Dr Gang Liu

Dr Gang Liu

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Liu 's PhD studies in respiratory disease and immunology at the University of Newcastle. His research primarly focuses on tissue remodelling in respiratory diseases, including chronic pulmonary obstructive disease (COPD), severe asthma and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). He has established several animal models to represent the respiratory diseases. Since completion of PhD, Dr Liu performed deeply researches on how extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins regulate tissue remodelling in the lung diseases. He has identified that Fibulin-1, one component of ECM proteins play critical roles in airway and tissue remodelling in COPD, asthma and IPF. Targeting to Fibulin1 have benefit to protect remodelling features in these lung diseases. His works have been published in high impact journals in pathology, immunology and medicine. 

Now, Dr Liu is a postdoctoral research fellow in gastrointestinal group at hunter medical research institute. One of his current projects is to focus on micronutrients affects microbiota in gut diseases. His is also interested in cross-link of diseases between lung and gut, in particular microbiota and tissue remodelling. At least one third of patients with gut diseases, for example inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have secondary organ disorder. Pulmonary inflammation is predominant diseases associated with patients with IBD. He is looking for potential therapeutic targets on gut and lung disorders. 


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Master of Science, University of Wollongong

Keywords

  • Mucosal immunology
  • Hypoxia
  • Immunology
  • pathology
  • Molecular Biology
  • asthma
  • Crohn's Disease
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • COPD
  • IPF
  • Extracellular matrix protein

Languages

  • English (Fluent)
  • Mandarin (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110203 Respiratory Diseases 20
110307 Gastroenterology and Hepatology 40
110799 Immunology not elsewhere classified 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Postdoctoral Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (11 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Nair PM, Starkey MR, Haw TJ, Ruscher R, Liu G, Maradana MR, et al., 'RelB-deficient Dendritic Cells Promote the Development of Spontaneous Allergic Airway Inflammation.', American journal of respiratory cell and molecular biology, (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1165/rcmb.2017-0242oc
Co-authors Malcolm Starkey, Philip Hansbro
2018 Mateer SW, Mathe A, Bruce J, Liu G, Maltby S, Fricker M, et al., 'IL-6 Drives Neutrophil-Mediated Pulmonary Inflammation Associated with Bacteremia in Murine Models of Colitis.', Am J Pathol, (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.ajpath.2018.03.016
Co-authors Michael Fricker, Hock Tay, Philip Hansbro, Simon Keely, Andrea Mathe, Steven Maltby, Paul Foster, Jay Horvat, Marjorie Walker
2018 Haw TJ, Starkey MR, Pavlidis S, Fricker M, Arthurs AL, Nair PM, et al., 'Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 have opposing roles in the pathogenesis of cigarette smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.', American journal of physiology. Lung cellular and molecular physiology, 314 L298-L317 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1152/ajplung.00154.2017
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Michael Fricker, Jay Horvat, Philip Hansbro, Malcolm Starkey, Paul Foster
2017 Hansbro PM, Kim RY, Starkey MR, Donovan C, Dua K, Mayall JR, et al., 'Mechanisms and treatments for severe, steroid-resistant allergic airway disease and asthma', Immunological Reviews, 278 41-62 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Severe, steroid-resistant asthma is clinically and economically important since affected individuals d... [more]

© 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Severe, steroid-resistant asthma is clinically and economically important since affected individuals do not respond to mainstay corticosteroid treatments for asthma. Patients with this disease experience more frequent exacerbations of asthma, are more likely to be hospitalized, and have a poorer quality of life. Effective therapies are urgently required, however, their development has been hampered by a lack of understanding of the pathological processes that underpin disease. A major obstacle to understanding the processes that drive severe, steroid-resistant asthma is that the several endotypes of the disease have been described that are characterized by different inflammatory and immunological phenotypes. This heterogeneity makes pinpointing processes that drive disease difficult in humans. Clinical studies strongly associate specific respiratory infections with severe, steroid-resistant asthma. In this review, we discuss key findings from our studies where we describe the development of representative experimental models to improve our understanding of the links between infection and severe, steroid-resistant forms of this disease. We also discuss their use in elucidating the mechanisms, and their potential for developing effective therapeutic strategies, for severe, steroid-resistant asthma. Finally, we highlight how the immune mechanisms and therapeutic targets we have identified may be applicable to obesity-or pollution-associated asthma.

DOI 10.1111/imr.12543
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jay Horvat, Jodie Simpson, Paul Foster, Malcolm Starkey, Chantal Donovan, Darryl Knight, Nicole Hansbro, Lisa Wood, Philip Hansbro
2017 Nair PM, Starkey MR, Haw TJ, Liu G, Horvat JC, Morris JC, et al., 'Targeting PP2A and proteasome activity ameliorates features of allergic airway disease in mice', Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 72 1891-1903 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd. Background: Asthma is an allergic airway disease (AAD) caused by aberrant immune responses to aller... [more]

© 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd. Background: Asthma is an allergic airway disease (AAD) caused by aberrant immune responses to allergens. Protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) is an abundant serine/threonine phosphatase with anti-inflammatory activity. The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) controls many cellular processes, including the initiation of inflammatory responses by protein degradation. We assessed whether enhancing PP2A activity with fingolimod (FTY720) or 2-amino-4-(4-(heptyloxy) phenyl)-2-methylbutan-1-ol (AAL (S) ), or inhibiting proteasome activity with bortezomib (BORT), could suppress experimental AAD. Methods: Acute AAD was induced in C57BL/6 mice by intraperitoneal sensitization with ovalbumin (OVA) in combination with intranasal (i.n) exposure to OVA. Chronic AAD was induced in mice with prolonged i.n exposure to crude house dust mite (HDM) extract. Mice were treated with vehicle, FTY720, AAL (S) , BORT or AAL (S) +BORT and hallmark features of AAD assessed. Results: AAL (S) reduced the severity of acute AAD by suppressing tissue eosinophils and inflammation, mucus-secreting cell (MSC) numbers, type 2-associated cytokines (interleukin (IL)-33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin, IL-5 and IL-13), serum immunoglobulin (Ig)E and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR). FTY720 only suppressed tissue inflammation and IgE. BORT reduced bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and tissue eosinophils and inflammation, IL-5, IL-13 and AHR. Combined treatment with AAL (S) +BORT had complementary effects and suppressed BALF and tissue eosinophils and inflammation, MSC numbers, reduced the production of type 2 cytokines and AHR. AAL (S) , BORT and AAL (S) +BORT also reduced airway remodelling in chronic AAD. Conclusion: These findings highlight the potential of combination therapies that enhance PP2A and inhibit proteasome activity as novel therapeutic strategies for asthma.

DOI 10.1111/all.13212
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jay Horvat, Philip Hansbro, Nikki Verrills, Malcolm Starkey
2017 Jones B, Donovan C, Liu G, Gomez HM, Chimankar V, Harrison CL, et al., 'Animal models of COPD: What do they tell us?', Respirology, 22 21-32 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology COPD is a major cause of global mortality and morbidity but current treatments are poorly effective. This is because the underlying mec... [more]

© 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology COPD is a major cause of global mortality and morbidity but current treatments are poorly effective. This is because the underlying mechanisms that drive the development and progression of COPD are incompletely understood. Animal models of disease provide a valuable, ethically and economically viable experimental platform to examine these mechanisms and identify biomarkers that may be therapeutic targets that would facilitate the development of improved standard of care. Here, we review the different established animal models of COPD and the various aspects of disease pathophysiology that have been successfully recapitulated in these models including chronic lung inflammation, airway remodelling, emphysema and impaired lung function. Furthermore, some of the mechanistic features, and thus biomarkers and therapeutic targets of COPD identified in animal models are outlined. Some of the existing therapies that suppress some disease symptoms that were identified in animal models and are progressing towards therapeutic development have been outlined. Further studies of representative animal models of human COPD have the strong potential to identify new and effective therapeutic approaches for COPD.

DOI 10.1111/resp.12908
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Darryl Knight, Philip Hansbro, Chantal Donovan
2017 Liu G, Cooley MA, Nair PM, Donovan C, Hsu AC, Jarnicki AG, et al., 'Airway remodelling and inflammation in asthma are dependent on the extracellular matrix protein fibulin-1c', JOURNAL OF PATHOLOGY, 243 510-523 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/path.4979
Co-authors Nicole Hansbro, Paul Foster, Chantal Donovan, Darryl Knight, Hock Tay, Peter Wark, Jay Horvat, Philip Hansbro, Christopher Grainge, Alan Hsu
2016 Haw TJ, Starkey MR, Nair PM, Pavlidis S, Liu G, Nguyen DH, et al., 'A pathogenic role for tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease', Mucosal Immunology, 9 859-872 (2016) [C1]

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a life-Threatening inflammatory respiratory disorder, often induced by cigarette smoke (CS) exposure. The development of effective ... [more]

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a life-Threatening inflammatory respiratory disorder, often induced by cigarette smoke (CS) exposure. The development of effective therapies is impaired by a lack of understanding of the underlining mechanisms. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a cytokine with inflammatory and apoptotic properties. We interrogated a mouse model of CS-induced experimental COPD and human tissues to identify a novel role for TRAIL in COPD pathogenesis. CS exposure of wild-Type mice increased TRAIL and its receptor messenger RNA (mRNA) expression and protein levels, as well as the number of TRAIL + CD11b + monocytes in the lung. TRAIL and its receptor mRNA were also increased in human COPD. CS-exposed TRAIL-deficient mice had decreased pulmonary inflammation, pro-inflammatory mediators, emphysema-like alveolar enlargement, and improved lung function. TRAIL-deficient mice also developed spontaneous small airway changes with increased epithelial cell thickness and collagen deposition, independent of CS exposure. Importantly, therapeutic neutralization of TRAIL, after the establishment of early-stage experimental COPD, reduced pulmonary inflammation, emphysema-like alveolar enlargement, and small airway changes. These data provide further evidence for TRAIL being a pivotal inflammatory factor in respiratory diseases, and the first preclinical evidence to suggest that therapeutic agents that target TRAIL may be effective in COPD therapy.

DOI 10.1038/mi.2015.111
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Adam Collison, Jay Horvat, Malcolm Starkey, Philip Hansbro, Alan Hsu, Paul Foster, Joerg Mattes, Darryl Knight, Peter Wark
2016 Gold MJ, Hiebert PR, Park HY, Stefanowicz D, Le A, Starkey MR, et al., 'Mucosal production of uric acid by airway epithelial cells contributes to particulate matter-induced allergic sensitization', Mucosal Immunology, 9 809-820 (2016) [C1]

Exposure to particulate matter (PM), a major component of air pollution, contributes to increased morbidity and mortality worldwide. PM induces innate immune responses and contrib... [more]

Exposure to particulate matter (PM), a major component of air pollution, contributes to increased morbidity and mortality worldwide. PM induces innate immune responses and contributes to allergic sensitization, although the mechanisms governing this process remain unclear. Lung mucosal uric acid has also been linked to allergic sensitization. The links among PM exposure, uric acid, and allergic sensitization remain unexplored. We therefore investigated the mechanisms behind PM-induced allergic sensitization in the context of lung mucosal uric acid. PM 10 and house dust mite exposure selectively induced lung mucosal uric acid production and secretion in vivo, which did not occur with other challenges (lipopolysaccharide, virus, bacteria, or inflammatory/fibrotic stimuli). PM 10 -induced uric acid mediates allergic sensitization and augments antigen-specific T-cell proliferation, which is inhibited by uricase. We then demonstrate that human airway epithelial cells secrete uric acid basally and after stimulation through a previously unidentified mucosal secretion system. Our work discovers a previously unknown mechanism of air pollution-induced, uric acid-mediated, allergic sensitization that may be important in the pathogenesis of asthma.

DOI 10.1038/mi.2015.104
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Jay Horvat, Darryl Knight, Philip Hansbro, Malcolm Starkey
2016 Jarnicki AG, Schilter H, Liu G, Wheeldon K, Essilfie AT, Foot JS, et al., 'The inhibitor of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase, PXS-4728A, ameliorates key features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a mouse model', British Journal of Pharmacology, 173 3161-3175 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The British Pharmacological Society Background and Purpose: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of illness and death, often induced by cigarette s... [more]

© 2016 The British Pharmacological Society Background and Purpose: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of illness and death, often induced by cigarette smoking (CS). It is characterized by pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis that impairs lung function. Existing treatments aim to control symptoms but have low efficacy, and there are no broadly effective treatments. A new potential target is the ectoenzyme, semicarbazide-sensitive mono-amine oxidase (SSAO; also known as vascular adhesion protein-1). SSAO is elevated in smokers¿ serum and is a pro-inflammatory enzyme facilitating adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes from the vasculature to sites of inflammation. Experimental Approach: PXS-4728A was developed as a low MW inhibitor of SSAO. A model of COPD induced by CS in mice reproduces key aspects of human COPD, including chronic airway inflammation, fibrosis and impaired lung function. This model was used to assess suppression of SSAO activity and amelioration of inflammation and other characteristic features of COPD. Key Results: Treatment with PXS-4728A completely inhibited lung and systemic SSAO activity induced by acute and chronic CS-exposure. Daily oral treatment inhibited airway inflammation (immune cell influx and inflammatory factors) induced by acute CS-exposure. Therapeutic treatment during chronic CS-exposure, when the key features of experimental COPD develop and progress, substantially suppressed inflammatory cell influx and fibrosis in the airways and improved lung function. Conclusions and Implications: Treatment with a low MW inhibitor of SSAO, PXS-4728A, suppressed airway inflammation and fibrosis and improved lung function in experimental COPD, demonstrating the therapeutic potential of PXS-4728A for this debilitating disease.

DOI 10.1111/bph.13573
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Philip Hansbro
2016 Gang L, Hsu A, Cooley MA, Jarnicki AG, Nair PM, Haw TJ, et al., 'Fibulin-1 regulates the pathogenesis of tissue remodeling in respiratory diseases', Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight, 1 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1172/jci.insight.86380
Citations Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Michael Fricker, Alan Hsu, Philip Hansbro, Jay Horvat, Darryl Knight, Peter Wark, Marjorie Walker
Show 8 more journal articles

Conference (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Horvat JC, Alit M, Johnstone D, Essilfie A-T, Mayall J, Pinkerton JW, et al., 'Role Of Increased Iron Levels In The Pathogenesis Of Lung Disease', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, Washington, DC (2017)
Co-authors Chantal Donovan, Jay Horvat, Philip Hansbro, Liz Milward
2017 Ali MK, Kim R, Johnstone D, Essilfie A-T, Mayall J, Karim R, et al., 'ROLE OF INCREASED IRON LEVELS IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF LUNG DISEASE', RESPIROLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Jay Horvat, Philip Hansbro, Liz Milward, Chantal Donovan
2017 Liu G, Cooley MA, Jarnicki AG, Hsu AC-Y, Nair PM, Haw TJ, et al., 'FIUBLIN-1C PLAYS CRITICAL ROLES IN LUNG REMODELLING IN IDIOPATHIC PULMONARY FIBROSIS', RESPIROLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Michael Fricker, Jay Horvat, Philip Hansbro, Alan Hsu, Darryl Knight, Marjorie Walker
2016 Hansbro PM, Liu G, Cooley MA, Jarnicki AG, Hsu AC, Nair PM, et al., 'Fibulin-1 Plays Critical Roles In The Pathogenesis Of Pulmonary Diseases', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, San Francisco, CA (2016)
Co-authors Peter Wark, Philip Hansbro, Michael Fricker, Alan Hsu, Darryl Knight, Jay Horvat
2016 Gellatly S, Dennis P, Jarnicki A, Lachner N, Wood D, Fricker M, et al., 'HEALTHY GUT MICROBIOTA AMELIORATES EXPERIMENTAL CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE', RESPIROLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Simon Keely, Philip Hansbro, Michael Fricker
2016 Hansbro P, Nair P, Starkey M, Haw T, Liu G, Clark A, Ammit A, 'TRISTETRAPROLIN PROTECTS MICE AGAINST CIGARETTE-SMOKE INDUCED EXPERIMENTAL COPD', RESPIROLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Philip Hansbro
2016 Starkey M, Haw T, Pavlidis S, Nair MP, Liu G, Hanish I, et al., 'TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 7 PROMOTES CIGARETTE-SMOKE INDUCED EMPHYSEMA-LIKE ALVEOLAR ENLARGEMENT IN CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE', RESPIROLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Jay Horvat, Philip Hansbro
2015 Hansbro P, Haw T, Nair P, Hanish I, Nguyen D, Liu G, et al., 'Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand promotes the development of experimental chronic obstructive pulmonary disease', JOURNAL OF IMMUNOLOGY, New Orleans, LA (2015)
Co-authors Joerg Mattes, Darryl Knight, Adam Collison, Jay Horvat, Philip Hansbro
Show 5 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $48,250

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20181 grants / $33,250

Non- immunosuppressive strategies for the treatment of IBD$33,250

Funding body: Bowel of the Ball Limited

Funding body Bowel of the Ball Limited
Project Team Associate Professor Simon Keely, Doctor Andrea Mathe, Doctor Gang Liu
Scheme Research Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800196
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

20171 grants / $10,000

Countess II FL$10,000

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Doctor Malcolm Starkey, Doctor Adam Collison, Doctor Hock Tay, Doctor Aniruddh Deshpande, Doctor Gang Liu, Doctor Jemma Mayall
Scheme Medical Research Support Program (MRSP)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701221
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON Y

20161 grants / $5,000

Targeting to Fibulin-1 as a novel therapeutic option for IPF$5,000

https://www.thoracic.org.au/researchawards/2016-award-winners

Funding body: Lung Foundation Australia

Funding body Lung Foundation Australia
Project Team

Gang Liu, Phil Hansbro

Scheme Research Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.2

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Epithelial Metabolism as a Mediator of Host-Microbiome Interactions in Inflammatory Bowel Disease PhD (Immunology & Microbiol), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Gang Liu

Position

Postdoctoral Research Fellow
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email gang.liu@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4042 0195

Office

Building HMRI building
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