Dr Karen Blackmore

Dr Karen Blackmore

Senior Lecturer

School of Electrical Engineering and Computing (Information Technology)

A serious attitude toward gaming

Dr Karen Blackmore is driven by problem-solving. From the application of Virtual Reality for industry, to girls participation in STEM Karen is always looking toward an innovative solution to society’s issues.

An early career as a special scientist has led Karen to some diverse and challenging fields, and Karen’s now moved from making maps to assisting industry navigate the maze of virtual reality to deal with the challenges of training for real-world problems.

Serious Gaming

Gaming’s transitioned from being purely for fun, to taking a more serious stance, so it’s unsurprising that Karen’s moved into this space from a teaching and a research perspective. “As a spatial analyist I make 3D environments for a living, so the transition into this space was a fairly natural one. I teach game design and production and while students are very interested in those spaces, the job prospects are limited, so I feel the need to provide guidance in spaces where there’s a range of job prospects,” Karen says.

Serious gaming is an area of opportunity with a range of businesses taking it on as a form of training. “Serious games falls into my simulation and training area and I’m particularly interested in that space because they use a lot of common technologies where job opportunities are interesting and offer huge scope for growth.”

On the defence

One of the key areas utilising simulation and virtual reality for training is defence, and Karen’s forged key partnerships in the area. “I was contacted by the Director of the Defence Simulation Centre to do training for staff which has spawned a key collaboration at Williamtown where they do all the training for our UN Peacekeeping forces both locally and globally,” Karen says.

“People are flying in from all over the world to receive training in the Hunter before being deployed,” Karen adds. “They’re faced with a lot of problems moving into those landscapes so defence is using simulation-based training as one of their tools in preparing their people.”

UON has now signed an MOU where Honours students in the IT program can collaborate with students from the Defence College on projects. “This is a real growth area,” says Karen. “We’ve already had successful students go through and complete projects and now more local industry groups have approached us to collaborate with students and research projects. There’s a definite skill shortage in the defence-space in particular where the workforce is limited as they are not permitted to bring in people from overseas for national security reasons.”

Virtual reality

Karen’s interest in virtual reality goes back her special analysis days, where the idea of using 3D models and virtual reality to view them first began. “The technology has now advanced so far, and it’s now readily available and has matured enough to be deployable in a range of different scenarios,” Karen says. “The biggest changes that industry partners face is answering the question ‘How can we best make use of this technology?’”

Karen and her team are looking to help industry develop training scenarios that will allow a trainee to participate and then develop a set of skills that are transferable to real-world scenarios. Using a broach range or VR devices such as the head-mounted Oculus Rift and the HTC Vive, to the newly acquired iDome – which is a large format immersive display, the team are exploring which form of technology is best deployed in which situation.

“We can now start to go back and look at the impact of these technologies on training tasks: on the cognitive load that an individual will be under when performing a training task, the impact of those training tasks in that specific tasks in those environments and help industry partners optimise their training in a simulated, immersive environment which sees their trainee move into a real world scenario with transferable skills.”

I3 lab

Universities are increasingly moving toward collaborations with industry – taking the knowledge and research formed in academia and implementing in society through collaborations with industry. As such, Karen and her colleagues Dr Keith Nesbitt and Dr Shamus Smith set up i3 Lab.

The focus of i3 Lab is industry-linked research: finding new solutions to complex problems caused by interactions between humans, computers and data. “Recognising the need for academics to engage better with industry we sat down and thought about the best ways to successfully collaborate and connect with industry,” Karen says. “It’s our ability to deliver services that’s of interest to industry – not an academic publication record, so we needed to set up a commercial front when representing the university when dealing with industry.”

The i3 Lab has successfully been appointed to a Simulation Support Panel by a Government tender, so it’s now on the Preferred Supplier List for any Government Department. “This was a major coup,” Karen says. “We now provide services around evaluating simulation environments.”

While many people recoil at the very thought of a problem Karen takes a completely different approach to the issue: “What drives my interest in STEM? Problem-based issues. What drives my research? Interesting problems. What do I prioritise in my work? Problems. And not having a full solution set to a problem because of limited participation by women is a problem.”

Karen’s experience with gender stereotyping was highlighted during her career as a spatial scientist in the public sector. “I made maps for a living in a very male-dominated field, and if we feed in all the stereotypes of women: that they’re not meant to be good at reading maps, and we’re not meant to have strong spatial abilities, well, you can imagine the issues I faced…” Karen says with a wry smile.

Despite the challenges, Karen’s still inspired by her early career: “I love the art as much as I love the science,” Karen says. “For me, that area in particular is about creative expression. There’s a lot of aesthetics and visualisation involved: understanding how we can best organise things so that people can understand. I see that the field itself would be enhanced with the addition of women: women bring a different perspective and a different set of skills to the field,” Karen says.

In the early years of her academic career Karen was often the only woman in her particular discipline, “I come from the particular viewpoint that the driver is that people should work to our abilities, and what we understand to be our abilities should not be undermined by stereotypes.”

Tech girls are superheroes

There’s a sustained global push to encourage more girls into STEM, with the gender balance seen as driving inequity. However, Karen approaches it in a different manner. “The maleness of this area isn’t the driver for me, it’s the obvious contribution that a female can add to those areas that drives me,” Karen says. “It’s about generating better solutions, and we should be striving toward this.”

Karen’s commitment to increasing the participation of girls in STEM-related subjects saw her bring Tech Girls Are Superheros to the Hunter. With this program, designed to bring 100 000 girls to the tech industry by 2020, Karen brings a group of Year 8 girls from Maitland High onto UON’s campus to delve into the world of technology. “As someone who’s been lecturing in IT-related courses for over 10 years, often to entirely male-dominated classes, there’s a very different dynamic when it’s a girls-only class.”

“When I have 20 girls in a lab developing a mobile app it’s fascinating to see how they work together. As most of them don’t have a technology background the day’s as much about entrepreneurship as it is about coding,” Karen says.

This program inspired her ‘a-ha’ moment: “When you only have a few girls in class they get sucked into the first-finished mentality and they’re seen as slowing things down if they don’t. However, projects need balance: you need directedness and a capacity to meet your targets, but intermixed in there you also need an exploration of space.”

“The sense of ‘playfulness’ they have with the software is unique. They’re interested in exploring, testing and surveying the space rather than being driven to complete the project in the shortest time possible as so many boys are.”

Karen’s latest project is HunterWiSE – where she has the opportunity to work with industry, partners, schools and communities alongside women in STEM to enhance opportunities and promote positive collaboration. Watch this space.

A serious attitude toward gaming

Dr Karen Blackmore is driven by problem-solving, from the application of Virtual Reality for industry to girls participation in STEM

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Career Summary

Biography

Karen Blackmore received her BInfoTech(SpatialInfo) With Distinction in 2001 and her PhD in 2008 from Charles Sturt University, Australia. Her PhD research was cross-disciplinary in nature and focused on agent-based modelling of business strategies and their associated changing resource needs. Specifically, this work involved the use of data mining, clustering and visualisation to identify and explore patterns in a large longitudinal data set. Her postdoctoral research work was conducted at the University of Newcastle, in collaboration with Hunter Councils. This work focused on the use of self-organising maps and data analysis techniques to model the environmental impacts of climate change. This work was awarded LGSA’s Environment Award for Energy Saving and Climate Projection Winner C Division & Overall Category Winner 2009. She also has a research track record in the areas of business strategy modelling, data mining, information visualisation, pattern recognition, computer games and education.

Research Expertise
My major areas of research interest include: * Agent based models of complex adaptive systems * Application of data mining and pattern recognition techniques to understand patterns in global climate model data * Spatial and aspatial models of social and physical systems * Cross-disciplinary research issues My early research focus centred on data mining and spatial data modelling. For example, I explored the use of rule based classifiers, neural networks, genetic algorithms and fuzzy logic to find patterns in “Missing Persons Data” (Blackmore, et al. 2005; Blackmore & Bossomaier 2003a, 2003b; Blackmore & Bossomaier 2002a, 2002b; Blackmore et al. 2002). Data mining, clustering and statistical modelling also featured significantly in my PhD and Postdoctoral research. My PhD research involved modelling and analysing patterns associated with changing resource needs in organisations. A number of publications have arisen from this work (Blackmore et al. 2003; Blackmore & Nesbitt 2009; Blackmore & Nesbitt 2012). More recently, I have published results from my postdoctoral work that uses Self-Organising Maps (SOMS) and statistical downscaling to model regional climate variability (Goodwin, Freeman & Blackmore 2010; Goodwin & Blackmore forthcoming). In addition to the above academic publications, during 2008 to 2010 I was principal or co-author on eleven (11) reports (six allocated ISBN numbers) associated with my industry based postdoctoral studies and my employment with the University of Newcastle’s Centre for Urban and Regional Studies (CURS). The postdoctoral work was in collaboration with the Hunter Central Coast Regional Environment Strategy (HCCREMS). This work has been applied and used as the basis for the development of climate change adaptation strategies by local government authorities within the Hunter and Central Coast region. My work with CURS was conducted under an ARC Linkage grant and focussed on inter-agency data sharing and involved spatial data analysis of social vulnerability. The work was conducted in collaboration with the University of Western Sydney and the Department of Premier and Cabinet. Lastly, I have a research record and interest in areas relating to teaching and learning. I have investigated the complex factors associated with plagiarism in courses offered through partner or offshore campuses (Moffatt & Blackmore 2005, 2006) and issues in cross-disciplinary research higher degree research (Blackmore & Nesbitt 2008). In my role with Planning, Quality and Reporting at the University of Newcastle, I authored numerous research reports on a range of topics related to improving the student experience and developing strategies to improve the University’s performance in global ranking schemes. One of these reports formed the basis of a current University project aimed at reducing student attrition. Additionally, my work titled “Fuzzy Data Mining Approaches to Predicting Student Success and Retention” was presented at Australasian Association for Institutional Research Annual Forum held in November, 2012.

Teaching Expertise
I have teaching experience at a University level in a range of IT areas. This experience encompasses different modes of delivery (eg. Internal and Distance Education) and ranges in level from 1st year to Masters and Graduate Certificate programs. I have delivered courses in the following areas:
• Computer Games Production • Database Management Systems • Database Systems • Principles of Database Development • ICT Fundamentals • Managing Internet Marketing Information • Market Research • Geographic Information Systems • Digital Image Analysis • Strategic Information Management • Commerce on the Information Superhighway • Introduction to the Senses • Relationship Marketing • Introduction to Remote Sensing

I am committed to the delivery of high quality teaching and engage in continuing professional development activities (eg. Tertiary Teaching Colloquium and education research publications) to ensure my skills in this area are appropriate and relevant to the needs of students. The quality of my teaching has been evidenced through positive student and peer feedback, both in terms of the way I deal with students and the quality of the materials I develop to support my teaching.

Administrative Expertise
I have been an active member of school based marketing and research committees, as well as being a member of Faculty level Marketing committees. My involvement in the marketing committees stems from expertise in this area and also an interest in making courses more attractive to, and reaching, potential students.

Collaborations
Macquarie University - Continued research building on from postdoctoral work to derive regional climate change projections. Research involves the use of self organising maps (SOMs) to produce synoptic types, statistical analysis of weather station data, statistical downscaling and rule based classification. Ongoing work focuses on spatial modelling of shoreline changes and analysis of complex global climate data.

Qualifications

  • PhD, Charles Sturt University
  • Bachelor of Information Technology, Charles Sturt University

Keywords

  • Agent-Based Modelling
  • Complex systems
  • Conceptual modelling
  • Data mining
  • Game Design
  • Human Computer Interaction
  • Pattern Recognition

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
080602 Computer-Human Interaction 30
080109 Pattern Recognition and Data Mining 30
190202 Computer Gaming and Animation 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Electrical Engineering and Computing
Australia
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Design Communication and IT
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/05/2009 - 1/12/2012 Research Fellow Macquarie University
Department of Environment and Geography - Environmental Science
Australia
1/01/2008 - 1/05/2010 Postdoctoral Fellow

Climate Science.

University of Newcastle
Australia
1/01/2006 - 1/01/2008 Lecturer Charles Sturt University
School of Information Technology

Awards

Award

Year Award
2016 Team Teaching Excellence and Contribution to Student Learning [Highly Commended]
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle

Distinction

Year Award
1999 Dean’s Award for Academic Excellence (Autumn & Spring sessions)
Charles Sturt University

Prize

Year Award
2016 Best Research Paper - SimTect 2016
Australasian Simulation Congress
2014 LGSA’s Environment Award for Energy Saving and Climate Projection Winner C Division & Overall Category Winner 2009
Hunter and Central Coast Regional Environment Management Strategy (NCCREMS)
1999 AISIST Achievement Prize in Spatial Information Systems
Australian Institute of Spatial Information Sciences and Technology (AISIST)

Thesis Examinations

Year Level Discipline Thesis
2016 Masters Science Intelligent virtual agents to provide support to young people and young adults
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 10
Total funding $424,583

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20174 grants / $75,000

HunterWiSE: Hunter Women in STEM and Entrepreneurship$30,000

Funding body: Muswellbrook Shire Council

Funding body Muswellbrook Shire Council
Project Team Doctor Elena Prieto-Rodriguez, Doctor Karen Blackmore, Doctor Anna Giacomini, Associate Professor Sarah Johnson, Professor Regina Berretta, Professor Erica Wanless, Associate Professor Juanita Todd
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700965
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON Y

HunterWiSE: Hunter Women in STEM and Entrepreneurship$15,000

Funding body: Hunter Water Corporation

Funding body Hunter Water Corporation
Project Team Doctor Elena Prieto-Rodriguez, Doctor Karen Blackmore, Doctor Anna Giacomini, Associate Professor Sarah Johnson, Professor Regina Berretta, Professor Erica Wanless, Associate Professor Juanita Todd
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700961
Type Of Funding Donation - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFD
UON Y

HunterWiSE: Hunter Women in STEM and Entrepreneurship$15,000

Funding body: Glencore Coal Assets Australia Pty Ltd

Funding body Glencore Coal Assets Australia Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Elena Prieto-Rodriguez, Doctor Karen Blackmore, Doctor Anna Giacomini, Associate Professor Sarah Johnson, Professor Regina Berretta, Professor Erica Wanless, Associate Professor Juanita Todd
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700962
Type Of Funding Donation - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFD
UON Y

HunterWiSE: Hunter Women in STEM and Entrepreneurship$15,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Elena Prieto-Rodriguez, Doctor Karen Blackmore, Doctor Anna Giacomini, Associate Professor Sarah Johnson, Professor Regina Berretta, Professor Erica Wanless, Associate Professor Juanita Todd
Scheme Special Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700963
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20163 grants / $334,998

Assessing coal properties and their effects on coking performance: a data mining approach$330,000

Funding body: Australian Coal Research Limited

Funding body Australian Coal Research Limited
Project Team Miss Lauren North, Doctor Merrick Mahoney, Doctor Karen Blackmore, Doctor Keith Nesbitt
Scheme Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1600137
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Exploring Avatar Facial Fidelity and Emotional Expressions on Observer Perception of the Uncanny Valley$3,998

Funding body: Simulation Australasia Ltd

Funding body Simulation Australasia Ltd
Project Team Doctor Karen Blackmore, Miss Jacqueline Bailey
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1601247
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

QL126 Joint Fires in the Exploratory Force workshop$1,000

Funding body: RPDE: Rapid Prototyping, Development and Evaluation Program

Funding body RPDE: Rapid Prototyping, Development and Evaluation Program
Project Team Doctor Karen Blackmore
Scheme Industry Workshop Participant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600799
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20141 grants / $8,500

Climate Change Model Validation and Projected Climate Surface Generation$8,500

To assist HCCREMS identify the long-term threats of climate change on a number of regionally key species, regional scale climate change projections were required to be incorporated into species distribution models (SDM). The potential impacts of climate change on the Hunter, Central and Lower North Coast region have been previously modelled (Verdon, 2007; Blackmore & Goodwin, 2008 & 2009). This project aimed to update regional historic data and plots, validate the existing models to determine their suitability to incorporate into the SDMs.

Funding body: Hunter and Central Coast Regional Environment Management Strategy (NCCREMS)

Funding body Hunter and Central Coast Regional Environment Management Strategy (NCCREMS)
Project Team

Karen Blackmore

Scheme Regional Conservation Assessment Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON N

20131 grants / $4,085

Spatial Data Analytics: Addressing critical application problems concerning the environment and human society, and the interactions between them, using spatial data analytic approaches$4,085

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Karen Blackmore
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300663
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20061 grants / $2,000

International Travel Grant$2,000

Funding body: Complex Open Systems Research Network (COSNet)

Funding body Complex Open Systems Research Network (COSNet)
Project Team

Karen Blackmore

Scheme Internation Travel Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current6

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD2.5

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Gender Equity in Higher Education PhD (Statistics), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Avatar and Participant Gender Differences in the Perception of Uncanniness of Virtual Humans PhD (Information Technology), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Data Mining to Better Predict Coking Performance of Coals PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Comprehensive Cybernetic Model for Innovation Network Management (C2MINM) PhD (Management), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Modelling the Academic Publishing System: A Data-Driven Agent-Based Approach PhD (Information Technology), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2012 PhD Design and Development of Engaging Active Video Games (AVG) to Combat Childhood Obesity PhD (Information Technology), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 Honours Exploring avatar facial fidelity and emotional expressions on observer perceptions of the uncanny valley
Avatars have been a traditional mainstay of game based interactive entertainment, where they aim to enhance story-based interaction and player engagement. However, there has been an increase in avatar roles in fields such as serious gaming and simulation training, where accurate and cost-effective avatar development to convey human emotional expressions is of interest. The area of emotional expression in avatars is not well understood, and uncanniness in avatars can pose issues that may impact on training outcomes. There are two aims of this research, firstly to explore how avatar fidelity or realism influences the emotional experience of interactions between humans and computer-generated avatars. Secondly, to examine how the emotional expressions displayed by avatar facial features affect participants perceived valence or the intrinsic attractiveness of the avatar. In order to test these affects, the research uses a combination of survey and experimental methodologies. Utilising a Godspeed survey to measure the perception of an avatars &lsquo;<em>humanness</em>&rsquo;, &lsquo;eeriness&rsquo; and &lsquo;<em>attractiveness</em>&rsquo;, and a three-part experiment measuring participant startle reflex responses to differing fidelity and emotional expression avatars, human-avatar interaction was explored. The analysis of results indicated that participant gender played a role in the perception of avatars. In addition, the avatars themselves appear to have a significant impact on the responses from participants. The emotional expressions displayed indicated that sad expressions are less unpleasant and possibly less uncanny, than smiling. In conclusion, this research represents an entry point into a broad, cross-disciplinary research area. While there are important findings and contributions made, the significant amount of data generated through the experiments will pose questions for future work in this research area.
Information Technology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia Sole Supervisor
2014 Honours Measuring the effect of sound on the emotional and immersive experience of players in a video game: a case study in the horror genre
Sound is considered an important concept in modern video games, where it facilitates an immersive experience for players. Immersion, as a concept, has many varying definitions, and the role of sound in creating this experience is still a point of debate. However, the importance of sound in games generally, is well accepted. Efforts to further understanding of the precise contributing factors of sound to the player experience are of importance and value to the broader game design community. In this thesis we approach the problem of defining the impact of sound on a player&amp;rsquo;s videogame experience through the use of both survey instruments and physiological measurement. Specifically, we do this by measuring a player&amp;rsquo;s self-reported level of immersion through surveys, and their affective response via facial electromyography. Participants in the research played Parsec Studio&amp;rsquo;s Slender: The Eight Pages, a freely available video game within the horror genre. Experiments were conducted both with and without audio accompaniement, and results were studied. We hypothesised that those participants who identified as being more easily immersed would demonstrate a larger gap in affective response between scenarios. The analysis of data failed to find statistically significant differences in the sound on/sound of experiment conditions and the self reported level of immersion in the game. Despite this, the EMG startle responses were higher during experiments with the game sound on, and these results anecdotally indicate that sound does increase the emotional experience of players. However, a statistically significant higher proportion of participants exhibited valid EMG startle responses while actually playing the game compared to viewing a play-through of the game, suggesting that the fear state of the game is enhanced through player interaction and increased attention. Sound appears to play a lesser role in this process.
Information Technology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia Sole Supervisor
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Research Opportunities

Evaluating IT Banking Systems

Industry Based Honours Project in collaboration with the Greater Building Society

Honours

School of Design Communication and IT

18/12/2015 - 19/12/2017

Contact

Doctor Karen Blackmore
University of Newcastle
School of Electrical Engineering and Computing
karen.blackmore@newcastle.edu.au

Fidelity Effects on Actor Driven Avatars In Military Simulations

Industry Based Honours Project in collaboration with the Australian Defence College Simulation Centre

Honours

School of Design Communication and IT

18/12/2015 - 19/12/2017

Contact

Doctor Karen Blackmore
University of Newcastle
School of Electrical Engineering and Computing
karen.blackmore@newcastle.edu.au

Desktop Video Games To Improve Critical Thinking

Industry Based Honours Project in collaboration with the Australian Defence College Simulation Centre

Honours

School of Electrical Engineering and Computing

1/01/2016 - 31/12/2017

Contact

Doctor Shamus Smith
University of Newcastle
School of Electrical Engineering and Computing
shamus.smith@newcastle.edu.au

PhD opportunity for a business intelligence and data analytics framework for delivering gender equity in the higher education sector

A fully funded PhD position is available as part of the University of Newcastle’s commitment to the Athena SWAN charter for gender equity and diversity. Applications are invited from graduates to undertake a PhD that will develop an innovative framework to enable the long term capture and analysis of institutional data. This project will focus on data that is relevant to understanding and addressing gender inequity by drawing on emerging technologies and approaches in the business intelligence sphere. The project will also provide a best practice approach to the collection, and statistical analysis, of data for enhancing gender equity in the higher education sector. This is a targeted opportunity for women to complete a PhD in statistics and IT.

PHD

Faculty of Science and IT

8/11/2016 - 9/11/2019

http://www.newcastle.edu.au/newsroom/featured-news/gender-equity-phd-opportunity

Contact

Professor Eric Beh
University of Newcastle
School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
eric.beh@newcastle.edu.au

Serious Games to Improve Critical Thinking/Decision Making

A fully funded PhD position is available as part of a collaboration with the Australian Defence College (ADC) Simulation Centre. This project will allow a candidate to work with the Australian Defence Force Academy (ADFA) (through the ADC Simulation Centre) to conduct research that will see the introduction of a Serious Game/s to benefit the training of ADFA Trainee Officers, and possibly the ADF Chaplains College. The project will involve investigating existing “off the shelf“ game environment(s), develop appropriate training activities within the environment(s), and evaluating the cognitive/behavioural efficacy of the approach. Potential for profiling of cognitive/behavioural types and biases also exists. The preferred candidate will have a background in either Computer Science/Information Technology, Psychology, and/or Education, with excellent written and oral English language skills. Please note that the applicant must be an AUSTRALIAN CITIZEN.

PHD

Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

1/02/2017 - 1/02/2020

Contact

Doctor Karen Blackmore
University of Newcastle
School of Electrical Engineering and Computing
karen.blackmore@newcastle.edu.au

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News

Gender Equity PhD Opportunity

November 3, 2016

PhD opportunity for a business intelligence and data analytics framework for delivering gender equity in the higher education Sector.

Dr Karen Blackmore

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Design, Communication and IT (DCIT)
School of Electrical Engineering and Computing
Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment

Focus area

Information Technology

Contact Details

Email karen.blackmore@newcastle.edu.au
Phone +61 2 492 15206
Fax +61 2 492 15896
Links Personal Blogs
Twitter

Office

Room 3-61
Building ICT Building.
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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