJ, Feron K, et al., 'Optimisation of purification techniques for the preparation of large-volume aqueous solar nanoparticle inks for organic photovoltaics', BEILSTEIN JOURNAL OF NANOTECHNOLOGY, 9 649-659 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3762/bjnano.9.60
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Krishna Feron, Xiaojing Zhou, Warwick Belcher, Paul Dastoor
2016 Andersen TR, Cooling NA, Almyahi F, Hart AS, Nicolaidis NC, Feron K, et al., 'Fully roll-to-roll prepared organic solar cells in normal geometry with a sputter-coated aluminium top-electrode', Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, 149 103-109 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. We demonstrate a pathway for fully roll-to-roll (R2R) prepared organic solar cells in a normal geometry with a R2R sputtered aluminium to... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. We demonstrate a pathway for fully roll-to-roll (R2R) prepared organic solar cells in a normal geometry with a R2R sputtered aluminium top electrode. Initial attempts utilizing a stack geometry without an electron transport layer (ETL) failed to obtain working devices. By applying aluminium zinc oxide (AZO) as an ETL, and optimizing the AZO thickness, working printed OPV devices with an efficiency of 0.58% were obtained. Further optimization of the donor:acceptor ratio in the active layer increased the efficiency to 0.90%. This work demonstrates that normal geometry organic solar cells using a metal top contact can be produced using large scale production techniques.

DOI 10.1016/j.solmat.2016.01.012
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Krishna Feron, Warwick Belcher, Paul Dastoor
2016 Griffith MJ, Willis MS, Kumar P, Holdsworth JL, Bezuidenhout H, Zhou X, et al., 'Activation of Organic Photovoltaic Light Detectors Using Bend Leakage from Optical Fibers', ACS APPLIED MATERIALS & INTERFACES, 8 7928-7937 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acsami.5b12373
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Paul Dastoor, Warwick Belcher, Xiaojing Zhou, John Holdsworth
2016 Griffith MJ, Cooling NA, Vaughan B, Elkington DC, Hart AS, Lyons AG, et al., 'Combining Printing, Coating, and Vacuum Deposition on the Roll-to-Roll Scale: A Hybrid Organic Photovoltaics Fabrication', IEEE Journal on Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics, 22 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 IEEE. The potential for organic electronic technologies to produce low-cost energy at large scales is often cited as the most attractive feature of these materials. Such as... [more]

© 2015 IEEE. The potential for organic electronic technologies to produce low-cost energy at large scales is often cited as the most attractive feature of these materials. Such aspirations depend on the ability of materials to be printed from solution at high speeds across large areas using roll-to-roll (R2R) processing. However, progressing the technology from the laboratory environment into the industrial manufacturing arena is highly challenging. Closing the gap between exciting laboratory scale insights and the industrial scale potential requires a new focus on upscaling existing technology. Some recent progress in this area is discussed, concentrating on the need to pursue research across several different scales simultaneously in order to most effectively optimize large-scale fabrication efforts. These discussions are placed in the context of a design philosophy that combines printing, coating, and vacuum-based procedures. The challenges associated with selecting, and subsequently synthesizing, the optimal materials for device construction at large scales are considered. Case histories that highlight the unique challenges encountered during printing, coating, and sputtering at the R2R scale are presented. Developing testing and characterization procedures that can interrogate organic photovoltaic device (OPV) structures in real time is also discussed, and the opportunity for new tools to probe device photophysics is highlighted. The collection of innovative approaches to R2R fabrication challenges discussed here highlights the exciting progress toward efficient OPV modules becoming a commercial reality.

DOI 10.1109/JSTQE.2015.2487968
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Warwick Belcher, Paul Dastoor
2016 Cooling NA, Barnes EF, Almyahi F, Feron K, Al-Mudhaffer MF, Al-Ahmad A, et al., 'A low-cost mixed fullerene acceptor blend for printed electronics', Journal of Materials Chemistry A, 4 10274-10281 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry. The synthesis and performance of a cost-effective mixed fullerene at the 100+ g scale with a reaction yield of 85% is demonstrated. The cost... [more]

© 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry. The synthesis and performance of a cost-effective mixed fullerene at the 100+ g scale with a reaction yield of 85% is demonstrated. The cost to convert a fullerene such as C60 into the mixed acceptor blend is less than $1 g-1. The photovoltaic performance of the mixed acceptor is demonstrated in both small scale and roll-to-roll printed devices.

DOI 10.1039/c6ta04191d
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Paul Dastoor, Krishna Feron, Warwick Belcher
2016 Andersen TR, Almyahi F, Cooling NA, Elkington D, Wiggins L, Fahy A, et al., 'Comparison of inorganic electron transport layers in fully roll-to-roll coated/printed organic photovoltaics in normal geometry', Journal of Materials Chemistry A, 4 15986-15996 (2016) [C1]

© The Royal Society of Chemistry 2016. We investigate the suitability of four different inorganic materials (chromium oxide (CrOX), titanium oxide (TiOX), aluminium doped zinc oxi... [more]

© The Royal Society of Chemistry 2016. We investigate the suitability of four different inorganic materials (chromium oxide (CrOX), titanium oxide (TiOX), aluminium doped zinc oxide (AZO) and zinc oxide (ZnO)) as electrode transport layers in fully roll-to-roll (R2R) fabricated P3HT:ICxA organic solar cells. CrOX and TiOX were found to be unsuitable, as the CrOX devices did not exhibit rectifying behaviour while the TiOX devices did not withstand the annealing conditions. Of the last two ETLs, ZnO showed by far the most promise with devices demonstrating an average efficiency of 2.2%, which is the highest reported value for R2R devices in normal geometry, and a significantly extended lifetime compared with AZO devices under ISOS-L-2 conditions.

DOI 10.1039/c6ta06746h
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Warwick Belcher, Krishna Feron, Paul Dastoor
2015 Yune JH, Karatchevtseva I, Evans PJ, Wagner K, Griffith MJ, Officer D, Triani G, 'A versatile binder-free TiO2 paste for dye-sensitized solar cells', RSC ADVANCES, 5 29513-29523 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/c4ra14247k
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2015 Griffith MJ, Cooling NA, Vaughan B, O'Donnell KM, Al-Mudhaffer MF, Al-Ahmad A, et al., 'Roll-to-Roll Sputter Coating of Aluminum Cathodes for Large-Scale Fabrication of Organic Photovoltaic Devices', ENERGY TECHNOLOGY, 3 428-436 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/ente.201402174
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Paul Dastoor, Warwick Belcher
2015 Van Der Salm H, Lind SJ, Griffith MJ, Wagner P, Wallace GG, Officer DL, Gordon KC, 'Probing Donor-Acceptor Interactions in meso-Substituted Zn(II) Porphyrins Using Resonance Raman Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry', Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 119 22379-22391 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Chemical Society. A series of Zn(II) porphyrins which have asymmetrically substituted meso groups have been studied with UV-vis, resonance Raman, emission spectros... [more]

© 2015 American Chemical Society. A series of Zn(II) porphyrins which have asymmetrically substituted meso groups have been studied with UV-vis, resonance Raman, emission spectroscopies, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) of these materials have also been fabricated and their performance parameters measured. DFT calculations show perturbation of frontier molecular orbitals, and redox-active substituents cause greater perturbation than nonredox active substituents. All substituents cause a broadening of the B band, as is common for substituted porphyrins. TD-DFT calculations and resonance Raman spectroscopy suggest the donor and acceptor substituents play a small role in transitions of the B band. The meso donor substituent is electronically isolated and does not significantly perturb the molecular orbitals (MOs), while the meso cyanoacrylic acid TiO<inf>2</inf> binding group has a much larger effect on the e<inf>g</inf> MO in particular. However, in the oxidized porphyrin species, the hole is located on the meso substituent, localizing it away from the semiconductor surface, which should reduce recombination and also improve performance. They show modest efficiency when incorporated into solar cells; however, the pattern of behavior is consistent with localization of charge at the meso unit.

DOI 10.1021/acs.jpcc.5b07129
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
2014 Ikeuchi T, Nomoto H, Masaki N, Griffith MJ, Mori S, Kimura M, 'Molecular engineering of zinc phthalocyanine sensitizers for efficient dye-sensitized solar cells', CHEMICAL COMMUNICATIONS, 50 1941-1943 (2014)
DOI 10.1039/c3cc47714b
Citations Scopus - 74Web of Science - 71
2014 Zhao L, Wagner P, Elliott ABS, Griffith MJ, Clarke TM, Gordon KC, et al., 'Enhanced performance of dye-sensitized solar cells using carbazole-substituted di-chromophoric porphyrin dyes', Journal of Materials Chemistry A, 2 16963-16977 (2014) [C1]

© the Partner Organisations 2014. The purpose of this work is to investigate the origin of improved photovoltaic performance of a series of di-chromophoric carbazole-substituted p... [more]

© the Partner Organisations 2014. The purpose of this work is to investigate the origin of improved photovoltaic performance of a series of di-chromophoric carbazole-substituted porphyrin dyes employed as sensitizers in dye-sensitized solar cells. Five di-chromophoric zinc porphyrin dyes with the same porphyrin core, a carbazole unit attached in the meso-position through a phenylethenyl linkage, and substituents spanning a range of electron affinities, in an attempt to tune the electronic level of the carbazole unit, have been synthesized (CZPs). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations predicted the nature of the electronic transitions observed in the CZP systems, showing a large degree of orbital mixing. In contrast, UV-vis absorption, resonance Raman spectroscopy and differential pulse voltammetry investigations suggested negligible interaction between the porphyrin and carbazole chromophores. Carbazole substitution led to a moderate increase in photon absorption intensity within the ~300 nm to 400 nm wavelength region, a smaller but broader Soret band absorption and slightly increased photon absorption intensity in the 550 nm to 650 nm Q band region. Despite the rather small changes in light harvesting and negligible changes in the HOMO/LUMO electronic levels, the photovoltaic performance of the new dyes is increased by as much as 30% compared to the single chromophore Zn porphyrin dye 5-(4-(2-cyano-2-carboxyethenyl)phenyl-15-phenyl-10,20-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)porphyrinato zinc(ii) (ZP1), leading to over 6% power conversion efficiencies (PCEs). Both open circuit voltage (VOC) and short circuit current (JSC) have increased. The increased VOC is attributed to increased electron lifetimes due to a steric blocking effect. Analysis of the increased short circuit current (¿JSC) showed that only less than 10% of ¿JSC originates from increased light absorption under simulated air mass 1.5 illumination, while the rest of the improvements are attributed to a steric effect enhancing the electron injection efficiency. These results suggest that developing non-conjugated multichromophoric dyes can lead to simultaneous increases in both the photocurrent and the photovoltage of dye-sensitized solar cells. This journal is

DOI 10.1039/c4ta03226h
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 22
2014 Griffith MJ, Cooling NA, Elkington DC, Muller E, Belcher WJ, Dastoor PC, 'Printable sensors for explosive detonation', Applied Physics Letters, 105 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 AIP Publishing LLC. Here, we report the development of an organic thin film transistor (OTFT) based on printable solution processed polymers and employing a quantum tunnell... [more]

© 2014 AIP Publishing LLC. Here, we report the development of an organic thin film transistor (OTFT) based on printable solution processed polymers and employing a quantum tunnelling composite material as a sensor to convert the pressure wave output from detonation transmission tubing (shock tube) into an inherently amplified electronic signal for explosives initiation. The organic electronic detector allows detection of the signal in a low voltage operating range, an essential feature for sites employing live ordinances that is not provided by conventional electronic devices. We show that a 30-fold change in detector response is possible using the presented detector assembly. Degradation of the OTFT response with both time and repeated voltage scans was characterised, and device lifetime is shown to be consistent with the requirements for on-site printing and usage. The integration of a low cost organic electronic detector with inexpensive shock tube transmission fuse presents attractive avenues for the development of cheap and simple assemblies for precisely timed initiation of explosive chains.

DOI 10.1063/1.4897140
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Warwick Belcher, Paul Dastoor
2014 Nicolaidis N, Vaughan B, Mulligan CJ, Bryant G, Zillger T, Trnovec B, et al., 'Solution processable interface materials for nanoparticulate organic photovoltaic devices', Applied Physics Letters, 104 (2014) [C1]

Nanoparticulate zinc oxide can be prepared at low temperatures from solution processable zinc acetylacetonate. The use of this material as a cathode interfacial layer in nanoparti... [more]

Nanoparticulate zinc oxide can be prepared at low temperatures from solution processable zinc acetylacetonate. The use of this material as a cathode interfacial layer in nanoparticulate organic photovoltaic devices results in comparable performances to those based on reactive calcium layers. Importantly, the enhanced degradation stability and full solution processability make zinc oxide a more desirable material for the fabrication of large area printed devices. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

DOI 10.1063/1.4863216
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Warwick Belcher, Krishna Feron, Paul Dastoor, Xiaojing Zhou
2013 Kimura M, Nomoto H, Suzuki H, Ikeuchi T, Matsuzaki H, Murakami TN, et al., 'Molecular Design Rule of Phthalocyanine Dyes for Highly Efficient Near-IR Performance in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells', CHEMISTRY-A EUROPEAN JOURNAL, 19 7496-7502 (2013)
DOI 10.1002/chem.201300716
Citations Scopus - 54Web of Science - 52
2013 Griffith MJ, Sunahara K, Furube A, Mozer AJ, Officer DL, Wagner P, et al., 'Cation Exchange at Semiconducting Oxide Surfaces: Origin of Light-Induced Performance Increases in Porphyrin Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY C, 117 11885-11898 (2013)
DOI 10.1021/jp3067712
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
2013 Sunahara K, Griffith MJ, Uchiyama T, Wagner P, Officer DL, Wallace GG, et al., 'A Nonconjugated Bridge in Dimer-Sensitized Solar Cells Retards Charge Recombination without Decreasing Charge Injection Efficiency', ACS APPLIED MATERIALS & INTERFACES, 5 10824-10829 (2013)
DOI 10.1021/am403022d
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
2012 Griffith MJ, Sunahara K, Wagner P, Wagner K, Wallace GG, Officer DL, et al., 'Porphyrins for dye-sensitised solar cells: new insights into efficiency-determining electron transfer steps', CHEMICAL COMMUNICATIONS, 48 4145-4162 (2012)
DOI 10.1039/c2cc30677h
Citations Scopus - 176Web of Science - 166
2011 Wagner K, Griffith MJ, James M, Mozer AJ, Wagner P, Triani G, et al., 'Significant Performance Improvement of Porphyrin-Sensitized TiO2 Solar Cells under White Light Illumination', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY C, 115 317-326 (2011)
DOI 10.1021/jp107615h
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 34
2011 Sunahara K, Furube A, Katoh R, Mori S, Griffith MJ, Wallace GG, et al., 'Coexistence of Femtosecond- and Nonelectron-Injecting Dyes in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Inhomogeniety Limits the Efficiency', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY C, 115 22084-22088 (2011)
DOI 10.1021/jp2093109
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 45
2011 Griffith MJ, Mozer AJ, Tsekouras G, Dong Y, Wagner P, Wagner K, et al., 'Remarkable synergistic effects in a mixed porphyrin dye-sensitized TiO2 film', APPLIED PHYSICS LETTERS, 98 (2011)
DOI 10.1063/1.3576904
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 26
2011 Griffith MJ, James M, Triani G, Wagner P, Wallace GG, Officer DL, 'Determining the Orientation and Molecular Packing of Organic Dyes on a TiO2 Surface Using X-ray Reflectometry', LANGMUIR, 27 12944-12950 (2011)
DOI 10.1021/la202598c
Citations Scopus - 45Web of Science - 45
2009 Mozer AJ, Griffith MJ, Tsekouras G, Wagner P, Wallace GG, Mori S, et al., 'Zn-Zn Porphyrin Dimer-Sensitized Solar Cells: Toward 3-D Light Harvesting', JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, 131 15621-+ (2009)
DOI 10.1021/ja9057713
Citations Scopus - 153Web of Science - 152
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 10
Total funding $2,160,847

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20191 grants / $149,440

Printed Electronics: Powering Community Engagement Through Demonstrator Technology $149,440

Funding body: Lane Cove Municipal Council

Funding body Lane Cove Municipal Council
Project Team Doctor Matthew Griffith, Doctor Michael Dickinson
Scheme Research Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1900882
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

20183 grants / $1,005,072

Printed Organic Electronic Igniters$452,536

Funding body: DetNet Ltd

Funding body DetNet Ltd
Scheme Industry Research Development
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding C3211 - International For profit
Category 3211
UON N

Sensor Arrays for Shock Tube Based Detonation Systems$452,536

Funding body: DetNet Ltd

Funding body DetNet Ltd
Scheme Industry Research Development
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding C3211 - International For profit
Category 3211
UON N

Commercial Installation of Large Area Organic Photovoltaic Technology$100,000

Funding body: CHEP Australia Limited

Funding body CHEP Australia Limited
Scheme Ausindustry Innovation Connections Facilitation
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON N

20171 grants / $40,000

Demonstrating Large Area Organic Photovoltaic Technology$40,000

Funding body: CHEP, KiWO, Starleaton

Funding body CHEP, KiWO, Starleaton
Scheme PacPrint Industry Sponsorship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON N

20161 grants / $68,450

Equipment Grant: Rotary Screen Printer for Organic Electronics$68,450

Funding body: Australian National Fabircation Facility

Funding body Australian National Fabircation Facility
Scheme ANFF Agility Fund
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20142 grants / $357,181

Optic Fibre Based Organic Electronic Sensors for Detonators$350,181

Funding body: AEL Mining Services

Funding body AEL Mining Services
Scheme Industrial Research Development
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding C3211 - International For profit
Category 3211
UON N

Printable Organic Electronics for Fabrication on the Roll‐to‐Roll Scale$7,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Scheme Faculty Strategic Investment Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20131 grants / $477,204

Printable Plasmic Fuseheads for Electronic Detonators$477,204

Funding body: AEL Mining Services

Funding body AEL Mining Services
Scheme Industrial Research Development
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding C3211 - International For profit
Category 3211
UON N

20101 grants / $63,500

Understanding Charge Transfer Kinetics in Porphyrin Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells$63,500

Funding body: Australian Federal Government

Funding body Australian Federal Government
Scheme Prime Minister’s Asia Australia Endeavour Award,
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 PhD Semiconducting Polymers for Biocompatible and Implantable Drug Delivery Systems
&lt;p&gt;This project focuses on employing novel organic semiconducting materials as scaffolds for the deployment of biomedical drug systems. It focuses on the following innovations and development of new knowledge:&lt;/p&gt;&lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Establishing the links between nanostructure and electrical drug release release kinetics of conducting polymer scaffolds&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Developing neutrotrophin drug release systems for the promotion of nerve growth&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Developing DNA inhibitor drug release systems for the targeted destruction of cancer&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt;
Biochemistry & Cell Biology, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Organic Electronic Radiation Detector Arrays
&lt;p&gt;This project focuses on the use of organic semiconducting materials for ionizing radiation detection. It focuses on the following innovations and development of new knowledge:&lt;/p&gt;&lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Establishing the mechanism of charge generation in organic semiconductors under ionizing radiation exposure&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Developing new organic electronic dosimeters for measurement of ionizing radiation dose &lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Determining structure function relationships for optimizing mobility in crystalline semiconducting polymers&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt;
Natural and Physical Sciences, University of Wollongong Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Artifical Retina Systems: Stimulating Neurons Using Optically Triggered Semiconducting Polymers
&lt;p&gt;This project focuses on employing organic semiconducting materials as light induced triggering systems for optical neurons to create artificial retina implants. It focuses on the following innovations and development of new knowledge:&lt;/p&gt;&lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Establishing the links between polymer device structure and electrical capacitance generation in pixellated printed arrays&lt;br /&gt;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrating photostimultation of optical neurons through optically triggered printed semiconductor arrays &lt;br /&gt;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstration of a proof-of-principle artificial retina array for deployment in animal testing trials&lt;br /&gt;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt;
Biochemistry & Cell Biology, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Optical and Electrical Characterisation of Bulk Heterojunction and Nanoparticulate Morphologies for Printed Large Area Organic Photovoltaics
&lt;p&gt;This project analyzed the fundamental photophysics of nanostructured organic solar cells, producing the following major areas of insights:&lt;br /&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;New optical models for nanoparticulate semiconducting active materials in solar cells&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Understanding energy transfer pathways in nanoparticulate organic solar cells&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Understanding energy and charge transfer pathways in quaternary blend organic solar cells&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;
PhD (Physics), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Opportunities

Biomedical Engineering: Platforms for Printable Radiation Sensing

Development of a printed array to read out voltage signals in a pixellated array

Honours

School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

9/08/2019 - 31/12/2021

Contact

Doctor Matthew Griffith
University of Newcastle
School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
matthew.griffith@newcastle.edu.au

Fully Printed Biomatrials Sensing Platforms

Development of printable drug nanosensors

PHD

School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

9/08/2019 - 31/12/2023

Contact

Doctor Matthew Griffith
University of Newcastle
School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
matthew.griffith@newcastle.edu.au

Probing Photophysics of Energy Transfer Between Organic Scintillators and Polymers

Measurement of energy and charge transfer pathways in custom-developed organic scintillator-semiconducting polymer nanoparticulate systems

PHD

School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

9/08/2019 - 31/12/2023

Contact

Doctor Matthew Griffith
University of Newcastle
School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
matthew.griffith@newcastle.edu.au

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Dr Matthew Griffith

Position

Lecturer
School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email matthew.griffith@newcastle.edu.au
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