Dr Khoka Hamiduzzaman

Dr Khoka Hamiduzzaman

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

University Newcastle Department of Rural Health

Career Summary

Biography

I am a social epidemiologist and health services researcher who has been working in higher education for more than ten years. I have conducted extensive research in aged care, person-centered dementia care, health beliefs and behaviours, person-centered interactions, health and social services structuring. The major focus of my research is to improve physical and intellectual capacity of disadvantaged people through public health interventions. To do this, I use theoretical knowledge and methodological skills and experience [quantitative and qualitative] in leading and managing health and well-being research projects in different regions of Australia. I have expertise and experience in systematic, meta-analysis, scoping and integrated literature reviews and using research software such as REDCap, Qualtrics, SPSS and NVivo add value to my research data management skills and analysis capacity.

I have been a Co-investigator and Associate Investigator of two national research projects [$3.2 million], funded by Australian Department of Health, (i) Harmony in the Bush: A Personalised Model of Care for Dementia [Chief Investigator/AUD 1.5 Million]; (ii) Virtual Dementia Friendly Rural Communities [Project Coordinator/Associate Investigator – South Australia/AUD 1.7 million].


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Flinders University

Keywords

  • Advance Care Planning
  • Digital Health
  • Health Services Research
  • Health Workforce
  • Healthy Ageing
  • Person-centred Dementia Care
  • Social Determinants of Health

Languages

  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
420301 Aged health care 40
420321 Rural and remote health services 40
390110 Medicine, nursing and health curriculum and pedagogy 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Postdoctoral Research Fellow University of Newcastle
University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Hamiduzzaman M, 'Challenges and solutions for collecting data in health research: experiences of Australian doctoral and early career researchers', Field Guide for Research in Community Settings Tools, Methods, Challenges and Strategies, Edward Elgar Publishing, United Kingdom 11-24 (2021)

Journal article (31 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Hamiduzzaman M, Torres S, Fletcher A, Islam MR, Siddiquee NA, Greenhill J, 'Aging, care and dependency in multimorbidity: how do relationships affect older Bangladeshi women's use of homecare and health services?', JOURNAL OF WOMEN & AGING, (2021)
DOI 10.1080/08952841.2021.1951115
2021 Rahman MM, Bhattacharjee B, Farhana Z, Hamiduzzaman M, Chowdhury MAB, Hossain MS, et al., 'Age-related risk factors and severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Journal of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene, 62 E329-E371 (2021)

Objectives. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of reported symptoms and comorbidities, and investigate the factors associated with age of the SARS-CoV-2 infected patients. Method... [more]

Objectives. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of reported symptoms and comorbidities, and investigate the factors associated with age of the SARS-CoV-2 infected patients. Methods. We performed a systematic review with meta-analysis (PROSPERO registration: CRD42020182677) where the databases (PubMed, SCOPUS, EMBASE, WHO, Semantic Scholar, and COVID-19 Primer) were searched for clinical studies published from January to April, 2020. Initially, the pooled prevalence of symptoms and comorbidity of COVID-19 patients were estimated using random effect model and the age ¿related factors were identified performing multivariate analysis [factor analysis]. Results. Twenty-nine articles with 4,884 COVID-19 patients were included in this study. Altogether, we found 33 symptoms and 44 comorbidities where the most frequent 19 symptoms and 11 comorbidities were included in the meta-analysis. The fever (84%), cough/dry cough (61%), and fatigue/weakness (42%) were found more prevalent while acute respiratory distress syndrome, hypertension and diabetes were the most prevalent comorbid condition. The factor analysis showed positive association between a cluster of symptoms and comorbidities with patients¿ age. The symptoms comprising fever, dyspnea/shortness of breath, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dizziness, anorexia and pharyngalgia; and the comorbidities including diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease, COPD/lung disease and ARDS were the factors positively associated with COVID-19 patient¿s age. Conclusion. As an unique effort, this study found a group of symptoms (fever, dyspnea/shortness of breath, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dizziness, anorexia and pharyngalgia) and comorbidities (diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease, COPD/lung disease and ARDS), associated with the age of COVID-19 infected patients.

DOI 10.15167/2421-4248/jpmh2021.62.2.1946
2021 Nichols E, Abd-Allah F, Abdoli A, Abualhasan A, Abu-Gharbieh E, Afshin A, et al., 'Use of multidimensional item response theory methods for dementia prevalence prediction: an example using the Health and Retirement Survey and the Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study', BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, 21 (2021)

Background: Data sparsity is a major limitation to estimating national and global dementia burden. Surveys with full diagnostic evaluations of dementia prevalence are prohibitivel... [more]

Background: Data sparsity is a major limitation to estimating national and global dementia burden. Surveys with full diagnostic evaluations of dementia prevalence are prohibitively resource-intensive in many settings. However, validation samples from nationally representative surveys allow for the development of algorithms for the prediction of dementia prevalence nationally. Methods: Using cognitive testing data and data on functional limitations from Wave A (2001¿2003) of the ADAMS study (n = 744) and the 2000 wave of the HRS study (n = 6358) we estimated a two-dimensional item response theory model to calculate cognition and function scores for all individuals over 70. Based on diagnostic information from the formal clinical adjudication in ADAMS, we fit a logistic regression model for the classification of dementia status using cognition and function scores and applied this algorithm to the full HRS sample to calculate dementia prevalence by age and sex. Results: Our algorithm had a cross-validated predictive accuracy of 88% (86¿90), and an area under the curve of 0.97 (0.97¿0.98) in ADAMS. Prevalence was higher in females than males and increased over age, with a prevalence of 4% (3¿4) in individuals 70¿79, 11% (9¿12) in individuals 80¿89¿years old, and 28% (22¿35) in those 90 and older. Conclusions: Our model had similar or better accuracy as compared to previously reviewed algorithms for the prediction of dementia prevalence in HRS, while utilizing more flexible methods. These methods could be more easily generalized and utilized to estimate dementia prevalence in other national surveys.

DOI 10.1186/s12911-021-01590-y
2021 McLaren H, Patmisari E, Hamiduzzaman M, Jones M, Taylor R, 'Respect for religiosity: Review of faith integration in health and wellbeing interventions with muslim minorities', Religions, 12 (2021)

Integration of religion in community health and wellbeing interventions is important for achieving a good life among faith-based populations. In countries hosting Muslim-minoritie... [more]

Integration of religion in community health and wellbeing interventions is important for achieving a good life among faith-based populations. In countries hosting Muslim-minorities, however, relatively little is reported in academic literature on processes of faith integration in the development and delivery of interventions. We undertook a review of peer reviewed literature on health and wellbeing interventions with Muslim-minorities, with specific interest on how Islamic principles were incorporated. Major databases were systematically searched and PRISMA guidelines applied in the selection of eligible studies. Twenty-one journal articles met the inclusion criteria. These were coded and analyzed thematically. Study characteristics and themes of religiosity are reported in this review, including the religious tailoring of interventions, content co-creation and delivery design based on the teachings from the Quran and Sunnah, and applicability of intervention structures. We reviewed the philosophical and structural elements echoing the Quran and Islamic principles in the intervention content reported. However, most studies identified that the needs of Muslim communities were often overlooked or compromised. This may be due to levels of religiocultural knowledge of persons facilitating community health and wellbeing interventions. Our review emphasizes the importance of intellectual apparatus when working in diverse communities, effective communication-strategies, and community consultations when designing interventions with Muslim-minority communities.

DOI 10.3390/rel12090692
2021 Parajuli DR, Kuot A, Hamiduzzaman M, Gladman J, Isaac V, 'Person-centered, non-pharmacological intervention in reducing psychotropic medications use among residents with dementia in Australian rural aged care homes', BMC Psychiatry, 21 (2021)

Background: High rates of psychotropic medications are prescribed in aged care homes despite their limited effectiveness and associated adverse effects. We aim to evaluate the cha... [more]

Background: High rates of psychotropic medications are prescribed in aged care homes despite their limited effectiveness and associated adverse effects. We aim to evaluate the changes in prescription patterns for elderly residents with dementia in the ¿Harmony in the Bush Dementia Study¿. Harmony in the Bush is a person-centered model of dementia care in nursing homes, based on the principles of Progressively Lowered Stress Threshold and person-centered music intervention. Methods: Our larger study (12 weeks period) was a quasi-experimental design conducted in five rural nursing homes in Australia. Medication charts (n = 31) were collected retrospectively from three rural aged care facilities. Medication data for each resident was collected from a three-month medication charts, pre-intervention, and post-intervention. Fifty-three staff participated in 31 semi-structured interviews and 8 focus groups at post-intervention, and at 1-month and 3-months follow up. Results: The median age of the participants was 83 years, and 68% of them were female. Polypharmacy was measured in 87% (n = 27) of the participants. Hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and the Alzheimer¿s disease were the major comorbidities identified in residents. None of the residents received more than the maximum dose of psychotropic medications recommended by the guidelines. There was a reduction of 22.4% (77.4% vs 55%) in the use of at least any psychotropic medications, 19.6% (39% vs, 19.4%) reduction in antipsychotics and benzodiazepines (39% vs 19.4%), and 6.5% (42% vs 35.5%) reduction in antidepressants prescription medicines, when comparing residents¿ medication charts data covering 3-months pre- and post-intervention, however, these changes were not statistically significant. Additionally, there was a decreasing trend in the use of inappropriate medications. Psychotropic medications were prescribed in up to 43% and anti-dementia medications in 44% of participants for more than 6 months. Three themes extracted from qualitative data include decrease behavioral and psychiatric symptoms of dementia due to medication weaning or dose tapering, other strategies to reduce medication use, and environmental or noise control. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that the Harmony in the Bush model as a non-pharmacological approach reduces the prescription of psychotropic medications in rural nursing homes as supported by findings from both quantitative and qualitative data. Trial registration: ANZCTR, ACTRN12618000263291. Registered on 20th February 2018.

DOI 10.1186/s12888-020-03033-w
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2021 Hamiduzzaman M, De Bellis A, Abigail W, Kalaitzidis E, Harrington A, 'The World Is Not Mine Barriers to Healthcare Access for Bangladeshi Rural Elderly Women', Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, 36 69-89 (2021)

Social determinants of health is a core cross-cutting approach of the World Health Organization to reduce health inequalities, and places an emphasis on aged care planning in rura... [more]

Social determinants of health is a core cross-cutting approach of the World Health Organization to reduce health inequalities, and places an emphasis on aged care planning in rural areas of low- and lower-middle income countries including Bangladesh. The complex correlated health and social factors in Bangladesh interplay to shape the healthcare access of rural people. This impact is significant for rural elderly women in particular who have been shown to access healthcare in ways that are described as ¿socially determined¿. This study aimed to explore how this cohort related their healthcare access to their living circumstances and provided insight into how their healthcare access needs can be addressed. This study was a critical social theoretical exploration from conversational interviews held over three months with 25 elderly women in rural Bangladesh. Two critical social constructs, ¿emancipation¿ of Habermas and ¿recognition¿ of Honneth, were used in the exploration and explanation of the influence of personal circumstances, society and system on rural elderly women¿s healthcare access. The concept of ¿social determinants of healthcare access¿ is defined from the physical, emotive, symbolic and imaginative experiences of these women. Interviewing the women provided information for exploration of the determinants that characterized their experiences into an overall construct of ¿The World is Not Mine¿. This construct represented four themes focusing on the exclusion from healthcare, oppressive socioeconomic condition, marginalization in social relationships and personal characteristics that led the women to avoid or delay access to modern healthcare. This study confirms that the rural elderly women require adequate policy responses from the government, and also need multiple support systems to secure adequate access to healthcare. As healthcare services are often a reflection of community values and human rights concerns for the elderly, there is a need of recognition and respect of their voice by the family members, society and the healthcare system in planning and implementation of a prudent aged care policy for rural elderly women in Bangladesh.

DOI 10.1007/s10823-020-09420-w
Citations Scopus - 1
2021 Paul GK, Rahman MM, Hamiduzzaman M, Farhana Z, Mondal SK, Akter S, et al., 'Hypertension and its physio-psychosocial risks factors in elderly people: a cross-sectional study in north-eastern region of Bangladesh', JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC CARDIOLOGY, 18 75-82 (2021)
DOI 10.11909/j.issn.1671-5411.2021.01.011
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2021 Rahman MM, Hamiduzzaman M, Akter MS, Farhana Z, Hossain MK, Hasan MN, Islam MN, 'Frailty indexed classification of Bangladeshi older adults' physio-psychosocial health and associated risk factors- a cross-sectional survey study', BMC GERIATRICS, 21 (2021)
DOI 10.1186/s12877-020-01970-5
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2021 Isaac V, Kuot A, Hamiduzzaman M, Strivens E, Greenhill J, 'The outcomes of a person-centered, non-pharmacological intervention in reducing agitation in residents with dementia in Australian rural nursing homes', BMC GERIATRICS, 21 (2021)
DOI 10.1186/s12877-021-02151-8
Citations Scopus - 1
2021 Parajuli DR, Kuot A, Hamiduzzaman M, Gladman J, Isaac V, 'Person-centered, non-pharmacological intervention in reducing psychotropic medications use among residents with dementia in Australian rural aged care homes (vol 21, 36, 2021)', BMC PSYCHIATRY, 21 (2021)
DOI 10.1186/s12888-021-03141-1
2021 Smadi O, Chamberlain D, Shifaza F, Hamiduzzaman M, 'A Community of Inquiry lens into nursing education: The educators experiences and perspectives from three Australian universities', Nurse Education in Practice, 54 (2021) [C1]

Aim: Nursing is a social and collaborative profession; therefore, nursing education requires a pedagogy that supports the establishment of a collaborative learning community. Desp... [more]

Aim: Nursing is a social and collaborative profession; therefore, nursing education requires a pedagogy that supports the establishment of a collaborative learning community. Despite the limited use of the Community of Inquiry framework in Australian nursing courses, the educators viewed it as applicable for course design. This paper aims to understand Australian nurse educators' current practices in designing and delivering courses using the Community of Inquiry lens. Design and methods: This paper represent the second phase of the explanatory mixed-methods approach¿the data collected in October 2019 via semi-structured interviews with eleven nurse academics from 3 Australian universities. Results: the deductive thematic analysis using the Community of Inquiry coding template confirmed that the 'cognitive presence' and its indicators are implicitly embedded in online/blended courses. But the 'social presence' and 'teaching presence' are faced with some challenges: the underuse of discussion forums by students, the use of social media pages with exclusion of educators and the educators' role of content development rather than course design. Conclusions: The study findings suggest that the Community of Inquiry framework's explicit application would strengthen 'social and teaching' presences in nursing courses design. Further studies on nursing students' evaluation and perspectives about courses design regarding Community of Inquiry are essential.

DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2021.103114
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2021 Mangiameli J, Hamiduzzaman M, Lim D, Pickles D, Isaac V, 'Rural disability workforce perspective on effective inter-disciplinary training A qualitative pilot study', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 29 137-145 (2021) [C1]

Objective: Inter-professional education is a growing area of importance that enables training of health care professionals and students to develop skills in collaborative clinical... [more]

Objective: Inter-professional education is a growing area of importance that enables training of health care professionals and students to develop skills in collaborative clinical practice, a critical aspect of disability care. However, research is limited on appropriate on-site inter-professional training for the rural and remote disability workforce. This paper aims to explore the features of an effective inter-professional training approach for rural disability workforce. Setting: Riverland, South Australia. Participants: Clinical educators, allied health professionals, health and service providers and students. Design: A qualitative-explorative research design, involving focus group discussion and a thematic analysis method were employed in this study. Participants of the focus group discussion completed a capacity building training program centred on inter-professional education, cultural-safety and the National Disability Insurance Scheme. National Disability Services Social Impact Measurement Tool was used to evaluate and explore the features of effective inter-professional training program for existing and emerging disability workforce in rural regions. Results: Four themes emerged from data analysis: inter-professional education focus; structured inter-professional training; building collaborative learning environment; and culturally appropriate care practice. Inter-professional supervision was identified as a key enabler for capacity building in an area with limited health workforce. Inter-agency collaboration and professional network were identified as important elements to support disability health workforce retention and the transition from novice to practitioner. Prior knowledge about the needs of persons with disability and empathetic relationships influenced the quality of practice. Conclusion: In situ training programs, which provide real-life rural practice context and harness inter-agency collaboration, improve effectiveness of rural disability workforce readiness for practice.

DOI 10.1111/ajr.12719
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2021 Hamiduzzaman M, De Bellis A, Abigail W, 'Exploring the System Determinants Associated with Senior Women s Access to Medical Care in Rural Bangladesh', Ageing International, (2021)

Senior women¿s access to medical care in rural Bangladesh is a major public health concern. This study aims to explore the system determinants that impact on rural senior women¿s ... [more]

Senior women¿s access to medical care in rural Bangladesh is a major public health concern. This study aims to explore the system determinants that impact on rural senior women¿s utilization of healthcare. Following a qualitative critical social research design, healthcare staff and senior women living in three rural villages of Bangladesh were approached to participate in face-to-face audio-recorded interviews. A total of 11 staff and 25 senior women were interviewed with questions about health policy, healthcare services and management of aged care. Data was analyzed using a blend of critical discourse and thematic analysis methods. Several healthcare system determinants were identified that were complex and cross-sectional. Three major themes emerged from the system determinants: legal framework of aged care; inadequate healthcare support; and professional knowledge and skills of healthcare staff that led the rural senior women to avoid or delay access to hospitals and clinics. The findings revealed that a lack of health focus and professional skills among healthcare staff can be considered as critical. This study recommends that policy and organizational changes are made to improve the women¿s access to rural hospitals and clinics in Bangladesh.

DOI 10.1007/s12126-021-09444-8
2021 Smadi O, Chamberlain D, Shifaza F, Hamiduzzaman M, 'Factors affecting the adoption of the Community of Inquiry Framework in Australian online nursing education: A transition theory perspective', Nurse Education in Practice, 55 (2021)

Objectives: This paper aims to understand the factors influencing the adoption of teaching, social and cognitive presence in online nursing education and explain the novice nurse ... [more]

Objectives: This paper aims to understand the factors influencing the adoption of teaching, social and cognitive presence in online nursing education and explain the novice nurse academics journey in adopting these aspects. Background: The quality of the online/blended courses is about the content and a need for suitable pedagogical design, clear instructions and a collaborative environment based on a valid and reliable theoretical framework. Design and settings: A qualitative study involves semi-structured interviews with 11 nurse academics from three Australian Universities and thematic analysis was conducted. Results and conclusions: The Community of Inquiry framework informed three themes including several factors in each from the interviews: (1) Teaching Presence (TP): the lack of understanding of educational theory use, the inadequate course evaluation and the resources scarcity found to be the factors affecting the adoption of TP in online nursing education; (2) Social Presence: the engagement difficulty and creating a learning community affected the adoption of SP; and (3) Cognitive Presence: the variety in learning styles and formative assessment and discussion forums found to be affecting the adoption of CP. This study paper is unique because it uses the Community of Inquiry framework and Meleis's Transition Theory and provides insight on how to facilitate the transition [from role insufficiencies to role supplementation to role mastery] of nurse academics¿ journey in adopting teaching, social and cognitive presence for online higher education.

DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2021.103166
2021 Wilding C, Davis H, Rasekaba T, Hamiduzzaman M, Royals K, Greenhill J, et al., 'Volunteers support of carers of rural people living with dementia to use a custom-built application', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18 (2021)

There is great potential for human-centred technologies to enhance wellbeing for people living with dementia and their carers. The Virtual Dementia Friendly Rural Communities (Ver... [more]

There is great potential for human-centred technologies to enhance wellbeing for people living with dementia and their carers. The Virtual Dementia Friendly Rural Communities (Verily Connect) project aimed to increase access to information, support, and connection for carers of rural people living with dementia, via a co-designed, integrated website/mobile application (app) and Zoom videoconferencing. Volunteers were recruited and trained to assist the carers to use the Verily Connect app and videoconferencing. The overall research design was a stepped wedge open cohort randomized cluster trial involving 12 rural communities, spanning three states of Australia, with three types of participants: carers of people living with dementia, volunteers, and health/aged services staff. Data collected from volunteers (n = 39) included eight interviews and five focus groups with volunteers, and 75 process memos written by research team members. The data were analyzed using a descriptive evaluation framework and building themes through open coding, inductive rea-soning, and code categorization. The volunteers reported that the Verily Connect app was easy to use and they felt they derived benefit from volunteering. The volunteers had less volunteering work than they desired due to low numbers of carer participants; they reported that older rural carers were partly reluctant to join the trial because they eschewed using online technologies, which was the reason for involving volunteers from each local community.

DOI 10.3390/ijerph18189909
Co-authors David Perkins
2021 Islam MR, Hamiduzzaman M, 'Status and utilization of child health and nutritional services among low-income urban households in Bangladesh', SN Social Sciences, 1 (2021)
DOI 10.1007/s43545-021-00178-7
2020 Wechkunanukul K, Parajuli DR, Hamiduzzaman M, 'Utilising digital health to improve medication-related quality of care for hypertensive patients: An integrative literature review', WORLD JOURNAL OF CLINICAL CASES, 8 (2020)
DOI 10.12998/wjcc.v8.i11.2266
2020 Hamiduzzaman M, 'Self-reported seasonal symptoms and diseases and primary healthcare utilization among rural elderly women in Sylhet District, Bangladesh', Journal of UOEH, 42 175-185 (2020)

The physical health and conditions of elderly people are challenged by the adverse effects of seasonal variations in sub-tropical countries, including Bangladesh. Research to date... [more]

The physical health and conditions of elderly people are challenged by the adverse effects of seasonal variations in sub-tropical countries, including Bangladesh. Research to date does not feature the risk of seasonal changes for primary healthcare infrastructures and practices in supporting elderly women's care, especially in rural areas. This study aims to identify the health effects of seasonal variations that place increased risk of symptoms and diseases on rural elderly women, and to explore the determinants associated with the women's use of healthcare locally. Using a mixed-methods approach, audio-recorded semi-structured interviews including a short survey with sixty-five rural elderly women and eleven healthcare professionals were conducted. Quantitative data were analyzed in SPSS, and a thematic analysis of the qualitative data was facilitated by NVivo. Self-reported health history by rural elderly women identified the prevalence of three major seasonal symptoms: headache (28/43.1%), digestive disorder (27/41.5%), and physical pain (27/41.5%). The prevalence of three symptoms such as nausea, headache and digestive disorder varied significantly (p < 0.05) across the study villages. Of the women, the age group (60-70 years) recorded the highest number of cases (20), followed by age group (71-80 years/15), where the number of cases significantly varied across three seasons (p = 0.021). While 78.5% and 55.4% reported one and two symptoms/ diseases respectively, the community clinic visits differed significantly (p = 0.011) among the seasons. The utilization of primary healthcare was low, and marginalization in using healthcare was underpinned by the health system, the poor living conditions of the women, and their reluctance to seek treatment. The findings suggest a need for policy solutions in promoting preventive measures and treatments by strengthening local clinics and on-going health education and training of staff and elderly women.

DOI 10.7888/juoeh.42.175
Citations Scopus - 3
2020 Sivertsen N, Harrington A, Hamiduzzaman M, ' Two-eyed seeing : the integration of spiritual care in Aboriginal residential aged care in South Australia', Journal of Religion, Spirituality and Aging, 32 149-171 (2020)

It is argued that spirituality acts as a powerful determinant of health and influences the general care experiences of older people living in residential aged care. This impact is... [more]

It is argued that spirituality acts as a powerful determinant of health and influences the general care experiences of older people living in residential aged care. This impact is significant, especially for Aboriginal residents, whose cultural and spiritual well-being is shown to be strongly connected with divine beliefs, land and community. This study, a qualitative exploration from conversational interviews with 7 Aboriginal residents and 19 carers, aimed to investigate how the Aboriginal residents¿ spiritual well-being related to living in residential aged care in South Australia. Participants shared what spirituality meant to them and how spiritual needs are met in aged care centres for Aboriginal residents. Three major themes emerged from the views of the residents and carers: a lack of understanding of spiritual well-being; challenges around aged care plan; and practice and inadequate resources and funding. The main themes and sub-themes contributed to carers¿ unawareness around the spiritual care needs of Aboriginal residents. This study concluded there was a requirement for changes in care management and staff approach, and management structure in order to integrate spiritual care into general care for Aboriginal residents in aged care.

DOI 10.1080/15528030.2019.1669515
Citations Scopus - 6
2020 Hamiduzzaman M, Kuot A, Greenhill J, Strivens E, Isaac V, 'Towards personalized care: Factors associated with the quality of life of residents with dementia in Australian rural aged care homes', PLOS ONE, 15 (2020)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0233450
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2020 Hamiduzzaman M, Islam MR, 'Save life or livelihood: Responses to COVID-19 among South-Asian poor communities', Local Development & Society, 1 177-189 (2020)
DOI 10.1080/26883597.2020.1801334
2020 Hamiduzzaman M, Torres S, Fletcher A, Islam MR, Greenhill J, 'Aging, Care and Dependency in Multimorbidity: How Relationships Affect Older Bangladeshi Women s Use of Homecare and Health Services (2020)
DOI 10.1101/2020.06.19.20126078
2020 Hamiduzzaman M, Kuot A, Greenhill J, Strivens E, Parajuli DR, Isaac V, 'The Nexus of Music, Mind, and Well-being : Effects of Harmony in the Bush Music Intervention for Residents with Advanced Dementia in Australian Rural Nursing Homes (2020)
DOI 10.21203/rs.3.rs-67641/v1
2019 Shifaza F, Hamiduzzaman M, 'System factors influencing the australian nurses' evidence-based clinical decision making: A systematic review of recent studies', Evidence Based Care Journal, 9 17-30 (2019)

Background: There is growing attention to evidence-based practice in Australian clinical contexts and nursing literature. Recent research explores the dimensions of evidence-based... [more]

Background: There is growing attention to evidence-based practice in Australian clinical contexts and nursing literature. Recent research explores the dimensions of evidence-based practice; however, the implementation of evidence-based clinical decision making has been identified as a cumbersome process. Aim: This study aimed to review the literature systematically regarding the system factors and their possible impacts on the process of evidence-based practice implementation. Method: An electronic search on major databases, including MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, ProQuest, Google Scholar, and CINAHL was conducted from January 2018 to March 2018. A rigorous selection process focusing on the inclusion of nurses in the study population and the system factors related to their practices resulted in the selection of 18 articles. Data were extracted from the studies and grouped into categories using a thematic analysis. Results: The factors affecting the nurses' evidence-based practice were identified at the individual, team, and organizational culture levels. The individual domain included a lack of education and clinical expertise, inadequate research skills, time constraint, and low levels of confidence and autonomy in changing practices. The factors identified at the team level associated with a lack of research orientation and peer support. At the organizational culture level, poor research culture and infrastructure were identified as important factors. Implications for Practice: The findings of the system factors would help policymakers to redefine the nursing practice. Moreover, the results raise the nurse's awareness about the importance of using evidence-based practice in decision making.

DOI 10.22038/ebcj.2019.40598.2068
Citations Scopus - 1
2019 Sivertsen N, Harrington A, Hamiduzzaman M, 'Exploring Aboriginal aged care residents' cultural and spiritual needs in South Australia', BMC HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, 19 (2019)
DOI 10.1186/s12913-019-4322-8
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2018 Hamiduzzaman M, De Bellis A, Abigail W, Kalaitzidis E, 'Social determinants of rural elderly women's healthcare access a systematic review of qualitative literature', Indian Journal of Social Work, 79 469-496 (2018)

Research to date on rural elderly women&apos;s healthcare is primarily focused on morbidity and biomedical causes of diseases. This systematic review of qualitative literature aim... [more]

Research to date on rural elderly women's healthcare is primarily focused on morbidity and biomedical causes of diseases. This systematic review of qualitative literature aims to explore the social determinants of women's healthcare access. Major databases were searched and references from retrieved articles and appropriate journals were manually checked. Data were extracted from 22 studies, and synthesised into four themes: (a) health beliefs, (b) healthcare practices, (c) adverse socioeconomic environment, and (d) cultural implications. This article identifies a need to focus specifically on women's overall health including care needs and support, socioeconomic factors and cultural issues.

DOI 10.32444/ijsw.2018.79.4.469-496
Citations Scopus - 4
2018 Hamiduzzaman M, de Bellis A, Abigail W, Kalaitzidis E, 'Elderly Women in Rural Bangladesh: Healthcare Access and Ageing Trends', South Asia Research, 38 113-129 (2018)

In Bangladesh, one of the world¿s poorest countries, a significant proportion of its most deprived citizens are elderly women living in rural areas, where healthcare access remain... [more]

In Bangladesh, one of the world¿s poorest countries, a significant proportion of its most deprived citizens are elderly women living in rural areas, where healthcare access remains difficult. This article argues that as citizens, such elderly women, too, should have a constitutional right to healthcare access. Meeting this constitutional and human rights challenge is a joint obligation for the government and healthcare professionals. Yet, socio-economic discrimination and several cultural factors at individual, societal and institutional levels are known to limit access to healthcare services for elderly rural women in Bangladesh, who represent a highly vulnerable population group in Bangladesh regarding healthcare and healthcare access. This article first examines demographic ageing trends and then highlights key issues concerning the necessity of securing better healthcare for rural elderly women (REW) in Bangladesh.

DOI 10.1177/0262728018767018
Citations Scopus - 11
2017 Hamiduzzaman M, De Bellis A, Abigail W, Kalaitzidis E, 'The social determinants of healthcare access for rural elderly women - A systematic review of quantitative studies', Open Public Health Journal, 10 244-266 (2017)

Objective: This review aimed to explore and analyze the social determinants that impact rural women¿s aged 60 years and older healthcare access in low or middle income and high in... [more]

Objective: This review aimed to explore and analyze the social determinants that impact rural women¿s aged 60 years and older healthcare access in low or middle income and high income countries. Methods: Major healthcare databases including MEDLINE and MEDLINE In-Process, PsycINFO, PubMed, ProQuest, Web of Science, CINAHL and ERIC were searched from April 2016 to August 2016 and a manual search was also conducted. A rigorous selection process focusing on the inclusion of rural elderly women in study population and the social determinants of their healthcare access resulted in 38 quantitative articles for inclusion. Data were extracted and summarized from these studies, and grouped into seven categories under upstream and downstream social determinants. Results: Prevailing healthcare systems in combination with personal beliefs and ideas about ageing and healthcare were identified as significant determinants. Socioeconomic and cultural determinants also had a statistically significant negative impact on the access to healthcare services, especially in developing countries. Conclusion: Potentially, improvements to healthcare access can be achieved through consideration of rural elderly women¿s overall status including healthcare needs, socioeconomic determinants and cultural issues rather than simply establishing healthcare centers.

DOI 10.2174/1874944501710010244
Citations Scopus - 9
Uddin N, 'HAZARDOUS CHILD LABOR & PSYCHO-PHYSICAL AND ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES: A STUDY IN SYLHET CITY, BANGLADESH', Innovative Issues and Approaches in Social Sciences, 7 18-31
DOI 10.12959/issn.1855-0541.iiass-2014-no1-art02
Uddin MN, Hamiduzzaman M, Gunter BG, 'Physical and Psychological Implications of Risky Child Labor: A Study in Sylhet City, Bangladesh', SSRN Electronic Journal,
DOI 10.2139/ssrn.1428206
Nashir Uddin M, Hamiduzzaman M, 'Public-private partnership as a responsive culture for green management in Bangladesh', Journal of Natural Resources and Development, 3 96-105
DOI 10.5027/jnrd.v3i0.08
Show 28 more journal articles

Other (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
Rahman MM, Bhattacharjee B, Farhana Z, Hamiduzzaman M, Chowdhury MAB, Hossain MS, et al., 'Prevalence and correlation of symptoms and comorbidities in COVID-19 patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory [O1]
DOI 10.1101/2020.08.19.20177980
Veltre AS, Broadbent A, Sanmugarajah J, Marshall A, Hamiduzzaman M, 'The Prevalence and Types of Advance Care Planning Use in Patients with Advanced Cancer: A Retrospective Single-Centre Perspective, Australia', Research Square Platform LLC [O1]
DOI 10.21203/rs.3.rs-372446/v1

Thesis / Dissertation (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Hamiduzzaman M, The World Is Not Mine: Factors and Issues of Rural Elderly Women s Access to Modern Healthcare Services in Bangladesh, Flinders University (2018)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $14,984

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20211 grants / $14,984

Hospitalisations and Allied Health Service Utilisation for Older Adults with Preventable Conditions in New South Wales Rural Coastal Regions$14,984

Funding body: College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, University of Newcastle

Funding body College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Dr Khoka Hamiduzzaman, A/Prof Tony Smith, Prof Leigh Kinsman, Dr Debbie Deasey

Scheme Strategic Research Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N
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Dr Khoka Hamiduzzaman

Position

Postdoctoral Research Fellow
University Newcastle Department of Rural Health
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Contact Details

Email khoka.hamiduzzaman@newcastle.edu.au
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