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Dr Jianhua Du

Research Fellow

Global Centre for Environmental Remediation

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise

I have over 10 years’ experience in solid waste, soil and wastewater treatment and remediation field. I hold bachelor and master degrees in Environmental Engineering in Wuhan University of Technology and Ph.D. of Material and Mineral in the University of South Australia. I have been working in environmental remediation field for more than 7 years in the fields of environmental waste remediation, management and disposal. I also have extensive knowledge in mineral waste’s reuse and dewatering which was his Ph.D. study.

My PhD study was focusing on recycling and reuse of mineral tailing and mining waste water, the Ph.D. project led to the development of a patented technology, SonicCARE, by using ultra-sonication for the dewatering of colloidal mineral tailings- a technology that has been scaled up in the field by several mining companies including Iluka and OZ Minerals. While yet to be commercialised, the technology has been attractive to a number of mining companies. I have also developed a new technology for the remediation of tributyltin from storm water as well as sediments especially around jetties where boats are repainted. This technology was developed following the request from the Department of Defence.

Being an engineer and having been trained as a surface/solution chemist, I am enthusiastic in different approaches to research that is trans-discipline and includes collaboration with researchers from both within and external to the University. 

 


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of South Australia
  • Bachelor of Engineering, Wuhan University -China
  • Master of Engineering, Wuhan University -China

Keywords

  • Clay
  • Dewatering
  • General waste disposal
  • Mineral Tailings
  • Waste water treatment
  • treated timber

Languages

  • English (Fluent)
  • Mandarin (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
050299 Environmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified 35
050399 Soil Sciences not elsewhere classified 35
091499 Resources Engineering and Extractive Metallurgy not elsewhere classified 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Fellow University of Newcastle
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (12 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Du J, Chadalavada S, Naidu R, 'Synthesis of porous bentonite organoclay granule and its adsorption of tributyltin', Applied Clay Science, 148 131-137 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2017.07.033
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2016 Sun Z, He X, Du J, Gong W, 'Synergistic effect of photocatalysis and adsorption of nano-TiO2 self-assembled onto sulfanyl/activated carbon composite', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 23 21733-21740 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-016-7364-z
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2016 Liu Y, Naidu R, Ming H, Dharmarajan R, Du J, 'Effects of thermal treatments on the characterisation and utilisation of red mud with sawdust additive', Waste Management and Research, 34 518-526 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0734242X16634197
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Raja Dharmarajan, Yanju Liu, Ravi Naidu
2015 Kuang Y, Du J, Zhou R, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Calcium alginate encapsulated Ni/Fe nanoparticles beads for simultaneous removal of Cu (II) and monochlorobenzene', Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 447 85-91 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jcis.2015.01.080
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2014 Jin X, Jiang M, Du J, Chen Z, 'Removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution by surfactant-modified kaolinite', JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL AND ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY, 20 3025-3032 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.jiec.2013.11.038
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2014 Du J, McLoughlin R, Smart RSC, 'Improving thickener bed density by ultrasonic treatment', International Journal of Mineral Processing, 133 91-96 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.minpro.2014.10.003
Citations Scopus - 1
2014 Shi L, Du J, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Functional kaolinite supported Fe/Ni nanoparticles for simultaneous catalytic remediation of mixed contaminants (lead and nitrate) from wastewater', Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 428 302-307 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jcis.2014.04.059
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen, Ravi Naidu
2014 Du J, Chadalavada S, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Environmental remediation techniques of tributyltin contamination in soil and water: A review', CHEMICAL ENGINEERING JOURNAL, 235 141-150 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.cej.2013.09.044
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Ravi Naidu
2010 Du J, Morris G, Pushkarova RA, St C Smart R, 'Effect of surface structure of kaolinite on aggregation, settling rate, and bed density', Langmuir, 26 13227-13235 (2010)

The flocculation and solid/liquid separation of four well-characterized kaolinites (2 well, 2 poorly crystallized) have been studied for comparison of surface structure (SEM), agg... [more]

The flocculation and solid/liquid separation of four well-characterized kaolinites (2 well, 2 poorly crystallized) have been studied for comparison of surface structure (SEM), aggregate structure during flocculation (cryo-SEM), settling rate, and bed density (with raking). It is shown that major differences in these properties are largely due to crystallinity and consequent surface structure of the extensive (larger dimension "basal") face. Well-crystallized kaolinites, with higher Hinckley indices and lower aspect ratios, have relatively smooth, flat basal surfaces and thicker edge planes promoting both effective initial bridging flocculation (largely edge-edge) and structural rearrangement to face-face during the raking process. This results in faster settling rates and more compact bed structures. Poorly crystallized kaolinites, with low Hinckley indices and high aspect ratios, exhibit ragged, stepped structures of the extensive face with a high proportion of nanosized islands forming cascade-like steps (i.e., multiple edges) contributing up to 30% of the specific surface area and providing flocculant adsorption sites (hydroxyl groups) across this extensive face. This leads to bridging flocculation taking place on both edge and extensive ("basal") planes, producing low-density edge-face structures during flocculation which leads to slow settling rates and poor bed densities. In particular, the complex surface morphology of the poorly crystallized kaolinites resists the transformation of edge-face structures to dense face-face structures under shear force introduced by raking. This results in low sediment density for poorly crystallized kaolinites. The studies suggest that the main influence on settling rates and bed densities of kaolinites in mineral tailings is likely to be related to the crystallinity and surface morphology of the kaolinite. They also suggest that interpretation of kaolinite behavior based on models of a flat (001) basal plane and edge sites only at the particle boundaries is not likely to be adequate for many real, less-crystallized kaolinites. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

DOI 10.1021/la100088n
Citations Scopus - 35
2009 Zbik MS, Du J, Pushkarova RA, Smart RSC, 'Observation of gaseous films at solid-liquid interfaces: Removal by ultrasonic action', Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 336 616-623 (2009)

The critical role of dissolved gas nano-bubbles at solid surfaces in particle association, aggregation, adsorption and flotation has been recognised in the recent literature. The ... [more]

The critical role of dissolved gas nano-bubbles at solid surfaces in particle association, aggregation, adsorption and flotation has been recognised in the recent literature. The principles of mineral processing, fine particle separation, and water recovery depend upon changing the surface properties at the solid-liquid interface. It has been assumed that the solid surfaces are either in direct contact with the liquid or may have nano-bubbles attached only at hydrophobic surfaces. This paper shows that gaseous layers 50-100 nm thick can be attached surrounding high proportions of solid clay mineral surfaces restricting reagent access, producing buoyancy and aggregation. Ultrasonic treatment before flocculant addition effectively removes these gaseous layers as well as dispersed micro-bubbles. Re-aggregation after brief ultrasonication produces denser (less buoyant) flocs, demonstrated with cryo-SEM statistical analysis, giving more complete access of the flocculant to the aggregate surfaces. In the subsequent flocculant addition, the settling rates of the denser flocs can be increased up to 40%. If ultrasonic action is continued, the bridged flocs are disturbed with some redispersion of smaller flocs and individual platelets and consequent slower settling rates. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.jcis.2009.04.037
Citations Scopus - 5
2009 Du J, Pushkarova RA, Smart RSC, 'A cryo-SEM study of aggregate and floc structure changes during clay settling and raking processes', International Journal of Mineral Processing, 93 66-72 (2009)

The destabilization of kaolinite suspension by anionic flocculant addition occurs in three zones; free settling, hindered settling and compression which usually includes a final b... [more]

The destabilization of kaolinite suspension by anionic flocculant addition occurs in three zones; free settling, hindered settling and compression which usually includes a final bed raking process in mineral processing practice. This paper reports changes in the kaolinite aggregate and floc structures in the different settling and raking zones by cryo-vitrification/cryo-SEM techniques with image analysis combining micro- and macro-flocs. Cryo-SEM images indicate that, even during free settling, fine clay particles are bridged predominantly in edge-edge (E-E) with some face-face (F-F) configurations forming single, small flocs and some chain structures. When these small flocs and chains settle into the hindered settling zone, the collision between flocs and chains results in "honeycomb" network structures formed with lateral chain-like extension. The settled bed consists of these honeycomb structures with both inter-aggregate and intra-aggregate trapped water and has relatively low bed density (e.g. < 12¿wt.% for a 2¿wt.% slurry). The effect of the raking process in dramatically improving thickener underflow solids has been extensively studied but the structural changes in flocs and aggregates in this process are less well defined. Raking the compression zone for 1¿h at 3¿rpm can release some of the trapped water in the "honeycomb" structure and the bed density for 2¿wt.% slurry improves dramatically to more than 36¿wt.%. Cryo-SEM illustrates the extensive restructuring of flocs from predominantly E-E to predominantly F-F in many areas. The STructural IMage ANalysis (STIMAN) software is used to combine a series of images at magnifications from 1000× to 8000×, including both macro- and micro-flocs. This structural analysis comparing the un-raked and raked bed samples gives increases in total particle area of 30% and in relative particle area of 6%. The relatively low energy rake action of the shear stress results in the disruption of the E-E chains and the honeycomb structure, partly releasing the trapped water and inducing some E-E to F-F aggregate restructuring are clearly illustrated in these results. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.minpro.2009.06.004
Citations Scopus - 16
2006 Sun ZY, Du JH, Chen HS, Gong WQ, 'FTIR study of nano-iron oxyhydroxides' decoloration on the azo dye', Guang Pu Xue Yu Guang Pu Fen Xi/Spectroscopy and Spectral Analysis, 26 1226-1229 (2006)

IR spectra were used to analyse the azo dye solution decoloration action by two kinds of iron oxyhydroxides. It was discovered that: (1) Acid Red G and methyl orange are apt to fo... [more]

IR spectra were used to analyse the azo dye solution decoloration action by two kinds of iron oxyhydroxides. It was discovered that: (1) Acid Red G and methyl orange are apt to form complex on the surface of iron oxyhydroxides > FeOH, especially Acid Red G. which possesses two -SO 3 Na structures has a relatively high decoloration efficiency as a result of complexation reaction; (2) after 2 hours adsorption, the IR spectra of iron oxyhydroxides show characteristic wave numbers at 1033 and 1030 cm -1 which belong to -SO 3 Na, whereas the peaks at wave numbers between 1450 and 1400 cm -1 , which belong to azo dye, disappear. These phenomena indicate that azo dye molecules are adsorbed on the surface of iron oxyhydroxides due to the negative -SO 3 Na structure, and at the moment when azo dye molecules are adsorbed on the surface of iron oxyhydroxides, the electron transfer occurs between the azo dye molecules and the iron oxyhydroxides surface's Fe 3+ centre, which could lead to the rupture of azo bond. It can be infered that the decoloration of azo dye molecules is the co-effect of the selective chemical absorption and the oxidation-deoxidation effect on the surface of iron oxyhydroxides.

Citations Scopus - 12
Show 9 more journal articles

Other (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Du J, 'Putting the Squeeze on Mining Water', ( issue.92 pp.22-24). Australia (2010)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 4
Total funding $338,087

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $82,060

Integrated decision-making methodology and tools for groundwater remediation at Defence Site$82,060

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Dawit Bekele, Doctor Jianhua Du
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700319
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

20163 grants / $256,027

Human Health Risk Assessment from Old Railway Sleepers - Port Hedland and Newman Mainline, WA$158,300

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Dawit Bekele, Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Morrow Dong, Doctor Yanju Liu, Doctor Jianhua Du, Doctor Mezbaul Bahar, Dr Prashant Srivastava
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600616
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Clean Up Toxic Metals From CCA Treated Timber$87,727

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Yanju Liu, Doctor Jianhua Du, Professor Ravi Naidu
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1501554
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Remediation of mine spoil soils employing nano-composites$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Raja Dharmarajan, Doctor Jianhua Du, Professor Nanthi Bolan, Doctor Kenneth Williams, Associate Professor Craig Wheeler
Scheme Linkage Pilot Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1601274
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.25

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Rehabilitation of Mining Impacted Farmland to Ensure Food Security in Thai Nguyen Province, Vietnam PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Jianhua Du

Position

Research Fellow
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email jianhua.du@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 40339412

Office

Room ATC
Building Advanced Technology Centre.
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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