Professor John Rodger

Professor John Rodger

Conjoint Professor

School of Environmental and Life Sciences (Biological Sciences)

Career Summary

Biography

- Leading international figure in marsupial gamete biology for over 30 years - First to study fertilization in a marsupial - First to collect and study marsupial semen - First to develop assisted breeding technologies for marsupials - First to succesfully freeze marsupial sperm - First to develop reliable superovulation methods for marsupials - Leader in the development of fertility control vaccines for marsupial population management - Leader in the development of vaccines for use in marsupial disease management For 8 years (1995-2003) I was full time Director/CEO of the CRC for Marsupial Conservation and Management. I remained involved in leadership in the above areas but my direct involvement in research was reduced. From 2005 I have been half time Director of the Tom Farrell Institute for the Environment. Establishment and leadership oin this university-wide multi-disciplinary Institute has reduced my time for research.

Research Expertise
The broad area of my research is mammalian reproduction and development. The major emphasis has been marsupials and their use as model species to examine basic phenomena in developmental biology and the application of this basic biology for marsupial management. Involvement with marsupial reproduction dates from the late 1960s and has led to 89 refereed publications in journals and books of international standing. My early work dealt mainly with the male marsupial, the comparative anatomy of the reproductive tract and the biochemistry and physiology of semen. During my post doctoral years in the USA the focus shifted to a current major interest marsupial fertilization and the critical maturation events which lead to gamete interaction.

At ANU I began a second major research area early mammalian development and the immunology of reproduction. At the University of Newcastle I initiated a research program which exploited this background and moved into a very new area of marsupial biology practical manipulation of breeding. This applied task was initiated because it is an essential first step in my long term goal of studying the developmental biology of marsupials at the cellular and molecular level. In addition the ability to manipulate fertility and productivity has application in the conservation and management of marsupials.

This growing expertise is being recognised for its contribution to basic science and in the practical assessment of fertility and the manipulation of marsupial breeding. This work led to my major collaborations and funding from New Zealand and formed the basis for a large component of the successful application for a Cooperative Research Centre for the Conservation and Management of Marsupials of which I was Director. This role lead to a major interest in the management of science and its integration in interdisciplinary applied programs for environmental and conservation outcomes.

I have published in the area, chaired the committee overseeing the redevelopment of the Bachelor of Environmental Science degree at the University of Newcastle in line with this experience and have advised government agencies and commercial organisations on these issues. From 2005 I was Project Director leading the establishment of an Environmental Institute at the University of Newcastle.

Teaching Expertise
UNDERGRADUATE 1986-1995 I was responsible for the development, presentation and examination of two courses offered by the then Department of Biological Sciences.Biology 100: Animal Diversity - Form & Function (average approx 400 students) As well as developing a new lecture course I significantly reorganised the practical course. This has involved new exercises and substantial revision and reorganisation of the laboratory manual. My aim in the course was to prepare those students proceeding to higher level study in biology and to provide an appreciation of the broad principles of animal function for those not planning a career as biologists.

With the increasing numbers of students enrolled in science courses and their lower standard of entry this course has required major reappraisal. Biology 300: Animal Development (average approx 40 students) This course, originally 'Mammalian Development', was new to Newcastle when I introduced it in 1986. It seeks to bring senior students to an understanding of the fundamental and applied aspects of this rapidly developing field. Practical work is project based and aims to give students hands on experience in some of the main techniques used and exposure to the practical problems faced by the experimental embryologist.

POST-GRADUATE COURSE IN INDONESIA (1989-1991) For three years I was a lecturer in biology for the second semester program of a year long upgrading program for young Indonesian science academics (a total of 40/year across Physics, Maths, Chemistry & Biology) organised by the International Development Program of the Australian Universities and Colleges (IDP). The 'Basic Sciences Bridging Program' operated at the premier science university in Indonesia the Institut Teknologi Bandung in Western Java. From this program around 20 students were selected to come to Australia for post-graduate training. This demanding exercise required the development of a lecture and laboratory program suitable for the English and science level of the students and the facilities available in Bandung.

Newcastle 2003 -2006 Since returning to a normal academic role in the School of Environmental & Life Sciences I have had an active teaching and leadership role in the area of Environmental Biology/Science. BIOL3190: Wetlands Ecology In 2003 I coordinated, lectured in and examined this course. BIOL2070: Ecology Commencing in Semester 2 2003 I presented and examined about 1/3 of the lecture content of this course in the area of animal population biology. This is a large class of approximately 90-100 students. As well as being a major offering in Environmental Biology the course forms part of the compulsory core of the B Env Sci program.

ENVS3020: Allied Environmental Science This course, offered for the first time in Semester 2, 2004, was developed by me to fill a need for more environmental management focused courses in Biology at the 3000 level. It has now developed into a core unit of the Env Sci & Mgt Program which seeks to bridge the University to workplace transition. Bachelor of Environmental Science & Management Program In October 2003 I took over responsibility for leading the Action Group appointed by the HoS SELs to develop the first school-based structure for this program. This has been completed and the revised program and related new courses began to role out in Semester 1 2005.

Administrative Expertise
Chair ACT Kangaroo Advisory Committee (1995-97) Chairman, Australian Society for Reproductive Biology (1989-91) Chair, Scientific Committee, North Head Sanctuary, Sydney Harbour Federation Trust (2004-2006) Director/CEO CRC for Conservation & Management of Marsupials (1995-2003) Director Tom Farrell Institute for the Environment (2005-)


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Sydney
  • Bachelor of Science, University of New South Wales
  • Master of Science, University of New South Wales

Keywords

  • Animal Form & Function
  • Application of Science
  • Ecology
  • Environmental Biology
  • Marsupials
  • Reproduction
  • Wildlife BIotechnology
  • Wildlife Management

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
050211 Wildlife and Habitat Management 40
050202 Conservation and Biodiversity 60

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Casual Academic University of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
Member - Organising Committee: Reproduction and the Conservation and Management of Wild Species Symposia of the Zoological Scoiety of London
United Kingdom
Chair - International Conference on Biotechnology for Wildlife International Conference on Biotechnology for Wildlife
Australia
Chair & Member -Australian Society for Reproductive Biology Australian Society for Reproductive Biology
Australia
Chair - ACT Kangaroo Advisory Committee ACT Kangaroo Advisory Committee
Australia
Member - Newcastle Environmental Advisory Panel Newcastle Environmental Advisory Panel
Australia
Chair - North Head Sanctuary Scientific Committee North Head Sanctuary Scientific Committee
Australia
1/03/2015 - 17/09/2015 CEO FAUNA Research Alliance
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/07/1995 - 30/06/2003 Director & CEO Cooperative Research Centre for Conservation and Management of Marsupials, (Marsupial CRC)
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Zhang F, Lidbury BA, Richardson AM, Yates BF, Gardiner MG, Bridgeman AJ, et al., Preface (2011)
DOI 10.4018/978-1-61350-062-0

Chapter (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Mate KE, Rodger JC, Lidbury B, 'Language support for first year human physiology and biology', Sustainable language support practices in science education : Technologies and solutions, IGI Global, Hershey, PA 129-159 (2012) [B1]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Karen Mate
2004 Rodger JC, 'Integrating Experimental Research with the Needs of Natural-Resource and Land Managers: Case Studies from Australia and New Zealand', Experimental Approaches to Conservation Biology, University of California Press, California 269-281 (2004) [B1]
2003 Rodger JC, 'Postscript sex, wildlife and vindication', Reproductive science and integrated conservation, Cambridge Unviersity Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom 396-400 (2003) [B1]
2003 Rodger JC, 'Fertility control for wildlife', Reproductive Science and Integrated Conservation, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK 281-290 (2003) [B1]
Show 1 more chapter

Journal article (99 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Witt RR, Rodger JJ, Rodger JC, 'Breeding in the fat-tailed dunnart following ovarian suppression with the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist Lucrin® Depot', Reproduction, Fertility and Development, (2017)
DOI 10.1071/RD16518
2016 Witt RR, Forbes IR, Mcbain J, Rodger JC, 'Ovarian suppression in a marsupial following single treatment with a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist in microspheres', Reproduction, Fertility and Development, 28 1964-1973 (2016) [C1]

© The Authors 2016. The effect of treatment with Lucrin Depot (1 month), a microsphere gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist preparation, was investigated in the fat-tailed dun... [more]

© The Authors 2016. The effect of treatment with Lucrin Depot (1 month), a microsphere gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist preparation, was investigated in the fat-tailed dunnart (Sminthopsis crassicaudata) as a potential strategy to synchronise cycling. The status of the ovaries (ovarian size, number and size of Graafian follicles and corpora lutea) and reproductive tract (weight, vascularity and muscularity) in twelve untreated females were assessed to establish the activity parameters for randomly selected cycling animals. Thirty-six females were treated with 1mgkg-1 (n=12), 10mgkg-1 (n=12) or 20mgkg-1 (n=12) Lucrin Depot. At 4, 6 and 8 weeks the reproductive tracts were assessed using the criteria developed in the untreated females. All of the females treated with 10mgkg-1 showed suppression at 4 weeks and 25% showed return of reproductive activity at 8 weeks. A dose of 1mgkg-1 did not appear to suppress reproductive activity and 20mgkg-1 gave equivocal results, with evidence of both suppression and activity. The results indicate that Lucrin Depot appears to be a promising agent to regulate and potentially synchronise breeding activity in the fat-tailed dunnart.

DOI 10.1071/RD14423
2011 Zhang F, Lidbury BA, Richardson AM, Yates BF, Gardiner MG, Bridgeman AJ, et al., 'Sustainable language support practices in science education: Technologies and solutions', Sustainable Language Support Practices in Science Education: Technologies and Solutions, 1-246 (2011)

The effective communication of science through language, including reading, writing, listening, speaking, and visual representation, is an essential part of scientific learning, u... [more]

The effective communication of science through language, including reading, writing, listening, speaking, and visual representation, is an essential part of scientific learning, understanding, and practice. Language is the medium by which scientific reasoning occurs, whether be it formal language or symbolic representations of scientific phenomena. Sustainable Language Support Practices in Science Education: Technologies and Solutions presents cases on the results of a study done in Australia on first-year university students and the impact of new techniques of language acquisition on science education. The project covered biology, chemistry, and physics. Nearly 3,400 students were involved in the project, drawn from the University of Canberra, the University of Technology-Sydney, the University of Sydney, the University of Tasmania, and the University of Newcastle in Australia. This book serves as the latest research available on meta-cognitive assessment and language needs for a diverse student body; it is a vital resource for academics and practitioners designing and implementing science education around the world today. © 2012 by IGI Global. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.4018/978-1-61350-062-0
Co-authors Karen Mate
2010 Czarny NA, Rodger JC, 'Vitrification as a method for genome resource banking oocytes from the endangered Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii)', Cryobiology, 60 322-325 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.cryobiol.2010.02.007
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
2010 Czarny NA, Rodger JC, 'The spermatozoa of the dasyurid marsupial, Sminthopsis crassicaudata, are highly susceptible to cold shock', Reproduction Fertility and Development, 22 580-585 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/rd09119
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2010 Zhang F, Lidbury B, Schulte J, Yates B, Bridgeman A, Rodger JC, 'Integrating language learning practices in first year science disciplines', International Journal of Learning, 17 481-502 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2
2009 Czarny NA, Garnham JI, Harris MS, Rodger JC, 'Comparison of the production, quality, and in vitro maturation capacity of oocytes from untreated cycling and intermediate phase equine serum gonadotropin-treated fat-tailed dunnarts (Sminthopsis crassicaudata)', Reproduction, 138 23-31 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1530/rep-09-0064
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Merrilee Harris
2009 Grezl K, Lucas JA, Ebrill N, Rodger JC, 'Science in technology and the progression of ideas through innovation', The International Journal of Science in Society, 1 71-85 (2009) [C1]
Co-authors John Lucas
2009 Grezl K, Rodger JC, 'Landscape reclamation: Science, art or business?', The International Journal of Science in Society, 1 13-29 (2009) [C1]
2009 McLean CM, Koller CE, Rodger JC, Macfarlane GR, 'Mammalian hair as an accumulative bioindicator of metal bioavailability in Australian terrestrial environments', Science of the Total Environment, 407 3588-3596 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2009.01.038
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Geoff Macfarlane
2009 Rodger JC, Paris DBBP, Czarny NA, Harris MS, Molinia FC, Taggart DA, et al., 'Artificial insemination in marsupials', Theriogenology, 71 176-189 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.theriogenology.2008.09.006
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Merrilee Harris
2009 Czarny NA, Harris MS, De Iuliis GN, Rodger JC, 'Acrosomal integrity, viability, and DNA damage of sperm from dasyurid marsupials after freezing or freeze drying', Theriogenology, 72 817-825 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.theriogenology.2009.05.018
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Merrilee Harris, Geoffry DeiuliIs
2009 Kitchener AL, Harman A, Kay DJ, McCartney CA, Mate KE, Rodger JC, 'Immunocontraception of Eastern Grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) with recombinant brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) ZP3 protein', Journal of Reproductive Immunology, 79 156-162 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jri.2008.10.004
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Karen Mate
2009 Kitchener AL, Kay DJ, Walters B, Menkhorst P, McCartney CA, Buist JM, et al., 'The immune response and fertility of koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) immunised with porcine zonae pellucidae or recombinant brushtail possum ZP3 protein', Journal of Reproductive Immunology, 82 40-47 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jri.2009.07.001
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Karen Mate
2009 Czarny NA, Harris MS, Rodger JC, 'Dissociation and preservation of preantral follicles and immature oocytes from female dasyurid marsupials', Reproduction Fertility and Development, 21 640-648 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/rd08303
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Merrilee Harris
2008 Czarny NA, Mate KE, Rodger JC, 'Acrosome stability in the spermatoza of dasyurid marsupials', Reproduction, Fertility and Development, 20 295-302 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/RD07178
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Karen Mate
2007 Molinia FC, Myers JV, Glazier AM, Duckworth JA, Rodger JC, 'Uterine and vaginal insemination optimised in brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) superovulated with pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin and porcine luteinising hormone', Reproduction Fertility and Development, 19 521-529 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/rd06135
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
2007 McCartney CA, Harris MS, Rodger JC, Mate KE, 'Towards a ZP-Based contraceptive for marsupials: Comparative analysis and developmental expression of marsupial ZP genes', Molecular Reproduction and Development, 74 1581-1589 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/mrd.20707
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Karen Mate, Merrilee Harris
2005 Harris MS, Rodger JC, 'Characterisation of an epitope shared by an acrosomal acrosin-like protein and the surface of tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) spermatozoa', Journal of Experimental Zoology Part a-Comparative Experimental Biology, 303A 713-721 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/jez.a.193
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Merrilee Harris
2004 Sidhu KS, Mate KE, Gunasekera T, Veal D, Hetherington L, Baker MA, et al., 'A flow cytometric assay for global estimation of tyrosine phosphorylation associated with capacitation of spermatozoa from two marsupial species, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) and the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)', Reproduction, 127 95-103 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1530/rep.1.00073
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 26
Co-authors John Aitken, Karen Mate, Mark Baker
2003 Magarey GM, Rodger JC, Buist JM, Mate KE, 'Effects of repeated superovulation and surgical oocyte collection on ovarian response and natural breeding ability of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)', REPRODUCTION, 125 701-707 (2003) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Karen Mate
2003 Sidhu KS, Mate KE, Molinia FC, Berg DK, Rodger JC, 'Ionic calcium levels in oviduct explant-conditioned media from an Australian marsupial, the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) and its relevance to in vitro fertilization', ZYGOTE, 11 285-291 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S0967199403002338
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Karen Mate
2002 Glazier AM, Mate KE, Rodger JC, 'In vitro and in vivo maturation of oocytes from gonadotrophin-treated brushtail possums', MOLECULAR REPRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT, 62 504-512 (2002) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/mrd.10154
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Karen Mate
2000 Jungnickel MK, Molinia FC, Harman AJ, Rodger JC, 'Sperm transport in the female reproductive tract of the brushtail possum, Trichosurus vulpecula, following superovulation and artificial insemination', ANIMAL REPRODUCTION SCIENCE, 59 213-228 (2000) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0378-4320(00)00074-9
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 10
2000 Mate KE, Sidhu KS, Molinia FC, Glazier AM, Rodger JC, 'Sperm binding and penetration of the zona pellucida in vitro but not sperm-egg fusion in an Australian marsupial, the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)', ZYGOTE, 8 189-196 (2000) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S0967199400000976
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Karen Mate
1999 Lin M, Rodger JC, 'Acrosome formation during sperm transit through the epididymis in two marsupials, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) and the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)', Journal of Anatomy, 194 223-232 (1999)

In certain Australian marsupials including the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) and the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula), formation of the acrosome is not completed in th... [more]

In certain Australian marsupials including the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) and the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula), formation of the acrosome is not completed in the testis but during a complex differentiation process as spermatozoa pass through the epididymis. Using transmission and scanning electron microscopy this paper defined the process of acrosome formation in the epididymis, providing temporal and spatial information on the striking reorganisation of the acrosomal membranes and matrix and of the overlying sperm surface involved. On leaving the testis wallaby and possum spermatozoa had elongated 'scoop'-shaped acrosomes projecting from the dorsal surface of the head. During passage down the epididymis, this structure condensed into the compact button-like organelle found on ejaculated spermatozoa. This condensation was achieved by a complex process of infolding and fusion of the lateral projections of the 'scoop'. In the head of the epididymis the rims of the lateral scoop projections became shorter and thickened and folded inwards, to eventually meet midway along the longitudinal axis of the acrosome. As spermatozoa passed through the body of the epididymis the lateral projections fused together. Evidence of this fusion of the immature outer acrosomal membrane is the presence of vesicles within the acrosomal matrix which persist even in ejaculated spermatozoa. When spermatozoa have reached the tail of the epididymis the acrosome condenses into its mature form, as a small button-like structure contained within the depression on the anterior end of the nucleus. During the infolding process, the membranes associated with the immature acrosome are either engulfed into the acrosomal matrix (outer acrosomal membrane), or eliminated from the sperm head as tubular membrane elements (cytoplasmic membrane). Thus the surface and organelles of the testicular sperm head are transient structures in those marsupials with posttesticular acrosome formation and this must be taken into consideration in attempts to dissect the cell and molecular biology of fertilisation.

DOI 10.1017/S0021878299004586
Citations Scopus - 17
1999 Sidhu KS, Mate KE, Molinia FC, Rodger JC, 'Induction of thumbtack sperm during coculture with oviduct epithelial cell monolayers in a marsupial, the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)', BIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION, 61 1356-1361 (1999) [C1]
DOI 10.1095/biolreprod61.5.1356
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Karen Mate
1999 Lin M, Rodger JC, 'Acrosome formation during sperm transit through the epididymis in two marsupials, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) and the brushtailpossum (Trichosurus vulpecula)', Journal of Anatomy, 194 223-232 (1999) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 15
1999 Jungnickel MK, Bielanowicz AJ, Roger SD, 'Ultrastructural observations on in vitro fertilisation in the brushtail possum, Trichosurus vulpecula, following PMSG/LH superovulation and artificial insemination', Zygote, 7 307-320 (1999) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
1999 Sidhu KS, Mate KE, Molinia FC, Glazier AM, Rodger JC, 'Secretory proteins from the female reproductive tract of the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula): binding to sperm and effects on sperm survival in vitro', REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT, 11 329-336 (1999) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/RD00010
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Karen Mate
1998 Sidhu KS, Mate KE, Rodger JC, 'Sperm-oviduct epithelial cell monolayer co-culture: An in vitro model of sperm-female tract interactions in a marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)', Journal of Reproduction and Fertility, 114 55-61 (1998)

Oviduct epithelial cell (OEC) monolayers were prepared from the isthmic and ampullary parts of the oviducts of FSH-primed tammar wallabies. Co-culture experiments found that 50-60... [more]

Oviduct epithelial cell (OEC) monolayers were prepared from the isthmic and ampullary parts of the oviducts of FSH-primed tammar wallabies. Co-culture experiments found that 50-60% of wallaby spermatozoa attached immediately to OEC monolayers, tracheal cell monolayer controls, and the surface of culture dishes with and without Matrigel coating. Spermatozoa were considered to be attached if they remained on the culture surface after rapidly pipetting the co-culture medium five times. The percentages of attached and unattached spermatozoa were calculated from the number of spermatozoa recovered in the agitated supernatant. After 2 h co-culture the percentage of attached spermatozoa rose to 60-80%. After 6 h co-culture the number of spermatozoa attached to OEC monolayers derived from the oviductal isthmus remained high and only a small percentage were recovered in the agitated supernatant (unattached spermatozoa 3.85 ± 0.76%, P = 0.67). However, after 6 h co-culture of spermatozoa with OEC monolayers derived from the ampulla and with the controls the percentage of attached spermatozoa declined significantly (unattached spermatozoa: ampullary monolayer 23.08 ± 4.80%, P < 0.01; tracheal monolayer 23.23 ± 5.18%, P < 0.01; Matrigel 27.23 ± 7.76%, P < 0.01; plastic surface 28.19 ± 5.30%, P < 0.01). After 6 h co-culture with ampullary and isthmic OEC monolayers, the percentage motility of both attached and unattached spermatozoa was maintained at 64.00 ± 1.90% and 56.66 ± 3.18% and 62.00 ± 3.11% and 52.00 ± 2.43%, respectively, and was then maintained at = 35% after 24 h incubation. In the controls, that is, tracheal monolayer and Matrigel, the motility of attached spermatozoa declined rapidly to 48.66 ± 2.15% and 33.63 ± 8.66%, respectively, at 6 h, and all spermatozoa were immotile after 24 h incubation. However, the motility of unattached spermatozoa in the controls (tracheal monolayer and Matrigel) was maintained at 57.33 ± 3.00% and 34.54 ± 9.27%, respectively, until 6 h and then declined rapidly, and all spermatozoa were immotile after 24 h incubation. Co-culture of wallaby spermatozoa with OEC monolayers also induced acrosomal modifications that were followed by acrosomal loss. At 6 h incubation 38.92 ± 3.98% of spermatozoa on ampullary OEC monolayers and 36.50 ± 3.81% spermatozoa on isthmic OEC monolayers had shed their acrosome. Acrosomal loss during co-culture with both isthmic and ampullary OEC monolayers was significantly (P < 0.01) greater than that observed on tracheal epithelial monolayer (24.42 ± 1.90%, P < 0.01), Matrigel (20.70 ± 2.71%, P < 0.01) and plastic (15.54 ± 2.49%, P < 0.01). Co-culturing spermatozoa with OEC monolayers also induced a transformation from streamlined orientation of sperm head and tail to T-shaped (thumbtack) orientation in a small number (10-15%) of motile spermatozoa after 6 h incubation (data not shown). The significance of these results in relation to the role of the oviduct in sperm capacitation is discussed.

Citations Scopus - 8
Co-authors Karen Mate
1998 Molinia FC, Gibson RJ, Brown AM, Glazier AM, Rodger JC, 'Successful fertilization after superovulation and laparoscopic intrauterine insemination of the brushtail possum, Trichosurus vulpecula, and tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii', JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTION AND FERTILITY, 113 9-17 (1998)
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 27
1998 Sidhu KS, Mate KE, Rodger JC, 'Sperm-oviduct epithelial cell monolayer co-culture: an in vitro model of sperm-female tract interactions in a marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)', JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTION AND FERTILITY, 114 55-61 (1998)
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Karen Mate
1998 Mate KE, Molinia FC, Rodger JC, 'Manipulation of the fertility of marsupials for conservation of endangered species and control of over-abundant populations', ANIMAL REPRODUCTION SCIENCE, 53 65-76 (1998)
DOI 10.1016/S0378-4320(98)00127-4
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Karen Mate
1998 Molinia FC, Gibson RJ, Smedley MA, Rodger JC, 'Further observations of the ovarian response of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) to exogenous gonadotrophins: an improved method for superovulation using FSH/LH', ANIMAL REPRODUCTION SCIENCE, 53 253-263 (1998)
DOI 10.1016/S0378-4320(98)00117-1
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 20
1998 Harris MS, Rodger JC, 'Characterisation of fibrous sheath and midpiece fibre network polypeptides of marsupial spermatozoa with a monoclonal antibody', MOLECULAR REPRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT, 50 461-473 (1998)
DOI 10.1002/(SICI)1098-2795(199808)50:4&lt;461::AID-MRD10&gt;3.0.CO;2-5
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
1997 Setiadi D, Lin MJ, Rodger JC, 'Posttesticular development of spermatozoa of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)', JOURNAL OF ANATOMY, 190 275-288 (1997)
DOI 10.1046/j.1469-7580.1997.19020275.x
Citations Web of Science - 23
1997 Lin MJ, Harman A, Rodger JC, 'Spermiogenesis and spermiation in a marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)', JOURNAL OF ANATOMY, 190 377-395 (1997)
DOI 10.1046/j.1469-7580.1997.19030377.x
Citations Web of Science - 21
1997 Lin M, Harman A, Rodger JC, 'Spermiogenesis and spermiation in a marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)', Journal of Anatomy, 190 377-395 (1997)

Fourteen steps of spermatid development in the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), from the newly formed spermatid to the release of the spermatozoon into the lumen of the seminife... [more]

Fourteen steps of spermatid development in the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), from the newly formed spermatid to the release of the spermatozoon into the lumen of the seminiferous tubules, were recognised at the ultrastructural level using transmission and scanning electron microscopy. This study confirmed that although the main events are generally similar, the process of the differentiation of the spermatid in marsupials is notably different and relatively more complex than that in most studied eutherian mammals and birds. For example, the sperm head rotated twice in the late stage of spermiogenesis: the shape of the spermatid changed from a T-shape at step 10 into a streamlined shape in step 14, and then back to T-shape in the testicular spermatozoa. Some unique figures occurring during the spermiogenesis in other marsupial species, such as the presence of Sertoli cell spurs, the nuclear ring and the subacrosomal space, were also found in the tammar wallaby. However, an important new finding of this study was the development of the postacrosome complex (PAC), a special structure that was first evident as a line of electron dense material on the nuclear membrane of the step 7 spermatid. Subsequently it became a discontinuous line of electron particles, and migrated from the ventral side of the nucleus to the area just behind the posterior end of the acrosome, which was closely located to the sperm-egg fusion site proposed for Monodelphis domestica. The PAC and its possible role in both American and Australian marsupials requires detailed examination. Distinct immature features were discovered in the wallaby testicular spermatozoa. A scoop shape of the acrosome was found on the testicular spermatozoa of the tammar wallaby, which was completely different to the compact button shape of acrosome in ejaculated spermatozoa. The fibre network found beneath the cytoplasm membrane of the midpiece of the ejaculated sperm also did not occur in the testicular spermatozoa, although the structure of the principle piece was fully formed and had no obvious morphological difference from that of the epididymal and ejaculated spermatozoa. The time frame of the formation of morphologically mature spermatozoa in the epididymis of the tammar wallaby needs to be determined by further studies.

DOI 10.1017/S0021878296001744
Citations Scopus - 25
1997 Setiadi D, Lin M, Rodger JC, 'Posttesticular development of spermatozoa of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)', Journal of Anatomy, 190 275-288 (1997)

Tammar wallaby spermatozoa undergo maturation during transit through the epididymis. This maturation differs from that seen in eutherian mammals because in addition to biochemical... [more]

Tammar wallaby spermatozoa undergo maturation during transit through the epididymis. This maturation differs from that seen in eutherian mammals because in addition to biochemical and functional maturation there are also major changes in morphology, in particular formation of the condensed acrosome and reorientation of the sperm head and tail. Of spermatozoa released from the testes, 83% had a large immature acrosome. By the time spermatozoa reached the proximal cauda epididymis 100% of sperm had condensed acrosomes. Similarly 86% of testicular spermatozoa had immature thumb tack or T shape head-tail orientation while only 2% retained this immature morphology in the corpus epididymis. This maturation is very similar to that reported for the common brush tail possum, Trichosurus vulpecula. However, morphological maturation occurred earlier in epididymal transit in the tammar wallaby. By the time spermatozoa had reached the proximal cauda epididymis no spermatozoa had an immature acrosome and thumbtack orientation. Associated with acrosomal maturation was an increase in acrosomal thiols and the formation of disulphides which presumably account for the unusual stability of the wallaby sperm acrosome. The development of motility and progressive motility of tammar wallaby spermatozoa is similar to that of other marsupials and eutherian mammals. Spermatozoa are immotile in the testes and the percentage of motile spermatozoa and the strength of their motility increases during epididymal transit. During passage through the caput and corpus epididymis, spermatozoa first became weakly motile in the proximal caput and then increasingly progressively motile through the corpus epididymis. Tammar wallaby spermatozoa collected from the proximal cauda epididymis had motility not different from ejaculated spermatozoa. Ultrastructural studies indicated that acrosomal condensation involved a complex infolding of the immature acrosome. At spermiation the acrosome of tammar wallaby spermatozoa was a relatively large flat or concave disc which projected laterally and anteriorly beyond the limits of the nucleus. During transit of the epididymal caput and proximal corpus the lateral projections folded inwards to form a cup like structure the sides of which eventually met and fused. The cavity produced by this fusion was lost as the acrosome condensed to its mature form as a small button-like structure contained within the depression on the anterior end of the nucleus. During this process the dorsal surface of the immature acrosome and its outer acrosomal membrane and overlying plasma membrane were engulfed into the acrosomal matrix. This means that the dorsal surface of the acrosomal region of the testicular tammar wallaby sperm. head is a transient structure. The dorsal acrosomal surface of the mature spermatozoon appears ultrastructurally to be the relocated ventral surface of the acrosomal projections which previously extended out beyond the acrosomal depression on the dorsal surface of the nucleus of the immature spermatozoon.

DOI 10.1017/S0021878296001641
Citations Scopus - 25
1997 Sistina Y, Rodger JC, 'Arachidonic acid-induced acrosomal loss in the spermatozoa of a marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)', REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT, 9 803-809 (1997)
DOI 10.1071/R95217
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
1996 Mate KE, Rodger JC, 'Capacitation and the acrosome reaction in marsupial spermatozoa', REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT, 8 595-603 (1996)
DOI 10.1071/RD9960595
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Karen Mate
1996 Hinds LA, Fletcher TP, Rodger JC, 'Hormones of oestrus and ovulation and their manipulation in marsupials', REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT, 8 661-672 (1996)
DOI 10.1071/RD9960661
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 30
1996 Molinia FC, Rodger JC, 'Pellet-freezing spermatozoa of two marsupials: The tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii, and the brushtail possum, Trichosurus vulpecula', REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT, 8 681-684 (1996)
DOI 10.1071/RD9960681
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 29
1995 LIN MJ, SISTINA Y, RODGER JC, 'ELECTRON-MICROSCOPIC LOCALIZATION OF THIOL AND DISULFIDE GROUPS BY DIRECT MONOMALEIMIDO-NANOGOLD LABELING IN THE SPERMATOZOA OF A MARSUPIAL, THE TAMMAR WALLABY (MACROPUS-EUGENII)', CELL AND TISSUE RESEARCH, 282 291-296 (1995)
DOI 10.1007/s004410050480
Citations Web of Science - 11
1995 Lin M, Sistina Y, Rodger JC, 'Electron-microscopic localisation of thiol and disulphide groups by direct monomaleimido-nanogold labelling in the spermatozoa of a marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)', Cell &amp; Tissue Research, 282 291-296 (1995)

This study utilised a commercially available monomaleimido-nanogold reagent to directly label cellular thiol groups (SH) of marsupial (tammar wallaby) spermatozoa before and after... [more]

This study utilised a commercially available monomaleimido-nanogold reagent to directly label cellular thiol groups (SH) of marsupial (tammar wallaby) spermatozoa before and after reduction of disulphides (S-S) with mercaptoethylamine hydrochloride (MEA). The sperm surface, mitochondrial membranes, axoneme and tail fibres were all labelled with gold particles before MEA treatment and the label intensity was increased after S-S reduction. The acrosomal membranes and matrix of spermatozoa contained no detectable SH prior to MEA treatment. However, after moderate MEA treatment (1 mg/ml) gold label was associated with the acrosomal membrane and invaginated acrosomal membrane within the acrosomal matrix. After exposure to 5 and 10 mg/ml MEA, gold particles heavily labelled the acrosomal matrix. Thus, the acrosomal membranes and matrix of tammar wallaby spermatozoa both contain S-S cross-linked structures, and this may contribute to the unusual stability of the marsupial acrosome. Under all treatment conditions the nucleus remained unlabelled. This is consistent with early studies which indicated that cysteine was absent from the nuclear protamines. The study also demonstrated that monomaleimido-nanogold can be used to resolve SH- and S-S-rich cellular structures directly, in addition to its use to label antibodies and Fab fragments for immunochemical localisation. © 1995 Springer-Verlag.

DOI 10.1007/BF00319119
Citations Scopus - 12
1994 MATE KE, KOSOWER NS, WHITE IG, RODGER JC, 'FLUORESCENT LOCALIZATION OF THIOLS AND DISULFIDES IN MARSUPIAL SPERMATOZOA BY BROMOBIMANE LABELING', MOLECULAR REPRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT, 37 318-325 (1994)
DOI 10.1002/mrd.1080370311
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Karen Mate
1993 SISTINA Y, LIN M, MATE KE, RODGER JC, 'INDUCTION OF THE MARSUPIAL SPERM ACROSOME REACTION IN-VITRO BY TREATMENT WITH DIACYLGLYCEROLS', JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTION AND FERTILITY, 99 335-341 (1993)
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Karen Mate
1993 MATE KE, RODGER JC, 'ROLE OF DIACYLGLYCEROLS AND CALCIUM IN THE MARSUPIAL ACROSOME REACTION', JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTION AND FERTILITY, 99 367-373 (1993)
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Karen Mate
1993 KING NJC, MULLBACHER A, TIAN L, RODGER JC, LIDBURY B, HLA RT, 'WEST NILE VIRUS-INFECTION INDUCES SUSCEPTIBILITY OF INVITRO OUTGROWN MURINE BLASTOCYSTS TO SPECIFIC LYSIS BY PATERNALLY DIRECTED ALLO-IMMUNE AND VIRUS-IMMUNE CYTOTOXIC T-CELLS', JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, 23 131-144 (1993)
DOI 10.1016/0165-0378(93)90003-Z
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 11
1993 SISTINA Y, LIN MJ, MATE KE, ROBINSON ES, RODGER JC, 'THE UNIQUE STABILITY OF THE MARSUPIAL SPERM ACROSOMAL MEMBRANES EXAMINED BY UNPROTECTED FREEZE-THAWING AND TREATMENT WITH THE DETERGENT TRITON-X-100', REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT, 5 1-14 (1993)
DOI 10.1071/RD9930001
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Karen Mate
1993 RODGER JC, COUSINS SJ, MATE KE, HINDS LA, 'OVARIAN-FUNCTION AND ITS MANIPULATION IN THE TAMMAR WALLABY, MACROPUS-EUGENII', REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT, 5 27-38 (1993)
DOI 10.1071/RD9930027
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Karen Mate
1993 MATE KE, RODGER JC, 'INVITRO MATURATION OF OOCYTES FROM A MARSUPIAL, THE TAMMAR WALLABY (MACROPUS-EUGENII)', MOLECULAR REPRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT, 34 329-336 (1993)
DOI 10.1002/mrd.1080340314
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Karen Mate
1993 SISTINA Y, LIN MJ, RODGER JC, 'LYSOPHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINE DISRUPTS THE ACROSOME OF TAMMAR WALLABY (MACROPUS-EUGENII) SPERMATOZOA', MOLECULAR REPRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT, 35 277-284 (1993)
DOI 10.1002/mrd.1080350310
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 13
1992 MATE KE, GILES I, RODGER JC, 'EVIDENCE THAT CORTICAL GRANULE FORMATION IS A PERIOVULATORY EVENT IN MARSUPIALS', JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTION AND FERTILITY, 95 719-728 (1992)
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Karen Mate
1992 RODGER JC, GILES I, MATE KE, 'UNEXPECTED OOCYTE GROWTH AFTER FOLLICULAR ANTRUM FORMATION IN 4 MARSUPIAL SPECIES', JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTION AND FERTILITY, 96 755-763 (1992)
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Karen Mate
1992 RODGER JC, BREED WG, BENNETT JH, 'GONADOTROPIN-INDUCED ESTRUS AND OVULATION IN THE POLYOVULATORY MARSUPIAL SMINTHOPSIS-CRASSICAUDATA', REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT, 4 145-152 (1992)
DOI 10.1071/RD9920145
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 21
1991 MATE KE, RODGER JC, 'STABILITY OF THE ACROSOME OF THE BRUSH-TAILED POSSUM (TRICHOSURUS-VULPECULA) AND TAMMAR WALLABY (MACROPUS-EUGENII) INVITRO AND AFTER EXPOSURE TO CONDITIONS AND AGENTS KNOWN TO CAUSE CAPACITATION OR ACROSOME REACTION OF EUTHERIAN SPERMATOZOA', JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTION AND FERTILITY, 91 41-48 (1991)
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 50
Co-authors Karen Mate
1991 RODGER JC, COUSINS SJ, MATE KE, 'A SIMPLE GLYCEROL-BASED FREEZING PROTOCOL FOR THE SEMEN OF A MARSUPIAL TRICHOSURUS-VULPECULA, THE COMMON BRUSHTAIL POSSUM', REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT, 3 119-125 (1991)
DOI 10.1071/RD9910119
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Karen Mate
1990 RODGER JC, 'PROSPECTS FOR THE ARTIFICIAL MANIPULATION OF MARSUPIAL REPRODUCTION AND ITS APPLICATION IN RESEARCH AND CONSERVATION', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY, 37 249-258 (1990)
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 26
1990 HAYMAN DL, SMITH MJ, RODGER JC, 'A COMPARATIVE-STUDY OF CHIASMATA IN MALE AND FEMALE BETTONGIA-PENICILLATA (MARSUPIALIA)', GENETICA, 83 45-49 (1990)
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 13
1990 HAYMAN DL, RODGER JC, 'MEIOSIS IN MALE AND FEMALE TRICHOSURUS-VULPECULA (MARSUPIALIA)', HEREDITY, 64 251-254 (1990)
DOI 10.1038/hdy.1990.30
Citations Web of Science - 12
1988 RODGER JC, MATE KE, 'A PMSG GNRH METHOD FOR THE SUPEROVULATION OF THE MONOVULATORY BRUSH-TAILED POSSUM (TRICHOSURUS-VULPECULA)', JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTION AND FERTILITY, 83 885-891 (1988)
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 42
Co-authors Karen Mate
1987 Drake BL, Rodger JC, 'Phagocytic properties of cultured murine trophoblast', Placenta, 8 129-139 (1987)

The phagocytic potential of cultured trophoblast from early (ectoplacental cone (EPC); day 7.5 post coitum) and mid-term (placenta; day is to 14 post coitum) pregnancy in the mous... [more]

The phagocytic potential of cultured trophoblast from early (ectoplacental cone (EPC); day 7.5 post coitum) and mid-term (placenta; day is to 14 post coitum) pregnancy in the mouse has been examined using a variety of test particles and culture conditions. In suspension, small numbers ( < 1 per cent) of large placental trophoblast cells showed limited phagocytic uptake of Staphylococcus aureus but not of opsonized sheep red blood cells (RBCs). In contrast, trophoblast phagocytosis was never seen in monolayer placental cell culture. Placental macrophages consistently exhibited phagocytic uptake of both opsonized sheep RBCs and S. aureus under these conditions. In monolayer culture, EPC trophoblast phagocytosed S. aureus, but there was only limited uptake of RBCs (mouse or sheep) or spermatozoa. When cultured in a three-dimensional matrix (blood and plasma clots), however, EPC trophoblast demonstrated extensive phagocytosis of both RBCs and sperm. These results are discussed with reference to the use of in vitro systems for examining developmental processes, and a possible role for trophoblast phagocytosis in early gestation is proposed. © 1987.

DOI 10.1016/0143-4004(87)90016-6
Citations Scopus - 17
1987 Drake BL, King NJC, Maxwell LE, Rodger JC, 'Class I major histocompatibility complex antigen expression on early murine trophoblast and its induction by lymphokines in vitro', Journal of Reproductive Immunology, 10 319-328 (1987)

The expression of paternal class I and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens in cultures of murine ectoplacental cone trophoblast was examined using immunogold ... [more]

The expression of paternal class I and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens in cultures of murine ectoplacental cone trophoblast was examined using immunogold labelled antibodies and electron microscopy. Class I MHC antigens could be induced on ectoplacental cone derived trophoblast following exposure to concanavalin A stimulated T cell supernatants. Class I MHC antigens were not detected in untreated trophoblast cultures. Class II MHC antigens were never detected on trophoblast whether treated or untreated. This is the first report of the experimental induction of Class I MHC antigens on a population of normally MHC-negative trophoblast cells. © 1987.

DOI 10.1016/0165-0378(87)90034-9
Citations Scopus - 9
1987 RODGER JC, DRAKE BL, 'THE ENIGMA OF THE FETAL GRAFT', AMERICAN SCIENTIST, 75 51-57 (1987)
Citations Web of Science - 15
1987 KING NJC, DRAKE BL, MAXWELL LE, RODGER JC, 'CLASS-I MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX ANTIGEN EXPRESSION ON EARLY MURINE TROPHOBLAST AND ITS INDUCTION BY LYMPHOKINES INVITRO .2. THE ROLE OF GAMMA INTERFERON IN THE RESPONSES OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY GIANT-CELLS', JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, 12 13-21 (1987)
DOI 10.1016/0165-0378(87)90077-5
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 23
1985 Rodger JC, Fletcher TP, Tyndale-Biscoe CH, 'Active anti-paternal immunization does not affect the success of marsupial pregnancy', Journal of Reproductive Immunology, 8 249-256 (1985)

Active anti-paternal immunization does not compromise pregnancy in eutherian mammals. However, in an earlier study in a marsupial, grafting with paternal skin appeared to have res... [more]

Active anti-paternal immunization does not compromise pregnancy in eutherian mammals. However, in an earlier study in a marsupial, grafting with paternal skin appeared to have resulted in transient infertility. In the present study, by critically monitoring the breeding efficiency of tammar wallabies sensitized against their mate's transplantation antigens, we aimed to resolve the question of immunologically mediated infertility in marsupials. Eight experimental females received two full-thickness skin grafts from their prospective mate and eight controls grafts of their own skin. The experimental group were monitored for 30 reproductive cycles and produced 24 pouch young (PY), whereas the control animals produced 28 young from 33 cycles. Five of the 11 apparently non-fertile cycles were judged to be normal pregnancies where the young had failed to reach the pouch (cycle length < 28 days: rapid plasma progesterone decline coincident with oestrus). True infertility was thus limited and, although occurring mainly in the male-skin grafted group (5 cycles), this was not significantly different (¿ 2 , P > 0.5) from the controls (1 cycle) and represented the effect of one very poor breeder. We conclude that allogeneic pregnancy in marsupials is not compromised by active anti-paternal immunization. Infertility observed here, and in the earlier study, reflected disturbance of breeding owing to handling of the animals or the poor reproductive efficiency of individual animals in small experimental groups. © 1985.

DOI 10.1016/0165-0378(85)90044-0
Citations Scopus - 8
1985 Drake BL, Rodger JC, 'The in vivo immunoregulatory properties of cultured murine trophoblast are not unique to this tissue', Immunology, 55 325-329 (1985)

Primary cultures of murine trophoblast (ectoplacental cone and mid-term placenta) and their supernatants were found to inhibit in vitro lymphocyte proliferative responses to conca... [more]

Primary cultures of murine trophoblast (ectoplacental cone and mid-term placenta) and their supernatants were found to inhibit in vitro lymphocyte proliferative responses to concanavalin A (77-87%) and allo-antigen (52-84%). However, cultures and cell-conditioned media from non-trophoblastic tissues (embryonic sac, adult lung and liver, and B16 melanoma line) produced similar results. In all cases, the inhibitory effects were not due to reduced cell viability. Addition of anti-progesterone serum to the ectoplacental cone-lymphocyte co-cultures, at a concentration known to bind the available trophoblast-derived progesterone, did not overcome the observed suppression. The results clearly demonstrate that a range of cultured cell types, and their conditioned media, will suppress immune reponses in vitro. We conclude that cultured trophoblast is not an appropriate model for studies of placental immunoregulation.

Citations Scopus - 6
1985 Rodger JC, 'Lack of a requirement for a maternal humoral immune response to establish or maintain successful allogeneic pregnancy', Transplantation, 40 372-375 (1985)

In general, breeding pairs are not major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-compatible, and therefore the fetoplacental unit can be considered as a natural allograft. In many mammal... [more]

In general, breeding pairs are not major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-compatible, and therefore the fetoplacental unit can be considered as a natural allograft. In many mammals pregnancy leads to the production of nonlytic antibodies of antipaternal MHC specificity. It has been suggested that these protect the semiallogeneic fetus from rejection by acting as blocking or enhancing factors¿or, alternatively, that they are part of a humoral response involved in the establishment of normal pregnancy. These hypotheses were tested in allomated mice made B cell deficient by continuous treatment with aIgMµ antiserum. The status of the maternal immune system was assessed by in vivo antibody production, in vitro mitogen responses, and allograft rejection. By these criteria B cell function could not be demonstrated in aIgMµ treated female mice, but T cell responses were unaffected. Allogeneic pregnancy, however, was not compromized by this humoral immune system dysfunction¿litter size and neonatal survival being the same in the agMµ and control serum-treated groups. These results indicate that a maternal humoral immune response is not essential for the establishment of pregnancy or the survival of the semiallogeneic: fetus. © 1985 by The Williams & Wilkins Co.

Citations Scopus - 40
1985 Drake BL, Rodger JC, 'Nonspecific suppression of in vitro immune responses by placental and nonplacental tissues', Transplantation Proceedings, 17 1653-1654 (1985)
Citations Scopus - 2
1984 Bedford JM, Rodger JC, Breed WG, 'Why so many mammalian spermatozoa - a clue from marsupials?', Proceedings of the Royal Society of London - Biological Sciences, 221 221-233 (1984)
Citations Scopus - 55
1982 Rodger JC, 'The testis and its excurrent ducts in American caenolestid and didelphid marsupials', American Journal of Anatomy, 163 269-282 (1982)

The present study examines and compares the structure of the testis and its excurrent ducts in a caenolestid and four didelphid marsupials. Of particular interest was the site of ... [more]

The present study examines and compares the structure of the testis and its excurrent ducts in a caenolestid and four didelphid marsupials. Of particular interest was the site of sperm pairing in the epididymis and whether this feature, shared by both American marsupial families but not by any Australian marsupial, was associated with changes in the morphology of the duct. In contrast to the testes of most Australian marsupials, except the peramelids (bandicoots), the intertubular space in the American marsupials was filled by Leydig cells (around 20% of testis volume). The opossum testes were unusual compared with those of eutherian mammals in that histological sections of individual seminiferous tubules contained only a single cellular association irrespective of the length of the tubule sectioned. The rete testis, as in the Australian dasyurids (devil, quoll, etc.), was a simple branching duct system that arose deep within the testis and emerged as a single duct at the testicular hilus. This arrangement is completely different from that in kangaroos and Australian possums, indicating a diversity of rete form in the marsupials similar to that seen in eutherian mammals. The rete emptied into a single, essentially straight, efferent duct that became convoluted towards the epididymis, where it formed a distinct structure adjacent to the caput epididymidis. The efferent ducts were highly variable in diameter and epithelial height, suggesting that the duct was not of uniform character along its length, or that the initial single duct had divided to form ducts of different characters. Sperm pairs were first seen in the proximal cauda epididymidis, and their appearance was correlated with changes in the character of the duct and its epithelium. The distal ductus deferens of Caenolestes, in contrast to those of the didelphids and indeed all other marsupials, was a convoluted ampulla-like structure adjacent to the prostate gland. In the other marsupials the only accessory sex glands are a segmented prostate and bulbourethral glands. Copyright © 1982 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

DOI 10.1002/aja.1001630307
Citations Scopus - 15
1982 Rodger JC, Bedford JM, 'Separation of sperm pairs and sperm-egg interaction in the opossum, Didelphis virginiana', Journal of Reproduction and Fertility, 64 171-179 (1982)
Citations Scopus - 68
1982 Rodger JC, Bedford JM, 'Induction of oestrus, recovery of gametes, and the timing of fertilization events in the opossum, Didelphis virginiana', Journal of Reproduction and Fertility, 64 159-169 (1982)

Of 14 lactating opossums maintained in laboratory conditions, 13 mated 4.7-8.5 days after removal of pouch young. The time between this removal and onset of receptive oestrus was ... [more]

Of 14 lactating opossums maintained in laboratory conditions, 13 mated 4.7-8.5 days after removal of pouch young. The time between this removal and onset of receptive oestrus was negatively correlated with the age of the pouch young. Mating generally occurred between 24:00 and 06:00 h, with ovulation following between 13:00 and 16:00 h. Each animal ovulated a mean of 29.6 eggs (range 19-40), approximately equal numbers coming from both ovaries. Spermatozoa were absent from the uterus and were present only in the oviducts during the periovular period. Those not cleared by flushing (1-160 x 10 3 /oviduct remained incarcerated in isthmic crypts lined by a simple cuboidal epithelium. Spermatozoa in crypts were paired, separating or single. The progressively motile cells flushed from the oviduct presented a similar pattern to that in the crypts, about 30% of spermatozoa were firmly paired, the others either loosely associated or single. Only single spermatozoa attached to ova. Monospermic fertilization followed shortly after ovulation, and no supplementary spermatozoa were present in the perivitelline space. Deposition of the mucoid layer on the zona pellucida then began, often before incorporation of the fertilizing spermatozoon by the vitellus was complete. The oviductal epithelium was formed throughout by ciliated and secretory cells. In the ampulla and upper isthmus, the secretory cells produced the mucoid material which formed a thick coat over the egg surface. Ovum transit through the oviduct was rapid, in one animal eggs had reached the uterus and acquired a shell within 15-20 h of ovulation.

Citations Scopus - 45
1981 Rodger JC, Pollitt CC, 'Radiographic examination of electroejaculation in marsupials', Biology of Reproduction, 24 1125-1134 (1981)
Citations Scopus - 18
1981 Rodger JC, Young RJ, 'Glycosidase and cumulus dispersal activities of acrosomal extracts from opossum (marsupial) and rabbit (eutherian) spermatozoa', Gamete Research, 4 507-514 (1981)

Opossum and rabbit sperm sonicates dispersed the mouse cumulus oophorus in vitro at the same rate on a per sperm basis, despite much higher activities of the glycosidic acrosomal ... [more]

Opossum and rabbit sperm sonicates dispersed the mouse cumulus oophorus in vitro at the same rate on a per sperm basis, despite much higher activities of the glycosidic acrosomal enzymes N-acetylhexosaminidase (350 ×) and arylsulphatase (40 ×) in the opossum preparation. Activities of another glycosidase, hyaluronidase, and the protease acrosin where similar in sperm extracts from both species. However, specific inhibitors of N-acetylhexosaminidase (iodoacetate) and arylsulphatase (SO 4 2- , PO 4 3- ) markedly reduced the rate of cumulus dispersal by rabbit sperm sonicates. These findings suggest that, while hyaluronidase action probably represents the rate-limiting (slow) step, several glycosidases act together to disperse the cumulus and in the passage of the fertilizing spermatozoon through it in eutherian mammals. The likely role of these acrosomal enzymes in the marsupial, where the ovulated oocytes lack a cumulus oophorus, is more uncertain. Copyright © 1981 Alan R. Liss, Inc.

DOI 10.1002/mrd.1120040604
Citations Scopus - 17
1981 Marley PB, Rodger JC, White IG, Selley ML, Duffield AM, '19-Hydroxylated prostaglandins in the semen of the marsupial trichosurus vulpecula (brush-tailed possum)', Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology -- Part B: Biochemistry and, 70 619-621 (1981)

1. 1. The semen of the brush tailed possum Trichosurus culpecula and the prostates of other marsupials were found to contain prostaglandins identified positively in possum semen a... [more]

1. 1. The semen of the brush tailed possum Trichosurus culpecula and the prostates of other marsupials were found to contain prostaglandins identified positively in possum semen as predominantly 19-OH PGF 1a , and 19-OH PGF 2a . 2. 2. The 19-OH prostaglandins can no longer be regarded as characteristic of primate semen. The 19-OH nature of the PGFs in possum semen may be of some evolutionary interest in view of the restricted occurrence of the 19-OH-PGs in the semen of eutherian species so far examined. © 1981.

DOI 10.1016/0305-0491(81)90306-0
Citations Scopus - 2
1980 Rodger JC, White IG, 'Glycogen not N-acetylglucosamine the prostatic carbohydrate of three Australian and American marsupials, and pattens of these sugars in marsupialia', Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology -- Part B: Biochemistry and, 67 109-113 (1980)

1. 1. The major carbohydrate of the prostate of dasyurid and didelphid marsupials was found to be glycogen. 2. 2. Neither N-acetylglucosamine, the characteristic seminal and prost... [more]

1. 1. The major carbohydrate of the prostate of dasyurid and didelphid marsupials was found to be glycogen. 2. 2. Neither N-acetylglucosamine, the characteristic seminal and prostatic sugar of all but one previously examined marsupial species, nor fructose were detected. 3. 3. Glycogen was only a minor constituent of the phalangerid and peramelid, prostate gland (high N-acetylglucosamine species). 4. 4. The prostatic secretion of the dasyurid, Sarcophilus, had a very high concentration of glycogen, suggesting that the polysaccharide is the seminal sugar in this species. 5. 5. These and earlier data indicate that there are at least three prostatic carbohydrate patterns in marsupials. © 1980.

DOI 10.1016/0305-0491(80)90277-1
Citations Scopus - 7
1980 Brown-Woodman PDC, Marley PB, Morris S, Rodger JC, White IG, 'Origin of glycerylphosphorylcholine, inositol, N-acetylaminosugar, and prostaglandins in human seminal plasma and their effects on sperm metabolism', Archives of Andrology, 4 149-155 (1980)

The origin of glycerylphosphorylcholine (GPC), N-acetylaminosugar, inositol, and prostaglandins in human seminal plasma was investigated by correlating the concentration of these ... [more]

The origin of glycerylphosphorylcholine (GPC), N-acetylaminosugar, inositol, and prostaglandins in human seminal plasma was investigated by correlating the concentration of these components in split ejaculates with known marker constituents. Fructose and acid phosphatase were selected as markers of the secretory activity of the seminal vesicles and prostate gland, respectively, and spermatozoa indicated epididymal origin. The concentration of fructose was lowest in the first fraction of the semen and increased to a maximum in the final portion. Prostaglandins E and F and N-acetylaminosugar values closely followed this pattern, indicating that these components originate in the seminal vesicles. The concentration of spermatozoa was high in the first 2 fractions, decreasing to a minimum in the final fraction. The distribution of GPC was similar to that of the spermatozoa, indicating that the epididymis secretes this compound. Inositol levels were similar in all fractions, indicating that it is probably present in epididymal, vesicular, and prostatic fluid. Human spermatozoa were unable to utilize N-acetylglucosamine or inositol. High concentrations of some prostaglandins (100 µg/ml of PGF 1 (a), 15S 15 met. F 2 (a), PGA 1 , and PGA 2 ) depressed the endogenous oxygen uptake of human spermatozoa.

Citations Scopus - 12
1980 Brown-woodman PDC, Marley PB, Morris S, Rodger JC, White IG, 'Origin of glycerylphosphorylcholine, inositol, n-acetylaminosugar, and prostaglandins in human seminal plasma and their effects on sperm metabolism', Systems Biology in Reproductive Medicine, 4 149-155 (1980)

The origin of glycerylphosphorylcholine (GPC), N-acetylaminosugar, inositol, and prostaglandins in human seminal plasma was investigated by correlating the concentration of these ... [more]

The origin of glycerylphosphorylcholine (GPC), N-acetylaminosugar, inositol, and prostaglandins in human seminal plasma was investigated by correlating the concentration of these components in split ejaculates with known marker constituents. Fructose and acid phosphatase were selected as markers of the secretory activity of the seminal vesicles and prostate gland, respectively, and spermatozoa indicated epididymal origin. The concentration of fructose was lowest in the first fraction of the semen and increased to a maximum in the final portion. Prostaglandins E and F and N-acetylaminosugar values closely followed this pattern, indicating that these components originate in the seminal vesicles. The concentration of spermatozoa was high in the first two fractions, decreasing to a minimum in the final fraction. The distribution of GPC was similar to that of the spermatozoa, indicating that the epididymis secretes this compound. Inositol levels were similar in all fractions, indicating that it is probably present in epididymal, vesicular, and prostatic fluid. Human spermatozoa were unable to utilize N-acetylglucosamine or inositol. High concentrations of some prostaglandins (100 µg/ml of PGF 1a , 15S 15 met. F 2a , PGA 1 , and PGA 2 ) depressed the endogenous oxygen uptake of human spermatozoa. © 1980 Informa UK Ltd.

DOI 10.3109/01485018008986482
Citations Scopus - 3
1978 Tyndale-Biscoe CH, Rodger JC, 'Differential transport of spermatozoa into the two sides of the genital tract of a monovular marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)', Journal of Reproduction and Fertility, 52 37-43 (1978)

Ovulation in the tammar wallaby alternates between the ovaries. The genital duct of each side enters the median vaginal culs-de-sac separately. Post-partum oestrus occurred 0.4 da... [more]

Ovulation in the tammar wallaby alternates between the ovaries. The genital duct of each side enters the median vaginal culs-de-sac separately. Post-partum oestrus occurred 0.4 days after birth and ovulation 1 day later. After a single copulation spermatozoa were found in both cervical canals at 0.5 h and extended to the oviduct on the non-parturient side only by 8 h. Very few spermatozoa were found in sections of the post-partum uterus or its associated oviduct at any time. Spermatozoa were recovered by flushing from both sides but the numbers were 2-20 times greater in the nonparturient than in the post-partum side: the greatest difference occurred in the cervical canals 2-5 h after copulation. In females which had undergone a previous infertile cycle, spermatozoa were abundant in both cervices and both uteri. It is concluded that the differential distribution of spermatozoa in post-partum animals was (1) due to failure of transport in the recently pregnant side of the tract, rather than attraction of spermatozoa to the ovulation side, and (2) established at the cervix which, on the ovulation side, provides a reservoir of spermatozoa for 24 h after copulation.

Citations Scopus - 36
1978 Rodger JC, Suter DAI, 'Respiration rates and sugar utilization by marsupial spermatozoa', Gamete Research, 1 111-116 (1978)

This paper reports the first metabolic study of marsupial spermatozoa. The oxidative metabolism of the spermatozoa of the Australian brush-tailed possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) wa... [more]

This paper reports the first metabolic study of marsupial spermatozoa. The oxidative metabolism of the spermatozoa of the Australian brush-tailed possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) was examined using a micro Warburg system. Semen was collected by electro-ejaculation and washed twice in Ca 2+ free Krebs-Ringer-phosphate buffer containing antibiotics (KRPA). Washed spermatozoa suspended in fresh KRPA, were then incubated for 3 hours at 37° C in the presence and absence of added substrates (4 mM). The exogenous substrates tested were N-acetylglucosamine, glucosamine, and glucose. Small quantities of radioactively labeled [ 14 C] substrates were included in the incubation media to allow measurement of substrate oxidation. Although the respiratory rate varied considerably between semen pools (replicate experiments), the relationship between total oxygen consumption (measured manometrically), and oxygen consumption accounted for by exogenous substrate utilization (calcuated from radioactivity recovered in the respiratory CO 2 ) was remarkably consistent. Oxidation of exogenous substrate accounted for 49¿54% of the oxygen consumption, depending on the substrate used. There was, however, no evidence that addition of these substrates stimulated the respiratory rate over that found when no substrate was added. Lactate formation accounted for the greater part of exogenous substrate consumed. Copyright © 1978 Alan R. Liss, Inc.

DOI 10.1002/mrd.1120010204
Citations Scopus - 8
1977 Tyndale-Biscoe CH, Rodger JC, 'Differential distribution of spermatozoa to the two uteri of the tammar wallaby', Theriogenology, 8 197 (1977)
1977 Marley PB, Selley ML, Duffield AM, Rodger JC, White IG, '19-OH-Prostaglandin F in the semen and prostate gland of marsupials', Theriogenology, 8 207 (1977)
DOI 10.1016/0093-691X(77)90169-8
Citations Scopus - 2
1976 Rodger JC, White IG, 'Oxygen consumption and sugar utilization by the spermatozoa of a marsupial, the brush-tailed possum', Theriogenology, 6 659 (1976)
DOI 10.1016/0093-691X(76)90098-4
Citations Scopus - 1
1976 Rodger JC, White IG, 'Proceedings: Comparison of sperm numbers released in the urine and in ejaculates of the brush-tailed possum.', Journal of Reproduction and Fertility, 46 502-503 (1976)
1976 Rodger JC, White IG, 'Source of seminal N acetylglucosamine in Australian marsupials and further studies of free sugars of the marsupial prostate gland', Journal of Reproduction and Fertility, 46 467-469 (1976)
Citations Scopus - 10
1976 Rodger JC, 'Comparative aspects of the accessory sex glands and seminal biochemistry of mammals', Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology -- Part B: Biochemistry and, 55 1-8 (1976)

1. 1. Despite large gaps in the literature of semen biochemistry, especially of wild species, recent studies of the carbohydrate biochemistry of marsupial semen allow an approach ... [more]

1. 1. Despite large gaps in the literature of semen biochemistry, especially of wild species, recent studies of the carbohydrate biochemistry of marsupial semen allow an approach to the question of the origin and evolution of mammalian seminal plasma. 2. 2. The marsupials are a very important part of an overall picture of seminal plasma evolution because they are the end product of an alternative line of mammalian evolution genetically separated from the eutherians for over 100 million years. 3. 3. The present paper discusses the accessory sex glands and seminal sugars of mammals from a comparative point of view in the light of present knowledge of evolutionary relationships and suggests possible schemes of evolution of mammalian seminal plasma. © 1976.

DOI 10.1016/0305-0491(76)90164-4
Citations Scopus - 14
1975 White IG, Rodger JC, Murdoch RN, Williams WL, Abney TO, 'Effect of decapacitation factor on the oxygen uptake of rabbit spermatozoa recovered from the uterus', Experientia, 31 80-81 (1975)
DOI 10.1007/BF01924689
Citations Scopus - 2
1975 Rodger JC, White IG, 'Free N acetylaminosugar in the seminal plasma of eutherian mammals', Journal of Reproduction and Fertility, 45 379-381 (1975)
Citations Scopus - 8
1975 Rodger JC, White IG, 'Electroejaculation of Australian marsupials and analyses of the sugars in the seminal plasma from three macropod species', Journal of Reproduction and Fertility, 43 233-239 (1975)

Electroejaculation of a variety of Australian marsupials was attempted in this study. The animals used were conscious, sedated, anaesthetized or recently shot. Electroejaculation ... [more]

Electroejaculation of a variety of Australian marsupials was attempted in this study. The animals used were conscious, sedated, anaesthetized or recently shot. Electroejaculation proved to be a satisfactory means of obtaining seminal plasma but not spermatozoa. The largest volumes of seminal plasma were collected from animals shortly after death. Anaesthetized animals also provided useful volumes of seminal plasma but only insignificant amounts were obtained from conscious and sedated animals. Quantitative analyses of N acetylglucosamine, glucose and anthronereactive material were made of deproteinized, deionized, water extracts of seminal plasma from electroejaculates obtained from wallabies and kangaroos shortly after death. The major seminal sugar of the 3 macropod species was N acetylglucosamine and glucose was also present in quite large concentrations. These observations show that the pattern of sugars in the prostate gland of marsupials is reflected in the semen.

Citations Scopus - 18
1975 Rodger JC, 'Seminal plasma, an unnecessary evil?', Theriogenology, 3 237-247 (1975)

Despite considerable activity in the field of semen biochemistry over the last thirty years no generalization about the function of the myriad of seminal plasma constituents has e... [more]

Despite considerable activity in the field of semen biochemistry over the last thirty years no generalization about the function of the myriad of seminal plasma constituents has emerged. As a result, some have commented, if not in print, that the seminal plasma has no essential function at all. The present paper examines the literature in the light of the premise that the answer to the question of the role of seminal plasma constituents will require an overall view of each species' reproductive physiology as it relates to such events and processes as gamete production, copulation, gamete transport and the environment within the female tract. Guidelines are suggested that should be followed when attempting to suggest a role or roles for seminal constituents. © 1975.

DOI 10.1016/0093-691X(75)90141-7
Citations Scopus - 7
1974 Rodger JC, White IG, 'Proceedings: Sugars in the semen of Australian marsupials.', Journal of Reproduction and Fertility, 36 453 (1974)
1974 Rodger JC, White IG, 'Carbohydrates of the prostate of two Australian marsupials, Trichosurus vulpecula and Megaleia rufa', Journal of Reproduction and Fertility, 39 267-273 (1974)
Citations Scopus - 2
1974 Rodger JC, White IG, 'Free N acetylglucosamine in marsupial semen', Journal of Reproduction and Fertility, 39 383-386 (1974)
Citations Scopus - 8
1973 Rodger JC, Hughes RL, 'Studies of the accessory glands of male marsupials', Australian Journal of Zoology, 21 285-301 (1973)

The reproductive tracts of males from eight species of Australian marsupial were examined (Macropus eugenii, Potorous tridactylus, Sminthopsis crassicaudata, Antechinus stuartii, ... [more]

The reproductive tracts of males from eight species of Australian marsupial were examined (Macropus eugenii, Potorous tridactylus, Sminthopsis crassicaudata, Antechinus stuartii, Pseudocheirus peregrinus, Trichosurus vulpécula, Isoodon macrourus, and Perameles nasuta). The prostate glands of these species were found to be of two shapes, carrot-like or heart-like. From one to three pairs of Cowper's glands were observed; these were mostly bulbous in shape but some were kidney-shaped. Both prostate and Cowper's glands were tubular in structure with the glandular tubules lined by a simple columnar epithelium. The glandular tubules of Cowper's glands were of much larger diameter than those of the prostate. The prostate glands were segmented, and this segmentation was usually shown by variations in the height and staining reactions of the tubular epithelium and in the volume of connective tissue between glandular tubules. Differences in microanatomy between pairs of Cowper's glands were far less than those between prostate segments. Mucosubstance appeared to be the major contribution of the prostate to the seminal plasma. This mucosubstance was mainly neutral, with glycogen largely absent. The present results indicate that the Cowper's glands secrete mucus but that various glands also contributed lipid and glycogen. © 1973 CSIRO. All Rights Reserved.

DOI 10.1071/ZO9730303
Citations Scopus - 41
1973 Rodger JC, White IG, 'Carbohydrates of the prostate of marsupials.', Journal of Reproduction and Fertility, 32 339-340 (1973)
1972 White IG, Murdoch RN, Rodger JC, Williams WL, Abney TO, 'The oxygen uptake of rabbit spermatozoa in vitro and after incubation in utero.', Journal of Reproduction and Fertility, 28 143-144 (1972)
Citations Scopus - 1
Show 96 more journal articles

Conference (11 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Zhang F, Lidbury B, Schulte J, Bridgeman A, Yates B, Rodger JC, 'Catering for the language needs of diverse first year science students', 13th Pacific Rim First Year in Higher Education Conference 2010 (2010) [E1]
2010 Zhang F, Lidbury B, Schulte J, Bridgeman A, Yates B, Rodger JC, 'Embedding in-discipline language support for first year students in the sciences', AARE 2009 Conference Proceedings (2010) [E1]
2009 Czarny NA, Harris MS, Rodger JC, 'ENZYMATIC DISSOCIATION AND VITRIFICATION OF PREANTRAL FOLLICLES FROM THREATENED CARNIVOROUS MARSUPIALS', REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1071/RDv21n1Ab156
2009 Czarny NA, Harris MS, Rodger JC, 'Enzymatic dissociation and vitrification of preantral follicles from threatened carnivorous maruspials', Reproduction Fertility and Development (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Merrilee Harris
2007 Czarny NA, Mate KE, Rodger JC, 'Acrosome stability in Dasyurid marsupials', Australian Mammal Society 53rd Scientific Meeting. Programme and Abstracts (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Karen Mate
2007 Moberg A, Richardson RT, Rodger JC, O'Rand MG, Harris MS, 'Cloning and functional analysis of proacrosin from a marsupial, the Tammar Wallaby (Macropus eugenii)', Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Society for Reproductive Biology (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Merrilee Harris
2007 Czarny NA, Harris MS, Rodger JC, 'Preservation of spermatozoa from Dasyurid marsupials', Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Society for Reproductive Biology (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Merrilee Harris
2001 Sidhu KS, Mate KE, Molinia FC, Rodger JC, 'Zymographic evaluation of proacrosin/acrosin system in spermatozoa of two marsupial species, the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) and the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)' (2001) [E1]
1997 Rodger JC, 'Likely targets for immunocontraception in marsupials', Reproduction, Fertility and Development (1997)

There is a growing need to manage marsupial populations as a means to mitigate economic and environmental damage and resolve animal welfare problems. In Australia, the problems of... [more]

There is a growing need to manage marsupial populations as a means to mitigate economic and environmental damage and resolve animal welfare problems. In Australia, the problems of population management are highly specific and localized. In contrast, in New Zealand the problem is the control of the many millions of widely-distributed brushtail possums which are the country's major vertebrate pest. The needs of the two countries are thus very different but immunocontraception may provide an effective and humane alternative to current lethal control strategies. This paper discusses the features of marsupial reproduction and development that offer potential as targets for immunocontraceptive interference, including: (1) sperm production and maturation in the male; (2) sperm transport and maturation in the female; and (3) sperm and egg antigens and the early embryo. Some of these antigen targets are shared with eutherian mammals but others are likely to be unique to marsupials.

DOI 10.1071/R96073
Citations Scopus - 27
1996 Johnson MH, Rodger J, 'Manipulation of marsupial reproduction', Reproduction, Fertility and Development (1996)
1994 RODGER JC, 'PREFERTILIZATION GAMETE MATURATION EVENTS IN MARSUPIALS', REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT (1994)
DOI 10.1071/RD9940473
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 19
Show 8 more conferences
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 43
Total funding $14,721,815

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20161 grants / $7,500

Developing artificial insemination technology for the recovery and genetic management of threatened and endangered rock wallabies$7,500

Funding body: Equity Trustees Limited

Funding body Equity Trustees Limited
Project Team Professor John Rodger, Mr Ryan Witt, Dr Lyn Hinds
Scheme Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600861
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20151 grants / $6,000

Developing artificial insemination technology for the recovery and genetic management of threatened and endangered rock wallabies$6,000

Funding body: Equity Trustees Limited

Funding body Equity Trustees Limited
Project Team Mr Ryan Witt, Professor John Rodger, Dr Lyn Hinds
Scheme Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500611
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20141 grants / $73,751

OvoControl contraception as a myna management tool $73,751

Funding body: NSW Environmental Trust

Funding body NSW Environmental Trust
Project Team Professor John Rodger, Doctor Andrea Griffin
Scheme Environmental Research (Major Grant)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1300311
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20093 grants / $33,750

Biotechnology for Biodiversity CRC - Planning Meeting$24,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Special Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190626
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Indian Myna Population Control$6,000

Funding body: Port Stephens Council

Funding body Port Stephens Council
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190343
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON Y

Development of Oocyte Preservation Protocols in Tasmanian Devil$3,750

Funding body: University of Tasmania

Funding body University of Tasmania
Project Team Professor John Rodger, Ms Natasha Czarny
Scheme Dr Eric Guiler Tasmanian Devil Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189691
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

20085 grants / $125,818

Process fundamentals of algae production$75,000

Funding body: Crucible Group Pty Ltd

Funding body Crucible Group Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Gary Ellem, Professor John Rodger
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0188560
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Development of a protective chlamydia vaccine for the koala$37,500

Funding body: Port Stephens Council

Funding body Port Stephens Council
Project Team Professor John Rodger, Conjoint Professor Kenneth Beagley, Professor Peter Timms, Doctor Merrilee Harris
Scheme Collaborative Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0189223
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON Y

Development of a protective chlamydia vaccine for the koala$10,000

Funding body: Landcom

Funding body Landcom
Project Team Professor John Rodger, Conjoint Professor Kenneth Beagley, Professor Peter Timms, Doctor Merrilee Harris
Scheme Collaborative Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189224
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Chlamydia Vaccine for the Koala$1,818

Funding body: Hunter Koala Preservation Society Inc

Funding body Hunter Koala Preservation Society Inc
Project Team Professor John Rodger, Doctor Merrilee Harris
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188679
Type Of Funding Donation - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFD
UON Y

Marsupial Research$1,500

Funding body: Pioneer Film and Television Productions Ltd

Funding body Pioneer Film and Television Productions Ltd
Project Team Professor John Rodger, Doctor Merrilee Harris
Scheme Consultancy
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189680
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON Y

20074 grants / $33,427

A primary assessment of mammalian taxa as bioindicators of heavy metal contaminant availability in areas adjacent to a disused lead and zinc smelter, Lake Macquarie$9,178

Funding body: Lake Macquarie City Council

Funding body Lake Macquarie City Council
Project Team Doctor Geoffrey MacFarlane, Professor John Rodger, Mr Christopher McLean
Scheme Lake Macquarie Environmental Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187328
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON Y

(31) Wildlife Biology and Management$8,910

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Publication Performance Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0187986
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

A cross-disciplinary approach to language support for first year students in the science disciplines$7,874

Funding body: Australian Learning and Teaching Council

Funding body Australian Learning and Teaching Council
Project Team Professor John Rodger, Doctor Gary Ellem
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188861
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Short and long term preservation and fertility of dasyurid sperm$7,465

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Merrilee Harris, Professor John Rodger
Scheme Pilot Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187900
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20064 grants / $267,197

Zona Pellucida Based Contraceptives for Overabundant Koalas and Kangaroos. $177,197

Funding body: Morris Animal Foundation

Funding body Morris Animal Foundation
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0185979
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

Farrell Institute Partnership Projects$50,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Farrell Institute Partnership
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187210
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Non-injection Chlamydia vaccine for the koala$30,000

Funding body: Pfizer Australia

Funding body Pfizer Australia
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme University Grant Partner Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0186841
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Non-injection chlamydia vaccine for the koala$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Collaborative Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186230
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20056 grants / $396,263

Oral delivery a viable strategy for fertility control vaccination of Kangaroos$240,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Rodger, Conjoint Professor Kenneth Beagley, Mr M Evans
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0184259
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Oral delivery a viable strategy for fertility control vaccination of Kangaroos$45,000

Funding body: Fetility Control Ltd

Funding body Fetility Control Ltd
Project Team Professor John Rodger, Conjoint Professor Kenneth Beagley
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0185714
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Oral delivery a viable strategy for fertility control vaccination of Kangaroos$45,000

Funding body: Environment ACT

Funding body Environment ACT
Project Team Professor John Rodger, Conjoint Professor Kenneth Beagley
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0185715
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON Y

Oral delivery a viable strategy for fertility control vaccination of Kangaroos$30,000

Funding body: Department of Defence

Funding body Department of Defence
Project Team Professor John Rodger, Conjoint Professor Kenneth Beagley
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0185716
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Scholarship - Matching - Semester 2, 2005$29,326

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Multi-Year Project Grant Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0185742
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

2005 RIBG allocation$6,937

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Research Infrastructure Block Grant (RIBG)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0185838
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20044 grants / $595,676

Upgrade and expansion of Newcastle Plant Growth Facility$329,504

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Emeritus Professor John Patrick, Emeritus Professor Ray Rose, Conjoint Professor Christina Offler, Associate Professor David McCurdy, Mr Michael Cole, Doctor Geoffrey MacFarlane, Professor John Rodger
Scheme Linkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0183029
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

Sperm-based contraception for marsupials$158,274

Funding body: Morris Animal Foundation

Funding body Morris Animal Foundation
Project Team Professor John Rodger, Doctor Merrilee Harris
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0184010
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

Fertility control for overabundant koalas and kangaroos$97,898

Funding body: Morris Animal Foundation

Funding body Morris Animal Foundation
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0183097
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

Marsupial fertilisation and its manipulation.$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0183469
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

19953 grants / $12,134,204

Conservation and Management of Marsupials.$11,664,000

Funding body: Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research

Funding body Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Cooperative Research Centres Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 1995
Funding Finish 2001
GNo G0176060
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Possum Gamete Biology - sperm and female tract interactions$455,204

Funding body: Ministry of Agriculture & Fisheries (New Zealand)

Funding body Ministry of Agriculture & Fisheries (New Zealand)
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1995
Funding Finish 1996
GNo G0175542
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON Y

Cell and molecular biology of the marsupial egg.$15,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Small Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1995
Funding Finish 1995
GNo G0174855
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

19944 grants / $523,000

94 MECH C. Australian wildlife conservation research centre./ Wallaby Breeding Colony$314,000

Funding body: Department of Education, Training & Youth Affairs

Funding body Department of Education, Training & Youth Affairs
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Mechanism C Infrastructure
Role Lead
Funding Start 1994
Funding Finish 1994
GNo G0174404
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

Possum Gamete Biology$200,000

Funding body: Ministry of Agriculture & Fisheries (New Zealand)

Funding body Ministry of Agriculture & Fisheries (New Zealand)
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1994
Funding Finish 1994
GNo G0175411
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON Y

Characterisation of Proteins from the Reproductive Tract and Gametes of the Tammar Wallaby$6,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1994
Funding Finish 1994
GNo G0174773
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Gordon Conference - Mammalian Gamaetogenesis & Embryogenesis - 31 July-5 August 1994$2,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1994
Funding Finish 1994
GNo G0175124
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

19934 grants / $244,129

93,94,95 GRANT. Minimally Invasive Reproductive Technology for Marsupials.$151,979

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Large Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1993
Funding Finish 1995
GNo G0173093
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Fertility targetted biological control of possums$80,000

Funding body: Landcare Research New Zealand Ltd

Funding body Landcare Research New Zealand Ltd
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1993
Funding Finish 1993
GNo G0173388
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON Y

The Marsupial Embryo In Vitro: Preimplantation Development$8,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1993
Funding Finish 1993
GNo G0172795
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Establishment Of Collaborative Research Aimed At The Control Of Possum Fertility In New Zealand$3,650

Funding body: Department of Industry, Science & Resources

Funding body Department of Industry, Science & Resources
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme DIST Biology & Biotechnology (Defunct)
Role Lead
Funding Start 1993
Funding Finish 1993
GNo G0173432
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

19922 grants / $251,600

92,93,94 GRANT. Pre-fertilization Maturation of Marsupial Gametes$244,600

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Large Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1992
Funding Finish 1994
GNo G0173094
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

The Preimplantation Marsupial Embryo In Vitro$7,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1992
Funding Finish 1992
GNo G0174210
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

19911 grants / $29,500

Fertilisation And Early Development In Marsupials And Its Experimental Manipulation In Vivo And In Vitro$29,500

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Rodger
Scheme Large Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1991
Funding Finish 1991
GNo G0173854
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current3

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD1.1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Conservation Biology and Public Policy PhD (Environmental Sc), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD GnRH agonist based synchronisation of marsupial reproduction for conservation breeding. PhD (Environmental Sc), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2006 Masters Oral Vaccine Delivery for Macropod Marsupials Zoology, University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 Masters Chlamydial Disease and Other Environmental Pressures Affecting an Opportunistically Sampled Wild Koala Population in the Port Stephens Region M Philosophy (Biological Sc), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD A Strategic Assessment of the Potential for a New Pyrolysis Industry in the Hunter Valley PhD (Environmental Sc), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Sole Supervisor
2009 PhD Advances in Assisted Reproductive Techniques for Conservation of Australian Carnivorous Marsupials PhD (Biological Sciences), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
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News

Three gram baby brush tailed wallaby

New breeding technique addresses extinction rates

January 24, 2014

With Australia leading the world in mammal extinctions, an innovative breeding technique could bring Australia's threatened kangaroos and wallabies back from the brink.

CRC Wildlife Biodiversity

Leading the bid for a Cooperative Research Centre for Wildlife Biodiversity

July 23, 2013

The University of Newcastle is leading a Trans-Tasman consortium bid for a Cooperative Research Centre for Wildlife Biodiversity (Wildlife Biodiversity CRC) for the 16th CRC Selection Round.

Professor John Rodger

Positions

Conjoint Professor
Wildlife Biology & Biotechnology
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science

Casual Academic
Wildlife Biology & Biotechnology
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science

Focus area

Biological Sciences

Contact Details

Email john.rodger@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 0419 211 071
Fax (02) 4921 5033

Office

Room SB.304
Building Science
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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