Dr Kristina Gottschall

Dr Kristina Gottschall

Research Assistant

Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health

Career Summary

Biography

Dr. Kristina Gottschall joined the research team at the Centre for Rural and Remote Health (CRRMH) in early 2018. Kristina’s primary focus will be research into contexts connected to RAMPH and Good Start and a comparative study of mental health services for Indigenous peoples in Australian, Aotearoa/New Zealand and Canada.  

Before coming to CRRMH, Kristina was awarded a Graduate Certificate in Indigenous Studies and a Graduate Certificate in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education,and was a lecturer over the last 7 years at both Charles Sturt University and the Australian Catholic University. Teaching areas included cultural & educational sociology, education research/ methodologies, Indigenous education and Indigenous studies.

In 2014, along with her School of Indigenous Australian Studies colleagues at Charles Sturt University, Kristina was awarded the Dean’s Merit Award for Teaching Excellence.

As well as researching in the areas of rurality and rural mental health, Kristina researches across the areas of popular and public pedagogies, school marketisation, popular film culture, post-structural theories, social semiotics, subjectivities, gender, Indigeneity and discourses about youth-hood.

Kristina’s doctoral study acknowledged popular film as pedagogy geared towards the formation of gendered and age-based subjects. Mobilising feminist, post-structuralist and cultural theory, a whole host of Australian films and film culture were analysed in this study. Key concepts in terms of potential ‘learning’ about the mediated  youth subject were considered, including the ‘larrikin’ and youthful masculinities, Aussie actor Ben Mendelsohn, the ‘psycho-sexual’ girl coming-of-age, the ‘bad’ girl subject, and ‘old’ versus ‘young’ tropes.

In 2012, Kristina won a Faculty Writing-Up Award ($5,000), in 2010, The Australian Association of Research in Education (AARE) annual Special Interest Group Grant ($3,000) with Dr. Claire Charles (Deakin University), and in 2009, The Mitchell Foundation Doctoral Student Award from the Faculty of Education at Charles Sturt. This latter award enabled Kristina to travel to the UK to present at the Gender & Education Conference at the University of London and London Centre for the Study of Children, Youth & Media, London Knowledge Lab.

Kristina has also worked on ARC Linkages relating to rural teaching, media literacies and young people and subjectivities.

In the recent past, Kristina was reviews editor of the journal Global Studies in Childhood, and Associate Editor (Internship) with journal Critical Studies in Education. Prior to this, Kristina was the Post-Graduate Representative, the Early Career Researcher Representative and the Gender, Sexualities and Culture Studies SiG leaders for the Australian Association for Research in Education(AARE), and the Australian-New Zealand representative for the Association for Cultural Studies(ACS) Executive Board.

Kristina has had supervisory experience with both Masters and PhD students. Recently the PhD project entitled: "Living the Label: Youth work, young people, being 'at-risk' and rural community-based projects", which Kristina was co-supervising, passed and her PhD student graduated with the Faculty Award. Kristina welcomes students to make contact with her about their potential PhD projects and ideas with the view to her supervision.

Kristina is also mad for a good binge-worthy TV series, playing the ukulele, fancy dress parties, cuddling her hyperJack Russell and Foxie-X dogs, and road-tripping with her hubby.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Charles Sturt University
  • Bachelor of Arts (Honours)(History), University of Sydney

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
190204 Film and Television 30
160809 Sociology of Education 15
200205 Culture, Gender, Sexuality 55
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Hutchesson R, Dionigi R, Gottschall KM, '"At-risk" youth sport programs: Another way of regulating boys?', Sport and Physical Activity across the Lifespan: Critical Perspectives, Palgrave McMillan, Basingstoke, UK 1-15 (2017)
2017 Hutchesson R, Dionigi RA, Gottschall K, '¿At-Risk¿ youth sport programmes: Another way of regulating boys?', Sport and Physical Activity Across the Lifespan: Critical Perspectives 155-173 (2017)

© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2018. Community youth sport programmes often target boys who are considered ¿at-risk¿ of failing at school or not transitioning t... [more]

© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2018. Community youth sport programmes often target boys who are considered ¿at-risk¿ of failing at school or not transitioning to an ¿ideal¿ adulthood, with the assumption that sport will ¿save them from social alienation¿. In this chapter, we extend literature that examines sport programmes as a form of governmentality. We show how on the one hand such programmes reinforce the need for self-regulation among youth, and on the other hand produce an attraction to certain aspects of being a young person ¿at-risk¿ (where it appears the more ¿at-risk¿ you are the more likely you are to become a ¿famous¿ sportsperson). We draw on ethnographic data collected from seven 13-15-year-old boys (including two Indigenous Australian and two Maori) involved in a regional New South Wales Police-run community-based Youth ¿At-Risk¿ Programme. This programme aimed to improve relationships between local police and young people who had previous involvement in minor criminal activity. In this context, sport, rather than educational success, is positioned as a ¿way out¿ of social marginalisation for young males, especially Indigenous boys, where the overrepresentation of Indigenous men in popular sports, such as rugby league, can establish desirable future selves. In other words, the very programmes that are designed to counter ¿risk¿ through sport can work to maintain, create or celebrate risk, making participants feel even more alienated and disengaged from school and/or the workforce when they step outside of the sport programme and return to these ¿normalising¿ contexts.

DOI 10.1057/978-1-137-48562-5_8
2016 Drew C, Gottschall K, Wardman N, Saltmarsh S, 'The joy of privilege: Elite private school online promotions and the promise of happiness', Elite Schools: Multiple Geographies of Privilege 87-100 (2016)
DOI 10.4324/9781315771335
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Gottschall K, ''Black kid burden': Cultural representations of Indigenous childhood and poverty in Australian cinema', The 'Poor Child': The Cultural Politics of Education, Development and Childhood 43-61 (2015)
2014 Gottschall KM, 'Ruptures in the heterosexual matrix through teenage flows and multiplicities', Collective Biography and the Production of Girlhood, Women's Press/Canadian Scholars Press, Toronto, ON 177-194 (2014)
2012 Gottschall KM, 'Monkey Grip/The Getting of Wisdom/Metal Skin', World Film Locations, Intellect Publishers, Bristol, UK (2012)
2010 Gottschall KM, 'Coming-Of-Age', Directory of World Cinema: Australian and New Zealand, Intellect, Bristol, UK 176-180 (2010)
2008 Gottschall KM, 'Situated Leadership and Rural Schooling: Leading learning Locally?', Spaces and Places: The NSW Rural [Teacher] Education Project, CSU Centre for Information Studies, Wagga Wagga, NSW 339-364 (2008)
2005 Letts W, Novak M, Gottschall KM, Green W, Meyenn R, 'Different Places, Familiar Spaces: Rural and Remote Education as Situated Practice', Report of the Consultation on Future Directions for Public Education and Training: "Oone size doesn't fit all", Department of Education, Training, Sydney, NSW 220-225 (2005)
Show 6 more chapters

Journal article (15 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Drew C, Gottschall K, 'Co-optation of diversity in nationalist advertising: a case study of an Australian advertisement', Continuum, 1-13 (2018)

© 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group Co-optation theory, more commonly used in sociology and marketing literature, has value in media and cultural st... [more]

© 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group Co-optation theory, more commonly used in sociology and marketing literature, has value in media and cultural studies for examination of how countercultural ideals such as diversity can be assimilated into dominant discourse, in ways that neutralize the concepts¿ countercultural significations. This paper demonstrates the value of co-optation theory through a case study of an Australian nationalist advertisement, which co-opts the concept of diversity and utilizes it in a way that is palatable to the imagined White Australian audience. In the process, it is argued, the concept of diversity is neutralized and stripped of its countercultural significations, and masculine Anglo-Australian identity is sustained as an idealized norm. A Foucauldian discourse analysis of the advertisement and its surrounding media reception is conducted to explore the advertisement as an instance of co-optation that was largely met uncritically, and resultantly, passed as a national adulation of an assimilationist ideal dressed as diversity.

DOI 10.1080/10304312.2018.1487033
2017 Gottschall K, Saltmarsh S, '¿You're not just learning it, you're living it!¿ Constructing the ¿good life¿ in Australian university online promotional videos', Discourse, 38 768-781 (2017)

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Online promotional videos on Australian university websites are a form of institutional branding and marketing ... [more]

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Online promotional videos on Australian university websites are a form of institutional branding and marketing that construct university experience in a variety of ways. Here we consider how these multimedia texts represent student lifestyles, identities and aspirations in terms of the ¿good life¿. We consider how the ¿promise of happiness¿ is deployed to appeal to perceived consumer desires within the local student market, as well as within the highly competitive global knowledge economy. These texts position university students as youthful, attractive, active and fun, and depict student life as being about leisure and pleasure. Such representations promote cultural and social entitlement to the ¿good life¿ as if synonymous with choice, participation and success in higher education. Learning and scholarship are depicted as secondary activities. We also contend that claims to cosmopolitanism and consumerism are framed by racialised entitlements where Whiteness remains both a commodity and norm.

DOI 10.1080/01596306.2016.1158155
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2016 Vass G, Gottschall K, 'Social justice and race critical education research', Critical Studies in Education, 57 411-419 (2016)
DOI 10.1080/17508487.2016.1225399
2014 Gottschall K, 'From the frozen wilderness to the moody sea: Rural space, girlhood and popular pedagogy', Gender and Education, 26 568-583 (2014)

© 2014 Taylor & Francis. This paper turns to debates in post-critical public pedagogy to focus on how a small body of films might potentially work as vehicles for teaching a... [more]

© 2014 Taylor & Francis. This paper turns to debates in post-critical public pedagogy to focus on how a small body of films might potentially work as vehicles for teaching and learning about youth, gender and space. It is argued that representations of the rural shape what is possible for girlhood, being both enabling and constraining for the subject. Framed by discourses around the politics of representing the rural, a range of popular Australian films will be analysed to think about how popular film might use representations of the rural to educate spectators about girls as ¿successful¿, ¿in crisis¿ and/or as girls asserting ¿girlpower¿. The films include four key Australian ¿coming of age¿ films about girls growing up in rural/rural coastal locales: Peaches set in a sleepy town on the banks of the Murray River, Somersault set in the frozen wilderness of Jindabyne in the Snowy Mountains, Caterpillar Wish set in the coastal town full of secrets and lies, and in Indigenous film maker Ivan Sen¿s Beneath Clouds, showing the Country passed through during a rural New South Wales road trip.

DOI 10.1080/09540253.2014.944486
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2014 Gottschall K, 'Always the larrikin: Ben mendelsohn and young aussie manhood in Australian cinema', Continuum, 28 862-875 (2014)

© 2014 Taylor and Francis. Ben Mendelsohn is Australian cinema's quintessential working-class larrikin of his generation. This paper will consider the kind of young, masculin... [more]

© 2014 Taylor and Francis. Ben Mendelsohn is Australian cinema's quintessential working-class larrikin of his generation. This paper will consider the kind of young, masculine, roguish, destructive character that Mendelsohn has been playing since the 1980s. It will argue that by borrowing from his cinematic forefathers and adding his unique contemporary stamp to the mould, Mendelsohn incites audiences towards a particular brand of masculinity where being young, being male and being Australian is normalized and idealized. For good and for bad, Mendelsohn is a powerful text by which Australian society constructs, maintains, protects, challenges and teaches concepts of manhood.

DOI 10.1080/10304312.2014.941332
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Wardman N, Gottschall K, Drew C, Hutchesson R, Saltmarsh S, 'Picturing natural girlhoods: Nature, space and femininity in girls' school promotions', Gender and Education, 25 284-294 (2013)

This paper furthers a discussion about the ways in which idealised versions of gender permeate the aesthetic presentation and impression management strategies of elite private sch... [more]

This paper furthers a discussion about the ways in which idealised versions of gender permeate the aesthetic presentation and impression management strategies of elite private schools. Specifically, we consider how the written text, layout and images used in 12 Australian private girls' school prospectuses function in constructing discourses of 'natural' femininity. Far from being merely factual sources of information, we see school prospectuses as strategic texts that idealise and commodify gendered subjectivities that are likely to appeal to the perceived clientele of a particular school. Drawing on feminist and poststructuralist theoretical frames and utilising social semiotic techniques, we analyse how these promotional texts align the feminine subject with nature and the natural world. This alignment serves the dual function of constituting femininity as naturally beautiful, fragile, passive and vulnerably at-risk, while at the same time ameliorating such risk through more empowered (yet constrained) notions of interconnectedness. The tensions between such contradictory discourses of traditional and neoliberal femininity create impossible subject positions for girls, as in order to succeed with one version of femininity, they must simultaneously fail at another. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/09540253.2012.756857
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
2013 Gottschall KM, Gannon S, Lampert J, McGraw K, 'The Cyndi Lauper Affect: Bodies, girlhood and popular culture', Girlhood Studies, 6 30-45 (2013)
2013 Davies B, Gonick M, Gottschall KM, Lampert J, 'Ruptures in the heterosexual matrix through teenage flows and multiplicities', Girlhood Studies, 6 46-62 (2013)
2013 Gannon S, Gottschall KM, Camden Pratt C, ''A quick sideways look and wild grin': Joyful assemblages in moments of girlhood', Girlhood Studies, 6 13-29 (2013)
2012 Gottschall KM, 'Directory of World Cinema: East Europe (Bingham, ed.) and Directory of World Cinema: Germany (Langford, ed.) Book review', Media International Australia, 167-169 (2012)
2012 Gottschall K, '¿Trashing the suburban streets¿: Learning about ¿bad¿ youth with/in idiot box and suburban mayhem', Studies in Australasian Cinema, 5 293-306 (2012)

Katrina is a suburban 19-year-old single mother with murder and mayhem on her mind. Kev and Mick are unemployed 20-something suburban blokes who get the idea from a cop show to ro... [more]

Katrina is a suburban 19-year-old single mother with murder and mayhem on her mind. Kev and Mick are unemployed 20-something suburban blokes who get the idea from a cop show to rob their local bank. This article considers how images and ideas about suburbia frame representations of gendered and classed youth in the Australian films Idiot Box (Caesar, 1996) and Suburban Mayhem (Goldman, 2006). These films ambivalently celebrate and critique suburbia in their portrayals of ¿bad¿ young protagonists. Taking a post-critical approach to pedagogy, this article explores these films as vehicles for teaching and learning about youth and subjectivity. The films and their suburban settings are considered in relation to a (post) Gothic aesthetic in Australian cinema. The article analyses key locations highlighted in the film, including the neighbourhood, the beauty salon, the shopping mall and the street, and asks how contemporary youthful femininities and masculinities are constructed and known in these simultaneously familiar and uncanny places. © 2011 Intellect Ltd Article.

DOI 10.1386/sac.5.3.293_1
Citations Scopus - 1
2011 Gottschall KM, ''Jesus! A Geriatric' That's All I Need!': Learning to come of age with/in Australian film', Global Studies of Childhood, 1 332-342 (2011)
2010 Wardman N, Hutchesson R, Gottschall K, Drew C, Saltmarsh S, 'Starry eyes and subservient selves: Portraits of 'well-rounded' girlhood in the prospectuses of all-girl elite private schools', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF EDUCATION, 54 249-261 (2010)
DOI 10.1177/000494411005400303
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 16
2010 Gottschall K, Wardman N, Edgeworth K, Hutchesson R, Saltmarsh S, 'Hard lines and soft scenes: Constituting masculinities in the prospectuses of all-boys elite private schools', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF EDUCATION, 54 18-30 (2010)
DOI 10.1177/000494411005400103
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
2009 Gottschall KM, 'Moral spectatorship: Technologies of voice and affect in postwar representations of the child', Continuum-Journal of Media & Cultural Studies, 23 409-422 (2009)
Show 12 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Gottschall KM, Biles B, Ghys L, Locke K, Quin A, 'Teaching and learning Indigenous Australian Studies online: 'The subject being held online was destructive to my learning'', University of South Australia (2015)

Creative Work (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 McLean L, Gottschall KM, Martello J, Wilson P, Hamilton M, Smith P, et al., CSUkes performing cecilia, Carrington Hotel, Katoomba, NSW (2015)

Thesis / Dissertation (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Gottschall KM, May You Live Normally Ever After!: Popular Film as Pedagogy: Youth, Subjectivity and Australian Cinema, Charles Sturt University (2011)
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Dr Kristina Gottschall

Position

Research Assistant
Research team
Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email kris.gottschall@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 6363 8438
Fax n/a

Office

Room R.37
Building CRRMH
Location Orange

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