Dr Joy Lyneham

Associate Professor

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Joy Lyneham is an associate professor is the School of Nursing and Midwifery currently the program convener of undergraduate nursing. A/Prof Lyneham has an extensive clinical, education and research history which has included Australian and international initiatives. Clinically focused in the area of Emergency nursing and this is reflected in both her teaching and research, she has maintained clinical practice until 2010. A/Prof Lyneham is an experienced supervisor of higher degree (PhD and Masters) candidates with over 20 completions with over 95% gaining excellent results, a significant proportion of these candidates have been international. The main methodological focus for research is phenomenology, however other qualitative and qualitative methods are evident in publications. Currently A/Prof Lyneham is completing a two year study conducted during the Christchurch earthquakes and the experiences of nurses and the role of Chaplains during a crisis.

Research Expertise

Areas of research interest and expertise are as follows; Phenomenology Acute Nursing Emergency Nursing Disaster Management Ethics Decision making.

Teaching Expertise
Teaching expertise as follows; basic nursing ethics emergency nursing disaster nursing research methods.

Administrative Expertise
Administration. University Level Academic Board Human Ethics committee EO committee Faculty Level Faculty Board Promotion Committee Education Committee School UG program coordinator PG program coordinator Education and assessment committees.

Collaborations
The most recent research collaboration has been with Christchurch hospital who were critical in gaining access to participants while the disaster was declared.

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Tasmania
  • Bachelor of Applied Science (Nursing), Tasmanian State Institute of Technology
  • Graduate Diploma of Clinical Pract(Emergency Nurs), University of Western Sydney
  • Master of Health Science (Nursing), Charles Sturt University

Keywords

  • Acute care
  • Decision making
  • Disaster Management
  • Disaster nursing
  • Emergency care
  • Emergency nursing
  • Ethics

Languages

  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111003 Clinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care) 50
111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/07/2002 - 1/12/2011 Senior Lecturer Monash University
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
1/01/2001 - 1/07/2002 PG Coordinator University of Tasmania
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia
1/01/1986 -  Membership - Royal College of Nursing - Australia Royal College of Nursing Australia
Australia
1/01/1985 - 1/01/2001 Lecturer Charles Sturt University
School of Nursing and Midwifery

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2000 - 1/10/2009 Clinical Nurse WW Agency
Emergency/ICU/CCU
Australia
1/04/1988 - 1/12/1999 Clinical Nurse Specialist St Georges Hospital
Emergency
Australia

Invitations

Distinguished Visitor

Year Title / Rationale
2007 Impact of Research on Nursing Practice
Organisation: Military Hospital - Ryhad Description: Military Hospital - Saudi Arabia invite to Keynote at the National conference. In addition curriculum review was undertaken.

External Reviewer - Programs

Year Title / Rationale
2004 PG Diploma in Nursing
Organisation: Australian Catholic University Description: PG review of Emergency and Acute Care Course
2003 MN (Nurse poractitioner)
Organisation: Univereisty of Tasmania Description: Nurse Practitioner program review
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Lyneham JI, Morphett J, 'Nursing Care of People in the Emergency Department or experiencing disasters', Medical-Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking for Person-centred Care, Pearson, French Forest NSW 135-149 (2014) [B2]
2013 Lyneham JI, Morphett J, 'Emergency and Emergency Nursing', Medical-surgical Nursing 3-volume Set, Pearson, Sydney (2013)

Journal article (31 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Lyneham J, Levett-Jones T, 'Insights into Registered Nurses' professional values through the eyes of graduating students', Nurse Education in Practice, 17 86-90 (2016) [C1]

© 2016. Professional values are integrated into undergraduate nursing curricula and taught in various ways. A significant influence on students' developing values and their ... [more]

© 2016. Professional values are integrated into undergraduate nursing curricula and taught in various ways. A significant influence on students' developing values and their definition of a 'good nurse' are the nurses they interact with in practice. The aim of this paper is to present the findings from a study that explored the professional values that graduating students viewed as important and how these values were illustrated in the behaviours of the nurses whose clinical practice they admired and wished to emulate. Fourteen students from one Australian university were interviewed on the last day of their final clinical placement. An interpretive qualitative design employing semi-structured interviews framed the study. Data were audio recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. The participants' descriptions illustrated a range of professional values and behaviours. Four main professional values were identified, these included: being person-centred; kindness and caring, being in control; and commitment to learning. Findings demonstrated that the participants understood the meaning and relevance of professional nursing values, from a theoretical, moral and practical stance. Their responses also illustrated an appreciation of how these values influence patient care and the organisational culture as a whole.

DOI 10.1016/j.nepr.2015.11.002
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones
2016 Lyneham J, 'Emergency department nurses report high workload and management pressure to meet 4 h treatment targets', Evidence-Based Nursing, 19 90 (2016)
DOI 10.1136/eb-2015-102160
2014 Lyneham J, 'In surveyed Australian medical-surgical units about a third of nurses on perceive emotional abuse in recent shifts and a fifth report actual violence; perception of violence in the workplace is associated with unstable or negative working conditions and adverse patient outcomes', Evidence-Based Nursing, 13 106-107 (2014)
DOI 10.1136/ebn1079
2013 Lyneham JI, Fevriasanty FI, McCauley K, 'Phenomenology: Exploring Women¿s Experiences of First Time IUD Insertion', Nurse Media Journal of Nursing, 3 569-579 (2013)
2013 Lyneham JI, 'Conceptual model for medical surgical nursing:Moving toward an international speciality', Medsurg Nursing, 22 215-220, 263 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
2011 Lyneham JI, Byrne H, 'Nurses' Experience of what helped or hindered during the Christchurch earthquake', Kai Tiaki Nursing Journal, 2 14-18 (2011) [C1]
2011 McCauley K, Elsom S, Muir-Cochrane E, Lyneham JI, 'Midwives and assessment of perinatal health', Jounral of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 18 786-795 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2850.2011.01727.x
Citations Scopus - 25
2010 Lyneham JI, 'Is there harm in silence?', Journal of Medical Ethics, 36 642-643 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2
2010 Lyneham JI, 'Violence in Nursing', Evidence-Based Nursing, 13 106-107 (2010) [C1]
2009 Lyneham JI, Parkinson C, Denholm C, 'Expert nursing practice: A mathematical explanation of Benner's fifth stage of practice development', Journal of Advanced Nursing, 65 2477-2484 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8
2009 Mazooq H, Lyneham JI, 'Cardiopulmonary resusitation knowledge among nurses working in Bahrain', International Journal of Nursing Practice, 15 294-302 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11
2008 Lyneham JI, Parkinson C, Denholm C, 'Explicating Benner's concept of expert practice: Intuition in emergency nursing', International Journal of Nursing Practice, 14 380-387 (2008) [C1]
2008 Lyneham J, Parkinson C, Denholm C, 'Intuition in emergency nursing: A phenomenological study', International Journal of Nursing Practice, 14 101-108 (2008)

The evidence of experience of intuitive knowing in the clinical setting has to this point only been informal and anecdotal. Reported experiences thus need to be either validated o... [more]

The evidence of experience of intuitive knowing in the clinical setting has to this point only been informal and anecdotal. Reported experiences thus need to be either validated or refuted so that its place in emergency nursing can be determined. The history, nature and component themes captured within the intuitive practice of emergency nursing are described. This study was informed by the philosophy and method of phenomenology. Participants were 14 experienced emergency nurses. Through their narrative accounts and recall of events their experience of knowing was captured. Through a Van Manen process and a Gadamerian analysis, six themes associated with the ways in which the participants experienced intuition in clinical practice, were identified. This paper reveals the six emerging themes as knowledge, experience, connection, feeling, syncretism and trust. © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/j.1440-172X.2008.00672.x
Citations Scopus - 20
2008 Lyneham J, Cloughessy L, Martin V, 'Workloads in Australian emergency departments a descriptive study', International Emergency Nursing, 16 200-206 (2008)

Objective: This study aimed to identify the current workload of clinical nurses, managers and educators in Australian Emergency Departments according to the classification of the ... [more]

Objective: This study aimed to identify the current workload of clinical nurses, managers and educators in Australian Emergency Departments according to the classification of the department Additionally the relationship of experienced to inexperienced clinical staff was examined. Design and setting: A descriptive research method utilising a survey distributed to 394 Australian Emergency departments with a 21% response rate. Main outcome measure(s): Nursing workloads were calculated and a ratio of nurse to patient was established. The ratios included nurse to patient, management and educators to clinical staff. Additionally the percentage of junior to senior clinical staff was also calculated. Results: Across all categories of emergency departments the mean nurse:patient ratios were 1:15 (am shift), 1:7 (pm shift) and 1:4 (night shift). During this period an average of 17.1% of attendances were admitted to hospital. There were 27 staff members for each manager and 23.3 clinical staff for each educator. The percentage of junior staff rostered ranged from 10% to 38%. Conclusion: Emergency nurses cannot work under such pressure as it may compromise the care given to patients and consequently have a negative effect on the nurse personally. However, emergency nurses are dynamically adjusting to the workload. Such conditions as described in this study could give rise to burnout and attrition of experienced emergency nurses as they cannot resolve the conflict between workload and providing quality nursing care. Crown Copyright © 2008.

DOI 10.1016/j.ienj.2008.05.006
Citations Scopus - 11
2008 Lyneham J, Parkinson C, Denholm C, 'Explicating Benner's concept of expert practice: Intuition in emergency nursing', Journal of Advanced Nursing, 64 380-387 (2008)

Aim. This paper is a report of a study exploring the experience of intuition in emergency nursing in relation to Benner's fifth stage of practice development, 'the exper... [more]

Aim. This paper is a report of a study exploring the experience of intuition in emergency nursing in relation to Benner's fifth stage of practice development, 'the expert practitioner.' Background. Expert nurses anecdotally report actions and thoughts that present in their consciousness and have an impact on the care given. Benner used the term 'intuition' for the fifth stage of practice development. However, Paley has criticized Benner's model for its lack of clarity about the nature of an expert practitioner. This criticism is further justified by Benner's inadequate explanation of expert. Method. A hermeneutic phenomenological study was conducted using van Manen's approach and a Gadamerian analysis. Fourteen expert emergency nurses in Australia were interviewed between January 2000 and December 2003. Findings. The analysis resulted in the reconstruction of Benner's expert stage into three distinct phases: cognitive intuition, where assessment is processed subconsciously and can be rationalized in hindsight; transitional intuition, where a physical sensation and other behaviours enter the nurse's awareness; and embodied intuition, when the nurse trusts the intuitive thoughts. Conclusion. The findings validate the use of intuitive decision-making as a construct in explaining expert clinical decision-making practices. The validity of intuitive practice should be recognized. It is essential to recognize the conditions that support practice development, and in the prenovice stage (during their university course) factors such as reflection, research (in its broadest sense) and clinical curiosity should be fostered. © 2008 The Authors.

DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2008.04799.x
Citations Scopus - 27
2007 Lyneham JI, Kremser K, 'Can Australian nurses safely assess for thrombolysis on EKG criteria?', Journal of Emergency Nursing, 33 102-109 (2007)
Citations Scopus - 5
2004 Lyneham J, 'Conversation with a relative who takes care of a dying patient', Servir (Lisbon, Portugal), 52 27-30 (2004)
2003 Lyneham J, 'A conversation with the family caretaker of a dying man.', Nursing forum, 38 33-35 (2003)
2001 Lyneham J, 'Workplace violence in New South Wales emergency departments', Australian Emergency Nursing Journal, 4 5-9 (2001)
DOI 10.1016/S1328-2743(01)80013-4
2001 Jones J, Lyneham J, 'Violence: Part of the job for Australian nurses?', Australian Emergency Nursing Journal, 4 10-14 (2001)
DOI 10.1016/S1328-2743(01)80014-6
2000 Lyneham J, 'Violence in New South Wales emergency departments.', The Australian journal of advanced nursing : a quarterly publication of the Royal Australian Nursing Federation, 18 8-17 (2000)

In 1999 the International Council of Nurses recognised workplace violence as a significant issue in nursing. During the same year the Australian Institute of Criminology reported ... [more]

In 1999 the International Council of Nurses recognised workplace violence as a significant issue in nursing. During the same year the Australian Institute of Criminology reported that health was the most violent industry. This study examined the nature and extent of violence in NSW hospital emergency departments. Emergency nurses experienced violent incidents in their department, in the wards and outside the hospital setting. Every respondent (n=266) experienced some form of violence at least weekly. Ninety-two incidents involved lethal weapons. Ninety-two percent of perpetrators were patients or their relatives, however other staff members were also implicated. Non-reporting of violence is an issue as over 70% of incidents were not referred to authorities. Drugs, alcohol and emergency department waiting times are the most significant predisposing factors. Most emergency nurses are not satisfied with the response of administration to violent incidents within hospitals.

Citations Scopus - 78
2000 Jones J, Lyneham J, 'Violence: part of the job for Australian nurses?', The Australian journal of advanced nursing : a quarterly publication of the Royal Australian Nursing Federation, 18 27-32 (2000)

According to a recent Australian Institute of Criminology report (1999) the health industry is the most violent industry in Australia. In this paper the authors aim to highlight v... [more]

According to a recent Australian Institute of Criminology report (1999) the health industry is the most violent industry in Australia. In this paper the authors aim to highlight violence as an important professional issue for Australian nurses that is currently concealed as 'part of the job'. National and international studies bring attention to the severity of the problem for nurses with a particular focus on emergency nurses. Some of the issues identified and discussed include increased waiting times and frustration; increasing use of weapons; inadequate systems of security; culture of silence; inadequate support for emergent mental health needs; lack of reporting; lack of institutional concern and systems of support, and; demands of triage nursing. The nature of workplace violence in emergency departments in New South Wales and South Australia will be explored based on the authors' research. A research pathway to explore national impact and implications of violence for nurses and nursing practice in general will be outlined.

Citations Scopus - 34
2000 Lyneham J, Jones J, 'Silence on violence no longer.', Australian nursing journal (July 1993), 7 3 (2000)
1999 Lyneham J, 'Patient education Web sites.', The Australian journal of advanced nursing : a quarterly publication of the Royal Australian Nursing Federation, 17 28 (1999)
Citations Scopus - 2
1999 Lyneham J, 'Twenty first century patient education.', The Australian journal of advanced nursing : a quarterly publication of the Royal Australian Nursing Federation, 17 29 (1999)
1999 Lyneham J, 'Violence in NSW emergency departments', Australian Emergency Nursing Journal, 2 22-25 (1999)
DOI 10.1016/S1328-2743(99)80015-7
1998 Lyneham J, 'Interactive clinical decision-making.', The Australian journal of advanced nursing : a quarterly publication of the Royal Australian Nursing Federation, 16 20 (1998)
1998 Lyneham JI, 'The process of decision-making by emergency nurses.', Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing (, 16 7-14 (1998)
Citations Scopus - 13
1997 Lyneham J, Nancarrow M, 'The nature and content of telephone calls received in rural and metropolitan emergency departments', Australian Emergency Nursing Journal, 1 64-68 (1997)
DOI 10.1016/S1328-2743(97)80039-9
1992 Lyneham JI, 'Death in an emergency unit.', Australian Nurses Journal, 21 16-17 (1992)
1988 Lyneham JI, 'The Ethics of Teaching Ethics', Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, 5 33-44 (1988) [C1]
Show 28 more journal articles

Conference (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Maund KA, Hilaire T, Smith SP, Brewer G, Lyneham J, Geale S, 'Virtual learning platforms: Assisting work integrated learning', AUBEA 2017 Conference Proceedings (2017) [E1]
Co-authors Shamus Smith, Kim Maund, Sara Geale, Graham Brewer
2016 Lyneham J, Byrne H, 'An Unintentional Method: Longitudinal Phenomenology', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF QUALITATIVE METHODS (2016)
2015 Keinwong, Hunter S, lyneham J, 'An exploration of the perceptions and understanding of health promotion activities by Health Care Providers in relation to Thai older person with hypertension' (2015)
Co-authors Sharyn Hunter
2015 Keinwong T, Hunter S, Lyneham J, 'Health promotion and learning in relation to older people with chronic illness: An integrative review of literature' (2015)
Co-authors Sharyn Hunter
2015 Keinwong, Hunter S, lyneham, 'Exploring whether the current Thai elderly¿s health education materials are best practices in gerogogy theory: A document analysis' (2015)
Co-authors Sharyn Hunter
2015 Keinwong T, Hunter S, Lyneham J, 'Promoting the health of Thai¿s older with chronic illness: An exploration of understanding and perception of Health Care Providers' (2015)
Co-authors Sharyn Hunter
2013 Lyneham JI, Byrne H, 'The Christchurch Experience: Nurses Reflections', Prehospital and Disaster Medicine (2013) [E3]
2009 Lyneham JI, Aljohani M, 'Emergency department in Saudi Arabia: why do we need a standardised triage system?', 2009 CENA International Conference for Emergency Nursing (2009)
DOI 10.1016/j.aenj.2009.08.089
2008 Lyneham J, Aljohani M, 'Development of a triage system (SATS) in Saudi Arabia', Australasian Emergency Nursing Journal (2008)
Show 6 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $2,250

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20151 grants / $750

14th Qualitative Methods Conference, Melbourne Aus, 26-30 April 2015$750

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Joy Lyneham
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500418
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20121 grants / $1,500

WADEM (World Class Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine), USA, 15 - 17 October 2012$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Joy Lyneham
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200875
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed10
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.4

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2013 PhD Health Promotion for Thai Elders With Hypertension: A Mixed Methods Study PhD (Nursing), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2011 PhD Emergency Department Triage in Saudi Arabia: Towards a Stand National Triage System Nursing, Monash University Principal Supervisor
2011 Masters Saudi Women's experience of Episiotomy Nursing, Monash University Principal Supervisor
2011 PhD The experience of Being a Saudi Arabian Nurse Nursing, Monash University Principal Supervisor
2007 Masters Factors Influeing knowledge regarding CPR in Bahrain Nursing, Monash University Sole Supervisor
2007 Masters identification of Triage Competence in Saudi Arabia Nursing, Monash University Sole Supervisor
2007 Masters The Expereince of Teaching Critical Thinking Nursing, Monash University Principal Supervisor
2005 Masters Predictive Assessment of Postoperative Dementia Nursing, Monash University Sole Supervisor
2004 Honours The Experience of the Transistion to Palliative Care Nursing, Monash University Sole Supervisor
2004 Masters Expert Coronary Care Nurses Preparedness for Nurse Initiated Thrombolysis Nursing, Monash University Sole Supervisor
2003 Masters Career Choice in PNG nursing Nursing, Monash University Sole Supervisor
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Dr Joy Lyneham

Position

Associate Professor
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email joy.lyneham@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 49217043

Office

Room RW119
Building Richardson Wing
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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