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Conjoint Professor Keith Jones

Conjoint Professor

School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy (Human Physiology)

Career Summary

Biography

Meiosis is the name given to the two cell divisions germ cells go through following DNA replication in order to produce haploid gametes. Our research focuses on mammalian female meiosis where we use imaging based techniques (Fluorescent Protein chimeras) to explore this process in real-time. We argue that this is an important strategy when examining a dynamic process such as the meiotic cell cycle. Meiosis is important to study because of its unique cell division; in terms of understanding a fundamental cellular developmental biology process; and also because errors in meiotic division lead to aneuploid embryos, the leading cause of early pregnancy loss in humans and the cause of Down's Syndrome. Research Highlights: The mammalian oocyte spends most of its life arrested at prophase of the first meiotic division and we found that APCcdh1 activity was necessary in order to achieve this arrest (Reis et al., Nature Cell Biology, 2006). Recently we extended these observations to show that APCcdh1 also functioned in prometaphase to prevent aneuploidy in maturing oocytes (Reis et al., Nature Cell Biology, 2007). In the first meiotic division chromosome homologues are separated, a unique cell division, and in 2006 we found that during this division separase is needed to inhibit MPF activity (Gorr et al., Nature Cell Biology, 2006. See Nature Cell Biology, News & Views). Following exit from the first meiotic division the egg re-arrests at metaphase of the second meiotic division until sperm break this arrest with a cytosolic calcium signal. Re-arrest at metaphase of the second meiotic division requires the APC inhibitor Emi2 (Madgwick et al., Journal of Cell Biology, 2006).

At fertilization the sister chromatids are separated. Another unequal cell division occurs, and the second polar body is extruded. The fertilized oocyte completes meiosis and forms a zygote. We are very much interested in how the two meiotic divisions are controlled at a molecular level. Our approach is to over-express and visualise gene products by tagging them with a toolkit of Fluorescent Proteins (Cyan; Cerulean; Yellow, Green; Venus; and Red Fluorescent Proteins) and knock them out using antisense morpholinos.

Research Expertise
Mammalian reproductive biology, especially female reproduction with emphasis on oocytes and the meiotic divisions. Cell division and early embryo development, such as the transition from meiosis to mitosis, and the embryonic divisions leading up to implantation. Mitotic cell divisions of cultured cells, and the control of M-phase. Mis-segregation of chromosomes that lead to aneuploidy. Control of the meiotic divisions of oocytes with focus on the mechanisms that control faithful chromosome segregation such as the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint.









Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Liverpool - UK
  • Bachelor of Science (Biochemistry)(Honours), University of Leeds - UK

Keywords

  • Cell Cycle
  • Cell Division
  • Chromosomes
  • Female Fertility
  • Meiosis
  • Mitosis
  • Oocytes
  • Ovarian Biology
  • Reproductive Biology

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
060199 Biochemistry and Cell Biology not elsewhere classified 35
060699 Physiology not elsewhere classified 45
111499 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine not elsewhere classified 20
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Jones KT, Lane SIR, Holt JE, 'Start and Stop Signals of Oocyte Meiotic Maturation', Oogenesis, Springer, London 183-193 (2013) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-0-85729-826-3_13
Citations Scopus - 7
Co-authors Janet Holt
2013 Holt JE, Lane SIR, Jones KT, 'The Control of Meiotic Maturation in Mammalian Oocytes', Gametogenesis, Academic Press, San diego 207-226 (2013) [B1]
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-416024-8.00007-6
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Janet Holt
2011 Jones KT, 'Anaphase-promoting complex control in female mouse meiosis', Cell Cycle in Development, Springer, Berlin 343-363 (2011) [B1]

Journal article (95 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Yun Y, Holt JE, Lane SIR, McLaughlin EA, Merriman JA, Jones KT, 'Reduced ability to recover from spindle disruption and loss of kinetochore spindle assembly checkpoint proteins in oocytes from aged mice', Cell Cycle, 13 1938-1947 (2014) [C1]

Currently, maternal aging in women, based on mouse models, is thought to raise oocyte aneuploidy rates, because chromosome cohesion deteriorates during prophase arrest, and Sgo2, ... [more]

Currently, maternal aging in women, based on mouse models, is thought to raise oocyte aneuploidy rates, because chromosome cohesion deteriorates during prophase arrest, and Sgo2, a protector of centromeric cohesion, is lost. Here we show that the most common mouse strain, C57Bl6/J, is resistant to maternal aging, showing little increase in aneuploidy or Sgo2 loss. Instead it demonstrates significant kinetochore-associated loss in the spindle assembly checkpoint protein Mad2 and phosphorylated Aurora C, which is involved in microtubule-kinetochore error correction. Their loss affects the fidelity of bivalent segregation but only when spindle organization is impaired during oocyte maturation. These findings have an impact clinically regarding the handling of human oocytes ex vivo during assisted reproductive techniques and suggest there is a genetic basis to aneuploidy susceptibility. © 2014 Landes Bioscience.

DOI 10.4161/cc.28897
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Eileen Mclaughlin, Janet Holt
2014 Lane SIR, Jones KT, 'Non-canonical function of spindle assembly checkpoint proteins after APC activation reduces aneuploidy in mouse oocytes', NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, 5 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/ncomms4444
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17
2014 Yun Y, Lane SIR, Jones KT, 'Premature dyad separation in meiosis II is the major segregation error with maternal age in mouse oocytes', DEVELOPMENT, 141 199-208 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1242/dev.100206
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 34
2014 Holt JE, Pye V, Boon E, Stewart JL, Garcia-Higuera I, Moreno S, et al., 'The APC/C activator FZR1 is essential for meiotic prophase I in mice', DEVELOPMENT, 141 1354-U327 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1242/dev.104828
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Eileen Mclaughlin, Janet Holt
2013 Merriman JA, Lane SIR, Holt JE, Jennings PC, García-Higuera I, Moreno S, et al., 'Reduced Chromosome Cohesion Measured by Interkinetochore Distance Is Associated with Aneuploidy Even in Oocytes from Young Mice1', Biology of Reproduction, 88 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1095/biolreprod.112.104786
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Janet Holt, Eileen Mclaughlin
2013 Lord T, Nixon B, Jones KT, Aitken RJ, 'Melatonin Prevents Postovulatory Oocyte Aging in the Mouse and Extends the Window for Optimal Fertilization In Vitro', Biology of Reproduction, 88 1-9 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1095/biolreprod.112.106450
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 35
Co-authors John Aitken, Brett Nixon
2013 Holt JE, Lane SIR, Jones KT, 'Time-lapse epifluorescence imaging of expressed cRNA to cyclin B1 for studying meiosis i in mouse oocytes', Methods in Molecular Biology, 957 91-106 (2013) [C2]

The first meiotic division of mammalian oocytes physiologically occurs in the ovary in the hours preceding ovulation. Fortunately, oocytes removed from their follicular environmen... [more]

The first meiotic division of mammalian oocytes physiologically occurs in the ovary in the hours preceding ovulation. Fortunately, oocytes removed from their follicular environment will readily undergo this process in culture. Their large size, optical transparency, and efficiency in translating exogenous cRNA make mouse oocytes very amenable to study this process in detail using fluorescence imaging-based techniques. Here we describe the process of microinjecting cRNA to proteins of interest that have been coupled to a fluorescent protein using cyclin B1 as an example. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

DOI 10.1007/978-1-62703-191-2-6
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Janet Holt
2013 Jamsai D, O'Connor AE, DeBoer KD, Clark BJ, Smith SJ, Browne CM, et al., 'Loss of GGN Leads to Pre-Implantation Embryonic Lethality and Compromised Male Meiotic DNA Double Strand Break Repair in the Mouse', PLOS ONE, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0056955
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2012 Merriman-Jones JA, Jennings PC, McLaughlin EA, Jones KT, 'Effect of aging on superovulation efficiency, aneuploidy rates, and sister chromatid cohesion in mice aged up to 15 months', Biology of Reproduction, 86 1-6 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 38
Co-authors Eileen Mclaughlin
2012 Jones KT, Lane SI, 'Chromosomal, metabolic, environmental, and hormonal origins of aneuploidy in mammalian oocytes', Experimental Cell Research, 318 1394-1399 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 27
2012 Lane SI, Yun Y, Jones KT, 'Timing of anaphase-promoting complex activation in mouse oocytes is predicted by microtubule-kinetochore attachment but not by bivalent alignment or tension', Development (Cambridge), 139 1947-1955 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 66Web of Science - 66
2012 Yuen WS, Merriman-Jones JA, O'Bryan MK, Jones KT, 'DNA double strand breaks but not interstrand crosslinks prevent progress through meiosis in fully grown mouse oocytes', PLOS One, 7 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0043875
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 19
2012 Liu W, Yin J, Zhao G, Yun Y, Wu S, Jones KT, Lei A, 'Differential regulation of cyclin B1 degradation between the first and second meiotic divisions of bovine oocytes', Theriogenology, 78 1171.e1-1181.e1 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2012 Jones KT, Robertson SA, Aitken RJ, 'Reactive oxygen species and sperm function-in sickness and in health', Journal of Andrology, 33 1096-1106 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 99Web of Science - 85
Co-authors John Aitken
2012 Jones KT, 'Meiosis: Mouse eggs do their anaphase topsy-turvy', Current Biology, 22 R153-R155 (2012) [C3]
2012 Holt JE, Lane SI, Jennings PC, Garcia-Higuera I, Moreno S, Jones KT, 'APC FZR1 prevents nondisjunction in mouse oocytes by controlling meiotic spindle assembly timing', Molecular Biology of the Cell, 23 3970-3981 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1091/mbc.E12-05-0352
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Janet Holt
2012 Seah KYM, Holt JE, Garcia-Higuera I, Moreno S, Jones KT, 'The APC activator fizzy-related-1 (FZR1) is needed for preimplantation mouse embryo development', Journal of Cell Science, 125 6030-6037 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Janet Holt
2011 Lane SI, Jones KT, 'Phosphorylation of histone H3 in 1- and 2-cell embryos', Cell Cycle, 10 17-18 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.4161/cc.10.1.14221
2011 Chang H-Y, Jennings PC, Stewart JL, Verrills NM, Jones KT, 'Essential role of protein phosphatase 2A in metaphase II arrest and activation of mouse eggs shown by okadaic acid, dominant negative protein phosphatase 2A, and FTY720', Journal of Biological Chemistry, 286 14705-14712 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1074/jbc.M110.193227
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Nikki Verrills
2011 Jamsai D, Sarraj MA, Merriner DJ, Drummond AE, Jones KT, McLachlan RI, O'Bryan MK, 'GGN1 in the testis and ovary and its variance within the Australian fertile and infertile male population', International Journal of Andrology, 34 624-632 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
2011 Jennings PC, Merriman-Jones JA, Beckett EL, Hansbro PM, Jones KT, 'Increased zona pellucida thickness and meiotic spindle disruption in oocytes from cigarette smoking mice', Human Reproduction, 26 878-884 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/humrep/deq393
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Emma Beckett, Philip Hansbro
2011 Holt JE, Tran SM-T, Stewart JL, Minahan KL, Garcia-Higuera I, Moreno S, Jones KT, 'The APC/C activator FZR1 coordinates the timing of meiotic resumption during prophase I arrest in mammalian oocytes', Development, 138 905-913 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1242/dev.059022
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Janet Holt
2010 Jones KT, Holt JE, 'BubR1 highlights essential function of Cdh1 in mammalian oocytes', Cell Cycle, 9 1029-1030 (2010) [C3]
Co-authors Janet Holt
2010 Holt JE, Stewart JL, Jones KT, 'Spatial regulation of APC(Cdh1)-induced cyclin B1 degradation maintains G2 arrest in mouse oocytes', Development, 137 1297-1304 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1242/dev.047555
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Janet Holt
2010 Jones KT, 'Cohesin and Cdk1: An anaphase barricade', Nature Cell Biology, 12 106-108 (2010) [C3]
DOI 10.1038/ncb0210-106
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2010 Lane SI, Chang H-Y, Jennings PC, Jones KT, 'The Aurora kinase inhibitor ZM447439 accelerates first meiosis in mouse oocytes by overriding the spindle assembly checkpoint', Reproduction, 140 521-530 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1530/REP-10-0223
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 38
2009 Benskin CMWH, Wilson K, Jones K, Hartley IR, 'Bacterial pathogens in wild birds: A review of the frequency and effects of infection', Biological Reviews, 84 349-373 (2009)

The importance of wild birds as potential vectors of disease has received recent renewed empirical interest, especially regarding human health. Understanding the spread of bacteri... [more]

The importance of wild birds as potential vectors of disease has received recent renewed empirical interest, especially regarding human health. Understanding the spread of bacterial pathogens in wild birds may serve as a useful model for examining the spread of other disease organisms, both amongst birds, and from birds to other taxa. Information regarding the normal gastrointestinal bacterial flora is limited for the majority of wild bird species, with the few well-studied examples concentrating on bacteria that are zoonotic and/or relate to avian species of commercial interest. However, most studies are limited by small sample sizes, the frequent absence of longitudinal data, and the constraints of using selective techniques to isolate specific pathogens. The pathogenic genera found in the gut are often those suspected to exist in the birds' habitat, and although correlations are made between bacterial pathogens in the avian gut and those found in their foraging grounds, little is known about the effect of the pathogen on the host, unless the causative organism is lethal. In this review, we provide an overview of the main bacterial pathogens isolated from birds (with particular emphasis on enteropathogenic bacteria) which have the potential to cause disease in both birds and humans, whilst drawing attention to the limitations of traditional detection methods and possible study biases. We consider factors likely to affect the susceptibility of birds to bacterial pathogens, including environmental exposure and heterogeneities within the host population, and present probable avenues of disease transmission amongst birds and from birds to other animal taxa. Our primary aim is to identify gaps in current knowledge and to propose areas for future study. © 2009 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

DOI 10.1111/j.1469-185X.2008.00076.x
Citations Scopus - 69
2009 Chang H-Y, Minahan KL, Merriman-Jones JA, Jones KT, 'Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase gamma 3 (CamKII[gamma]3) mediates the cell cycle resumption of metaphase II eggs in mouse', Development, 136 4077-4081 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1242/dev.042143
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 29
2009 Holt JE, Jones KT, 'Control of homologous chromosome division in the mammalian oocyte', Molecular Human Reproduction, 15 139-147 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/molehr/gap007
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 34
Co-authors Janet Holt
2008 Heaton JC, Jones K, 'Microbial contamination of fruit and vegetables and the behaviour of enteropathogens in the phyllosphere: A review', Journal of Applied Microbiology, 104 613-626 (2008)

Consumption of fruit and vegetable products is commonly viewed as a potential risk factor for infection with enteropathogens such as Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157, with rec... [more]

Consumption of fruit and vegetable products is commonly viewed as a potential risk factor for infection with enteropathogens such as Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157, with recent outbreaks linked to lettuce, spinach and tomatoes. Routes of contamination are varied and include application of organic wastes to agricultural land as fertilizer, contamination of waters used for irrigation with faecal material, direct contamination by livestock, wild animals and birds and postharvest issues such as worker hygiene. The ability of pathogens to survive in the field environment has been well studied, leading to the implementation of guidelines such as the Safe Sludge Matrix, which aim to limit the likelihood of viable pathogens remaining at point-of-sale. The behaviour of enteropathogens in the phyllosphere is a growing field of research, and it is suggested that inclusion in phyllosphere biofilms or internalization within the plant augments the survival. Improved knowledge of plant-microbe interactions and the interaction between epiphytic and immigrant micro-organisms on the leaf surface will lead to novel methods to limit enteropathogen survival in the phyllosphere. © 2007 The Authors.

DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2672.2007.03587.x
Citations Scopus - 224
2008 Jones KT, 'Meiosis in oocytes: predisposition to aneuploidy and its increased incidence with age', Human Reproduction Update, 14 143-158 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/humupd/dmm043
Citations Scopus - 126Web of Science - 115
2008 Nabti I, Reis A, Levasseur M, Stemmann O, Jones KT, 'Securin and not CDK1/cyclin B1 regulates sister chromatid disjunction during meiosis II in mouse eggs', Developmental Biology, 321 379-386 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ydbio.2008.06.036
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 23
2007 Madgwick S, Jones KT, 'How eggs arrest at metaphase II: MPF stabilisation plus APC/C inhibition equals Cytostatic Factor', Cell Division, 2 1-7 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1747-1028-2-4
2007 Reis A, Madgwick S, Chang H-Y, Nabti I, Levasseur M, Jones KT, 'Prometaphase APCcdh1 activity prevents non-disjunction in mammalian oocytes', Nature Cell Biology, 9 1192-1198 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/ncb1640
2007 Jones KT, Swann K, 'Composition of sea urchin egg homogenate determines its potency to inositol trisphosphate and cyclic ADPRibose-induced Ca2+ release', Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 360 815-820 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.06.134
2007 Levasseur M, Carroll M, Jones KT, McDougall A, 'A novel mechanism controls the Ca2+ oscillations triggered by activation of ascidian eggs and has an absolute requirement for Cdk1 activity', Journal of Cell Science, 120 1763-1771 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1242/jcs.003012
2007 Gardner AJ, Knott JG, Jones KT, Evans JP, 'CaMKII can participate in but is not sufficient for the establishment of the membrane block to polyspermy in mouse eggs', Journal of Cellular Physiology, 212 275-280 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/jcp.21046
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 19
2007 Jones KT, 'Intracellular calcium in the fertilization and development of mammalian eggs', Journal of Cellular Physiology, 34 1084-1089 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1681.2007.04726.x
2006 Madgwick S, Hansen DV, Levasseur M, Jackson PK, Jones KT, 'Mouse Emi2 Is Required to Enter Meiosis II by Reestablishing Cyclin B1 During Interkinesis', The Journal of Cell Biology, 174 791-801 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1083/jcb.200604140
2006 Gorr IH, Reis A, Boos D, Wühr M, Madgwick S, Jones KT, Stemmann O, 'Essential CDK1-inhibitory role for separase during meiosis I in vertebrate oocytes', Nature Cell Biology, 8 1035-1037 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/ncb1467
2006 Reis A, Chang H-Y, Levasseur M, Jones KT, 'APCcdh1 activity in mouse oocytes prevents entry into the first meiotic division', Nature Cell Biology, 8 539-540 (2006) [C1]
2006 Reis A, Levasseur M, Chang H-Y, Elliot DJ, Jones KT, 'The CRY box: A second APCcdh1-dependent degron in mammalian cdc20', EMBO Reports, 7 1040-1045 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/sj.embor.7400772
2006 Knott JG, Gardner AJ, Madgwick S, Jones KT, Williams CJ, Schultz RM, 'Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II triggers mouse egg activation and embryo development in the absence of Ca2+ oscillations', Developmental Biology, 296 388-395 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ydbio.2006.06.004
Citations Scopus - 49Web of Science - 46
2005 Madgwick S, Levasseur M, Jones KT, 'Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and not protein kinase C, is sufficient for triggering cell-cycle resumption in mammalian eggs', Journal of Cell Science, 118 3849-3859 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1242/jcs.02506
2005 Coward K, Ponting CP, Chang H-Y, Hibbitt O, Savolainen P, Jones KT, Parrington J, 'Phospholipase C{zeta}, the trigger of egg activation in mammals, is present in a non-mammalian species', Reproduction, 130 157-163 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1530/rep.1.00707
2005 Jones KT, 'Mammalian egg activation: from Ca2+ spiking to cell cycle progression', Reproduction, 130 813-823 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1530/rep.1.00710
2005 Obiri-Danso K, Weobong CAA, Jones K, 'Aspects of health-related microbiology of the Subin, an urban river in Kumasi, Ghana', Journal of Water and Health, 3 69-76 (2005)

The aim of this study was to assess the influence of urban waste, sewage and other human centred activities on the microbiological quality of the river Subin, which flows through ... [more]

The aim of this study was to assess the influence of urban waste, sewage and other human centred activities on the microbiological quality of the river Subin, which flows through the metropolis of Kumasi, Ghana, and serves as drinking water for communities downstream. Three sites, Racecourse, Asafo and Asago, on the Subin were monitored over a year for total coliforms, faecal coliforms, enterococci and biochemical oxygen demand. Bacterial indicator numbers (geometric mean 100 ml -1 ) varied from 1.61 × 10 9 to 4.06 × 10 13 for total coliforms, 9.75 × 10 8 to 8.98 × 10 12 for faecal coliforms and 1.01 × 10 2 to 6.57 × 10 6 for enterococci. There was a consistent increase in bacterial loading as the river flows from the source (Racecourse) through Kumasi. Bacterial numbers were significantly ( p # 0.05) higher during the rainy season compared with the dry (harmattan) season. The biochemical oxygen demand ranged from 8 mgl -1 at the source of the river to 419 mgl -1 at Asago; none of the sites achieved internationally accepted standards for water quality. The River Subin becomes grossly polluted as it flows through Kumasi and at Asago, a rural community downstream of Kumasi that abstracts water from the river for drinking, this probably contributes to the observed high levels of diarrhoeal disease. © IWA Publishing 2005.

Citations Scopus - 20
2004 Hyslop LA, Nixon VL, Levasseur M, Chapman F, Chiba K, McDougall A, et al., 'Ca2+-promoted cyclin B1 degradation in mouse oocytes requires the establishment of a metaphase arrest', Developmental Biology, 269 206-219 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ydbio.2004.01.030
2004 Madgwick S, Nixon VL, Chang H-Y, Herbert M, Levassuer M, Jones KT, 'Maintenance of sister chromatid attachment in mouse eggs through maturation-promoting factor activity', Developmental Biology, 275 68-81 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ydbio.2004.07.024
2004 Chang H-Y, Levasseur M, Jones KT, 'Degradation of APCcdc20 and APCcdh1 substrates during the second meiotic division in mouse eggs', Journal of Cell Science, 117 6289-6296 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1242/jcs.01567
2004 Venables JP, Dalgliesh C, Paronetto MP, Skitt L, Thornton JK, Saunders PT, et al., 'SIAH1 targets the alternative splicing factor T-STAR for degradation by the proteasome', Human Molecular Genetics, 13 1525-1534 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/hmg/ddh165
2004 Jones KT, 'Turning it on and off: M-phase promoting factor during meiotic maturation and fertilization', Molecular Human Reproduction, 10 1-5 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/molehr/gah009
2004 Boucard TK, Parry J, Jones K, Semple KT, 'Effects of organophosphate and synthetic pyrethroid sheep dip formulations on protozoan survival and bacterial survival and growth', FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 47 121-127 (2004)

Sheep dipping with organophosphate or synthetic pyrethroid-based formulations is still widely used by farmers in the UK to control ectoparasites and results in 175-220 million lit... [more]

Sheep dipping with organophosphate or synthetic pyrethroid-based formulations is still widely used by farmers in the UK to control ectoparasites and results in 175-220 million litres of spent sheep dip produced each year. Spent sheep dip may be diluted in animal slurry or water prior to disposal onto land. However, the effects of this practice on the microbial ecology of animal slurries, soil and aquatic systems are still relatively unknown. This paper investigated the effect of Bayticol (synthetic pyrethroid sheep dip) and Ectomort (organophosphate sheep dip) concentrations on (i) the survival of 15 protozoan species, (ii) the recovery of the four species of amoebae, and (iii) bacterial survival and growth. This investigation found that overall Bayticol was less toxic to protozoa than Ectomort, with minimum inhibitory concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 0.03% (v/v) and 0.005 to 0.06% (v/v), respectively. Amoebic cysts remained viable and emerged from dormancy, thereby pointing to the potential for recovery of protozoan communities in contaminated environments. The presence of sheep dips did not affect bacterial survival and growth on agar; however, the five test bacteria were not able to utilise the sheep dips as sole carbon sources. These findings have implications for the contamination of animal slurries, soil and aquatic systems, in that there is the potential for significant increases in microbial numbers, containing putative pathogens due to the diminution of bacteriophagous protozoan populations. © 2003 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/S0168-6496(03)00253-8
Citations Scopus - 15
2003 Carroll M, Levasseur M, Whitaker M, Jones KT, McDougall A, 'Exploring the mechanism of action of the sperm-triggered calcium-wave pacemaker in ascidian zygotes', Journal of Cell Science, 116 4997-5004 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1242/jcs.00846
2003 Strachan NJC, Ogden ID, Smith-Palmer A, Jones K, 'Foot and mouth epidemic reduces cases of human cryptosporidiosis in Scotland', Journal of Infectious Diseases, 188 783-786 (2003)

In Scotland, rates of cryptosporidiosis infection in humans peak during the spring, a peak that is coincident with the peak in rates of infection in farm animals (during lambing a... [more]

In Scotland, rates of cryptosporidiosis infection in humans peak during the spring, a peak that is coincident with the peak in rates of infection in farm animals (during lambing and calving time). Here we show that, during the outbreak of foot and mouth disease (FMD) in 2001, there was a significant reduction in human cases of cryptosporidiosis infection in southern Scotland, where FMD was present, whereas, in the rest of Scotland, there was a reduction in cases that was not significant. We associate the reduction in human cases of cryptosporidiosis infection with the reduction in the number of young farm animals, together with restrictions on movement of both farm animals and humans, during the outbreak of FMD in 2001. We further show that, during 2002, there was recovery in the rate of cryptosporidiosis infection in humans throughout Scotland, particularly in the FMD-infected area, but that rates of infection remained lower, though not significantly, than pre-2001 levels.

DOI 10.1086/377237
Citations Scopus - 7
2003 Colles FM, Jones K, Harding RM, Maiden MCJ, 'Genetic Diversity of Campylobacter jejuni Isolates from Farm Animals and the Farm Environment', Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 69 7409-7413 (2003)

The genetic diversity of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from farm animals and their environment was investigated by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A total of 30 genotypes, defi... [more]

The genetic diversity of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from farm animals and their environment was investigated by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A total of 30 genotypes, defined by allelic profiles (assigned to sequence types [STs]), were found in 112 C. jejuni isolates originating in poultry, cattle, sheep, starlings, and slurry. All but two of these genotypes belonged to one of nine C. jejuni clonal complexes previously identified in isolates from human disease and retail food samples and one clonal complex previously associated with an environmental source. There was some evidence for the association of certain clonal complexes with particular farm animals: isolates belonging to the ST-45 complex predominated among poultry isolates but were absent among sheep isolates, while isolates belonging to the ST-61 and ST-42 complexes were predominant among sheep isolates but were absent from the poultry isolates. In contrast, ST-21 complex isolates were distributed among the different isolation sources. Comparison with MLST data from 91 human disease isolates showed small but significant genetic differentiation between the farm and human isolates; however, representatives of six clonal complexes were found in both samples. These data demonstrate that MLST and the clonal complex model can be used to identify and compare the genotypes of C. jejuni isolates from farm animals and the environment with those from retail food and human disease.

DOI 10.1128/AEM.69.12.7409-7413.2003
Citations Scopus - 109
2003 Obiri-Danso K, Okore-Hanson A, Jones K, 'The microbiological quality of drinking water sold on the streets in Kumasi, Ghana', Letters in Applied Microbiology, 37 334-339 (2003)

Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the microbiological quality of Ghanaian bottled and plastic-bagged drinking water sold on the streets of Metropolitan Kumasi, Ghana. Metho... [more]

Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the microbiological quality of Ghanaian bottled and plastic-bagged drinking water sold on the streets of Metropolitan Kumasi, Ghana. Methods and Results: Eight bottled, 88 factory-filled plastic sachet and 40 hand-filled hand-tied polythene-bagged drinking waters were examined for the presence of heterotrophic bacteria total viable counts (TVCs), indicators of faecal contamination (total coliforms, faecal coliforms and enterococci) and for lead, manganese and iron. Heterotrophic bacteria were found in all three types of water with TVCs per millilitre ranging from 1 to 460 for bottled water, 2-6.33 x 10 5 for factory-bagged sachet water and 2.33 x 10 3 -7.33 x 10 12 for hand-filled hand-tied bagged water. None of the microbial indicators of faecal contamination were detected in bottled water, whereas 4.5% of the factory-bagged sachets contained total coliforms and 2.3% faecal coliforms, and 42.5% of the hand-filled hand-tied bags contained total coliforms, 22.5% faecal coliforms and 5% enterococci. Iron was found in all three types of drinking water but at concentrations well within the WHO recommendations. Lead and manganese were not detected. Conclusion: Ghanaian bottled water is of good microbiological quality but some factory-bagged sachet and hand-filled hand-tied polythene-bagged drinking water are of doubtful quality. Significance and Impact of the Study: Factory-bagged sachets and hand-filled hand-tied bags of drinking water sold in Ghana should be monitored for microbiological contamination, with the aim of raising standards in the industry and re-assuring the public.

DOI 10.1046/j.1472-765X.2003.01403.x
Citations Scopus - 42
2003 Soeller C, Jacobs MD, Donaldson PJ, Cannell MB, Jones KT, Ellis-Davies GCR, 'Application of two-photon flash photolysis to reveal intercellular communication and intracellular Ca2+ movements.', Journal of Biomedical Optics, 8 418-427 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1117/1.1582468
2001 Fitzgerald C, Stanley K, Andrew S, Jones K, 'Use of Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and Flagellin Gene Typing in Identifying Clonal Groups of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in Farm and Clinical Environments', Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 67 1429-1436 (2001)

Although campylobacters have been isolated from a wide range of animal hosts, the association between campylobacters isolated from humans and animals in the farm environment is un... [more]

Although campylobacters have been isolated from a wide range of animal hosts, the association between campylobacters isolated from humans and animals in the farm environment is unclear. We used flagellin gene typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to investigate the genetic diversity among isolates from animals (cattle, sheep, and turkey) in farm environments and sporadic cases of campylobacteriosis in the same geographical area. Forty-eight combined fla types were seen among the 315 Campylobacter isolates studied. Six were found in isolates from all four hosts and represented 50% of the total number of isolates. Seventy-one different SmaI PFGE macrorestriction profiles (mrps) were observed, with 86% of isolates assigned to one of 29 different mrps. Fifty-seven isolates from diverse hosts, times, and sources had an identical SmaI mrp and combined fla type. Conversely, a number of genotypes were unique to a particular host. We provide molecular evidence which suggests a link between campylobacters in the farm environment with those causing disease in the community.

DOI 10.1128/AEM.67.4.1429-1436.2001
Citations Scopus - 84
2001 Jones K, 'Campylobacters in water, sewage and the environment.', Symposium series (Society for Applied Microbiology), (2001)
Citations Scopus - 87
2000 Obiri-Danso K, Jones K, 'Intertidal sediments as reservoirs for hippurate negative campylobacters, salmonellae and faecal indicators in three EU recognised bathing waters in North West England', Water Research, 34 519-527 (2000)

Intertidal sediment samples from three EU recognised bathing waters in Morecambe Bay, Lancashire, U.K. (Morecambe North, Morecambe South and Heysham) were analysed for thermophili... [more]

Intertidal sediment samples from three EU recognised bathing waters in Morecambe Bay, Lancashire, U.K. (Morecambe North, Morecambe South and Heysham) were analysed for thermophilic campylobacters, salmonellae, faecal coliforms and faecal streptococci over a 12-month period. Campylobacters show a strong seasonality. They are generally absent in the summer months but are consistently present in the winter. The main Campylobacter species isolated were C. lari and urease-positive thermophilic campylobacters (UPTC), both of which are associated with avian hosts. C. jejuni and C. coli and Salmonella were not isolated from the sediments. Faecal coliforms and faecal streptococci were isolated throughout the year with no obvious seasonal trends in their numbers. Higher numbers were found at Morecambe North and South than at Heysham. There was no discernible relationship between the numbers of campylobacters and faecal indicators. Faecal indicators were found predominantly in the surface layers of the sediments and declined in number with depth. Campylobacters were restricted to the surface layer. Experimental results for the in situ deposition of bacteria onto clean, sterile surfaces from the water column during tidal cover showed deposition rates equivalent to approximately 0.1% of the total population of faecal coliforms, 0.01% of the faecal streptococci and 1% of the campylobacters in the sediments. These rates of accretion were not high enough to be detected during routine sampling carried out before and after high water, using standard methods. The results show that the sediments act as a reservoir for bacteria, especially the faecal indicators. In rough weather resuspension can contribute significantly to bacterial numbers in the surface waters. © 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/S0043-1354(99)00146-3
Citations Scopus - 84
2000 Piddock LJV, Ricci V, Stanley K, Jones K, 'Activity of antibiotics used in human medicine for Campylobacter jejuni isolated from farm animals and their environment in Lancashire, UK', Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, 46 303-306 (2000)

A retrospective study of 96 Campylobacter jejuni isolated from farm animals and the environment showed that most were less susceptible than the NCTC type strain to nalidixic acid ... [more]

A retrospective study of 96 Campylobacter jejuni isolated from farm animals and the environment showed that most were less susceptible than the NCTC type strain to nalidixic acid (MICs 4-32 mg/L), ciprofloxacin (MICs 1-2 mg/L) and erythromycin (MICs 16-64 mg/L), but had similar susceptibility to tetracycline (MICs 4-8 mg/L) and kanamycin (MICs 4-8 mg/L). None had the high MICs of ciprofloxacin ( > 32 mg/L) or erythromycin (1024 mg/L) typically associated with clinical resistance in this species. Some farms used antimicrobial agents, but there was no obvious association between the use of agents and the susceptibility of the isolates.

Citations Scopus - 38
2000 Semple KT, Hughes P, Langdon CJ, Jones K, 'Impact of synthetic pyrethroid-sheep dip on the indigenous microflora of animal slurries', FEMS Microbiology Letters, 190 255-260 (2000)

The chemical constituents of sheep dip in the UK are currently changing from organophosphate-based to synthetic pyrethroid-based insecticides. As a result, changes are also being ... [more]

The chemical constituents of sheep dip in the UK are currently changing from organophosphate-based to synthetic pyrethroid-based insecticides. As a result, changes are also being made to the methods of disposal of these chemicals in the environment, such that pyrethroid sheep dips must now be diluted in animal slurry or water. To date, there is a lack of quantitative information on the impact of the insecticide on the indigenous microflora of animal slurries. This paper investigated the impact of Bayticol (synthetic pyrethroid sheep dip) over a range of concentrations on selected populations of bacteria within animal slurry. It was found that, with increasing pesticide concentration, there was up to a four orders of magnitude increase in the numbers of faecal coliforms and pathogens, such as putative Salmonella spp. These findings have implications for the disposal of sheep dip-amended animal slurries to land from several aspects: (i) the longevity of putative pathogens in the field may require re-evaluation of the time required before the return of grazing livestock to a slurry-amended field; (ii) the potential for the transfer of pathogenic bacteria and faecal coliforms into human and animal foodchains, and (iii) the increased potential for faecal coliforms being washed into streams, rivers and coastal bathing waters. (C) 2000 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

DOI 10.1016/S0378-1097(00)00344-X
Citations Scopus - 9
1999 Obiri-Danso K, Jones K, 'The effect of a new sewage treatment plant on faecal indicator numbers, campylobacters and bathing water compliance in Morecambe Bay', Journal of Applied Microbiology, 86 603-614 (1999)

Until recently, sewage from Morecambe was macerated, but otherwise untreated, and discharged at high water via a short outfall pipe into Morecambe Bay adjacent to a recognized bat... [more]

Until recently, sewage from Morecambe was macerated, but otherwise untreated, and discharged at high water via a short outfall pipe into Morecambe Bay adjacent to a recognized bathing water. In March 1997, a new biological sewage treatment plant came on-line and the effluent was discharged via a longer outfall pipe into the Bay south of Heysham. The effect of the new sewage treatment on the quality of the bathing waters was monitored by testing sea water collected from the three EU designated bathing waters on Morecambe Bay: Morecambe North, Morecambe South and Heysham. After sewage treatment came on-line, the numbers of faecal coliforms and faecal streptococci were lower at Morecambe North and Morecambe South but higher at Heysham. Although the changes in numbers were not always statistically significant, they were sufficient to affect compliance with the EU Bathing Water Directive Imperative (mandatory) standards. Compliance improved markedly at Morecambe North and South but declined at Heysham, the closest bathing site to the new outfall. Numbers of thermophilic campylobacters were similar in both years, which is suggestive of their sources being different from those of the indicator bacteria. Campylobacter lari and urease-positive thermophilic campylobacters (UPTC) were the only species of Campylobacter isolated from Morecambe's bathing waters. Very low numbers of Salmonella were found, with Salm. arizonae the only species isolated.

DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2672.1999.00703.x
Citations Scopus - 40
1999 Jones K, Howard S, Wallace JS, 'Intermittent shedding of thermophilic campylobacters by sheep at pasture', Journal of Applied Microbiology, 86 531-536 (1999)

The rates at which sheep on different types of pasture shed campylobacters in their faeces were measured over 12 months. Overall, shedding of campylobacters at pasture was between... [more]

The rates at which sheep on different types of pasture shed campylobacters in their faeces were measured over 12 months. Overall, shedding of campylobacters at pasture was between a third and a half of the carriage rate (92%) of the intestines of sheep at slaughter. Shedding was highest during saltmarsh grazing, followed by upland fell and farm grazing. The rate of shedding varied at different times of the year, with the highest rates (100%) coinciding with lambing, weaning, and movement onto new pasture. The lowest rates (0%) occurred when sheep were fed on hay and silage. On the farm, low rates occurred during the whole of gestation, both when the sheep were indoors and outdoors. Campylobacter jejuni was the main species isolated and survived for up to 4 d in sheep faeces. Lambs became colonized by Campylobacter within 1-5d of being born. Ewes, which were not shedding campylobacters prior to lambing, started to shed after lambing, and ewes which were shedding low numbers of Campylobacter before lambing, increased the numbers of bacteria being shed after lambing.

DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2672.1999.00702.x
Citations Scopus - 52
1999 Obiri-Danso K, Jones K, 'Distribution and seasonality of microbial indicators and thermophilic campylobacters in two freshwater bathing sites on the River Lune in northwest England', Journal of Applied Microbiology, 87 822-832 (1999)

Two freshwater bathing sites, the Crook O'Lune and the University Boathouse, on the River Lune in the north-west of England, were monitored over a 2 year period for the faeca... [more]

Two freshwater bathing sites, the Crook O'Lune and the University Boathouse, on the River Lune in the north-west of England, were monitored over a 2 year period for the faecal indicators, faecal coliforms and faecal streptococci, the pathogens, Salmonella and Campylobacter, and compliance with the EU Directive on Bathing Water Quality. Faecal indicator numbers showed no seasonal variation, with numbers in the bathing season similar to those in the non-bathing season. They were consistently above the EU Guideline and Imperative standards so that if the EU Bathing Water Quality Directive (76/160/EEC) were applied, neither site would comply. Faecal indicator numbers in the sediments were an order of magnitude higher than in the overlying water. Campylobacter numbers showed seasonal variation in the water with higher counts in winter than in the summer, although numbers were low. Higher numbers were found in the sediments but there was no seasonal variation. Analysis of various inputs showed that indicators and campylobacters came from a mixture of sources, namely a sewage treatment works, agricultural run-off, streams and mallards. Microbial numbers in the water at the Crook O'Lune, which is closer to the sources of pollution, were twice those at the Boathouse. In the sediments they were six to eight times higher. Faecal coliforms were all identified as Escherichia coli of which 80% were a single biotype. Faecal streptococci were all enterococci of which 55% were E. avium, 38% E. faecalis and 7% E. durans. Salmonella was not isolated from either the water column or the sediments. Campylobacters were mainly Camp. jejuni, followed by Camp. coli, UPTC and Camp. lari.

DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2672.1999.00924.x
Citations Scopus - 91
1999 Kwasi OD, Jones K, Paul N, 'The effect of the time of sampling on the compliance of bathing water in NW England with the EU Directive on bathing water quality', Journal of Coastal Conservation, 5 51-58 (1999)

The ability of Morecambe's three designated bathing waters to pass the EU Directive on Bathing Water Quality depends on the time of day when the sample is taken, the indicato... [more]

The ability of Morecambe's three designated bathing waters to pass the EU Directive on Bathing Water Quality depends on the time of day when the sample is taken, the indicator organism tested for and whether the test uses the most strict (Guideline) or the least strict (Imperative) criteria. Morning and afternoon sampling for faecal coliforms, faecal streptococci and the pathogen Campylobacter was carried out monthly over the 1996 and 1997 bathing seasons. In the afternoons average faecal coliforms declined by 77 % in 1996 and 87 % in 1997 compared with the mornings, faecal streptococci by 79 % and 83 % and campylobacters by 66 % and 86 %. This decline in bacterial numbers between morning and afternoon was related to variations in water temperature and levels of ultraviolet radiation. All three bathing waters failed the Guideline criteria of the EU Directive on Bathing Water Quality. Using the Imperative criteria, no bathing waters passed in the mornings of either year, some passed in the afternoons of 1996 and all passed in the afternoons of 1997. The increased pass rate in 1997 coincided with improved sewage treatment, high temperatures and increased levels of sunshine. In 1997 sampling by the Environment Agency produced fewer failures than our morning sampling but more than our afternoon sampling. Their sampling was done around midday. It is suggested that where possible all sampling of EU designated bathing waters should be carried out in the early morning.

Citations Scopus - 13
1999 Harrison LM, Morris JA, Telford DR, Brown SM, Jones K, 'Sleeping position in infants over 6 months of age: Implications for theories of sudden infant death syndrome', FEMS Immunology and Medical Microbiology, 25 29-35 (1999)

The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of prone and supine sleeping in infants aged 0-12 months and relate this to changes in the number of cases of sudden infant d... [more]

The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of prone and supine sleeping in infants aged 0-12 months and relate this to changes in the number of cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) since 1985. Seventy-two babies, 38 male and 34 female, were followed for the first 18 months of life with regular home visits and sleeping position was recorded. In addition, data on the number of cases of SIDS in England and Wales between 1985 and 1995 were analysed. All babies slept supine for the first 5 months of life, but once they could turn over in their cots (mean age 7.34 months, range 5-11 months) the majority slept prone. By 11 months of age, 53 regularly slept prone (73%, 95% CI ±19.8%), while 11 slept supine, three adopted the side position and five varied from night to night. The number of cases of SIDS in infants aged 7-11 months has fallen significantly (P < 0.0001) in a period in which the prevalence of prone sleeping, in that age group, has not changed. The most plausible explanation for this paradoxical result is that supine sleeping in the first 5 months of life reduces the absolute risk of SIDS in the second 6 months of life even though most babies are then sleeping prone. It is suggested that reduced exposure to nasopharyngeal bacterial superantigens in babies sleeping prone might explain this effect. Copyright (C) 1999 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

DOI 10.1016/S0928-8244(99)00069-3
Citations Scopus - 19
1999 Harrison LM, Morris JA, Telford DR, Brown SM, Jones K, 'The nasopharyngeal bacterial flora in infancy: Effects of age, gender, season, viral upper respiratory tract infection and sleeping position', FEMS Immunology and Medical Microbiology, 25 19-28 (1999)

The aim of the investigation was to determine the effect of age, gender, viral upper respiratory tract infection (URTI), season and sleeping position on the composition of the nas... [more]

The aim of the investigation was to determine the effect of age, gender, viral upper respiratory tract infection (URTI), season and sleeping position on the composition of the nasopharyngeal bacterial flora in infancy. Seventy-two babies, 38 male and 34 female, whose birthdates were evenly spread throughout the year were followed from birth to 18 months of age. From 0 to 6 months nasopharyngeal swabs were obtained once a month in periods without URTI and daily for 3 days during episodes of URTI. From 12 to 18 months of age nasopharyngeal swabs were obtained in the early morning after an overnight sleep and later in the day after the baby had been up for over 2 h. Swabs were obtained in prone and supine sleepers with and without infection. In infants aged 0-6 months URTI had little effect on the nasopharyngeal bacterial flora, but there was a marked effect of age and less marked effect of season and gender. In particular Staphylococcus aureus carriage decreased with age, was most common in the winter months and the density of colonisation was greater in males than females. In infants aged 12-18 months the combination of prone sleeping with URTI and an early morning swab led to increased carriage of staphylococci, streptococci, Haemophilus influenzae and Gram-negative bacilli which are not normally part of the nasopharyngeal flora. These results are relevant to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The combination of prone sleeping and URTI reproduces the nasopharyngeal flora seen in SIDS. Gram-negative bacilli isolated from SIDS cases should not be dismissed as post-mortem contaminants. The features of S. aureus make it a prime candidate for a pathogenic role in SIDS. Copyright (C) 1999 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

DOI 10.1016/S0928-8244(99)00068-1
Citations Scopus - 94
1998 Stanley KN, Wallace JS, Jones K, 'Note: Thermophilic campylobacters in dairy slurries on Lancashire farms: Seasonal effects of storage and land application', Journal of Applied Microbiology, 85 405-409 (1998)

Slurry storage tanks on Lancashire farms were sampled in May, June; October and November. There was a seasonal pattern in the number of thermophilic campylobacters. The average lo... [more]

Slurry storage tanks on Lancashire farms were sampled in May, June; October and November. There was a seasonal pattern in the number of thermophilic campylobacters. The average log 10 MPN per gram fresh weight (log 10 MPN gfw -1 ) in stored samples in May and June was 0.78 (S.D. 0.71) compared to 2.07 (S.D. 0.70) in November and December. Campylobacters were readily detected in samples of mature slurry and composted bedding that farmers were about to put to land. The survival of campylobacters in slurry sprayed on land was studied in two seasons. In June, on farm A, stored slurry was mechanically aerated for 48h and very low numbers of campylobacters (0.9 log 10 MPN gfw -1 ) remained in the slurry before it was sprayed onto land. They became undetectable within 24 h once sprayed on land. In contrast, campylobacters in matured but unaerated slurry that was sprayed onto land on farm B in February were still detectable in samples taken 5 d after application to land, dropping from 2.11 log 10 MPN gfw -1 -1.37, a decline of only 0.74 log 10 MPN gfw -1 in the first 5 d after application.

DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2672.1998.00523.x
Citations Scopus - 23
1996 Wallace US, Jones K, 'The use of selective and differential agars in the isolation of Escherichia coli O157 from dairy herds', Journal of Applied Bacteriology, 81 663-668 (1996)

The use of selective and differential agars for the isolation of Escherichia coli O157 from the faeces of dairy herds was investigated. Out of the 614 isolates which were positive... [more]

The use of selective and differential agars for the isolation of Escherichia coli O157 from the faeces of dairy herds was investigated. Out of the 614 isolates which were positive for one or more of the selective criteria employed in the media only four proved to be E. coli O157. Ninety-nine per cent of the isolates were false positives. The procedure which resulted in the isolation of E. coli O157 from faecal samples was enrichment in modified Tryptone Soya Broth supplemented with novobiocin and subsequent growth on Chromagar® O157.

Citations Scopus - 20
1992 Jones K, 'Diurnal nitrogen fixation in tropical marine cyanobacteria: A comparison between adjacent communities of non-heterocystous lyngbya sp. and heterocystous calothrix sp.', British Phycological Journal, 27 107-118 (1992)

Nitrogenase activity (ARA) in adjacent marine tropical communities of a non-heterocystous Lyngbya sp. and a heterocystous Calothrix sp. was investigated in the light and the dark.... [more]

Nitrogenase activity (ARA) in adjacent marine tropical communities of a non-heterocystous Lyngbya sp. and a heterocystous Calothrix sp. was investigated in the light and the dark. For both cyanobacteria, in situ ARA increased throughout the day except for afternoon reductions during cloud cover. ARA rates varied on different days but Calothrix sp. was always more active during daylight hours than Lyngbya sp. Both cyanobacteria showed only very low rates of ARA when incubated in the dark in situ during normal daylight hours. Nocturnal ARA, at 82% the daylight rate in Lyngbya sp., and 18% the daylight rate in Calothrix sp., was three times higher in Lyngbya sp. than in Calothrix sp. In both, nocturnal ARA rose from a low rate after dusk to a peak around midnight and declined towards dawn. In each organism ARA in the light was higher than in the dark regardless of the time of day. The addition of DCMU, an inhibitor of photosystem II, generally inhibited nitrogenase activity in the heterocystous Calothrix sp. and stimulated it in the non-heterocystous Lyngbya sp., but there were differences dependent on the time of the day when DCMU was added. In short-term nitrogenase assays the temperature optimum for Lyngbya sp. was 35°C compared with 25°C for Calothrix sp. and the salinity optimum was 35%o for both. Calothrix sp., but not Lyngbya sp., rapidly revived after desiccation in the hot sun. © 1992 The British Phycological Society.

DOI 10.1080/00071619200650121
Citations Scopus - 22
1992 Betaieb M, Jones K, 'Nitrogen-fixing heterotrophic bacteria and presumptive coliforms in sewage treatment plants and irrigation reservoirs in Libya', Letters in Applied Microbiology, 15 32-33 (1992)

Monitoring of heterotrophic nitrogen-fixing bacteria and presumptive coliforms in two Libyan sewage treatment plants showed that tertiary treatment of effluents by chlorination ki... [more]

Monitoring of heterotrophic nitrogen-fixing bacteria and presumptive coliforms in two Libyan sewage treatment plants showed that tertiary treatment of effluents by chlorination killed these bacteria. However, the irrigation reservoirs which received the treated effluent contained large numbers of both types of bacteria. As the proportion of nitrogen-fixers to presumptive coliforms was much less in the sewage than in the irrigation reservoirs it is probable that the irrigation water became contaminated by a source other than sewage. Copyright © 1992, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved

DOI 10.1111/j.1472-765X.1992.tb00717.x
Citations Scopus - 1
1990 Jones K, 'Aerobic nitrogen fixation by lyngbya sp a marine tropical cyanobacterium', British Phycological Journal, 25 287-289 (1990)

Lyngbya majuscula, a frond-forming, non-heterocystous cyanobacterium found in the sublittoral zone off Oahu, Hawaii, is capable of high rates of aerobic nitrogen fixation in the l... [more]

Lyngbya majuscula, a frond-forming, non-heterocystous cyanobacterium found in the sublittoral zone off Oahu, Hawaii, is capable of high rates of aerobic nitrogen fixation in the light but incapable of nitrogen fixation in the dark. L. majuscula differs therefore from heterocystous Calothrix spp., which are found in the same habitat and are capable of N2 fixation in the dark. © 1990 The British Phycological Society.

DOI 10.1080/00071619000650291
Citations Scopus - 18
1990 Jones K, Betaieb M, Telford DR, 'Seasonal variation of thermophilic campylobacters in sewage sludge', Journal of Applied Bacteriology, 69 185-189 (1990)
Citations Scopus - 31
1990 Jones K, Betaieb M, Telford DR, 'Thermophilic campylobacters in surface waters around Lancaster, UK: Negative correlation with campylobacter infections in the community', Journal of Applied Bacteriology, 69 758-764 (1990)
Citations Scopus - 38
1990 Jones K, Betaieb M, Telford DR, 'Correlation between environmental monitoring of thermophilic campylobacters in sewage effluent and the incidence of Campylobacter infection in the community', Journal of Applied Bacteriology, 69 235-240 (1990)

Environmental monitoring of thermophilic campylobacters in liquid sewage effluent (primary settlement only) during 1988 and 1989 showed a prominent seasonablity with distinct peak... [more]

Environmental monitoring of thermophilic campylobacters in liquid sewage effluent (primary settlement only) during 1988 and 1989 showed a prominent seasonablity with distinct peaks in May and June (the average number of bacteria per 100 ml of effluent in months other than May and June was 2244 and the average for the peak months was 50 778). Apart from September 1989, this seasonality coincided precisely with the seasonal variation of Campylobacter enteritis in the community with similar distinct peaks in May and June (the incidence of infection in May and June was twice or three times that in the other months). Sampling of sewers showed that the campylobacters in the sewage effluent came mainly from abbatoir and animal processing plants with only a minor input from the community. Therefore, the seasonal peaks in the sewage effluent and in the community may not be dependent on human infections but on zoonotic infections which may also peak in May and June. Copyright © 1990, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved

DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2672.1990.tb01514.x
Citations Scopus - 41
1990 Betaieb M, Jones K, 'Thermophilic campylobacters in two sewage treatment plants in Libya', Letters in Applied Microbiology, 11 93-95 (1990)

Monitoring of thermophilic campylobacters in two Libyan seawage treatment plants has shown that the communities of Tripoli and Sabratha almost certainly harbour campylobacters cap... [more]

Monitoring of thermophilic campylobacters in two Libyan seawage treatment plants has shown that the communities of Tripoli and Sabratha almost certainly harbour campylobacters capable of producing enteritis. The plant in Tripoli eradicated the campylobacters from effuent by secondary treatment with trikling filtration followed by chlorination. The plant ant Sabratha, which was not working well at the time of sampling, reduced campylobacter numbers by only 53% and 74% during secondary teatment in a stabilization pond, and a reservoir in Sabratha, which received effluent from the stabilization pond and which supplies water for irrigation, also contained thermophilic campylobacters. In both treatment plants campylobacters were eradicated from sewage sludge by digestion and drying. Copyright © 1990, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved

DOI 10.1111/j.1472-765X.1990.tb01284.x
Citations Scopus - 9
1989 JONES K, 'Interactions between desiccation and dark nitrogen fixation in tropical Nostoc commune', New Phytologist, 113 1-6 (1989)

Colonies of Nostoc commune in tropical Oahu have normally become desiccated and inactive in nitrogen fixation by between noon and 2 p.m. On rehydration, the desiccated colonies fi... [more]

Colonies of Nostoc commune in tropical Oahu have normally become desiccated and inactive in nitrogen fixation by between noon and 2 p.m. On rehydration, the desiccated colonies fix nitrogen at the same rate in the dark and the light for at least 2 h. When rewetted in the dark, desiccated colonies fix nitrogen at more than twice the rate of non-desiccated colonies taken from the light and placed in the dark. The capacity of desiccated colonies to fix nitrogen in the dark when rehydrated is lost during storage for several months, but is rapidly regained after a short period of moist incubation in the light. This ability to fix nitrogen on rewetting in the dark is well suited to a tropical climate where rainfall is mainly at night and when metabolic activity during the day is restricted by the rapid onset of desiccation. Copyright © 1989, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved

DOI 10.1111/j.1469-8137.1989.tb02388.x
Citations Scopus - 10
1988 Dutka BJ, Jones K, Kwan KK, Bailey H, McInnis R, 'Use of microbial and toxicant screening tests for priority site selection of degraded areas in water bodies', Water Research, 22 503-510 (1988)

In this study, a new approach has been taken to evaluate Saint John River water and sediment conditions. A battery of biochemical, microbiological and bioassay tests were used to ... [more]

In this study, a new approach has been taken to evaluate Saint John River water and sediment conditions. A battery of biochemical, microbiological and bioassay tests were used to identify degraded or degrading sediments and waters. Data were obtained from waters and sediments at 38 sites within the Saint John River Basin. The data suggested that the following four sites had the highest priority concern: Little River No. 34, Grand Bay, Saint John River near Boars Head No. 33, Madawaska River below mill No. 7 and St Francois-de-Madawaska, mill stream No. 2. The data also indicated that microbial population, biochemical or bioassay tests performed independently do not provide realistic evaluations of priority concern areas and that the "battery of tests" approach is necessary to provide additional information. © 1988.

DOI 10.1016/0043-1354(88)90047-4
Citations Scopus - 30
1988 Jones K, Betaieb M, 'Nitrogen-fixing heterotrophic bacteria in coastal waters: A comparison of the contribution made by sewage effluent in a temperate and a tropical environment', Water Science and Technology, 20 323-328 (1988)

Using identical techniques a comparison has been made between the distribution and survival of heterotrophic nitrogen-fixing bacteria from sewage in cold seawater of Morecambe Bay... [more]

Using identical techniques a comparison has been made between the distribution and survival of heterotrophic nitrogen-fixing bacteria from sewage in cold seawater of Morecambe Bay, UK, and warm seawater of Oahu, Hawaii, USA. In the colder seawater the predominant nitrogen-fixing bacteria are salinity-tolerant strains of Enterobacteriaceae (mainly klebsiellas) which come from sewage effluent discharged into the rivers and estuaries flowing into the bay. In the inshore warmer waters of Oahu, similar numbers of heterotrophic nitrogen-fixing bacteria are found but, although most are salinity tolerant, they are not predominantly Enterobacteriaceae. Sewage effluent from Honolulu discharged into the sea is rapidly dispersed and the bacteria quickly killed by UV light which penetrates into the clear water. In Morecambe Bay, bacteria are found much further out to sea and they survive for much longer periods because sunshine levels are relatively low and light penetration is inhibited by high turbidity from suspended solids. Salinity tolerance does not appear to have a high survival value for the nitrogen-fixing klebsiellas.

Citations Scopus - 2
1987 Wolfenden J, Jones K, 'Seasonal variation of in situ nitrogen fixation (C2H2 reduction) in an expanding marsh of Spartina anglica.', Journal of Ecology, 75 1011-1021 (1987)

The seasonal trend to sedimentary acetylene reduction showed low levels during winter and higher rates in the warmer months with a midsummer peak. This activity was mainly due to ... [more]

The seasonal trend to sedimentary acetylene reduction showed low levels during winter and higher rates in the warmer months with a midsummer peak. This activity was mainly due to bacteria in the surface layer of the sediments. Acetylene reduction within the S. anglica sward was generally greater than in uncolonized sediments and was due largely to bacteria associated with the plant roots. This activity was less temperature-sensitive than that of uncolonized sediments and reached a maximum in late September. Total annual N fixation estimated for the young, developing area of this marsh was insufficient to supply > 2-3% of the plants' N requirements. Fixation in the established zones was up to 100 times higher and could contribute significantly to plant growth. It is likely, therefore, that N fixation is not a contributory factor in the rapid spread of S. anglica.-from Authors

Citations Scopus - 7
1987 Dutka BJ, Jones K, Bailey H, 'Enumeration of Klebsiella spp. in cold water by using MacConkey-inositol-potassium tellurite medium.', Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 53 1716-1717 (1987)

MacConkey-inositol-potassium tellurite agar was field tested for its ability to selectively enumerate Klebsiella species from the waters of the Saint John River Basin, which inclu... [more]

MacConkey-inositol-potassium tellurite agar was field tested for its ability to selectively enumerate Klebsiella species from the waters of the Saint John River Basin, which include fresh and marine waters. Water temperature varied from 1 to 6 degrees C during the survey period. Results of the study indicated that 77% of the typical colonies on MacConkey-inositol-potassium tellurite medium were Klebsiella species, but the total Klebsiella population enumerated was greatly underestimated.

Citations Scopus - 3
1987 Dutka BJ, Jones K, Xu H, Kwan KK, McInnis R, 'PRIORITY SITE SELECTION FOR DEGRADED AREAS IN THE AQUATIC ENVIRONMENT.', Water pollution research journal of Canada, 22 326-339 (1987)

The suitability of a variety of biochemical, microbiological and bioassay tests to become part of a battery of test procedures to identify degraded or degrading sediments and wate... [more]

The suitability of a variety of biochemical, microbiological and bioassay tests to become part of a battery of test procedures to identify degraded or degrading sediments and waterbodies are evaluated in this report. Data were obtained from 40 river (Detroit and Niagara) and inshore Lake Erie sampling sites. These data indicate that the top six areas of highest concern were: (1) mouth of the Rouge R. , (2) mouth of Little R. , (3) mouth of Two Mile Creek at Tonawanda, N. Y. , (4) offshore Port Burwell, (5) mouth of Turkey Creek, and (6) Detroit R. offshore of the Grosse Ile WTP.

Citations Scopus - 17
1987 Laybourn-Parry J, Jones K, Holdich JP, 'Grazing by Mayorella sp. ( Protozoa: Sarcodina) on cyanobacteria.', Functional Ecology, 1 99-104 (1987)

The feeding selectivity and reproductive rates of a Mayorella sp., an amoeba isolated from a salt marsh in Morecambe Bay, Lancashire, and fed on the cyanobacteria Anabaena cylindr... [more]

The feeding selectivity and reproductive rates of a Mayorella sp., an amoeba isolated from a salt marsh in Morecambe Bay, Lancashire, and fed on the cyanobacteria Anabaena cylindrica, Anabaena sp., Nostoc sp. and Calothrix sp. and the green alga Chlorella, were investigated at 26oC. Different rates of plaque extension and, in the case of cyanobacteria, reduced N-fixation (acetylene reduction), occurred with different food species. Calothrix was not observed inside food vacuoles; its morphology prevented it from being ingested. Amoeba reproductive rates varied in relation to diet, with generation times ranging between 41.6 h and 100 h, but rates of reproduction did not relate to the rates of plaque extension or acetylene reduction on any given diet, suggesting varying degrees of digestive efficiency on different algal and blue-green diets.-from Authors

Citations Scopus - 18
1985 Jones K, Bangs D, 'Nitrogen fixation by free-living heterotrophic bacteria in an oak forest: The effect of liming', Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 17 705-709 (1985)

Nitrogen-fixing heterotrophic bacteria, mainly Clostridium butyricum and, less frequently, Enterobacter agglomerons and Klebsiella pneumoniae, are found throughout the aerial and ... [more]

Nitrogen-fixing heterotrophic bacteria, mainly Clostridium butyricum and, less frequently, Enterobacter agglomerons and Klebsiella pneumoniae, are found throughout the aerial and soil layers of an oak forest. However they are only active in nitrogen fixation in the soil. Soil slurry experiments show that the main factors limiting N 2 fixation in the forest are low temperature, low pH and shortage of C sources. Raising the pH of the soil with lime to pH 6, which is the optimum for N 2 fixation by C. butyricum in soil slurries, more than doubles the rate of N 2 fixation (as measured by in situ 15 N 2 methods) from 7.84 to 16.1 kg N ha -1 yr -1 . The N fixed by C. butyricum can rapidly be taken up by oak seedlings and translocated to the actively-growing leaves. © 1985.

DOI 10.1016/0038-0717(85)90049-5
Citations Scopus - 15
1982 Jones K, 'Salinity-tolerant nitrogen-fixing Enterobacteriaceae in the Lune estuary', Zentralblatt fur Bakteriologie.Allgemeine Angewandte und Okologische Microbiologie Abt.1 Orig.C Hyg., 3 513-518 (1982)
Citations Scopus - 2
1982 Jones K, 'Nitrogen fixation in the temperate estuarine intertidal sediments of the River Lune', Limnology and Oceanography, 27 455-460 (1982)

This article is in Free Access Publication and may be downloaded using the ¿Download Full Text PDF¿ link at right. © 1982, by the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and ... [more]

This article is in Free Access Publication and may be downloaded using the ¿Download Full Text PDF¿ link at right. © 1982, by the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

DOI 10.4319/lo.1982.27.3.0455
Citations Scopus - 25
1982 Jones K, 'Nitrogen fixation in the canopy of temperate forest trees: A re-examination', Annals of Botany, 50 329-334 (1982)

15 N 2 studies and acetylene reduction assays of leaves and shoots of Douglas fir and other forest trees do not confirm previous reports that extensive nitrogen fixation occurs o... [more]

15 N 2 studies and acetylene reduction assays of leaves and shoots of Douglas fir and other forest trees do not confirm previous reports that extensive nitrogen fixation occurs on leaf surfaces and it is concluded that the importance of nitrogen fixation in the canopy of forest trees has been exaggerated. The presence of nitrogen-fixing bacteria on the leaves of trees is confirmed, however, and they have been identified as Enterobacter agglomerans, Clostridium butyricum and Bacillus sp. Their distribution on leaves is fortuitous since dead oak leaves and artificial leaves become colonized to the same extent as living oak leaves. © 1982 Annals of Botany Company.

Citations Scopus - 8
1978 Jones K, 'Transfer of ethylene from natural gas during aseptic technique: A possible source of error in acetylene reduction experiments', Journal of General Microbiology, 107 385-386 (1978)
Citations Scopus - 1
1974 Jones K, Thomas JG, 'Nitrogen fixation by the rumen contents of sheep', Journal of General Microbiology, 85 97-101 (1974)
Citations Scopus - 10
1974 Jones K, King E, Eastlick M, 'Nitrogen fixation by free-living bacteria in the soil and in the canopy of Douglas fir', Annals of Botany, 38 765-772 (1974)

Nitrogen fixing bacteria have been isolated from the soil and the leaves of Douglas fir. Measurements, taken at monthly intervals using 15 N, have shown that small quantities of ... [more]

Nitrogen fixing bacteria have been isolated from the soil and the leaves of Douglas fir. Measurements, taken at monthly intervals using 15 N, have shown that small quantities of nitrogen are fixed on the leaves and in the various soil layers and that the highest rates of fixation occur in the spring. Further studies with 15 N have shown that the products of nitrogen fixation in Douglas fir soils are available for growth of seedlings and for denitrification. © 1974 Oxford University Press.

Citations Scopus - 12
1970 Jones K, 'Nitrogen fixation in the phyllosphere of the douglas fir, Pseudotsuga douglasii', Annals of Botany, 34 239-244 (1970)

Nitrogen-fixing bacteria have been isolated from the leaf surfaces of the Douglas Fir. 15 N tracer studies have shown that these bacteria fix nitrogen in culture and in the field... [more]

Nitrogen-fixing bacteria have been isolated from the leaf surfaces of the Douglas Fir. 15 N tracer studies have shown that these bacteria fix nitrogen in culture and in the field on the trees. A considerable proportion of the annual requirement for nitrogen by Douglas Fir may be provided by nitrogen-fixing bacteria on the leaves and in the soil. © 1970 OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS.

Citations Scopus - 31
1969 Jones K, Stewart WDP, 'Nitrogen turnover in marine and brackish habitats IV. Uptake of the extracellular products of the nitrogen-fixing alga Calothrix scopulorum', Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 49 701-716 (1969)
DOI 10.1017/S0025315400037231
Citations Scopus - 21
1969 Jones K, Stewart WDP, 'Nitrogen turnover in marine and brackish habitats III. The production of extracellular nitrogen by Calothrix scopulorum', Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 49 475-488 (1969)
DOI 10.1017/S0025315400036043
Citations Scopus - 42
Show 92 more journal articles

Conference (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Chang H-Y, Jennings PC, Jones KT, 'The use of okadaic acid and FTY720 to examine the role of PP2A in the metaphase II arrest of mouse eggs', The American Society for Cell Biology 50th Annual Meeting Abstracts (2010) [E3]
2010 Jones KT, 'CDH1: A cell cycle protein involved in female meiosis and prevention of aneuploidy', Reproduction, Fertility and Development (2010) [E3]
DOI 10.1071/SRB10Abs032
2010 Hopkins LA, Pye VJ, Fraser BA, Holt JE, Jones KT, McLaughlin EA, 'The Role of Fizzy Related 1 in Male Meiosis', Reproduction, Fertility and Development (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Eileen Mclaughlin, Janet Holt
2010 Jennings PC, Jones KT, 'Investigating the Role of Cyclin A2 During Oocyte Meiosis', Reproduction, Fertility and Development (2010) [E3]
2009 Jones KT, Weaver J, Holt JE, 'The mechanism by which fizzy-related (Fzr1) controls pro-phase 1 arrest in mouse oocytes', Biology of Reproduction (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Janet Holt
2007 Jones K, Boxall C, McCabe RW, Shaw D, Buck M, 'Nanocomposites for water treatment - Maghemite as a photocatalyst', ECS Transactions (2007)

The treatment of waste water involves, amongst other processes, the removal of heavy metal ion pollutants and/or organic contaminants. As one component of a potential aluminosilic... [more]

The treatment of waste water involves, amongst other processes, the removal of heavy metal ion pollutants and/or organic contaminants. As one component of a potential aluminosilicate nanocomposite for water treatment, we have demonstrated the effectiveness of using Maghemite (¿-Fe 2 O 3 ) as a photocatalyst for the reduction of the aqueous pollutant chromium(VI) to chromium(III) in the presence of a sacrificial organic reductant. Maghemite has the twin advantages of being a photocatalyst that exhibits strong absorbance in the visible region of the spectrum and of being magnetic, so facilitating post processing solid/liquid separation. During this study, a simple, robust, calibrationless potentiometric technique for monitoring the concentration of chromium(VI) was developed. This method allowed the photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) to be observed in real-time with no sample pre-treatment. ©The Electrochemical Society.

DOI 10.1149/1.2790398
Citations Scopus - 3
2003 Jones K, 'Pathogens in the environment and changing ecosystems', Journal of Applied Microbiology Symposium Supplement (2003)
1999 Jones K, Obiri-Danso K, 'Non-compliance of beaches with the EU directives of bathing water quality: Evidence of non-point sources of pollution in Morecambe Bay', Journal of Applied Microbiology Symposium Supplement (1999)

Morecambe&apos;s three EU designated bathing beaches frequently fail the EU directives, even after a state of the art sewage treatment plant has become operational. We have been u... [more]

Morecambe's three EU designated bathing beaches frequently fail the EU directives, even after a state of the art sewage treatment plant has become operational. We have been using conventional microbiology to look at the seasonality and distribution of indicator and pathogenic bacteria in Morcambe Bay and using molecular methods (polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE)) to investigate the pathways by which pathogens reach the bathing waters. We will present data for Morecambe Bay which show that: 1. Failures and passes appear to be associated with the prevailing climatic conditions. 2. Indicator bacteria may not always be derived from sewage effluents. 3. Not all pathogens are distributed in the same way as indicator bacteria. 4. Pathogens such as Campylobacter are as likely to come from birds as from sewage.

Citations Scopus - 33
Show 5 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 29
Total funding $5,152,500

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20123 grants / $652,134

Pregnancy and Reproduction MRSP 2011-12 $369,134

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Laureate Professor Roger Smith, Laureate Professor John Aitken, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones
Scheme NSW MRSP Infrastructure Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1101192
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Project EVA: an environmentally responsible facility for interdisciplinary supercomputing applications$263,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Pablo Moscato, Laureate Professor Jon Borwein, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Professor Mark Parsons, Professor Michael Ostwald, Professor Hugh Craig, Conjoint Professor Peter Greer, Associate Professor Stephan Chalup, Professor Regina Berretta
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100627
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Regulation of the cell cycle by phosphorylation dependent targeting of CaMKII$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Nikki Verrills, Doctor Kathryn Skelding, Emeritus Professor John Rostas, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200679
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20117 grants / $1,004,178

Gamete-specific knockout of Fizzy-Related to examine its meiotic role in oocytes and sperm$644,178

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Eileen McLaughlin, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Professor Sergio Moreno
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1000020
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

An Advanced Mass Spectrometer for Applications in Phospho-Proteomics, Glycomics and Top-Down Sequencing of Proteins$250,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Mark Baker, Laureate Professor John Aitken, Laureate Professor Roger Smith, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Emeritus Professor Ray Rose, Professor Lois Salamonsen
Scheme Linkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000632
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

SCIREQ FlexiVentFX system + FlexiVentFX extension$45,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Phil Hansbro, Laureate Professor Paul Foster, Professor Joerg Mattes, Associate Professor Simon Keely, Doctor Jay Horvat, Doctor Nicole Hansbro, Doctor Ming Yang, Doctor Catherine Ptaschinski, Doctor Kelly Asquith, Doctor Gough Au, Conjoint Professor Peter Wark, Laureate Professor John Aitken, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Laureate Professor Roger Smith, Professor Judith Black, Professor Rakesh Kumar, Professor Paul Hertzog
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100037
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Factors affecting the quality of mammalian eggs when females age.$25,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Conjoint Professor Keith Jones
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1001042
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Eppendorf mastercycler pro with thermomixer comfort and 5430R centrifuge$15,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Eileen McLaughlin, Professor Peter Lewis, Professor Adam McCluskey, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Professor Brett Nixon, Doctor Shaun Roman, Doctor Jennette Sakoff, Associate Professor Ian Grainge, Doctor Janet Bristow, Doctor Xiao Yang
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100028
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

An Advanced Mass Spectrometer for Applications in Phospho-Proteomics, Glycomics and Top-Down Sequencing of Proteins$15,000

Funding body: Prince Henry's Institute of Medical Research

Funding body Prince Henry's Institute of Medical Research
Project Team Associate Professor Mark Baker, Laureate Professor John Aitken, Laureate Professor Roger Smith, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Emeritus Professor Ray Rose, Professor Lois Salamonsen
Scheme Linkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF) Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100844
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

IMPLEN NanoPhotometer pearl$10,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Murray Cairns, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Professor Alan Brichta, Emeritus Professor John Rostas, Emeritus Professor Patricia Michie, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Professor Ulli Schall, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Associate Professor Rohan Walker, Doctor Rick Thorne, Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Doctor Nikki Verrills, Doctor Janet Bristow, Doctor Severine Roselli, Doctor Kathryn Skelding, Doctor Jude Weidenhofer, Associate Professor Liz Milward, Doctor Charles De Bock, Doctor Julie Merriman-Jones, Doctor Jing Qin Wu, Doctor Bing Liu, Dr DAN Johnstone, Ms Belinda Goldie, Doctor Natalie Beveridge
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100030
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20106 grants / $1,040,356

HMRI MRSP Infrastructure Grant (10-11) - PREGNANCY & REPRODUCTION$362,277

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Laureate Professor Roger Smith, Laureate Professor John Aitken, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones
Scheme NSW MRSP Infrastructure Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1100474
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Laser microdissection microscopy system for cell and development biology$350,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Eileen McLaughlin, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Laureate Professor John Aitken, Professor Brett Nixon, Doctor Shaun Roman, Professor Alan Brichta, Doctor Rick Thorne, Associate Professor Doug Smith, Associate Professor David McCurdy, Emeritus Professor Ray Rose, Professor Christopher Grof, Emeritus Professor Leonie Ashman, Professor Gordon Burns, Associate Professor Brett Graham, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Laureate Professor Roger Smith, Laureate Professor Paul Foster, Professor Trevor Day, Professor Robert Callister
Scheme Linkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0190369
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

ABI 7500 Real Time PCR System $34,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Rick Thorne, Doctor Nikki Verrills, Professor Murray Cairns, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Associate Professor Doug Smith, Professor Gordon Burns, Emeritus Professor Leonie Ashman, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Doctor Charles De Bock, Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Associate Professor Brett Graham, Doctor Martin Horan, Doctor Rebecca Lim, Doctor Severine Roselli, Doctor Larisa Bobrovskaya, Doctor Kathryn Skelding, Associate Professor Rohan Walker, Doctor Jude Weidenhofer, Professor Philip Bolton, Professor Alan Brichta, Professor Robert Callister, Professor Trevor Day, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Professor Manohar Garg, Doctor Phil Jobling, Professor Derek Laver, Associate Professor Eugene Nalivaiko, Emeritus Professor John Rostas
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000055
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Electron Multiplier Charge-Coupled Device Camera. Hamamatsu EM-CCD Camera C9100-13$29,079

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Professor Eileen McLaughlin, Professor Dirk Van Helden, Doctor Rick Thorne
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000052
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20099 grants / $2,045,437

The role of the Anaphase-Promoting Complex activator Cdh1 in mammalian oocytes and aneuploidy$506,250

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Professor Eileen McLaughlin
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G0188850
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Elucidation of the signalling pathways during fertilization in mammals$325,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Dr Olaf Stemmann
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G0188824
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

HMRI MRSP Infrastructure Grant (09-10) Pregnancy and Reproduction$296,789

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Laureate Professor Roger Smith, Laureate Professor John Aitken, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones
Scheme NSW MRSP Infrastructure Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G1000642
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy for Live Cell Imaging$275,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Professor Eileen McLaughlin, Laureate Professor John Aitken, Emeritus Professor Ray Rose, Emeritus Professor John Patrick, Conjoint Professor Christina Offler, Associate Professor David McCurdy, Emeritus Professor Leonie Ashman, Professor Gordon Burns, Professor Dirk Van Helden, Doctor Nikki Verrills, Professor Brett Nixon, Doctor Shaun Roman, Professor Yong-Ling Ruan, Doctor Rick Thorne, Professor Mike Calford
Scheme Linkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189038
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

Aging eggs: understanding the molecular mechanisms of declining female fertility$79,489

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Professor Eileen McLaughlin
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0189795
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Leica VT1200S - Fully automated vibrating blade microtome$16,209

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Robert Callister, Professor Alan Brichta, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Professor Jon Hirst, Associate Professor Brett Graham, Professor Philip Bolton, Doctor Phil Jobling, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Doctor Angela McPherson, Doctor Rebecca Lim, Doctor Ramatis De Oliveira, Mr Matthew Walsh
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189842
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

GRC Fertilization and Egg Activation, Plymouth USA, 12-17 July 2009$1,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Conjoint Professor Keith Jones
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190133
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20084 grants / $410,395

The function of gametogenenin in male fertility and embryo genesis$230,500

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Dr M O'Bryan
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0188417
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Olympus Fluoview FV1000-IX81 Microscope$141,970

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Professor Keith Jones
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188673
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Colibri high-performance LED illumination system for fluorescence live cell microscopy$23,225

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Rick Thorne, Dr Charles De Bock, Professor Xu Dong Zhang, Doctor Lisa Lincz, Professor Gordon Burns, Conjoint Professor Peter Hersey, Professor Dirk Van Helden, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Laureate Professor Roger Smith
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188545
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Programmed mammalian oocyte activation: the production line model of primordial follicle development$14,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Eileen McLaughlin, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones
Scheme Pilot Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189084
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed5
Current0

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Susceptibility of Mammalian Oocytes to Chromosome Segregation Errors with Maternal Aging PhD (Human Physiology), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Role of Fzr1 in Embryogenesis PhD (Human Physiology), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD DNA Repair and the Fanconi Anemia Pathway: Insights into Female Meiosis and Mitosis PhD (Human Physiology), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2012 PhD Control of Chromosome Segregation in Mouse Oocytes PhD (Human Physiology), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2012 Masters Characterisation of an Oocyte Specific Knockout Model of Cdh1 M Philosophy (Human Physiolog), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
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Conjoint Professor Keith Jones

Position

Conjoint Professor
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Human Physiology

Contact Details

Email keith.jones@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 6682
Fax (02) 4921 7903

Office

Room MS612
Building Medical Sciences
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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