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Dr Lyn Ebert

Senior Lecturer

School of Nursing and Midwifery (Midwifery)

Career Summary

Biography

I have been a registered nurse since 1978 and a registered midwife since 1990. I remain current with registration in both disciplines. I recently completed my Doctor of Philosophy - Midwifery, exploring the maternity care encounters of socially disadvantaged women. I completed my Masters of Philosophy - Midwifery in 2008, exploring the interactions between midwives and women who smoked during pregnancy. My findings, for both studies would suggest that it is often difficult for midwives to maintain a woman-centred model of interaction with competing organisational and Ministry of Health public health agendas. I am the Program Convenor for the Bachelor of Midwifery in the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health, at the University of Newcastle. My research interests therefore, involve the provision of woman-centred care for all childbearing women regardless of the midwifery context as well as the educational strategies that will support graduate midwives to implement woman-centred care into their practice.

Research Expertise
Midwifery, Nursing, Women's health in relation to childbearing, and Communicating within a partnership model of health care I recently completed my Doctor of Philosophy - Midwifery, exploring the maternity care encounters of socially disadvantaged women. I completed my Masters of Philosophy - Midwifery in 2008, exploring the interactions between midwives and women who smoked during pregnancy. I my findings would suggest that it is often difficult for midwives to maintain a woman-centred model of interaction with competing organisational and Ministry of Health public health agendas.

Teaching Expertise
I have been teaching within the midwifery, nursing undergraduate and postgraduate programs since 2000 at the University of Newcastle. I also guest lecture into the Masters of Pharmacology program. I am currently the program convenor for the Bachelor of Midwifery Program in the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health, at the University of Newcastle. My research interests involve the provision of woman-centred care for all childbearing women regardless of the midwifery context and the educational strategies that will support graduate midwives to implement woman-centred care into their practice.

Administrative Expertise
I am currently the program convenor for the Bachelor of Midwifery Program in the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health, at the University of Newcastle.

Collaborations
I am currently a member of the nursing and midwifery BRICs (Building Research and Interdisciplinary Collaboration) Network. I am also currently a member of the research centre for health professional education.

Qualifications

  • Graduate Diploma in Vocational Education, Charles Sturt University
  • Bachelor of Nursing, University of Newcastle
  • Master of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • health professional interactions
  • midwifery
  • neonatal care
  • nursing
  • social disadvantage and childbearing
  • woman-centred care
  • woman-midwife relationship

Languages

  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified 15
111006 Midwifery 85

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/10/2011 -  Casual Midwife Gosford Private hospital
Australia
1/01/2003 - 1/01/2008 Casual Registered Midwife Northern Sydney Central Coast Health Service
Australia
1/10/1996 - 1/01/2002 Clinical Nurse Educator Gosford Hospital
Australia
1/10/1990 - 1/09/1996 Registered Midwife Gosford Hospital
Australia
1/10/1989 - 1/09/1990 Trainee Midwife Gosford Hospital
Australia
1/04/1980 - 1/03/1981 Registered Nurse Wendham Holt Hospital
Gerontology
United Kingdom
1/01/1979 - 1/07/1979 Registered Nurse Prince Henry Hospital
Renal Unit
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (20 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Zhu J, Ebert L, Xue Z, Shen Q, Chan SW-C, 'Development of a mobile application of Breast Cancer e-Support program for women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy.', Technol Health Care, 25 377-382 (2017)
DOI 10.3233/THC-161292
Co-authors Sally Chan
2017 Zhu J, Ebert L, Liu X, Chan SWC, 'A mobile application of breast cancer e-support program versus routine Care in the treatment of Chinese women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial', BMC Cancer, 17 (2017)

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: Women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy suffer from a number of symptoms and report receiving inadequate support from health care profe... [more]

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: Women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy suffer from a number of symptoms and report receiving inadequate support from health care professionals. Innovative and easily accessible interventions are lacking. Breast Cancer e-Support is a mobile Application program (App) that provides patients with individually tailored information and a support group of peers and health care professionals. Breast Cancer e-Support aims to promote women's self-efficacy, social support and symptom management, thus improving their quality of life and psychological well-being. Methods: A single-blinded, multi-centre, randomised, 6-month, parallel-group superiority design will be used. Based on Bandura's self-efficacy theory and the social exchange theory, Breast Cancer e-Support has four modules: 1) a Learning forum; 2) a Discussion forum; 3) an Ask-the-Expert forum; and 4) a Personal Stories forum. Women with breast cancer (n = 108) who are commencing chemotherapy will be recruited from two university-affiliated hospitals in China. They will be randomly assigned to either control group that receives routine care or intervention group that receives routine care plus access to Breast Cancer e-Support program during their four cycles of chemotherapy. Self-efficacy, social support, symptom distress, quality of life, and anxiety and depression will be measured at baseline, then one week and 12 weeks post-intervention. Discussion: This is the first study of its kind in China to evaluate the use of a mobile application intervention with a rigorous research design and theoretical framework. This study will contribute to evidence regarding the effectiveness of a theory-based mobile application to support women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. The results should provide a better understanding of the role of self-efficacy and social support in reducing symptom distress and of the credibility of using a theoretical framework to develop internet-based interventions. The results will provide evidence to support the implementation of an innovative and easily accessible intervention that enhances health outcomes. Trial registration: ACTRN: ACTRN12616000639426 , Registered 17 May, 2016.

DOI 10.1186/s12885-017-3276-7
Co-authors Sally Chan
2017 Fealy SM, Taylor RM, Foureur M, Attia J, Ebert L, Bisquera A, Hure AJ, 'Weighing as a stand-alone intervention does not reduce excessive gestational weight gain compared to routine antenatal care: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.', BMC Pregnancy Childbirth, 17 36 (2017)
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-1207-2
Co-authors John Attia, Alexis Hure, Shanna Fealy
2017 Tierney O, Sweet L, Houston D, Ebert L, 'The Continuity of Care Experience in Australian midwifery education¿What have we achieved?', Women and Birth, 30 200-205 (2017)

© 2016 Australian College of Midwives Problem/background The Continuity of Care Experience is a mandated workplace based component of midwifery education in Australia. Since its ... [more]

© 2016 Australian College of Midwives Problem/background The Continuity of Care Experience is a mandated workplace based component of midwifery education in Australia. Since its inclusion in midwifery clinical education, the pedagogical approaches used across Australia have varied. Aim The purpose of this integrative review is to determine the outcomes of the Continuity of Care Experience as an educational model. Methods A search for relevant research literature was undertaken in 2015 using a range of databases and by examining relevant bibliographies. Articles published in English, which provided information about the outcomes of Continuity of Care Experiences for midwifery education were included. A total of 20 studies were selected. Findings The included studies were primarily exploratory and descriptive. Studies reported the value that both students and women place on the relationship they developed. This relationship resulted in opportunities that enhanced student learning by providing a context in which clinical practice learning was optimized. Challenges identified included managing time and workload pressures for students in relation to the CCE, inconsistencies in academic use of the experience, and variations in how the healthcare system influences the continuity experience. Conclusion No research was found that reports on the educational model in terms of defining learning objectives and assessment of outcomes. This represents an important omission in mandating this clinical practice model in midwifery curricula without sufficient guidance to unify and maximize learning for students. Research is required to explore the educational intent and assessment methods of the Continuity of Care Experience as an educational model.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2016.10.006
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2017 Zhu J, Ebert L, Chan SWC, 'Integrative review on the effectiveness of internet-based interactive programs for women with breast cancer undergoing treatment', Oncology Nursing Forum, 44 E42-E54 (2017)

Copyright 2017 by the Oncology Nursing Society. Problem Identification: Internet-based interactive programs have been developed to address health needs for women with breast cance... [more]

Copyright 2017 by the Oncology Nursing Society. Problem Identification: Internet-based interactive programs have been developed to address health needs for women with breast cancer undergoing treatment, but evidence has been inadequate to establish the effectiveness of these programs. This article aims to synthesize studies published in English or Chinese regarding the effectiveness of these programs on the outcomes of symptom distress, social support, self-efficacy, quality of life, and psychological well-being for women with breast cancer undergoing treatment. Literature Search: CINAHL Complete, MEDLINE®, Mosby's Nursing Index, PsycINFO®, Scopus, Web of Science, Joanna Briggs Institute, Cochrane Library, Embase, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure. Databases were searched from the start of the database to April 2015. Data Evaluation: 174 articles were retrieved, yielding 23 eligible articles. A manual search led to an additional five eligible articles. After 10 were excluded, 3 qualitative and 15 quantitative studies were evaluated. Data were analyzed to identify similarities and differences across articles. Synthesis: Internet-based interactive programs moderated by healthcare professionals have demonstrated positive effects on women's self-efficacy, symptom distress, and psychological well-being, but inconclusive effects have been found on social support and quality of life. Conclusions: Moderated Internet-based interactive programs are a promising intervention for women with breast cancer undergoing treatment. Implications for Research: Studies with more robust research designs and theoretical frameworks and conducted in different countries and cultures are warranted to elucidate the effectiveness of these programs.

DOI 10.1188/17.ONF.E42-E54
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Sally Chan
2016 Ebert L, Tierney O, Jones D, 'Learning to be a midwife in the clinical environment; tasks, clinical practicum hours or midwifery relationships', Nurse Education in Practice, 16 294-297 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2015.08.003
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Donovan Jones
2016 McLaughlin K, Kable A, Ebert L, Murphy V, 'Midwives' perception of their role in providing antenatal asthma management in Australia - A qualitative study', Midwifery, 35 11-16 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. International guidelines recommend a collaborative approach to the care of pregnant women with asthma. Midwives, as the primary health care provider for chil... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. International guidelines recommend a collaborative approach to the care of pregnant women with asthma. Midwives, as the primary health care provider for childbearing women should be viewed as collaborative partners in the provision of antenatal asthma management. However, the role of the midwife in providing antenatal asthma management has not been widely reported.Method: Australian midwives' perceived role in antenatal asthma management was studied using a qualitative descriptive method. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 13 midwives working in a regional tertiary hospital. Morse and Field's four-stage process was used to analyse the data.Findings: the perceived role of the midwife in antenatal asthma management varied among participants. Some midwives stated their role was to refer women on to other health professionals. Other midwives stated that they should provide education to the women regarding their asthma management during their pregnancy.Conclusion: participants were uncertain about their role and lacked confidence in antenatal asthma management. The midwifery context in which they worked and the resources available to them at this health care facility appeared to influence the perception of their role.

DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2016.01.016
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Vanessa Murphy, Ashley Kable
2016 Lavender TJ, Ebert L, Jones D, 'An evaluation of perinatal mental health interventions: An integrative literature review', Women and Birth, 29 399-406 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Australian College of Midwives Background National statistics related specifically to the mental health of women in the perinatal period is poorly acknowledged in Australi... [more]

© 2016 Australian College of Midwives Background National statistics related specifically to the mental health of women in the perinatal period is poorly acknowledged in Australia. Maternal deaths related to mental health in the perinatal period can be attributed to a lack of appropriate treatment and/or support. A barrier to women's help-seeking behaviors is the lack of discrete, perinatal specific interventions where women can self-assess and access support. Aim This review examines original research evaluating perinatal mental health interventions used by women to improve mental health. Method An integrative literature review was undertaken. A comprehensive search strategy using 5 electronic databases resulted in the retrieval of 1898 articles. Use of an inclusion and exclusion criteria and Critical Appraisal Skills Program tools resulted in 4 original research papers. Thematic analysis identified universal themes. Findings Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Behavioral Activation and Mindfulness-based interventions, specifically adapted to meet the needs of women in the perinatal period, demonstrate an overall improvement in mental health. Women involved in the interventions experienced both improvements in symptoms of anxiety and depression as well as secondary benefits from participating in the research. Conclusion To improve perinatal mental health outcomes, innovative modes of providing effective perinatal mental health interventions that address the unique needs of women in the perinatal period are needed. Future development of perinatal mental health interventions require adaptions of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Behavioral Activation and/or Mindfulness-based methods to address mental health outcomes for women in the perinatal period.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2016.04.004
Co-authors Donovan Jones
2015 McLaughlin K, Kable A, Ebert L, Murphy VE, 'Barriers preventing Australian midwives from providing antenatal asthma management', British Journal of Midwifery, 23 116-123 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 MA Healthcare Ltd. International guidelines indicate that management of asthma during pregnancy should be multidisciplinary; however, the role of midwives has not been res... [more]

© 2015 MA Healthcare Ltd. International guidelines indicate that management of asthma during pregnancy should be multidisciplinary; however, the role of midwives has not been researched. Method: A qualitative descriptive study exploring Australian midwives' current knowledge about asthma in pregnancy and their perceived role in antenatal asthma management was conducted, involving individual semi-structured in-depth interviews with 13 midwives in a tertiary referral hospital. Data were analysed using Morse and Field's four-stage process. Findings: Midwives identified barriers preventing them from providing antenatal asthma management, including: lack of knowledge about asthma in pregnancy; time constraints; women's knowledge about asthma in pregnancy; lack of a clear referral pathway; and lack of accessible asthma management equipment. Barriers were influenced by the institutional context in which the midwives worked. Conclusion: While participants identified barriers preventing them from providing recommended antenatal asthma management, they also suggested that improving their knowledge about asthma in pregnancy and developing a clear referral pathway may be beneficial.

DOI 10.12968/bjom.2015.23.2.116
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Ashley Kable, Vanessa Murphy
2015 Jones DP, Hazelton M, Ebert L, 'Perinatal mental health and men', Australian Nursing & Midwifery Journal, 23 41-41 (2015) [C3]
Co-authors Michael Hazelton, Donovan Jones
2014 Ebert L, Hoffman K, Levett-Jones T, Gilligan C, '"They have no idea of what we do or what we know": Australian graduates' perceptions of working in a health care team', Nurse Education in Practice, 14 544-550 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Globally it has been suggested that interprofessional education can lead to improvements in patient safety as well as increased job satisfaction and understa... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Globally it has been suggested that interprofessional education can lead to improvements in patient safety as well as increased job satisfaction and understanding of professional roles and responsibilities. In many health care facilities staff report being committed to working collaboratively, however their practice does not always reflect their voiced ideologies. The inability to work effectively together can, in some measure, be attributed to a lack of knowledge and respect for others' professional roles, status and boundaries. In this paper, we will report on the findings of an interpretative study undertaken in Australia, focussing specifically on the experiences of new graduate nurses, doctors and pharmacists in relation to 'knowing about' and 'working with' other health care professionals. Findings indicated there was little understanding of the roles of other health professionals and this impacted negatively on communication and collaboration between and within disciplines. Furthermore, most new graduates recall interprofessional education as intermittent, largely optional, non-assessable, and of little value in relation to their roles, responsibilities and practice as graduate health professionals. Interprofessional education needs to be integrated into undergraduate health programs with an underlying philosophy of reciprocity, respect and role valuing, in order to achieve the proposed benefits for staff and patients.

DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2014.06.005
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Conor Gilligan, Kerry Hoffman, Tracy Levett-Jones
2014 Ebert L, Bellchambers H, Ferguson A, Browne J, 'Socially disadvantaged women's views of barriers to feeling safe to engage in decision-making in maternity care', Women and Birth, 27 132-137 (2014) [C1]

Background: Although midwifery literature suggests that woman-centred care can improve the birthing experiences of women and birth outcomes for women and babies, recent research h... [more]

Background: Although midwifery literature suggests that woman-centred care can improve the birthing experiences of women and birth outcomes for women and babies, recent research has identified challenges in supporting socially disadvantaged women to engage in decision-making regarding care options in order to attain a sense of control within their maternity care encounters. Objective: The objective of this paper is to provide an understanding of the issues that affect the socially disadvantaged woman's ability to actively engage in decision-making processes relevant to her care. Research design: The qualitative approach known as Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was used to gain an understanding of maternity care encounters as experienced by each of the following cohorts: socially disadvantaged women, registered midwives and student midwives. This paper focuses specifically on data from participating socially disadvantaged women that relate to the elements of woman-centred care-choice and control and their understandings of capacity to engage in their maternity care encounters. Findings: Socially disadvantaged women participants did not feel safe to engage in discussions regarding choice or to seek control within their maternity care encounters. Situations such as inadequate contextualised information, perceived risks in not conforming to routine procedures, and the actions and reactions of midwives when these women did seek choice or control resulted in a silent compliance. This response was interpreted as a consequence of women's decisions to accept responsibility for their baby's wellbeing by delegating health care decision-making to the health care professional. Conclusion: This research found that socially disadvantaged women want to engage in their care. However without adequate information and facilitation of choice by midwives, they believe they are outsiders to the maternity care culture and decision-making processes. Consequently, they delegate responsibility for maternity care choices to those who do belong; midwives. These findings suggest that midwives need to better communicate a valuing of the woman's participation in decision-making processes and to work with women so they do have a sense of belonging within the maternity care environment. Midwives need to ensure that socially disadvantaged women do feel safe about having a voice regarding their choices and find ways to give them a sense of control within their maternity care encounters. © 2013.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2013.11.003
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Alison Ferguson, Helen Bellchambers
2013 Powers JR, Loxton DJ, O'Mara AT, Chojenta CL, Ebert L, 'Regardless of where they give birth, women living in non-metropolitan areas are less likely to have an epidural than their metropolitan counterparts', WOMEN AND BIRTH, 26 E77-E81 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2012.12.001
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Jenny Powers, Deborah Loxton
2011 Ebert LM, Ferguson AJ, Bellchambers HL, 'Working for socially disadvantaged women', Women and Birth, 24 85-91 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2010.08.002
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Helen Bellchambers, Alison Ferguson
2009 Ebert LM, Van Der Riet PJ, Fahy KM, 'What do midwives need to understand/know about smoking in pregnancy?', Women and Birth, 22 35-40 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2008.11.001
Citations Scopus - 13
Co-authors Pamela Vanderriet
2009 Ebert LM, Freeman L, Fahy KM, Van Der Riet PJ, 'Midwives' interactions with women who smoke in pregnancy', British Journal of Midwifery, 17 24-29 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Pamela Vanderriet
2008 Ebert LM, 'Midwifery education and models of care: Moving forward mindfully', Women and Birth, 21 43-44 (2008) [C3]
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2007.11.003
2008 Ebert LM, 'Examination of the Newborn and Neonatal Health: A Multidimensional Approach (Book review)', Women and Birth, 21 177-178 (2008) [C3]
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2008.07.005
2008 Teale C, Ebert LM, Norton CA, 'Perineal trauma and childbirth: A discussion paper', HNE Handover for Nurses and Midwives, 1 28-31 (2008) [C2]
Co-authors Carol Norton
2007 Ebert LM, Fahy KM, 'Why do women continue to smoke in pregnancy?', Women and Birth, 20 161-168 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2007.08.002
Citations Scopus - 44
Show 17 more journal articles

Conference (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Fealy S, Jones D, Ebert L, Dowse E, Wynne O, Zhang M, Chan S, 'Developing a ¿Postnatal Psychoeducational¿ smartphone application for first time mothers', Developing a ¿Postnatal Psychoeducational¿ smartphone application for first time mothers (2016)
Co-authors Eileen Dowse, Olivia Wynne, Sally Chan, Shanna Fealy, Donovan Jones
2016 Mclaughlin K, Kable A, Ebert L, Murphy V, 'MIDWIVES' PERCEPTION OF THEIR ROLE IN PROVIDING ANTENATAL ASTHMA MANAGEMENT IN AUSTRALIA-A QUALITATIVE STUDY', RESPIROLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Ashley Kable, Vanessa Murphy
2015 Stokes-Parish JB, roche J, ebert L, skinner V, morgan T, Galal M, symonds I, 'Does Simulated Interprofessional Education (IPE) in obstetrics and midwifery improve the student experience?' (2015)
Co-authors Jessica Stokes
2015 Williams N, Taylor A, Ebert L, O'Brien L, 'Facilitating care for women with intellectual disability in pregnancy: A qualitative study into health professionals' understanding of the issues', WOMEN AND BIRTH (2015) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2015.07.104
Co-authors Louise Obrien, Ann Taylor
2012 Ebert LM, Ferguson AJ, Browne J, Bellchambers HL, 'Can't breathe: The socially disadvantaged woman and choice', 4th Biennial Conference Breathing New Life into Maternity Care (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Alison Ferguson, Helen Bellchambers
2011 Ebert LM, Ferguson AJ, 'Woman-centered care: Experiences of socially disadvantaged women, registered midwives and student midwives', 1st Global Congress for Qualitative Health Research 2011 (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Alison Ferguson
2009 Ebert LM, 'The midwifery experience of working for disadvantaged women', Australian College of Midwives 16th National Conference: Midwives & Women: A Brilliant Blend: Conference Handbook (2009) [E3]
Show 4 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 9
Total funding $124,981

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $20,000

Supporting postnatal first-time mothers – An RCT of a new mobile$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Sally Chan, Doctor Lyn Ebert, Mr Donovan Jones, Doctor Eileen Dowse, Ms Shanna Fealy
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700189
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20153 grants / $73,000

The Effectiveness of Breast Cancer e-Support for Chinese Women with Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy: A Randomised Controlled Trial. 2016-2018$40,000

The aim of the study is to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of an Internet-based Interactive Program (IIP) for Chinese women with breast cancer on social support, self-efficacy, symptom distress, quality of life, and psychological well-being. The study will be conducted in two phases: (1) Phase I will aim to develop an internet-based self-management website. (2) Phase II will aim to evaluate the effectiveness of the IIP on the above mentioned outcomes for Chinese women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy.


Funding body: National Natural Science Foundation of China

Funding body National Natural Science Foundation of China
Project Team

Ms Jiemin Zhu, Professor Sally Chan, Dr Lyn Ebert

Scheme National Natural Science Foundation
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Supporting student success through connecting and belonging. $18,000

This study explored the student experience of two health disciplines, nursing and midwifery. These programs have a higher than average UON number of low SES and Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander students. Students’ sense of connectedness to the academic environment and learning activities as well as the development of a sense of professional belongingness within different models of clinical placement and linked academic support were examined.

The study objectives included identification of:

  • Clinical placement models that best support a sense of professional belonging
  • Academic practices that best support student learning in the clinical environment
  • Academic practices that best support student success in the academic environment

Funding body: The Centre of Excellence for Equity in Higher Education

Funding body The Centre of Excellence for Equity in Higher Education
Project Team

Dr Lyn Ebert, Professor Tracy Levett-Jones, Mr Donovan Jones, Ms Vicki Holliday, Associate Professor Pamela van Der Riet

Scheme The Centre of Excellence for Equity in Higher Education
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON N

Does having access to a postnatal maternity outpatient clinic after discharge from hospital reduce the length of stay for women at PMBH maternity unit? $15,000

The aim of this study is to investigate if the establishment of a PMOC has an effect on breastfeeding rates, emergency department presentations and readmission rates of women and babies from hospital discharge to 2 weeks postnatal. This study forms part of the evaluation process following the establishment of the PMOC in October 2015.

Baseline data of mother and infant pair outcomes for the 6 months before the opening of the PMOC (March 2015 to September 2015) will be collected from electronic and paper hospital medical and community health records and compared to 6 month follow up data obtained post opening of the PMOC for the same period (March 2016 to September 2016).

Funding body: Mid North Coast Local Health District Research & Quality Improvement Grant Program

Funding body Mid North Coast Local Health District Research & Quality Improvement Grant Program
Project Team

Ms Olivia Tierney, Ms Shanna Fealy, Dr Lyn Ebert

Scheme Mid North Coast Local Health District Research & Quality Improvement Grant Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON N

20141 grants / $770

3rd Asia Pacific Qualitative Conference, Town Hall, Newcastle, 1 - 3 October 2014$770

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Lyn Ebert
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400965
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20121 grants / $1,500

2nd Global Conference for Qualitative Health Research 2012, University Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, 28-30 June 2012$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Lyn Ebert
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200725
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20081 grants / $1,000

Heathly People for the Healthly World, Emerald Hotel Bangkok Thailand, 25/6/2008 - 27/6/2008$1,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Lyn Ebert
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188940
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20072 grants / $28,711

Equity Research Fellowship - Teaching Relief$24,980

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Lyn Ebert
Scheme Equity Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0186942
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

2007 Equity Research Fellowship - Research Grant$3,731

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Lyn Ebert
Scheme Equity Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187293
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current9

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD1.6

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Improving Access to Skilled Birth Attendants for Women in Rural Settings Living in Developing Countries Through the Provision of Midwifery Education PhD (Midwifery), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Exploring the Use of Virtual Reality Technology in Neonatal Resuscitation Simulation for Second Year Bachelor of Midwifery Students PhD (Midwifery), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 Honours Bachelor of Midwifery student’s preference and experience of working with registered midwife clinicians who are responsible for their academic education
<p>The primary aim of this project was to explore and appraise the research related to the role of the Link Lecturer (LL) in undergraduate midwifery and nursing education. The review pays particular attention to the perspectives of various stakeholders surrounding the LL role and the capacity for the LL role to bridge the perceived theory practice gap in health care education programs. </p>
Midwifery, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD The effectiveness of internet-based interactive program for Chinese women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy PhD (Nursing), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 Honours An evaluation of programs used by women to improve mental health during the perinatal period.
<p><span lang="EN-US">The project aimed to synthesis best available evidence on mental health programs used by women during the perinatal period to improve their mental health. Specifically:</span><span lang="EN-US"></span></p><ul><li><span lang="EN-US">What mental health programs are used by women during the perinatal period to improve their mental health?</span><span lang="EN-US"></span></li><li><span lang="EN-US">What are women&rsquo;s experiences of existing mental health programs are used by women during the perinatal period to improve their mental health?</span></li></ul>
Midwifery, The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Antenatal Weighing and Gestational Weight Gain PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Midwifery Student Continuity of Care Experience: learning objectives and assessment Midwifery, Flinders University Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Maternity Care for Women with Intellectual Disability: A Qualitative Studies into the Barriers and Facilitators of Care PhD (Midwifery), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Supporting Emotional Wellbeing of Fathers through a Mindfulness Intervention during their Journey in Parenthood PhD (Midwifery), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2014 Masters Asthma and Pregnancy: A Qualitative Descriptive Study of Midwives' Current Knowledge About Asthma in Pregnancy and Their Perceived Role in Antenatal Asthma Management in Australia M Philosophy (Midwifery), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Lyn Ebert

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Midwifery

Contact Details

Email lyn.ebert@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 6347
Fax (02) 4921 6301

Office

Room RW1-40
Building Richardson Wing
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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