Dr Job Fransen

Conjoint Lecturer

School of Environmental and Life Sciences

Career Summary

Biography

Job Fransen is a young academic with a strong background in sports practice. During his PhD candidature and after finishing his PhD on motor competence development in children and adolescents at Ghent University in Belgium early 2014, he was employed as a Strength and Conditioning coach for the Flemish Rugby Union, the Belgian Female Rugby Sevens team and several clubs in field hockey, soccer and rugby in the highest levels of their respective codes. Thanks to his multidisciplinary interest, he has published several A1 papers on talent identification, motor competence development and training and testing within different disciplines from soccer to combat sports.

With regards to teaching, Job Fransen has experience in both the academic and coach education setting. His strong practical background help him to integrate many elements of sports coaching into his teaching.

Research Expertise
I have three main research interests: 1) The measurement, development and retention of motor competence: What is the retention rate of motor competence in adulthood? Can we identify windows for optimal development of motor competence? How does motor competence contribute to talent identification and development? 2) Understand how we can use fundamental motor concepts in field-based settings that are representative for different sports codes: How do we use sensory information when performing sport-specific tasks such as dribbling or catching in different sports disciplines? Do we understand the underlying concepts associated with loss of attention during very sport specific skills? How can we modify existing training programs to optimise skill acquisition 3) Understanding skill/sports expertise with regard to talent identification and development: How do expert performers differ from novice performance in terms of generic motor competence, skill performance, maturation, fitness levels and sports participation profile? 

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Ghent University - Belgium
  • Master of Physical Education, Ghent University - Belgium

Keywords

  • Motor Competence
  • Motor Control
  • Motor Development
  • Skill Acquisition
  • Talent Development
  • Talent Identification

Languages

  • Dutch (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2010 - 1/01/2014 PhD Candidate Ghent University
Movement and Sports Science
Belgium

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/02/2011 - 1/12/2014 Strength and Conditioning Coach Flemish Rugby Union
Sports Coaching
Belgium
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (25 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Novak AR, Bennett KJM, Fransen J, Dascombe BJ, 'A multidimensional approach to performance prediction in Olympic distance cross-country mountain bikers', Journal of Sports Sciences, 36 71-78 (2018)

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This study adopted a multidimensional approach to performance prediction within Olympic distance cross-country... [more]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This study adopted a multidimensional approach to performance prediction within Olympic distance cross-country mountain biking (XCO-MTB). Twelve competitive XCO-MTB cyclists (VO 2 max 60.8¿±¿6.7¿ml¿·¿kg -1 ·¿min -1 ) completed an incremental cycling test, maximal hand grip strength test, cycling power profile (maximal efforts lasting 6¿600¿s), decision-making test and an individual XCO-MTB time-trial (34.25¿km). A hierarchical approach using multiple linear regression analyses was used to develop predictive models of performance across 10 circuit subsections and the total time-trial. The strongest model to predict overall time-trial performance achieved prediction accuracy of 127.1¿s across 6246.8¿±¿452.0¿s (adjusted R 2 ¿=¿0.92; P¿ < ¿0.01). This model included VO 2 max relative to total cycling mass, maximal mean power across 5 and 30¿s, peak left hand grip strength, and response time for correct decisions in the decision-making task. A range of factors contributed to the models for each individual subsection of the circuit with varying predictive strength (adjusted R 2 : 0.62¿0.97; P¿ < ¿0.05). The high prediction accuracy for the total time-trial supports that a multidimensional approach should be taken to develop XCO-MTB performance. Additionally, individual models for circuit subsections may help guide training practices relative to the specific trail characteristics of various XCO-MTB circuits.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2017.1280611
Co-authors Ben Dascombe
2018 Woods CT, Veale J, Fransen J, Robertson S, Collier NF, 'Classification of playing position in elite junior Australian football using technical skill indicators', Journal of Sports Sciences, 36 97-103 (2018)

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor &amp; Francis Group. ¿In team sport, classifying playing position based on a players¿ expressed skill sets can provide a guide to... [more]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. ¿In team sport, classifying playing position based on a players¿ expressed skill sets can provide a guide to talent identification by enabling the recognition of performance attributes relative to playing position. Here, elite junior Australian football players were a priori classified into 1 of 4 common playing positions; forward, midfield, defence, and ruck. Three analysis approaches were used to assess the extent to which 12 in-game skill performance indicators could classify playing position. These were a linear discriminant analysis (LDA), random forest, and a PART decision list. The LDA produced classification accuracy of 56.8%, with class errors ranging from 19.6% (midfielders) to 75.0% (ruck). The random forest model performed at a slightly worse level (51.62%), with class errors ranging from 27.8% (midfielders) to 100% (ruck). The decision list revealed 6 rules capable of classifying playing position at accuracy of 70.1%, with class errors ranging from 14.4% (midfielders) to 100% (ruck). Although the PART decision list produced the greatest relative classification accuracy, the technical skill indicators reported were generally unable to accurately classify players according to their position using the 3 analysis approaches. This player homogeneity may complicate recruitment by constraining talent recruiter¿s ability to objectively recognise distinctive positional attributes.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2017.1282621
2017 Fransen J, Lovell TWJ, Bennett KJM, Deprez D, Deconinck FJA, Lenoir M, Coutts AJ, 'The Influence of Restricted Visual Feedback on Dribbling Performance in Youth Soccer Players', MOTOR CONTROL, 21 158-167 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1123/mc.2015-0059
2017 Novak AR, Bennett KJM, Fransen J, Dascombe BJ, 'Predictors of performance in a 4-h mountain-bike race', Journal of Sports Sciences, 1-7 (2017)

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor &amp; Francis Group This study aimed to cross validate previously developed predictive models of mountain biking performance in a n... [more]

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group This study aimed to cross validate previously developed predictive models of mountain biking performance in a new cohort of mountain bikers during a 4-h event (XC4H). Eight amateur XC4H cyclists completed a multidimensional assessment battery including a power profile assessment that consisted of maximal efforts between 6 and 600¿s, maximal hand grip strength assessments, a video-based decision-making test as well as a XC4H race. A multiple linear regression model was found to predict XC4H performance with good accuracy (R 2 ¿=¿0.99; P¿ < ¿0.01). This model consisted of (Formula presented.) relative to total cycling mass (body mass including competition clothing and bicycle mass), maximum power output sustained over 60¿s relative to total cycling mass, peak left hand grip strength and two-line decision-making score. Previous models for Olympic distance MTB performance demonstrated merit (R 2 ¿=¿0.93; P¿ > ¿0.05) although subtle changes improved the fit, significance and normal distribution of residuals within the model (R 2 ¿=¿0.99; P¿ < ¿0.01), highlighting differences between the disciplines. The high level of predictive accuracy of the new XC4H model further supports the use of a multidimensional approach in predicting MTB performance. The difference between the new, XC4H and previous Olympic MTB predictive models demonstrates subtle differences in physiological requirements and performance predictors between the two MTB disciplines.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2017.1313999
Co-authors Ben Dascombe
2017 Novak AR, Bennett KJM, Pluss MA, Fransen J, Watsford ML, Dascombe BJ, 'Power profiles of competitive and non-competitive mountain bikers.', J Strength Cond Res, (2017)
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000002003
Co-authors Ben Dascombe
2016 Smith MR, Fransen J, Deprez D, Lenoir M, Coutts AJ, 'Impact of mental fatigue on speed and accuracy components of soccer-specific skills', Science and Medicine in Football, 1 48-52 (2016)
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2016.1252850
Co-authors Mitch Smith
2016 Henrique RS, Ré AHN, Stodden DF, Fransen J, Campos CMC, Queiroz DR, Cattuzzo MT, 'Association between sports participation, motor competence and weight status: A longitudinal study', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 19 825-829 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Sports Medicine Australia Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate if baseline motor competence, weight status and sports participation in early childhood predi... [more]

© 2015 Sports Medicine Australia Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate if baseline motor competence, weight status and sports participation in early childhood predict sports participation two years later. Design longitudinal study. Methods In 2010, motor competence (object control and locomotor skills), weight status and sports participation were assessed in 292 children between three and five years-of-age. In 2012, sports participation was re-evaluated in 206 of the original 292 children. Logistic regression was implemented to examine if initial sports participation, motor competence and weight status would predict sports participation two years later. Results In the final model, sports participation in 2010 (OR = 9.68, CI: 3.46 to 27.13) and locomotor skills (OR = 1.21, CI: 1.01 to 1.46) significantly predicted sports participation after two years. Conclusions These results suggest that initial sports participation and more advanced locomotor skills in preschool years may be important to promote continued participation in sports across childhood.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2015.12.512
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2016 Bennett KJM, Fransen J, Scott BR, Sanctuary CE, Gabbett TJ, Dascombe BJ, 'Positional group significantly influences the offensive and defensive skill involvements of junior representative rugby league players during match play', Journal of Sports Sciences, 34 1542-1546 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Taylor &amp; Francis. This study examined the skill involvements of three positional groups across a junior representative rugby league season. Data were collected from ... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. This study examined the skill involvements of three positional groups across a junior representative rugby league season. Data were collected from 45 rugby league players (mean ± SD; age = 16.5 ± 1.0 years) currently participating in the Harold Matthews and SG Ball Cup. Players were subdivided into hit-up forwards, adjustables and outside backs. The frequency (n · min -1 ) of offensive, defensive and overall involvements was coded for each group using a notation system and a practical coach skill analysis tool. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) revealed a significant effect of playing position on skill involvements (F = 9.06; P < 0.001; ES = 0.41). Hit-up forwards performed a significantly greater frequency of offensive (0.31 ± 0.10), defensive (0.42 ± 0.15) and overall involvements (0.74 ± 0.19) when compared to adjustables (0.20 ± 0.08, 0.28 ± 0.08 and 0.52 ± 0.15, respectively) and outside backs (0.20 ± 0.12, 0.11 ± 0.07 and ± 0.31 ± 0.17, respectively). Further, adjustables performed a significantly greater number of defensive (0.28 ± 0.08) and overall involvements (0.52 ± 0.15) when compared to outside backs (0.11 ± 0.07 and 0.31 ± 0.17, respectively). The findings of this study suggest that it is important to consider a junior player¿s positional group when analysing their skill involvements. Information gained from this study could assist in the design of specific training methodologies for junior rugby league players in high-level talent development programmes.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2015.1122206
Co-authors Ben Dascombe
2016 Bennett KJM, Scott BR, Fransen J, Elsworthy N, Sanctuary CE, Gabbett TJ, Dascombe BJ, 'Examining the skill involvements of under-16 rugby league players during a small-sided game and match-play', International Journal of Sports Science and Coaching, 11 532-537 (2016) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2016. This study investigated the correlations between the skill demands of an &apos;on-side&apos; small-sided game (SSG) and match-play in under-16 junior rugby ... [more]

© The Author(s) 2016. This study investigated the correlations between the skill demands of an 'on-side' small-sided game (SSG) and match-play in under-16 junior rugby league players. Fifteen Harold Matthews players undertook a SSG (10 vs. 10 on a 68 m by 40 m playing surface for 3 min) in the week leading up to round 6 of their competitive season. The frequency of skill involvements (i.e. offensive, defensive and total) was manually coded using a specific criterion. The defensive and total skill involvements were significantly higher per minute of play in the SSG when compared to match-play. A significant, very large, positive correlation was observed between offensive and total skill involvements during a SSG and offensive skill involvements during a match (r (s) = 0.80, p < 0.01; r (s) = 0.71, p < 0.01, respectively). No significant correlations were evident for defensive skill involvements during SSG and match-play. Overall, it appears that the selected SSG provided players with ample opportunity to practice match-specific skills. In addition, the transfer of these opportunities seems confined to offensive rather then defensive skills.

DOI 10.1177/1747954116654780
Co-authors Ben Dascombe
2016 Woods CT, Banyard HG, McKeown I, Fransen J, Robertson S, 'Discriminating talent identified junior Australian footballers using a fundamental gross athletic movement assessment', Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 15 548-553 (2016)

© Journal of Sports Science and Medicine. Talent identification (TID) is a pertinent component of the sports sciences, affording practitioners the opportunity to target developme... [more]

© Journal of Sports Science and Medicine. Talent identification (TID) is a pertinent component of the sports sciences, affording practitioners the opportunity to target developmental interventions to a select few; optimising financial investments. However, TID is multi-componential, requiring the recognition of immediate and prospective performance. The measurement of athletic movement skill may afford practitioners insight into the latter component given its augmented relationship with functional sport specific qualities. It is currently unknown whether athletic movement skill is a discriminant quality in junior Australian football (AF). This study aimed to discriminate talent identified junior AF players from their non-talent identified counterparts using a fundamental gross athletic movement assessment. From a total of 50 under 18 (U18) AF players; two groups were classified a priori based on selection level; talent identified (n = 25; state academy representatives) and non-talent identified (n = 25; state-based competition repre-sentatives). Players performed a fundamental gross athletic movement assessment based on the Athletic Ability Assessment (AAA), consisting of an overhead squat, double lunge (left and right legs), single leg Romanian deadlift (left and right legs), and a push up (six movement criterions). Movements were scored across three assessment points using a three-point scale (resulting in a possible score of nine for each movement). A multivariate analysis of variance revealed significant between group effects on four of the six movement criterions (d = 0.56 ¿ 0.87; p = 0.01 ¿ 0.02). Binary logistic regression models and a receiver operating characteristic curve inspection revealed that the overhead squat score provided the greatest group discrimination (ß(SE) = -0.89(0.44); p < 0.05), with a score of 4.5 classifying 64% and 88% of the talent identified and non-talent identified groups, respectively. Results support the integration of this assessment into contemporary talent identification approaches in junior AF, as it may provide coaches with insight into a juniors developmental potential.

Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Deprez D, Fransen J, Boone J, Lenoir M, Philippaerts R, Vaeyens R, 'Characteristics of high-level youth soccer players: variation by playing position', JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCES, 33 243-254 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2014.934707
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
2015 Deprez D, Buchheit M, Fransen J, Pion J, Lenoir M, Philippaerts RM, Vaeyens R, 'A longitudinal study investigating the stability of anthropometry and soccerspecific endurance in pubertal high-level youth soccer players', Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 14 418-426 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, Journal of Sports Science and Medicine. All rights reserved. We investigated the evolution and stability of anthropometric and soccer-specific endurance characteristics o... [more]

© 2015, Journal of Sports Science and Medicine. All rights reserved. We investigated the evolution and stability of anthropometric and soccer-specific endurance characteristics of 42 high-level, pubertal soccer players with high, average and low yo-yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (YYIR1) baseline performances over two and four years. The rates of improvement were calculated for each performance group, and intra-class correlations were used to verify short- and long-term stability. The main finding was that after two and four years, the magnitudes of the differences at baseline were reduced, although players with high YYIR1 baseline performance still covered the largest distance (e.g., low from 703 m to 2126 m; high from 1503 m to 2434 m over four years). Furthermore, the YYIR1 showed a high stability over two years (ICC = 0.76) and a moderate stability over four years (ICC = 0.59), due to large intra-individual differences in YYIR1 performances over time. Anthropometric measures showed very high stability (ICCs between 0.94 to 0.97) over a two-year period, in comparison with a moderate stability (ICCs between 0.57 and 0.75) over four years. These results confirm the moderate-to-high stability of high-intensity running performance in young soccer players, and suggest that the longer the follow-up, the lower the ability to predict player¿s future potential in running performance. They also show that with growth and maturation, poor performers might only partially catch up their fitter counterparts between 12 and 16 years.

Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2015 Deprez D, Fransen J, Lenoir M, Philippaerts RM, Vaeyens R, 'The Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 is reliable in young high-level soccer players', BIOLOGY OF SPORT, 32 65-70 (2015)
DOI 10.5604/20831862.1127284
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 4
2015 Pion JA, Fransen J, Deprez DN, Segers VI, Vaeyens R, Philippaerts RM, Lenoir M, 'STATURE AND JUMPING HEIGHT ARE REQUIRED IN FEMALE VOLLEYBALL, BUT MOTOR COORDINATION IS A KEY FACTOR FOR FUTURE ELITE SUCCESS', JOURNAL OF STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING RESEARCH, 29 1480-1485 (2015)
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
2015 Deprez DN, Fransen J, Lenoir M, Philippaerts RM, Vaeyens R, 'A retrospective study on anthropometrical, physical fitness, and motor coordination characteristics that influence dropout, contract status, and first-team playing time in high-level soccer players aged eight to eighteen years.', Journal of strength and conditioning research, 29 1692-1704 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1519/jsc.0000000000000806
2014 Deprez D, Fransen J, Lenoir M, Philippaerts RM, Vaeyens R, 'A retrospective study on anthropometrical, physical fitness and motor coordination characteristics that influence drop out, contract status and first-team playing time in high-level soccer players, aged 8 to 18 years.', J Strength Cond Res, (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000806
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
2014 Deprez D, Coutts AJ, Lenoir M, Fransen J, Pion J, Philippaerts R, Vaeyens R, 'Reliability and validity of the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 in young soccer players', JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCES, 32 903-910 (2014)
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2013.876088
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 10
2014 Fransen J, D'Hondt E, Bourgois J, Vaeyens R, Philippaerts RM, Lenoir M, 'Motor competence assessment in children: Convergent and discriminant validity between the BOT-2 Short Form and KTK testing batteries', RESEARCH IN DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES, 35 1375-1383 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.ridd.2014.03.011
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
2014 Fransen J, Deprez D, Pion J, Tallir IB, D'Hondt E, Vaeyens R, et al., 'Changes in Physical Fitness and Sports Participation Among Children With Different Levels of Motor Competence: A 2-Year Longitudinal Study', PEDIATRIC EXERCISE SCIENCE, 26 11-21 (2014)
DOI 10.1123/pes.2013-0005
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 13
2014 Pion J, Fransen J, Lenoir M, Segers V, 'The value of non-sport-specific characteristics for talent orientation in young male judo, karate and taekwondo athletes', Archives of Budo, 10 147-152 (2014)
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 12
2014 Pion J, Segers V, Fransen J, Debuyck G, Deprez D, Haerens L, et al., 'Generic anthropometric and performance characteristics among elite adolescent boys in nine different sports', European Journal of Sport Science, (2014) [C1]

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the Flemish Sports Compass (FSC), a non-sport-specific generic testing battery. It was hypothesised that a set of 22 tests would have ... [more]

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the Flemish Sports Compass (FSC), a non-sport-specific generic testing battery. It was hypothesised that a set of 22 tests would have sufficient discriminant power to allocate athletes to their own sport based on a unique combination of test scores. First, discriminant analyses were applied to the 22 tests of anthropometry, physical fitness and motor coordination in 141 boys under age 18 (16.1 ± 0.8 years) and post age at peak height velocity (maturity offset = 2.674 ± 0.926) from Flemish Top Sport Academies for badminton, basketball, gymnastics, handball, judo, soccer, table tennis, triathlon and volleyball. Second, nine sequential discriminant analyses were used to assess the ability of a set of relevant performance characteristics classifying participants and non-participants for the respective sports. Discriminant analyses resulted in a 96.4% correct classification of all participants for the nine different sports. When focusing on relevant performance characteristics, 80.1% to 97.2% of the total test sample was classified correctly within their respective disciplines. The discriminating characteristics were briefly the following: flexibility in gymnastics, explosive lower-limb strength in badminton and volleyball, speed and agility in badminton, judo, soccer and volleyball, upper-body strength in badminton, basketball and gymnastics, cardiorespiratory endurance in triathletes, dribbling skills in handball, basketball and soccer and overhead-throwing skills in badminton and volleyball. The generic talent characteristics of the FSC enable the distinction of adolescent boys according to their particular sport. Implications for talent programmes are discussed. © 2014 © 2014 European College of Sport Science.

DOI 10.1080/17461391.2014.944875
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2013 Deprez D, Coutts AJ, Fransen J, Deconinck FJA, Lenoir M, Vaeyens R, Philippaerts R, 'Relative Age, Biological Maturation and Anaerobic Characteristics in Elite Youth Soccer Players', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, 34 897-903 (2013)
DOI 10.1055/s-0032-1333262
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 23
2013 Matthys SPJ, Vaeyens R, Fransen J, Deprez D, Pion J, Vandendriessche J, et al., 'A longitudinal study of multidimensional performance characteristics related to physical capacities in youth handball', JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCES, 31 325-334 (2013)
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2012.733819
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 16
2013 Matthys SPJ, Fransen J, Vaeyens R, Lenoir M, Philippaerts R, 'Differences in biological maturation, anthropometry and physical performance between playing positions in youth team handball', JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCES, 31 1344-1352 (2013)
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2013.781663
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 12
2012 Fransen J, Pion J, Vandendriessche J, Vandorpe B, Vaeyens R, Lenoir M, Philippaerts RM, 'Differences in physical fitness and gross motor coordination in boys aged 6-12 years specializing in one versus sampling more than one sport', JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCES, 30 379-386 (2012)
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2011.642808
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 36
Show 22 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Smith MR, Fransen J, Coutts AJ, 'The effects of three cognitively demanding tasks on psychological and performance indicators of cognitive fatigue', Amsterdam, The Netherlands (2014)
Co-authors Mitch Smith
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current0

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Development of Valid Performance Testing Protocols for Mountain Bikers PhD (Exercise & Sport Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Job Fransen

Position

Conjoint Lecturer
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email job.fransen@newcastle.edu.au

Office

Room .
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