Miss Li Chai

Miss Li Chai

Research Assistant

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Li is an Accredited Practicing Dietitian and a PhD candidate (Nutrition & Dietetics) at the University of Newcastle. She is a food lover and believes healthy eating is about consuming a well balanced diet consists of a wide variety of food. Li is passionate about nutrition and healthy living. She has sought experience from a variety of disciplines including nutrition research, community health promotion, clinical dietetics, and university tutoring. Furthermore, Li is a strong advocate for children’s health and nutrition. Her current research interests lie in the fields of childhood obesity, one of the primary modifiable risk factors for chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and stroke. Her research focuses on using technology to develop, deliver and evaluate nutrition and lifestyle interventions to manage and treat obesity in children.


Keywords

  • Diet
  • Nutrition
  • Obesity
  • Paediatrics
  • Telehealth

Languages

  • English (Fluent)
  • Chinese, nec (Fluent)
  • Cantonese (Fluent)
  • Malay (Fluent)
  • Hakka (Fluent)
  • Mandarin (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 30
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified 70

Professional Experience

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/11/2014 - 31/12/2015 Research Assistant Hunter New England Population Health
Good for Kids. Good for Life
1/09/2014 - 28/02/2015 Clinical dietitian Nutrition Care Services
Australia
1/08/2014 - 31/12/2015 Casual Research Assistant PRC in Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle
Australia
1/04/2014 - 31/12/2014 Casual Research Assistant University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
School of Health Sciences
Australia

Awards

Research Award

Year Award
2016 Dietitians Association of Australia Emerging Researcher Award
Dietitians Association of Australia
2016 2016 Best Higher Degree Research Confirmation
University of Newcastle - School of Health Sciences

Scholarship

Year Award
2017 Emlyn and Jennie Thomas Postgraduate Medical Research Scholarship
Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
2016 The Barker PhD Award Top Up Scholarship
University of Newcastle
2015 University of Newcastle International Postgraduate Research Scholarship
University of Newcastle
2015 University of Newcastle Research Scholarship Central
Univeristy of Newcastle

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
HLSC1220 Food Science 1
The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Tutor 26/07/2016 - 25/10/2016
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 May C, Chai LK, Burrows T, 'Parent, partner, co-parent or partnership? The need for clarity as family systems thinking takes hold in the quest to motivate behavioural change.', Children (Basel), 4 (2017)
DOI 10.3390/children4040029
Co-authors Tracy Burrows
2016 Nathan N, Yoong SL, Sutherland R, Reilly K, Delaney T, Janssen L, et al., 'Effectiveness of a multicomponent intervention to enhance implementation of a healthy canteen policy in Australian primary schools: a randomised controlled trial', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 13 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0431-5
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2016 Wolfenden L, Milat AJ, Lecathelinais C, Skelton E, Clinton-McHarg T, Williams C, et al., 'A bibliographic review of public health dissemination and implementation research output and citation rates', Preventive Medicine Reports, 4 441-443 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Authors The aim of this study was to describe the research output and citation rates (academic impact) of public health dissemination and implementation research accor... [more]

© 2016 The Authors The aim of this study was to describe the research output and citation rates (academic impact) of public health dissemination and implementation research according to research design and study type. A cross sectional bibliographic study was undertaken in 2013. All original data-based studies and review articles focusing on dissemination and implementation research that had been published in 10 randomly selected public health journals in 2008 were audited. The electronic database ¿Scopus¿ was used to calculate 5-year citation rates for all included publications. Of the 1648 publications examined, 216 were original data-based research or literature reviews focusing on dissemination and implementation research. Of these 72% were classified as descriptive/epidemiological, 26% were intervention and just 1.9% were measurement research. Cross-sectional studies were the most common study design (47%). Reviews, randomized trials, non-randomized trials and decision/cost-effectiveness studies each represented between 6 and 10% of all output. Systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials and cohort studies were the most frequently cited study designs. The study suggests that publications that had the greatest academic impact (highest citation rates) made up only a small proportion of overall public health dissemination and implementation research output.

DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2016.08.006
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Serene Yoong, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2016 Yoong SL, Chai LK, Williams CM, Wiggers J, Finch M, Wolfenden L, 'Systematic review and meta-analysis of interventions targeting sleep and their impact on child body mass index, diet, and physical activity', Obesity, 24 1140-1147 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Obesity Society. Objective This review aimed to examine the impact of interventions involving an explicit sleep component on child body mass index (BMI), diet, and phy... [more]

© 2016 The Obesity Society. Objective This review aimed to examine the impact of interventions involving an explicit sleep component on child body mass index (BMI), diet, and physical activity. Methods A systematic search was undertaken in six databases to identify randomized controlled trials examining the impact of interventions with a sleep component on child BMI, dietary intake, and/or physical activity. A random effects meta-analysis was conducted assessing the impact of included interventions on child BMI. Results Of the eight included trials, three enforced a sleep protocol and five targeted sleep as part of multicomponent behavioral interventions either exclusively or together with nutrition and physical activity. Meta-analysis of three studies found that multicomponent behavioral interventions involving a sleep component were not significantly effective in changing child BMI (n = 360,-0.04 kg/m 2 [-0.18, 0.11], I 2 = 0%); however, only one study included in the meta-analysis successfully changed sleep duration in children. There were some reported improvements to adolescent diet, and only one trial examined the impact on child physical activity, where a significant effect was observed. Conclusions Findings from the included studies suggest that where improvements in child sleep duration were achieved, a positive impact on child BMI, nutrition, and physical activity was also observed.

DOI 10.1002/oby.21459
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Chai LK, Burrows T, May C, Brain K, Wong See D, Collins C, 'Effectiveness of family-based weight management interventions in childhood obesity: an umbrella review protocol.', JBI Database System Rev Implement Rep, 14 32-39 (2016)
DOI 10.11124/JBISRIR-2016-003082
Co-authors Tracy Burrows
2016 Chai LK, Macdonald-Wicks L, Hure AJ, Burrows TL, Blumfield ML, Smith R, Collins CE, 'Disparities exist between the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating and the dietary intakes of young children aged two to three years', Nutrition and Dietetics, 73 312-320 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Dietitians Association of Australia Aim: To compare dietary intakes of young children to the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE) and Nutrient Reference Values (NRVs)... [more]

© 2015 Dietitians Association of Australia Aim: To compare dietary intakes of young children to the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE) and Nutrient Reference Values (NRVs). Methods: Dietary intakes of 54 children (50% girls) aged two to three years (mean 2.7 years) from the Women and Their Children's Health (WATCH) study were reported by mothers using a validated 120-item food frequency questionnaire. Daily consumption of AGHE food group servings, macronutrients, and micronutrients were compared to the AGHE and NRVs using t-test with significance set at P < 0.05. Results: No child achieved all AGHE targets, with the majority consuming less breads/cereals (1.9 vs 4.0 servings/day), vegetables (1.3 vs 2.5), and meat/alternatives (0.7 vs 1.0), all P < 0.0001. Adequate servings were observed for dairy (2.2 vs 1.5) and fruit (1.3 vs 1.0). Macronutrients were within recommended ranges, although 96% exceeded saturated fatty acid recommendations. Children who met selected NRVs consumed more fruit (1.4 vs 1.0; P < 0.0086), dairy (2.2 vs 1.5; P < 0.0001) and discretionary foods (2.6 vs =1.0; P < 0.0001) but less breads/cereals (2.0 vs 4.0; P < 0.0001) and vegetables (1.3 vs 2.5; P < 0.0001) servings, compared to the AGHE recommended servings. Conclusions: Child dietary intakes did not align with AGHE, while adequate nutrient profiles were achieved by various dietary patterns. Future studies involving data from larger, representative samples of children are warranted.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12203
Co-authors Roger Smith, Alexis Hure, Lesley Wicks, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2015 Burrows T, Hutchesson M, Chai LK, Rollo M, Skinner G, Collins C, 'Nutrition interventions for prevention and management of childhood obesity: What do parents want from an ehealth program?', Nutrients, 7 10469-10479 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. With the growth of Internet technologies, offering interventions for child and family weight management in an online for... [more]

© 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. With the growth of Internet technologies, offering interventions for child and family weight management in an online format may address barriers to accessing services. This study aimed to investigate (i) whether an eHealth family healthy lifestyle program would be of interest to parents; and (ii) preferences and/or expectations for program components and features. Parents of children aged four to18 years were recruited through social media and completed an online survey (54 items) including closed and open-ended questions. Responses were collated using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. Seventy-five participants were included (92% mothers, mean age 39.1 ± 8.6 years, mean BMI 27.6 ± 6.3 kg/m 2 ). The index child had a mean age of 11 ± 6.2 years with 24% overweight/obese. The majority of parents (90.3%) reported interest in an online program, with preference expressed for a non-structured program to allow flexibility users to log-on and off as desired. Parents wanted a program that was easy to use, practical, engaging, endorsed by a reputable source, and able to provide individual tailoring and for their children to be directly involved. The current study supports the need for online delivery of a healthy lifestyle program that targets greater parental concerns of diet rather than child weight.

DOI 10.3390/nu7125546
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Geoff Skinner, Tracy Burrows, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Megan Rollo
Show 4 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Chai LK, MacDonald-Wicks L, Hure AJ, Burrows T, Collins C, 'Disparities exist between the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating and the dietary patterns of Australian pre-schoolers', ISBNPA 2014 Abstract Book (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Lesley Wicks, Alexis Hure, Tracy Burrows
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $4,000

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20161 grants / $4,000

Faculty of Health and Medicine Strategic ECR Pilot Grant$4,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team

May C, Burrows T, Collins C, Wong See D, Chai LK

Scheme Pilot Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 7
United Kingdom 2
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News

Online program striving to get kids to eat their veg

July 26, 2017

The ongoing challenge of tempting kids to ‘eat their veg’ has taken a high-tech turn, with University of Newcastle dietitians trying out telehealth technology and online resources in a new nutrition intervention.

UON PhD candidate wins emerging researcher award

May 20, 2016

The Dietitians Association of Australia (DAA) has this morning presented its 2016 Emerging Researcher Award to Li Keng Chai, who is an Accredited Practising Dietitian (APD) and PhD candidate at the University of Newcastle.

Miss Li Chai

Positions

Research Assistant
PRC Physical Activity and Nutrition
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Casual Research Assistant
PRC Physical Activity and Nutrition
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email li.k.chai@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5355
Link Twitter

Office

Room ATC 209
Building Advanced Technology Centre (ATC)
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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