Dr Jennifer Baldwin

Dr Jennifer Baldwin

Postdoctoral Fellow

School of Health Sciences

Career Summary

Biography

I am an early-career researcher with experience in clinical and observational studies in healthy ageing. I completed my PhD at the University of Sydney, for which I co-led a large observational study collecting normative reference data for neuromusculoskeletal outcome measures in 1000 healthy Australians (1000 Norms Project). Following a 2-year Postdoctoral Research Fellow position at the Auckland University of Technology Centre for Active Ageing I returned to Australia and settled in Newcastle with my family. I am currently employed as a Postdoctoral Researcher in the Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity & Nutrition. I have a clinical background in physiotherapy.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Sydney
  • Bachelor of Applied Science, University of Sydney

Keywords

  • Healthy ageing
  • Musculoskeletal conditions
  • Outcome measures
  • Public health

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Postdoctoral Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/4/2017 - 30/6/2019 Postdoctoral Research Fellow Auckland University of Technology
Clinical Sciences
New Zealand

Awards

Award

Year Award
2011 Highly Commended Award
Australian and New Zealand Burns Association
2009 University of Sydney Medal
University of Sydney
2009 Physiotherapy Research Foundation Prize
Australian Physiotherapy Association

Prize

Year Award
2020 Best Oral Presentation, Aging Interest Group, International Society for Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity
International Society for Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity

Scholarship

Year Award
2019 ANZMUSC Clinical Trials Network Travel Scholarship
Australia and New Zealand Musculoskeletal Clinical Trials Network
2013 University of Sydney Alumni Scholarship
The University of Sydney
2013 University of Sydney Alumni Scholarship
The University of Sydney
2013 Australian Postgraduate Award
Australian Government
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (40 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Vasiljevski ER, Burns J, Bray P, Donlevy G, Mudge AJ, Jones KJ, et al., 'L-carnitine supplementation for muscle weakness and fatigue in children with neurofibromatosis type 1: A Phase 2a clinical trial', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL GENETICS PART A, 185 2976-2985 (2021)
DOI 10.1002/ajmg.a.62392
2021 Burda AN, Baldwin J, Cravatta J, Heetland J, Jacobs K, Merfeld H, et al., 'Effects of exercise on tests measuring attention and executive function in younger and older adults', Clinical Archives of Communication Disorders, 6 18-27 (2021)

Purpose: This study investigated whether or not performance differed between Young and Older Exercisers and between Young and Older Non-exercisers on the Attention Processing Trai... [more]

Purpose: This study investigated whether or not performance differed between Young and Older Exercisers and between Young and Older Non-exercisers on the Attention Processing Training-Test (APT-Test), Behavioral Assessment of Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS), and Functional Assessment of Verbal Reasoning and Executive Strategies (FAVRES). Methods: A total of 119 participants were divided into the following groups: 46 Young Exercisers: (aged 18-40 years), 45 Older Exercisers (aged 60 and older), fourteen Young Non-exercisers, and fourteen Older Non-exercisers. Participants completed the APT-Test, BADS, and FAVRES in a counterbalanced manner. Independent sample t-tests were used to calculate outcomes. Results: Young Exercisers had significantly higher scores than Older Exercisers on the APT-Test, BADS Total Profile Score, and the FAVRES Total Accuracy Score. No significant differences occurred between Young and Older Exercisers on the FAVRES Total Rationale, Total Time, or Reasoning scores. No statistically significant differences occurred on any measures between Young and Older Non-exercisers. Conclusions: Different performance trends occurred between the Exerciser groups and the Non-exerciser groups. For example, both Exerciser groups performed similarly on the FAVRES when asked to justify their responses and perform reasoning tasks. Older Exercisers provided correct responses for Accuracy measures, yet their responses did not earn the total points. No differences occurred on any test between the Non-exerciser groups. Thus, it could be helpful for clinicians to inquire about patients' pre-morbid exercise habits when using these tests. Participants were healthy, neurologically intact adults. Future research should investigate potential effects exercise has on these tests in adults with acquired neurological damage.

DOI 10.21849/CACD.2021.00360
2021 Hawke F, McKay MJ, Baldwin JN, Chiu S, Sadler S, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Correlates of night-time and exercise-associated lower limb cramps in healthy adults.', Muscle Nerve, 64 301-308 (2021)
DOI 10.1002/mus.27359
Co-authors Vivienne Chuter, Christopher Oldmeadow, Sean Sadler, Fiona Hawke
2021 Quigg KH, Berggren KN, McIntyre M, Bates K, Salmin F, Casiraghi JL, et al., '12-Month progression of motor and functional outcomes in congenital myotonic dystrophy.', Muscle & nerve, 63 384-391 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/mus.27147
2021 O brien DW, Pigg W, Ellis R, Baldwin JN, Quicke JG, Evans N, Dziedzic K, 'An evidence-informed model of care for people with lower limb osteoarthritis in New Zealand', New Zealand Journal of Physiotherapy, 49 24-30 (2021) [C1]

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent and costly condition. Evidence-based clinical guidelines recommend three core treatments for OA: education, exercise, and weight loss (as approp... [more]

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent and costly condition. Evidence-based clinical guidelines recommend three core treatments for OA: education, exercise, and weight loss (as appropriate). However, the translation of evidence into practice is limited. Clinical guidelines do not provide information on how to implement recommendations in local care settings. In New Zealand, management of people with OA in primary care is inconsistent and fragmented. Clinicians and researchers have made a call for a New Zealand OA model of care to close this evidence-practice gap and optimise primary care OA management nationwide. A model of care is a condition-specific implementation strategy that outlines what care should be funded and delivered, who should provide it, and where and how care should be addressed. Various models of care for OA have been implemented with promising results in Australia, the United Kingdom (UK) and Europe. One programme that is translating guidelines into practice is the Model OsteoArthritis Consultation (MOAC). Empirical evaluations of the MOAC in the UK and Europe have demonstrated greater delivery of core treatments, better service quality, and improved patient outcomes. This article makes a case for piloting the MOAC in New Zealand as an implementation strategy to optimise primary care management of OA.

DOI 10.15619/NZJP/49.1.04
2021 Nicholson LL, McKay MJ, Baldwin JN, Burns J, Cheung W, Yip S, Chan C, 'Is there a relationship between sagittal cervical spine mobility and generalised joint hypermobility? A cross-sectional study of 1000 healthy Australians.', Physiotherapy, 112 150-157 (2021)
DOI 10.1016/j.physio.2020.12.003
2021 Baldwin JN, Ashton LM, Forder PM, Haslam RL, Hure AJ, Loxton DJ, et al., 'Increasing fruit and vegetable variety over time is associated with lower 15-year healthcare costs: Results from the australian longitudinal study on women s health', Nutrients, 13 (2021)

Healthcare costs are lower for adults who consume more vegetables; however, the association between healthcare costs and fruit and vegetable varieties is unclear. Our aim was to i... [more]

Healthcare costs are lower for adults who consume more vegetables; however, the association between healthcare costs and fruit and vegetable varieties is unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association between (i) baseline fruit and vegetable (F&V) varieties, and (ii) changes in F&V varieties over time with 15-year healthcare costs in an Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health. The data for Survey 3 (n = 8833 women, aged 50¿55 years) and Survey 7 (n = 6955, aged 62¿67 years) of the 1946¿1951 cohort were used. The F&V variety was assessed using the Fruit and Vegetable Variety (FAVVA) index calculated from the Cancer Council of Victoria¿s Dietary Questionnaire for Epidemiological Studies food frequency questionnaire. The baseline FAVVA and change in FAVVA were analysed as continuous predictors of Medicare claims/costs by using multiple regression analyses. Healthy weight women made, on average, 4.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7¿6.8) fewer claims for every 10-point-higher FAVVA. Healthy weight women with higher fruit varieties incurred fewer charges; however, this was reversed for women overweight/obese. Across the sample, for every 10-point increase in FAVVA over time, women made 4.3 (95% CI 1.9¿6.8) fewer claims and incurred $309.1 (95% CI $129.3¿488.8) less in charges over 15 years. A higher F&V variety is associated with a small reduction in healthcare claims for healthy weight women only. An increasing F&V variety over time is associated with lower healthcare costs.

DOI 10.3390/nu13082829
Co-authors Peta Forder, Amanda Patterson, Lee Ashton, Clare Collins, Alexis Hure, Deborah Loxton
2021 Baldwin JN, Forder PM, Haslam R, Hure A, Loxton D, Patterson AJ, Collins CE, 'Lower Vegetable Variety and Worsening Diet Quality Over Time Are Associated With Higher 15-Year Health Care Claims and Costs Among Australian Women', Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 121 655-668 (2021)

Background: The relationship between diet quality and health care costs is unclear. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between baseline diet qual... [more]

Background: The relationship between diet quality and health care costs is unclear. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between baseline diet quality and change in diet quality over time, with 15-year cumulative health care claims/costs. Design: Data from a longitudinal cohort study were analyzed. Participants/setting: Data for survey 3 (2001) (n = 7,868) and survey 7 (2013) (n = 6,349 both time points) from the 1946-1951 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health were analyzed. Main outcome measures: Diet quality was assessed using the Australian Recommended Food Score (ARFS). Fifteen-year cumulative Medicare Benefits Schedule (Australia's universal health care coverage) data were reported by baseline ARFS quintile and category of diet quality change (¿diet quality worsened¿ [ARFS change = ¿4 points], ¿remained stable¿ [¿3 = change in ARFS =3 points], or ¿improved¿ [ARFS change =4 points]). Statistical analyses: Linear regression analyses were conducted adjusting for area of residence, socioeconomic status, lifestyle factors, and private health insurance status. Results: Consuming a greater variety of vegetables at baseline but fewer fruit and dairy products was associated with lower health care costs. For every 1-point increment in the ARFS vegetable subscale, women made 3.3 (95% CI, 1.6-5.0) fewer claims and incurred AU$227 (95% CI, AU$104-350 [US$158; 95% CI, US$72-243]) less in costs. Women whose diet quality worsened over time made more claims (median, 251 claims; quintile 1, quintile 3 [Q1; Q3], 168; 368 claims) and incurred higher costs (AU$15,519; Q1; Q3, AU$9,226; AU$24,847 [US$10,793; Q1; Q3, US$6,417; US$17,281]) compared with those whose diet quality remained stable (median, 236 claims [Q1; Q3, 158; 346 claims], AU$14,515; Q1; Q3, AU$8,539; AU$23,378 [US$10,095; Q1; Q3, US$5,939; US$16,259]). Conclusions: Greater vegetable variety was associated with fewer health care claims and costs; however, this trend was not consistent across other subscales. Worsening diet quality over 12 years was linked with higher health care claims and costs.

DOI 10.1016/j.jand.2020.12.012
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Clare Collins, Peta Forder, Deborah Loxton, Amanda Patterson
2021 Donlevy GA, Garnett SP, Cornett KMD, McKay MJ, Baldwin JN, Shy RR, et al., 'Association Between Body Mass Index and Disability in Children With Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.', Neurology, (2021)
DOI 10.1212/WNL.0000000000012725
2021 Chan C, Qi HH, Baldwin JN, McKay MJ, Burns J, Nicholson LL, 'Joint hypermobility and its association with self-reported knee health: A cross-sectional study of healthy Australian adults', International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases, 24 687-693 (2021)

Aim: The primary aim of this study was to determine the association between generalized joint hypermobility (GJH), knee-specific hypermobility (KSH) and self-reported knee health ... [more]

Aim: The primary aim of this study was to determine the association between generalized joint hypermobility (GJH), knee-specific hypermobility (KSH) and self-reported knee health in an Australian population. Secondary aims included elucidating ethnic/gender differences in GJH/KSH prevalence and knee health, and identifying KSH using a novel knee extension range of motion cut-off method. Method: Knee extension range, Beighton score, and 5 domains of the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) were collected from adults aged 18-101¿years self-identifying as healthy, and were grouped by ethnicity and gender. Two established Beighton score criteria and 1 novel knee extension range cut-off method were used to determine GJH and KSH respectively. Point-biserial correlation tested the associations between GJH/KSH and KOOS. Differences in GJH/KSH prevalence and knee health between ethnic/gender groups were determined with the Chi-squared test. Results: Of 732 participants (50% male), 80.3% were Caucasian. No correlations were found between GJH and KOOS while a very weak correlation was found between KSH and 1 KOOS domain (r¿>¿-.30; P¿=.04). Prevalence of GJH was higher in non-Caucasians (17.4% vs 5.6%, P¿<.001) and females (4.4% vs 1.1%, P¿=.007). Prevalence of KSH between ethnic and gender groups was not significantly different (P¿=.50 and P¿=.69 respectively). Non-Caucasians scored higher (better) in all KOOS domains than Caucasians (all P¿<.05). Conclusion: Those who met the age- and gender-specific criteria for GJH/KSH did not report worse knee health than their non-hypermobile counterparts. Clinicians can assure individuals who exhibit GJH/KSH that these are not associated with lower knee health and function.

DOI 10.1111/1756-185X.14096
2020 Lebde N, Burns J, Mackey M, Baldwin J, McKay M, 'Normative reference values and physical factors associated with work ability: a cross-sectional observational study', OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, 77 231-237 (2020)
DOI 10.1136/oemed-2019-106248
2020 Morris EJ, Tofts L, Patterson M, Birke O, Adams R, Epps A, et al., 'Physical performance of children with longitudinal fibular deficiency (fibular hemimelia)', DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION, (2020)
DOI 10.1080/09638288.2020.1849420
2020 Rollo ME, Baldwin JN, Hutchesson M, Aguiar EJ, Wynne K, Young A, et al., 'The feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an ehealth lifestyle program in women with recent gestational diabetes mellitus: A pilot study', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 1-24 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17197115
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Katie-Jane Wynne, Robin Callister, Megan Rollo
2020 Mudge AJ, Sangeux M, Wojciechowski EA, Louey MG, McKay MJ, Baldwin JN, et al., 'Can pedobarography predict the occurrence of heel rocker in children with lower limb spasticity?', Clinical Biomechanics, 71 208-213 (2020) [C1]

Background: Pedobarography software calculates the centre-of-pressure trajectory in relation to the foot to quantify foot contact patterns. This study presents two new pedobarogra... [more]

Background: Pedobarography software calculates the centre-of-pressure trajectory in relation to the foot to quantify foot contact patterns. This study presents two new pedobarography measures using the centre-of-pressure trajectory to assess heel rocker. Methods: To validate these pedobarography measures against 3D gait analysis, emed®-x and Vicon Nexus gait analysis data were captured from 25 children aged 8¿16 years (11 male) with unilateral (n = 18) and bilateral (n = 7) cerebral palsy or acquired brain injury. 3D gait analysis identified whether heel rocker was intact (n = 22 feet) or absent (n = 28 feet) based on centre-of-pressure at initial contact and the ankle kinematic curve between 0 and 2% of the gait cycle. Pedobarography measures calculated from the initial centre-of-pressure point were the distance to the heel (point of initial contact) and to the most posterior point of the trajectory (rollback), reported as a percentage of foot length. Findings: The median point of initial contact in limbs with an intact heel rocker was 9% (range 7¿12%) and median rollback was 0% (range 0¿0.2%), whereas the median point of initial contact in limbs with an absent heel rocker was 58% (range 8¿78%) and rollback was 18% (range 0¿40%). Point of initial contact is the more accurate method for predicting heel rocker, with a threshold of 14% of foot length identifying the correct heel rocker status in 94% of cases. Interpretation: Point of initial contact can assess heel rocker with high accuracy. Both point of initial contact and rollback provide sensitive information on foot strike pattern, enhancing the utility of pedobarography.

DOI 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2019.10.022
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2020 Baldwin JN, Forder PM, Haslam RL, Hure AJ, Loxton DJ, Patterson AJ, Collins CE, 'Change in Diet Quality over 12 Years in the 1946-1951 Cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', NUTRIENTS, 12 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu12010147
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Clare Collins, Deborah Loxton, Peta Forder, Alexis Hure, Amanda Patterson
2019 Cornett KMD, Wojciechowski E, Sman AD, Walker T, Menezes MP, Bray P, et al., 'Magnetic resonance imaging of the anterior compartment of the lower leg is a biomarker for weakness, disability, and impaired gait in childhood Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease', MUSCLE & NERVE, 59 213-217 (2019)
DOI 10.1002/mus.26352
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2019 O brien DW, Chapple CM, Baldwin JN, Larmer PJ, 'Time to bust common osteoarthritis myths', New Zealand Journal of Physiotherapy, 47 18-24 (2019)

Several common beliefs about osteoarthritis held by people living with the condition and some clinicians are discordant with current evidence and can hinder effective management. ... [more]

Several common beliefs about osteoarthritis held by people living with the condition and some clinicians are discordant with current evidence and can hinder effective management. Therefore, providing information about the disease and its mechanisms could lead to better management of people with osteoarthritis. This paper addresses the seven most common myths surrounding osteoarthritis relating to its causative factors, pathology, assessment and management. We present the evidence to refute these misconceptions and argue that physiotherapists are in an ideal position to provide education to people with osteoarthritis. Ultimately, physiotherapists can play a central role in the provision of care for people with osteoarthritis.

DOI 10.15619/NZJP/47.1.03
Citations Scopus - 2
2019 Larmer PJ, Bennett K, Baldwin JN, Bassett S, O Brien DW, 'Quality indicators for hip and knee osteoarthritis management in New Zealand: A patient survey', New Zealand Journal of Physiotherapy, 47 183-192 (2019) [C1]

Osteoarthritis is a prevalent and costly condition. Knowledge of the quality of care being offered to people with hip and knee osteoarthritis in New Zealand is limited. The aim of... [more]

Osteoarthritis is a prevalent and costly condition. Knowledge of the quality of care being offered to people with hip and knee osteoarthritis in New Zealand is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the quality of care being offered to people with hip and knee osteoarthritis in New Zealand, and to investigate common pathways of care. The OsteoArthritis Quality Indicator (osteoarthritis) questionnaire was administered to adults with hip and/or knee osteoarthritis, and participants were also asked to list the healthcare professionals they had consulted. Descriptive statistics with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. The study included 106 participants (87% female, n=92; 94% European, n=100). The mean OsteoArthritis Quality Indicator achievement rate was 50.2% (95% confidence intervals 41.0¿59.7%). OsteoArthritis Quality Indicator achievement rates were lowest for weight reduction referral (8.6%; 3.7¿17.8%) and daily activity aids assessment (18.5%; 10.2¿31.0%), and highest for physical activity education (80.8%; 72.1¿87.3%) and offering of paracetamol (80.0%; 71.3¿ 86.6%). Following consultation with a general practitioner, 22% (n=24) consulted orthopaedic surgeons while 15% (n=17) consulted physiotherapists. The results suggest that implementation of evidence-informed conservative treatments for osteoarthritis in primary care is suboptimal, although evidence from a larger representative sample is needed.

DOI 10.15619/NZJP/47.3.06
Citations Scopus - 2
2019 McGruer N, Baldwin JN, Ruakere BT, Lamer PJ, 'Maori lived experience of osteoarthritis: a qualitative study guided by Kaupapa Maori principles', JOURNAL OF PRIMARY HEALTH CARE, 11 128-137 (2019)
DOI 10.1071/HC18079
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2019 Pate JW, Hancock MJ, Tofts L, Epps A, Baldwin JN, Mckay MJ, et al., 'Longitudinal Fibular Deficiency: A Cross-Sectional Study Comparing Lower Limb Function of Children and Young People with That of Unaffected Peers', CHILDREN-BASEL, 6 (2019)
DOI 10.3390/children6030045
Citations Web of Science - 2
2019 Baldwin JN, Garrett N, Larmer PJ, Murray C, Evans R, Buchan R, Neville S, 'Primary care doctor and nurse utilisation rates for billed consultations across the Comprehensive Care Primary Health Organisation', New Zealand Medical Journal, 132 79-89 (2019)
2018 Baldwin JN, Napier S, Neville S, Wright-St Clair VA, 'Impacts of older people's patient and public involvement in health and social care research: a systematic review', AGE AND AGEING, 47 801-809 (2018)
DOI 10.1093/ageing/afy092
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 7
2018 Palad YY, Leaver AM, McKay MJ, Baldwin JN, Lunar FRM, Caube FDM, et al., 'Knee thrust prevalence and normative hip-knee-ankle angle deviation values among healthy individuals across the lifespan', OSTEOARTHRITIS AND CARTILAGE, 26 1326-1332 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.joca.2018.06.009
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2018 Baldwin JN, McKay MJ, Burns J, Hiller CE, Nightingale EJ, Moloney N, 'What are the similarities and differences between healthy people with and without pain?', SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF PAIN, 18 39-47 (2018)
DOI 10.1515/sjpain-2017-0156
2017 Baldwin JN, McKay MJ, Hiller CE, Nightingale EJ, Moloney N, Burns J, 'Correlates of Perceived Ankle Instability in Healthy Individuals Aged 8 to 101 Years', ARCHIVES OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION, 98 72-79 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2016.08.474
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Fiona Hawke
2017 McKay MJ, Baldwin JN, Ferreira P, Simic M, Vanicek N, Burns J, 'Normative reference values for strength and flexibility of 1,000 children and adults', NEUROLOGY, 88 36-43 (2017)
DOI 10.1212/WNL.0000000000003466
Citations Scopus - 67Web of Science - 67
2017 McKay MJ, Baldwin JN, Ferreira P, Simic M, Vanicek N, Burns J, 'Reference values for developing responsive functional outcome measures across the lifespan', NEUROLOGY, 88 1512-1519 (2017)
DOI 10.1212/WNL.0000000000003847
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 37
2017 Baldwin J, Briggs A, Bagg W, Larmer P, 'An osteoarthritis model of care should be a national priority for New Zealand', NEW ZEALAND MEDICAL JOURNAL, 130 78-86 (2017)
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 6
2017 Davis PR, McKay MJ, Baldwin JN, Burns J, Pareyson D, Rose KJ, 'REPEATABILITY, CONSISTENCY, AND ACCURACY OF HAND-HELD DYNAMOMETRY WITH AND WITHOUT FIXATION FOR MEASURING ANKLE PLANTARFLEXION STRENGTH IN HEALTHY ADOLESCENTS AND ADULTS', MUSCLE & NERVE, 56 896-900 (2017)
DOI 10.1002/mus.25576
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2017 McKay MJ, Baldwin JN, Ferreira P, Simic M, Vanicek N, Wojciechowski E, et al., 'Spatiotemporal and plantar pressure patterns of 1000 healthy individuals aged 3-101 years', GAIT & POSTURE, 58 78-87 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2017.07.004
Citations Scopus - 50Web of Science - 44
2017 Baldwin JN, McKay MJ, Simic M, Hiller CE, Moloney N, Nightingale EJ, Burns J, 'Self-reported knee pain and disability among healthy individuals: reference data and factors associated with the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and KOOS-Child', OSTEOARTHRITIS AND CARTILAGE, 25 1282-1290 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.joca.2017.03.007
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 24
2017 Singh H, McKay M, Baldwin J, Nicholson L, Chan C, Burns J, Hiller CE, 'Beighton scores and cut-offs across the lifespan: cross-sectional study of an Australian population', RHEUMATOLOGY, 56 1857-1864 (2017)
DOI 10.1093/rheumatology/kex043
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 30
2017 Baldwin JN, McKay MJ, Moloney N, Hiller CE, Nightingale EJ, Burns J, 'Reference values and factors associated with musculoskeletal symptoms in healthy adolescents and adults', MUSCULOSKELETAL SCIENCE AND PRACTICE, 29 99-107 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.msksp.2017.03.010
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
2017 Baldwin JN, McKay MJ, Hiller CE, Moloney N, Nightingale EJ, Burns J, 'Relationship between physical performance and self-reported function in healthy individuals across the lifespan', MUSCULOSKELETAL SCIENCE AND PRACTICE, 30 10-17 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.msksp.2017.05.001
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
2017 Burns J, Sman AD, Cornett KMD, Wojciechowski E, Walker T, Menezes MP, et al., 'Safety and efficacy of progressive resistance exercise for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in children: a randomised, double-blind, sham-controlled trial', The Lancet Child and Adolescent Health, 1 106-113 (2017)

Background Exercise is potentially therapeutic for neuromuscular disorders, but a risk of harm exists due to overwork weakness. We aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of progr... [more]

Background Exercise is potentially therapeutic for neuromuscular disorders, but a risk of harm exists due to overwork weakness. We aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of progressive resistance exercise for foot dorsiflexion weakness in children with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Methods We did this randomised, double-blind, sham-controlled trial across the Sydney Children's Hospitals Network (NSW, Australia). Children aged 6¿17 years with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease were eligible if they had foot dorsiflexion weakness (negative Z score based on age-matched and sex-matched normative reference values). We randomly allocated (1:1) children, with random block sizes of 4, 6, and 8 and stratification by age, to receive 6 months (three times per week on non-consecutive days; 72 sessions in total) of progressive resistance training (from 50% to 70% of the most recent one repetition maximum) or sham training (negligible non-progressed intensity), using an adjustable exercise cuff to exercise the dorsiflexors of each foot. The primary efficacy outcome was the between-group difference in dorsiflexion strength assessed by hand-held dynamometry (expressed as a Z score) from baseline to months 6, 12, and 24. The primary safety outcome was the between-group difference in muscle and intramuscular fat volume of the anterior compartment of the lower leg assessed by MRI (expressed as a scaled volume) from baseline to 6 months and 24 months. Participants, parents, outcome evaluators, and investigators other than the treatment team were masked to treatment assignment. Analysis was by intention to treat. The trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, number ACTRN12613000552785. Findings From Sept 2, 2013, to Dec 11, 2014, we randomly assigned 60 children to receive progressive resistance exercise (n=30) or sham training (n=30), and 55 (92%) children completed the trial. ANCOVA-adjusted Z score differences in dorsiflexion strength between groups were 0 (95% CI -0·37 to 0·42; p=0·91) at 6 months, 0·3 (-0·23 to 0·81; p=0·27) at 12 months, and 0·6 (95% CI 0·03 to 1·12; p=0·041) at 24 months. Scaled muscle and fat volume was comparable between groups at 6 months (ANCOVA-adjusted muscle volume difference 0, 95% CI -0·03 to 0·10, p=0·24; and fat volume difference 0, 95% CI -0·01 to 0·05, p=0·25) and 24 months (0, -0·08 to 0·12, p=0·67; and 0, -0·05 to 0·03, p=0·58). No serious adverse events were reported. Interpretation 6 months of targeted progressive resistance exercise attenuated long-term progression of dorsiflexion weakness without detrimental effect on muscle morphology or other signs of overwork weakness in paediatric patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Funding Muscular Dystrophy Association and Australian National Health and Medical Research Council.

DOI 10.1016/S2352-4642(17)30013-5
Citations Scopus - 19
2016 McKay MJ, Baldwin JN, Ferreira P, Simic M, Vanicek N, Hiller CE, et al., '1000 Norms Project: protocol of a cross-sectional study cataloging human variation', PHYSIOTHERAPY, 102 50-56 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.physio.2014.12.002
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 31
2015 Baldwin JN, Mckay MJ, Hiller CE, Nightingale EJ, Moloney N, Vanicek N, et al., 'Defining health and disease: setting the boundaries for physiotherapy. Are we undertreating or overtreating? How can we tell?', BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, 49 (2015)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2014-094488
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2015 Baldwin JN, Mckay MJ, Hiller CE, Nightingale EJ, Moloney N, Vanicek N, et al., 'Forming norms: informing diagnosis and management in sports medicine', BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, 49 (2015)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2014-094489
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2013 Baldwin J, Li F, 'Exercise behaviors after burn injury', Journal of Burn Care and Research, 34 529-536 (2013)

The purpose of this study was to investigate exercise behaviors in adult burn survivors and to identify barriers to exercise in this population. A two-page questionnaire developed... [more]

The purpose of this study was to investigate exercise behaviors in adult burn survivors and to identify barriers to exercise in this population. A two-page questionnaire developed by the authors was administered on a single occasion to adults attending the ambulatory burns clinic at a metropolitan hospital. Data from 68 adult burn survivors were analyzed. Within this cohort, 59% of subjects reported exercising several times per week or more and the remaining 41% exercised once per week or less. There was no correlation among exercise frequency and age, TBSA, or hospital length of stay. Walking was the most common type of exercise, and subjects reported lower compliance with stretching and strengthening exercises. Physical condition and motivation were identified as the main barriers to exercise. Although this preliminary study reveals that a higher proportion of burn survivors engage in exercise compared with their healthy counterparts, a substantial number are exercising just once per week or less, below the recommended guidelines to improve physical fitness. Physical and occupational therapists play an important role in providing exercise prescription and education, as well as addressing barriers to exercise in burn survivors. The potential for further research into physical activity across all domains of life using a validated questionnaire is identified. © 2012 by the American Burn Association.

DOI 10.1097/BCR.0b013e31827a2bcd
Citations Scopus - 6
2013 Baldwin J, Li F, 'Exercise behaviors and barriers to exercise in adult burn survivors: A questionnaire survey.', Burns Trauma, 1 134-139 (2013)
DOI 10.4103/2321-3868.123075
Citations Scopus - 3
Show 37 more journal articles

Conference (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 McKay M, Baldwin J, Simic M, Ferreira P, Vanicek N, Burns J, 'Normative reference data for functional outcome measures in peripheral neuropathy trials across the lifespan', JOURNAL OF THE PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, Baltimore, MD (2018)
2016 Chen J, Mckay M, Baldwin J, Burns J, Simic M, 'REFERENCE VALUES FOR MINI SINGLE-LEG SQUAT ACROSS THE LIFESPAN: DATA FROM 1000 NORMS PROJECT', OSTEOARTHRITIS AND CARTILAGE, Amsterdam, NETHERLANDS (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.joca.2016.01.218
2015 Baldwin JN, Mckay M, Hiller C, Nightingale EJ, Moloney N, Burns J, '1000 Norms Project: health-related quality of life across the lifespan', QUALITY OF LIFE RESEARCH (2015)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $35,800

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20191 grants / $24,200

Co-designing a New Zealand Osteoarthritis Guidebook.$24,200

Funding body: Auckland University of Technology

Funding body Auckland University of Technology
Project Team

O'Brien D, Reay S, Quicke JG, Ellis R, Baldwin JN, Larmer PJ

Scheme .
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20181 grants / $5,800

Exploring the lived experience of Maori men with osteoarthritis: a qualitative study guided by Kaupapa Maori principles. $5,800

Funding body: Auckland University of Technology

Funding body Auckland University of Technology
Project Team

Baldwin JN, O'Brien D, Ruakere T, Larmer PJ

Scheme AUT Centre for Person Centred Research Summer Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20171 grants / $5,800

Māori lived experiences of osteoarthritis: A Kaupapa Māori qualitative study. $5,800

Funding body: Arthritis New Zealand

Funding body Arthritis New Zealand
Project Team

Baldwin JN, Ruakere T, Larmer PJ.

Scheme Summer Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N
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Research Projects

1000 Norms Project 2013 -

1000 Norms Project: A clinical catalogue of human variation

The 1000 Norms Project is an ongoing research program dedicated to improving our knowledge of normal physical function across the lifespan.

https://www.sydney.edu.au/medicine-health/our-research/research-centres/1000-norms-project.html



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Dr Jennifer Baldwin

Position

Postdoctoral Fellow
School of Health Sciences
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Contact Details

Email jennifer.baldwin@newcastle.edu.au
Links Twitter
Research Networks

Office

Room .
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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