Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin

Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin

Associate Professor

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Over the past 15 years, I have worked in a clinical research capacity with people experiencing psychotic disorders, depression, personality disorders, and alcohol/other drug use problems, with specific experience in the use of cognitive behaviour therapy, motivational interviewing and mindfulness-based stress reduction techniques among people with co-occurring mental health and alcohol/other drug problems. My main research activity has been on the development and clinical trial of computer- and internet-delivered treatments for people with co-occurring mental health and alcohol/other drug use problems. I have led several large scale randomized controlled clinical trials of face-to-face, phone-based and computerized psychological treatments, and translated these treatments into clinical practice. I have also developed tobacco-focused psychological treatments incorporating a multiple behavior change focus, and in clinical treatment trials evaluating the efficacy of such treatments among people with mental health problems.  My vision is to bring high quality, evidence based treatment for multiple health problems to the point-of-care for people experiencing mental health and addictive disorders to ensure that the right person receives the right intervention at the right time.   

The broad goal of my research program is to develop high quality, evidence-based care that is accessible and acceptable to people with mental and physical health comorbidities by:

  1. Developing and testing eHealth treatments to prevent or reduce harm in mental disorders;
  2. Participating with services, consumers, and industry to inform translation of comorbidity treatments;
  3. Optimising treatment provision via better understanding the mechanisms of change underlying my eHealth treatments; and
  4. Conducting research to determine how best to personalise eHealth treatment provision.

Research Expertise
Over the course of my research career, I have (i) conceived and completed 5 clinical large-scale RCTs and >20 smaller clinical studies in comorbidity treatment; (ii) initiated >30 meaningful national and international collaborations with academics and industry partners to facilitate translation of my evidence-based treatments outside of my research trials; (iii) created the first (and only) evidence-based eHealth treatment for depression and comorbid alcohol/cannabis/amphetamine use problems, which has been licensed for use by Magellan Health in the USA, seeded the development and trial of a further 4 multimedia treatment programs in comorbidity, and is currently the subject of 1 international NIDA-pilot trial (with application for the full trial to follow) and projects with NSW Health and the Mining Industry.

Leadership Roles 
In 2016, I became Co-Director of the Mental Health Hub of the University of Newcastle's Priority Research Centre in Brain and Mental Health (in partnership with Professor Sally Chan).

I am the current President of the International Society for Research on Internet Interventions; the peak international body representing research in technology in health and related disciplines.  

I lead the Translation Stream of the NHMRC CRE in Mental Health and Substance Use (CREMS, http://www.comorbidity.edu.au), with a staff of >20 academics and researchers. I am also an invited member of the Senior Leadership Advisory Group within CREMS, who have developed and direct the strategic vision of the Centre, its staff over >40 researchers across 7 Universities, and its affiliates (the largest international concentration of experts in comorbidity).   

My role as secretary for the Society for Mental Health Research (http://www.smhr.org.au) enables me to work alongside leaders in mental health research in Australia (Prof McGorry AO, current president), and through our work with politicians and key stakeholder groups, to lobby for increased recognition and funding for mental health research into the future.  Our partnership in 2014-15 with the ABC to run the ‘Mental As…’ campaign (with which I was heavily involved) is testament to this success, and has resulted in close to $2 million being channeled to support early career mental health researchers in Australia.

I have recently been appointed as Chair of the Research Review Committee for Oygen/Human Ethics Advisory Group for the Centre for Youth Mental Health (UniMelb).  This role enables me to ensure the quality of mental health research coming out of the national Centre, to facilitate collaborations between researchers within the Centres, and to be a conduit to facilitate the clinical-research interface.

These roles enable me to have significant intellectual input into the direction of the national and international research agenda in mental health and addiction research generally, and comorbidity specifically. 










Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Psychology)(Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • accessibility of psychological treatment
  • alcohol use
  • amphetamine use
  • cannabis use
  • cognitive behaviour therapy
  • comorbidity
  • computerised treatments
  • depression
  • internet-based treatments
  • mental health problems
  • mindfulness
  • motivational interviewing
  • psychological treatment
  • substance use
  • tobacco use

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 15
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 35
170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2006 -  NHMRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow The University of New South Wales
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (14 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Kay-Lambkin F, Healey A, Baker A, Swift W, Thornton L, Turner A, 'Engaging Cannabis Users in Treatment', Handbook of Cannabis and Related Pathologies: Biology, Pharmacology, Diagnosis, and Treatment e202-e210 (2017)

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Client engagement in drug and alcohol treatment is difficult, especially so for cannabis users, who respond differently to treatments th... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Client engagement in drug and alcohol treatment is difficult, especially so for cannabis users, who respond differently to treatments than do users of other drugs. Available data indicate that people who use cannabis report heightened interpersonal sensitivities, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, and psychoticism relative to users of other drugs, which may affect their ability to establish an early therapeutic alliance in psychological and behavioral treatments. The physiological effects of cannabis, and a low perception of risk associated with cannabis use, also contribute to the ambivalence reported by cannabis users in relation to modifying their current use patterns, and makes engagement particularly difficult. This is a concern, given the documented adverse health and psychological effects associated with chronic cannabis use. Importantly, evidence suggests that cannabis use responds better to psychological and behavioral treatments of at least 10 sessions' duration, highlighting the need to focus efforts on the better engagement and retention of cannabis users in treatment programs, over an extended period. In response, tailoring treatments to the unique challenges associated with cannabis use shows promise, particularly when geared toward meeting the cannabis user's wants and needs in terms of the goals of therapy, the tasks of therapy, and the bond in therapy. Focusing early treatment on behaviors that cannabis users perceive as most risky and harmful (eg, tobacco use, other lifestyle factors), offering treatment delivered in non-face-to-face format (non-F2F) (eg, by Internet or computer-based programs), and establishing specialized cannabis clinics with therapists trained to manage the complex relationships with cannabis users in therapy may prove the key to closing the gap between need for and receipt of treatment for cannabis users.

DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-800756-3.00134-4
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2016 Baker AL, Hides L, Kelly P, Kay-Lambkin F, Nasstasia Y, Birchwood M, 'Motivational interviewing and CBT to improve health and well-being', Innovations and Future Directions in the Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies, Australian Academic Press, Queensland, Australia 171-175 (2016) [B1]
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2015 Nesbitt K, Blackmore K, Hookham G, Kay-Lambkin F, Walla P, 'Using the Startle Eye-Blink to Measure Affect in Players', Serious Games Analytics: Methodologies for Performance Measurement, Assessment, and Improvement, Springer, Cham, Switzerland 401-434 (2015) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-05834-4_18
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Keith Nesbitt, Karen Blackmore, Peter Walla
2013 Kay-Lambkin F, Baker AL, 'Substance use and mood disorders', Principles of Addiction Comprehensive Addictive Behaviors and Disorders, Academic Press, San Diego (2013)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2012 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin F, de Ville M, McKetin R, Lee N, 'Stepped care approaches for ATS problems', Perspectives on amphetamine-type stimulants, IP Communications, Melbourne 329-341 (2012)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2012 McKetin R, Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin F, Lee N, 'Amphetamine-Type Stimulant use on a global level and implications for responding', Perspectives on amphetamine-type stimulants, IP Communications, Melbourne 5-20 (2012)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2009 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin F, Lee N, 'Managing mental health issues in alcohol and other drug settings', Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Psychiatric and Addiction Comorbidity, Commonwealth of Australia, Canberra (2009)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2008 Lee NK, Kay-Lambkin FJ, McKetin R, Baker AL, 'Everything old is new again: The application of drug treatment to the emerging challenge of methamphetamine use and dependence', Drugs and Public Health: Australian Perspectives on Policy and Practice, Oxford University Press, Oxford 73-84 (2008) [B1]
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2007 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Lewin TJ, 'Co-existing mental health and drug and alcohol problems: Steps towards better treatment', Clinical Handbook of Co-existing Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Problems, Routledge, London 1-19 (2007) [B1]
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2007 Baker AL, Bucci S, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Hides L, 'Cognitive behaviour therapy for people with co-existing mental health and drug and alcohol problems', Clinical Handbook of Co-existing Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Problems, Routledge, London 55-73 (2007) [B1]
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2007 Hides L, Lubman DI, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, 'Young people with co-existing mental health and drug and alcohol problems', Clinical Handbook of Co-existing Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Problems, Routledge, London 132-158 (2007) [B1]
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2007 Kelly BJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Kavanagh DJ, 'Rurally isolated populations and co-existing mental health and drug and alcohol problems', Clinical Handbook of Co-existing Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Problems, Routledge, London 159-176 (2007) [B1]
Co-authors Brian Kelly
2007 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Carr VJ, 'Depression and drug and alcohol problems', Clinical Handbook of Co-existing Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Problems, Routledge, London 218-240 (2007) [B1]
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2003 Whelan G, Kay-Lambkin F, Baker AL, Cohen M, 'Comorbidity', Alcohol and Drug Problems: A Case Studies Workbook, Oxford University Press, Melbourne 180-188 (2003)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
Show 11 more chapters

Journal article (125 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Thornton L, Handley T, Kay-Lambkin F, Baker A, 'Is A Person Thinking About Suicide Likely to Find Help on the Internet? An Evaluation of Google Search Results', Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 47 48-53 (2017)

© 2016 The American Association of Suicidology It is unclear whether individuals searching the Internet for assistance with thoughts of suicide are likely to encounter predominan... [more]

© 2016 The American Association of Suicidology It is unclear whether individuals searching the Internet for assistance with thoughts of suicide are likely to encounter predominantly helpful or harmful resources. This study investigated websites retrieved by searching Google for information and support for suicidal thoughts. Google searches retrieved a high percentage of irrelevant websites (26%, n¿=¿136). Of the 329 relevant websites retrieved, the majority were suicide preventive (68%); however, a considerable proportion of sites expressed mixed (22%) or neutral (8%) suicide attitudes, and 1% were explicitly pro-suicide. The results highlight a need for suicide prevention organization websites to be made more easily accessible. In the meantime, clinicians should be aware of appropriate websites to recommend to clients.

DOI 10.1111/sltb.12261
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2017 Thornton L, Quinn C, Birrell L, Guillaumier A, Shaw B, Forbes E, et al., 'Free smoking cessation mobile apps available in Australia: a quality review and content analysis.', Aust N Z J Public Health, (2017)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12688
2017 Baker AL, Richmond R, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Filia SL, Castle D, Williams JM, et al., 'Randomised controlled trial of a healthy lifestyle intervention among smokers with psychotic disorders: Outcomes to 36¿months.', Aust N Z J Psychiatry, 4867417714336 (2017)
DOI 10.1177/0004867417714336
Co-authors Robin Callister, Vanessa Clark, Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker
2017 Gardner AJ, Iverson GL, Wojtowicz M, Levi CR, Kay-Lambkin F, Schofield PW, et al., 'MR Spectroscopy Findings in Retired Professional Rugby League Players', International Journal of Sports Medicine, (2017)
DOI 10.1055/s-0042-120843
Co-authors Andrew Gardner, Peter Schofield, Christopher Levi, Peter Stanwell
2017 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Palazzi K, Lewin TJ, Kelly BJ, 'Therapeutic Alliance, Client Need for Approval, and Perfectionism as Differential Moderators of Response to eHealth and Traditionally Delivered Treatments for Comorbid Depression and Substance Use Problems.', Int J Behav Med, (2017)
DOI 10.1007/s12529-017-9676-x
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker, Brian Kelly
2017 Burrows T, Hides L, Brown R, Dayas CV, Kay-Lambkin F, 'Differences in Dietary Preferences, Personality and Mental Health in Australian Adults with and without Food Addiction.', Nutrients, 9 (2017)
DOI 10.3390/nu9030285
Co-authors Christopher Dayas, Tracy Burrows
2017 Tynan RJ, Considine R, Wiggers J, Lewin TJ, James C, Inder K, et al., 'Alcohol consumption in the Australian coal mining industry', Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 74 259-267 (2017)

© 2017, BMJ. All rights reserved. Objectives: To investigate patterns of alcohol use within the coal mining industry, and associations with the personal, social, workplace and em... [more]

© 2017, BMJ. All rights reserved. Objectives: To investigate patterns of alcohol use within the coal mining industry, and associations with the personal, social, workplace and employment characteristics. Design: 8 mine sites across 3 eastern Australian states were surveyed, selected to encompass key geographic characteristics (accessibility and remoteness) and mine type (open cut and underground). Problematic alcohol use was measured using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) to determine: (1) overall risky or hazardous drinking behaviour; and (2) frequency of single-occasion drinking (6 or more drinks on 1 occasion). Results: A total of 1457 employees completed the survey, of which 45.7% of male and 17.0% of female participants reported levels of alcohol use within the range considered as risky or hazardous, considerably higher than the national average. Hierarchical linear regression revealed a significant contribution of many individual level factors associated with AUDIT scores: younger age, male, current smoking status; illicit substance use; previous alcohol and other drug use (AOD) problems; and higher psychological distress. Workplace factors associated with alcohol use included working in mining primarily for the high remuneration, and the type of mining, with underground miners reporting higher alcohol use than open-cut miners. Conclusions: Our findings provide support for the need to address alcohol use in the coal mining industry over and above routine on-site testing for alcohol use.

DOI 10.1136/oemed-2016-103602
Co-authors Kerry Inder, Amanda Baker, Carole James, Brian Kelly, John Wiggers, Terry Lewin
2017 Clark V, Baker A, Lewin T, Richmond R, Kay-Lambkin F, Filia S, et al., 'Self-Reported Reasons for Smoking: Predicting Abstinence and Implications for Smoking Cessation Treatments Among Those With a Psychotic Disorder', Journal of Dual Diagnosis, 13 6-14 (2017)

© 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Objectives: People living with a psychotic illness have higher rates of cigarette smoking and face unique barriers to quitting compared to t... [more]

© 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Objectives: People living with a psychotic illness have higher rates of cigarette smoking and face unique barriers to quitting compared to the general population. We examined whether self-reported reasons for smoking are useful predictors of successful quit attempts among people with psychosis. Methods: As part of a randomized controlled trial addressing smoking and cardiovascular disease risk behaviors among people with psychosis, self-reported reasons for smoking were assessed at baseline (n = 235), 15 weeks (n = 151), and 12 months (n = 139). Three factors from the Reasons for Smoking Questionnaire (Coping, Physiological, and Stimulation/Activation) were entered into a model to predict short- and long-term abstinence. The relationship between these factors and mental health symptoms were also assessed. Results: Participants scoring higher on the Stimulation/Activation factor (control of weight, enjoyment, concentration, and ¿peps me up¿) at baseline were just less than half as likely to be abstinent at 15 weeks. Female participants were five times more likely to abstinent at 15 weeks, and those with a higher global functioning at baseline were 5% more likely to be abstinent. There was a positive correlation between changes over time in the Stimulation/Activation factor from baseline to 12-month follow-up and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale total score at 12-month follow-up. This indicates that increasingly higher endorsement of the factor was associated with more psychological symptoms. There was also a negative correlation between the change over time in the Stimulation/Activation factor and global functioning at 12 months, indicating that increasingly higher endorsement of the factor led to lower global assessment of functioning. Conclusions: The Stimulation/Activation factor may be particularly important to assess and address among smokers with psychosis. It is recommended that further research use the Reasons for Smoking Questionnaire among smokers with psychosis as a clinical tool to identify specific quit barriers. Further research into why females have higher smoking cessation rates in the short term and relapse prevention interventions seem worthy of further investigation.

DOI 10.1080/15504263.2016.1271489
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Juanita Todd, Vanessa Clark, Amanda Baker
2016 Tynan RJ, Considine R, Rich JL, Skehan J, Wiggers J, Lewin TJ, et al., 'Help-seeking for mental health problems by employees in the Australian Mining Industry', BMC HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, 16 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1755-1
Co-authors Jane Rich, Brian Kelly, Carole James, Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin, Kerry Inder, John Wiggers
2016 Deady M, Mills KL, Teesson M, Kay-Lambkin F, 'An online intervention for co-occurring depression and problematic alcohol use in young people: Primary outcomes from a randomized controlled trial', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 18 (2016) [C1]

Background: Depression and problematic alcohol use represent two of the major causes of disease burden in young adults. These conditions frequently co-occur and this is associated... [more]

Background: Depression and problematic alcohol use represent two of the major causes of disease burden in young adults. These conditions frequently co-occur and this is associated with increased harm and poorer outcomes than either disorder in isolation. Integrated treatments have been shown to be effective; however, there remains a significant gap between those in need of treatment and those receiving it. The increased availability of eHealth programs presents a unique opportunity to treat these conditions. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an automated Web-based self-help intervention (DEAL Project) in treating co-occurring depressive sympt oms and problematic alcohol use in young people. Methods: Young people (aged 18 to 25 years) with moderate depression symptoms and drinking at hazardous levels (recruited largely via social media) were randomly allocated to the DEAL Project (n=60) or a Web-based attention-control condition (HealthWatch; n=44). The trial consisted of a 4-week intervention phase with follow-up assessment at posttreatment and at 3 and 6 months postbaseline. The primary outcomes were change in depression severity according to the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 as well as quantity and frequency of alcohol use (TOT-AL). Results: The DEAL Project was associated with statistically significant improvement in depression symptom severity (d=0.71) and reductions in alcohol use quantity (d=0.99) and frequency (d=0.76) in the short term compared to the control group. At 6-month follow-up, the improvements in the intervention group were maintained; however, the differences between the intervention and control groups were no longer statistically significant, such that between-group effects were in the small to moderate range at 6 months (depression symptoms: d=0.39; alcohol quantity: d=-0.09; alcohol frequency: d=0.24). Conclusions: Overall, the DEAL Project was associated with more rapid improvement in both depression symptoms and alcohol use outcomes in young people with these co-occurring conditions relative to an attention-control condition. However, long-term outcomes are less clear.

DOI 10.2196/jmir.5178
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2016 Gardner A, Iverson G, Wojtowicz M, Levi C, Kay-Lambkin F, Schofield P, et al., 'MR spectroscopy findings in retired professional rugby league players', International Journal of Sports Medicine, In press (2016)
Co-authors Christopher Levi, Peter Schofield, Peter Stanwell
2016 Handley TE, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Lewin TJ, Kelly BJ, Inder KJ, et al., 'Investigation of a Suicide Ideation Risk Profile in People with Co-occurring Depression and Substance Use Disorder', Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 204 820-826 (2016) [C1]

© Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved. Disengagement from services is common before suicide, hence identifying factors at treatment presentation that predict future s... [more]

© Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved. Disengagement from services is common before suicide, hence identifying factors at treatment presentation that predict future suicidality is important. This article explores risk profiles for suicidal ideation among treatment seekers with depression and substance misuse. Participants completed assessments at baseline and 6 months. Baseline demographics, psychiatric history, and current symptoms were entered into a decision tree to predict suicidal ideation at follow-up. Sixty-three percent of participants at baseline and 43.5% at follow-up reported suicidal ideation. Baseline ideation most salient when psychiatric illness began before adulthood, increasing the rate of follow-up ideation by 16%. Among those without baseline ideation, dysfunctional attitudes were the most important risk factor, increasing rates of suicidal ideation by 35%. These findings provide evidence of factors beyond initial diagnoses that increase the likelihood of suicidal ideation and are worthy of clinical attention. In particular, providing suicide prevention resources to those with high dysfunctional attitudes may be beneficial.

DOI 10.1097/NMD.0000000000000473
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Amanda Baker, John Attia, Kerry Inder, Terry Lewin, Brian Kelly
2016 Thornton LK, Harris K, Baker AL, Johnson M, Kay-Lambkin FJ, 'Recruiting for addiction research via Facebook', Drug and Alcohol Review, 35 494-502 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Introduction and Aims: This study aimed to examine the feasibility of recruiting participants to addiction res... [more]

© 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Introduction and Aims: This study aimed to examine the feasibility of recruiting participants to addiction research via Facebook. Design and Methods: Participants were recruited via an advertisement on Facebook, a local research register and university psychology courses. Participants completed a self-report survey regarding substance use, history of mental health issues and current psychological distress. Results: The 524 participants recruited via Facebook cost $1.86 per participant; and 418 participants were recruited via more traditional methods. There were significantly fewer women in the Facebook sample compared with the non-Facebook sample (¿ 2 = 196.61, P < 0.001), but no differences on age. Significantly more Facebook participants reported current use of tobacco (women: Facebook = 57%, non-Facebook = 21%, ¿ 2 = 39.71, P < 0.001; men: Facebook = 62%, non-Facebook = 21%, ¿ 2 = 32.429, P < 0.001) and cannabis (women: Facebook = 26%, non-Facebook = 7%, ¿ 2 = 14.364, P < 0.001; men: Facebook = 46%, non-Facebook = 24%, ¿ 2 = 6.765, P < 0.01). They also reported significantly more harmful use of tobacco [women: F degrees of freedom (d.f.) = 6.07, P < 0.05; men: F(d.f.) = 9.03, P < 0.01] and cannabis [women: F(d.f.) = 11.00, P < 0.01; men: F(d.f.) = 6.40, P < 0.05]. The Facebook sample contained a higher percentage of high-severity cannabis users (women: Facebook = 24%, non-Facebook = 4%, ¿ 2 = 18.12, P < 0.001; men: Facebook = 43%, non-Facebook = 16%, ¿ 2 = 10.00, P < 0.01) and reported significantly more severe depressive symptoms [women: F(d.f.) = 26.38, P < 0.001; men: F(d.f.) = 7.44, P < 0.05]. Discussion and Conclusions: Through Facebook, we were able to capture a greater proportion of people with high-severity substance use and mental health issues and were able to capture a greater and more severe range of substance use behaviours. This suggests social networking sites are efficient, cost-effective ways to recruit large numbers of participants, with relevant behaviours and conditions, to addiction research. [Thornton LK, Harris K, Baker AL, Johnson M, Kay-Lambkin FJ. Recruiting for addiction research via Facebook. Drug Alcohol Rev 2016;35:494¿502] .

DOI 10.1111/dar.12305
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Martin Johnson
2016 Batterham PJ, McGrath J, McGorry PD, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Hickie IB, Christensen H, 'NHMRC funding of mental health research', The Medical journal of Australia, 205 350-351 (2016)
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Thornton L, Lappin JM, Hanstock T, Sylvia L, Jacka F, et al., 'Study protocol for a systematic review of evidence for lifestyle interventions targeting smoking, sleep, alcohol/other drug use, physical activity, and healthy diet in people with bipolar disorder', Systematic Reviews, 5 (2016)

© 2016 Kay-Lambkin et al. Background: People with bipolar disorder (BD) have a mortality gap of up to 20 years compared to the general population. Physical conditions, such as ca... [more]

© 2016 Kay-Lambkin et al. Background: People with bipolar disorder (BD) have a mortality gap of up to 20 years compared to the general population. Physical conditions, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer, cause the majority of excess deaths in psychiatric populations and are the leading causes of mortality in people with BD. However, comparatively little attention has been paid to reducing the risk of physical conditions in psychiatric populations. Unhealthy lifestyle behaviors are among the potentially modifiable risk factors for a range of commonly comorbid chronic medical conditions, including CVD, diabetes, and obesity. This systematic review will identify and evaluate the available evidence for effective interventions to reduce risk and promote healthy lifestyle behaviors in BD. Methods/design: We will search MEDLINE, Embase, PsychINFO, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and CINAHL for published research studies (with at least an abstract published in English) that evaluate behavioral or psychosocial interventions to address the following lifestyle factors in people with BD: tobacco use, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, overweight or obesity, sleep-wake disturbance, and alcohol/other drug use. Primary outcomes for the review will be changes in tobacco use, level of physical activity, diet quality, sleep quality, alcohol use, and illicit drug use. Data on each primary outcome will be synthesized across available studies in that lifestyle area (e.g., tobacco abstinence, cigarettes smoked per day), and panel of research and clinical experts in each of the target lifestyle behaviors and those experienced with clinical and research with individuals with BD will determine how best to represent data related to that primary outcome. Seven members of the systematic review team will extract data, synthesize the evidence, and rate it for quality. Evidence will be synthesized via a narrative description of the behavioral interventions and their effectiveness in improving the healthy lifestyle behaviors in people with BD. Discussion: The planned review will synthesize and evaluate the available evidence regarding the behavioral or psychosocial treatment of lifestyle-related behaviors in people with BD. From this review, we will identify gaps in our existing knowledge and research evidence about the management of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors in people with BD. We will also identify potential opportunities to address lifestyle behaviors in BD, with a view to reducing the burden of physical ill-health in this population. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42015019993

DOI 10.1186/s13643-016-0282-9
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Robin Callister, Simon Dennis, Tanya Hanstock, Sally Hunt, Christopher Oldmeadow
2016 Batterham PJ, McGrath J, McGorry PD, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Hickle IB, Christensen H, 'NHMRC funding of mental health research A case for better alignment of research funding with burden of disease', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 205 348-349 (2016)
DOI 10.5694/mja16.00179
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2016 Thornton L, Batterham PJ, Fassnacht DB, Kay-Lambkin F, Calear AL, Hunt S, 'Recruiting for health, medical or psychosocial research using Facebook: Systematic review', Internet Interventions, 4 72-81 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Published by Elsevier B.V. Recruiting participants is a challenge for many health, medical and psychosocial research projects. One tool more frequently being used to impro... [more]

© 2016 Published by Elsevier B.V. Recruiting participants is a challenge for many health, medical and psychosocial research projects. One tool more frequently being used to improve recruitment is the social networking website Facebook. A systematic review was conducted to identify studies that have used Facebook to recruit participants of all ages, to any psychosocial, health or medical research. 110 unique studies that used Facebook as a recruitment source were included in the review. The majority of studies used a cross-sectional design (80%) and addressed a physical health or disease issue (57%). Half (49%) of the included studies reported specific details of the Facebook recruitment process. Researchers paid between $1.36 and $110 per completing participants (Mean = $17.48, SD = $23.06). Among studies that examined the representativeness of their sample, the majority concluded (86%) their Facebook-recruited samples were similarly representative of samples recruited via traditional methods. These results indicate that Facebook is an effective and cost-efficient recruitment method. Researchers should consider their target group, advertisement wording, offering incentives and no-cost methods of recruitment when considering Facebook as a recruitment source. It is hoped this review will assist researchers to make decisions regarding the use of Facebook as a recruitment tool in future research.

DOI 10.1016/j.invent.2016.02.001
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Sally Hunt
2016 Sankaranarayanan A, Clark V, Baker A, Palazzi K, Lewin TJ, Richmond R, et al., 'Reducing smoking reduces suicidality among individuals with psychosis: Complementary outcomes from a Healthy Lifestyles intervention study', Psychiatry Research, 243 407-412 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. This study sought to explore the impact of smoking reduction on suicidality (suicide ideation and behaviour) among people with a psychotic disorder ... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. This study sought to explore the impact of smoking reduction on suicidality (suicide ideation and behaviour) among people with a psychotic disorder (n=235) who participated in a randomized trial of a healthy lifestyle intervention trial. Suicidality, measured by item -4 of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) was the main variable of interest. Measures were collected by research assistants blind to treatment allocation at baseline, at 15 weeks (mid-intervention) and 12 months after baseline. Mediation analysis, adjusted for confounders, was used to determine the relationship between smoking reduction and suicidality and to explore whether this was mediated through depression. At 12 months, smoking reduction was found to be significantly associated with suicidality change; an association was also seen between smoking reduction and depression and depression and suicidality. After adjusting for depression, the association between smoking reduction and suicidality was attenuated but remained statistically significant; the proportion of the total effect that was mediated through depression was 30%. There was no significant association between suicidality and treatment group (vs. controls) over time. Our study suggests that smoking interventions may have benefits over and above those for improved physical health, by reducing suicidal ideation in people with psychosis.

DOI 10.1016/j.psychres.2016.07.006
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin, Vanessa Clark
2016 Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Bryant J, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'The association between cannabis use and motivation and intentions to quit tobacco within a sample of Australian socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers.', Health Educ Res, 31 771-781 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyw049
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Chris Paul, Christopher Oldmeadow, Billie Bonevski
2016 McCarter KL, Halpin SA, Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Lewin TJ, Thornton LK, et al., 'Associations between personality disorder characteristics and treatment outcomes in people with co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression.', BMC Psychiatry, 16 210 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-0937-z
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Brian Kelly, Sean Halpin, Terry Lewin
2016 Andrews M, Baker AL, Halpin SA, Lewin TJ, Richmond R, Kay-Lambkin FJ, et al., 'Early therapeutic alliance, treatment retention, and 12-month outcomes in a healthy lifestyles intervention for people with psychotic disorders', Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 204 894-902 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. Engaging and retaining individuals with psychotic disorders in psychosocial treatments is difficult. Early therapeutic alliance, treatment rete... [more]

© 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. Engaging and retaining individuals with psychotic disorders in psychosocial treatments is difficult. Early therapeutic alliance, treatment retention, and 12-month outcomes were examined in a subsample of smokers with a psychotic disorder (N = 178) participating in a healthy lifestyles study comparing a telephone versus face-to-face delivered intervention. Therapeutic alliance was assessed using the Agnew Relationship Measure; primary outcomes were treatment retention and changes in symptoms and health behaviors. Contrary to expectations, early alliance did not predict treatment retention. However, elements of both client- and therapist-rated alliance predicted some clinical outcomes (e.g., higher confidence in the therapeutic alliance at session 1 predicted improvements in 12-month depression). Some modest interactions between early alliance and intervention condition were also identified (e.g., clients initially with lower self-perceived initiative, or higher therapist-perceived bonding benefited preferentially from the telephone-delivered intervention), highlighting the need to further examine the interplay between therapeutic alliance and treatment modality.

DOI 10.1097/NMD.0000000000000585
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Vanessa Clark, Terry Lewin, Sean Halpin, Robin Callister
2016 James E, Freund M, Booth A, Duncan MJ, Johnson N, Short CE, et al., 'Comparative efficacy of simultaneous versus sequential multiple health behavior change interventions among adults: A systematic review of randomised trials', Preventive Medicine, 89 211-223 (2016) [C1]

© 2016. Background: Growing evidence points to the benefits of addressing multiple health behaviors rather than single behaviors. Purpose: This review evaluates the relative effe... [more]

© 2016. Background: Growing evidence points to the benefits of addressing multiple health behaviors rather than single behaviors. Purpose: This review evaluates the relative effectiveness of simultaneous and sequentially delivered multiple health behavior change (MHBC) interventions. Secondary aims were to identify: a) the most effective spacing of sequentially delivered components; b) differences in efficacy of MHBC interventions for adoption/cessation behaviors and lifestyle/addictive behaviors, and c) differences in trial retention between simultaneously and sequentially delivered interventions. Methods: MHBC intervention trials published up to October 2015 were identified through a systematic search. Eligible trials were randomised controlled trials that directly compared simultaneous and sequential delivery of a MHBC intervention. A narrative synthesis was undertaken. Results: Six trials met the inclusion criteria and across these trials the behaviors targeted were smoking, diet, physical activity, and alcohol consumption. Three trials reported a difference in intervention effect between a sequential and simultaneous approach in at least one behavioral outcome. Of these, two trials favoured a sequential approach on smoking. One trial favoured a simultaneous approach on fat intake. There was no difference in retention between sequential and simultaneous approaches. Conclusions: There is limited evidence regarding the relative effectiveness of sequential and simultaneous approaches. Given only three of the six trials observed a difference in intervention effectiveness for one health behavior outcome, and the relatively consistent finding that the sequential and simultaneous approaches were more effective than a usual/minimal care control condition, it appears that both approaches should be considered equally efficacious. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42015027876.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.06.012
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Angela Booth, Mitch Duncan, Natalie Johnson, Erica James, Luke Wolfenden
2015 Tait RJ, McKetin R, Kay-Lambkin F, Carron-Arthur B, Bennett A, Bennett K, et al., 'Six-month outcomes of a web-based intervention for users of amphetamine-type stimulants: Randomized controlled trial', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 17 e105 (2015) [C1]

©Robert J Tait, Rebecca McKetin, Frances Kay-Lambkin, Bradley Carron-Arthur, Anthony Bennett, Kylie Bennett, Helen Christensen, Kathleen M Griffiths. Background: The use of amphe... [more]

©Robert J Tait, Rebecca McKetin, Frances Kay-Lambkin, Bradley Carron-Arthur, Anthony Bennett, Kylie Bennett, Helen Christensen, Kathleen M Griffiths. Background: The use of amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) places a large burden on health services. Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a self-guided Web-based intervention ("breakingtheice") for ATS users over 6 months via a free-to-access site. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial comparing a waitlist control with a fully automated intervention containing 3 modules derived from cognitive behavioral therapy and motivation enhancement. The main outcome was self-reported ATS use in the past 3 months assessed at 3- and 6-month follow-ups using the Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST). Secondary outcomes were help-seeking intentions (general help-seeking questionnaire), actual help seeking (actual help-seeking questionnaire), psychological distress (Kessler 10), polydrug use (ASSIST), quality of life (European Health Interview Survey), days out of role, and readiness to change. Follow-up data were evaluated using an intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis with a group by time interaction. Results: We randomized 160 people (intervention: n=81; control: n=79). At 6 months, 38 of 81 (47%) intervention and 41 of 79 (52%) control participants provided data. ATS scores significantly declined for both groups, but the interaction effect was not significant. There were significant ITT time by group interactions for actual help seeking (rate ratio [RR] 2.16; d=0.45) and help-seeking intentions (RR 1.17; d=0.32), with help seeking increasing for the intervention group and declining for the control group. There were also significant interactions for days completely (RR 0.50) and partially (RR 0.74) out of role favoring the intervention group. However, 37% (30/81) of the intervention group did not complete even 1 module. Conclusions: This self-guided Web-based intervention encouraged help seeking associated with ATS use and reduced days out of role, but it did not reduce ATS use. Thus, this program provides a means of engaging with some sections of a difficult-to-reach group to encourage treatment, but a substantial minority remained disengaged. Trial Registration: Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12611000947909; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=343307 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6Y0PGGp8q).

DOI 10.2196/jmir.3778
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2015 Hunt SA, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Michie PT, 'Systematic review of neurocognition in people with co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression', Journal of Affective Disorders, 179 51-64 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Background Alcohol misuse and depression represent two major social and health problems globally. These conditions commonly co-occur and both are associated ... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Background Alcohol misuse and depression represent two major social and health problems globally. These conditions commonly co-occur and both are associated with significant cognitive impairment. Despite this, few studies have examined the impact on cognitive functioning of co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression. This study aims to critically review findings from peer-reviewed published articles examining neuropsychological test performance among samples of people with co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression. Method A comprehensive literature search was conducted, yielding six studies reporting neuropsychological profiles of people with co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression. Results comparing cognitive functioning of people with this comorbidity to those with alcohol misuse alone, depression alone, healthy controls and published norms were examined as well as those describing the correlation between depressive symptoms and cognitive functioning in people with alcohol use disorders. Results In the majority of instances, the comorbid groups did not differ significantly from those with depression only or alcohol misuse only, nor from healthy controls or published norms. In the cases where a difference in neuropsychological test scores between groups was found, it was not consistently identified across studies. However, visual memory was identified in two studies as being impaired in comorbid samples and is worthy of inclusion in future studies. Limitations Due to the small number of included studies and the large variation in inclusion criteria as well as differing assessment tools and methodologies between studies, the review did not include a quantitative synthesis. Conclusions Research into cognitive deficits among people with singly occurring versus co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression is accumulating. Evidence suggests that the neuropsychological performance among samples with this comorbidity is generally not severely impaired and is unlikely to preclude benefit from treatment.

DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2015.03.024
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Sally Hunt, Pat Michie, Amanda Baker
2015 Gardner A, Iverson GL, Levi CR, Schofield PW, Kay-Lambkin F, Kohler RMN, Stanwell P, 'A systematic review of concussion in rugby league', British Journal of Sports Medicine, 49 495-498 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved. Objectives: Concussion remains one of the inherent risks of participation in rugby league. While other injuries incurred by rug... [more]

© 2015, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved. Objectives: Concussion remains one of the inherent risks of participation in rugby league. While other injuries incurred by rugby league players have been well studied, less focus and attention has been directed towards concussion. Review method: The current review examined all articles published in English from 1900 up to June 2013 pertaining to concussion in rugby league players. Data sources: Publications were retrieved via six databases using the key search terms: rugby league, league, football; in combination with injury terms: athletic injuries, concussion, sports concussion, sports-related concussion, brain concussion, brain injury, brain injuries, mild traumatic brain injury, mTBI, traumatic brain injury, TBI, craniocerebral trauma, head injury and brain damage. Observational, cohort, correlational, cross-sectional and longitudinal studies were all included. Results: 199 rugby league injury publications were identified. 39 (20%) were related in some way to concussion. Of the 39 identified articles, 6 (15%) had the main aim of evaluating concussion, while the other 33 reported on concussion incidence as part of overall injury data analyses. Rugby league concussion incidence rates vary widely from 0.0 to 40.0/1000 playing hours, depending on the definition of injury (time loss vs no time loss). The incidence rates vary across match play versus training session, seasons (winter vs summer) and playing position (forwards vs backs). The ball carrier has been found to be at greater risk for injury than tacklers. Concussion accounts for 29% of all injuries associated with illegal play, but only 9% of injuries sustained in legal play. Conclusions: In comparison with other collision sports, research evaluating concussion in rugby league is limited. With such limited published rugby league data, there are many aspects of concussion that require attention, and future research may be directed towards these unanswered questions.

DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2013-093102
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Christopher Levi, Peter Stanwell, Peter Schofield, Andrew Gardner
2015 Handley T, Perkins D, Kay-Lambkin F, Lewin T, Kelly B, 'Familiarity with and intentions to use Internet-delivered mental health treatments among older rural adults', Aging and Mental Health, 19 989-996 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 © 2014 Taylor & Francis. Objectives: Older adults are the fastest growing age group in Australia, necessitating an increase in appropriate mental health services in the... [more]

© 2014 © 2014 Taylor & Francis. Objectives: Older adults are the fastest growing age group in Australia, necessitating an increase in appropriate mental health services in the coming years. While Internet-delivered mental health treatments have been established as acceptable and efficacious among younger samples, little research has explored whether they would be similarly useful in older populations.Methods: The participants were part of the Australian Rural Mental Health study, which explores mental health and well-being in residents of non-metropolitan New South Wales. A postal survey was used to assess knowledge of and intentions to use Internet-delivered mental health treatments. Demographics, mental health, and frequency of Internet use were also measured.Results: The survey was completed by 950 adults aged 50-93. The sample was largely unfamiliar with Internet mental health services, with 75% reporting that they had never heard of them and a further 20% not knowing any details of what they involved. Intentions to use these services were also low, at 13.5%; however, this increased with level of familiarity. Respondents with higher psychological distress, higher education, and more frequent Internet use were significantly more likely to consider using Internet treatments.Conclusions: Among older adults, overall awareness of Internet-delivered mental health treatments appears to be limited; however, higher familiarity contributes to higher intentions to use these treatments. Importantly, respondents with higher distress and greater computer literacy were more likely to consider mental health treatments delivered via the Internet. Future research exploring strategies to increase the promotion of these services to older samples may further improve their perceptions and use.

DOI 10.1080/13607863.2014.981744
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Terry Lewin
2015 Baker AL, Richmond R, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Filia SL, Castle D, Williams JM, et al., 'Randomized controlled trial of a healthy lifestyle intervention among smokers with psychotic disorders', Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 17 946-954 (2015) [C1]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. Introduction: People with severe menta... [more]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. Introduction: People with severe mental disorders typically experience a range of health problems; consequently, interventions addressing multiple health behaviors may provide an efficient way to tackle this major public health issue. This two-arm randomized controlled trial among people with psychotic disorders examined the efficacy of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) plus either a faceto- face or predominantly telephone delivered intervention for smoking cessation and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk reduction. Methods: Following baseline assessment and completion of a common, individually delivered 90-minute face-to-face intervention, participants (n = 235) were randomized to receive NRT plus: (1) a "Healthy Lifestyles" intervention for smoking cessation and CVD risk behaviors or (2) a predominantly telephone-based intervention (designed to control for NRT provision, session frequency, and other monitoring activities). Research assistants blind to treatment allocation performed assessments at 15 weeks (mid-intervention) and 12 months after baseline. Results: There were no significant differences between intervention conditions in CVD risk or smoking outcomes at 15 weeks or 12 months, with improvements in both conditions (eg, 12 months: 6.4% confirmed point prevalence abstinence rate; 17% experiencing a 50% or greater smoking reduction; mean reduction of 8.6 cigarettes per day; mean improvement in functioning of 9.8 points). Conclusions: The health disparity experienced by people with psychotic disorders is high. Faceto- face Healthy Lifestyle interventions appear to be feasible and somewhat effective. However, given the accessibility of telephone delivered interventions, potentially combined with lower cost, further studies are needed to evaluate telephone delivered smoking cessation and lifestyle interventions for people with psychotic disorders.

DOI 10.1093/ntr/ntv039
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Natasha Weaver, Vanessa Clark, Terry Lewin, Robin Callister
2015 Adamson SJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker A, Frampton CMA, Sellman D, Lewin TJ, 'Measuring change in cannabis use', Addiction Research and Theory, 23 43-49 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Informa UK Ltd. We examined the ability of the Cannabis User Disorders Identification Test - Revised (CUDIT-R) to detect change in a treatment sample, including correlatio... [more]

© 2014 Informa UK Ltd. We examined the ability of the Cannabis User Disorders Identification Test - Revised (CUDIT-R) to detect change in a treatment sample, including correlation with changes in other clinically relevant areas of functioning, and to determine reliable and clinically significant change thresholds. 133 cannabis-using patients taking part in a treatment trial for concurrent substance use and mood disorder were administered the 8-item CUDIT-R at baseline, 6 and 12 months, in addition to assessment of current cannabis use disorder, mood, alcohol use, motivation and employment status. Significant reductions in CUDIT-R scores were observed and were correlated with change in cannabis diagnosis, and improvement in mood. Higher motivation at baseline predicted greater reduction in CUDIT-R score. Reliable change was identified as occurring when CUDIT-R score changed by two or more, while clinically significant change, benchmarked against an increase or decrease of one DSM-IV cannabis dependence symptom, was equated to a CUDIT-R score changing by 3 or more points.

DOI 10.3109/16066359.2014.926895
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin
2015 Thornton LK, Kay-Lambkin FJ, 'Negative effect of alcohol use on mood among people with psychosis', Evidence-Based Mental Health, 18 e3 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/eb-2014-101976
2015 Batterham PJ, Sunderland M, Calear AL, Davey CG, Christensen H, Teesson M, et al., 'Developing a roadmap for the translation of e-mental health services for depression.', The Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry, 49 776-784 (2015) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
2015 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Geddes J, Hunt SA, Woodcock KL, Teesson M, et al., 'The iTreAD project: A study protocol for a randomised controlled clinical trial of online treatment and social networking for binge drinking and depression in young people Health behavior, health promotion and society', BMC Public Health, 15 (2015) [C3]

© 2015 Kay-Lambkin et al. Background: Depression and binge drinking behaviours are common clinical problems, which cause substantial functional, economic and health impacts. Thes... [more]

© 2015 Kay-Lambkin et al. Background: Depression and binge drinking behaviours are common clinical problems, which cause substantial functional, economic and health impacts. These conditions peak in young adulthood, and commonly co-occur. Comorbid depression and binge drinking are undertreated in young people, who are reluctant to seek help via traditional pathways to care. The iTreAD project (internet Treatment for Alcohol and Depression) aims to provide and evaluate internet-delivered monitoring and treatment programs for young people with depression and binge drinking concerns. Methods: Three hundred sixty nine participants will be recruited to the trial, and will be aged 18-30 years will be eligible for the study if they report current symptoms of depression (score 5 or more on the depression subscale of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale) and concurrent binge drinking practices (5 or more standard drinks at least twice in the prior month). Following screening and online baseline assessment, participants are randomised to: (a) online monthly self-assessments, (b) online monthly self-assessments¿+¿12-months of access to a 4 week online automated cognitive behaviour therapy program for binge drinking and depression (DEAL); or (c) online monthly assessment¿+¿DEAL¿+¿12-months of access to a social networking site (Breathing Space). Independent, blind follow-up assessments occur at 26, 39, 52 and 64-weeks post-baseline. Discussion: The iTreAD project is the first randomised controlled trial combining online cognitive behaviour therapy, social networking and online monitoring for young people reporting concerns with depression and binge drinking. These treatments represent low-cost, wide-reach youth-appropriate treatment, which will have significantly public health implications for service design, delivery and health policy for this important age group. Trial registration: Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12614000310662. Date registered 24 March 2014.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2365-2
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Sally Hunt, Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin
2014 Hunt SA, Baker AL, Michie PT, Kay-Lambkin F, 'Change in neurocognition in people with co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression: 12-month follow-up', Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy, S10:004 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.4172/2155-6105.S10-004
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Pat Michie, Sally Hunt
2014 Deady M, Teesson M, Kay-Lambkin F, Mills KL, 'Evaluating a brief, internet-based intervention for co-occurring depression and problematic alcohol use in young people: Protocol for a randomized controlled trial', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 16 (2014) [C3]

Background: Depression and alcohol misuse represent two of the major causes of disease burden in young adults. These conditions frequently co-occur and this co-occurrence is assoc... [more]

Background: Depression and alcohol misuse represent two of the major causes of disease burden in young adults. These conditions frequently co-occur and this co-occurrence is associated with increased risks and poorer outcomes than either disorder in isolation. Integrated treatments have been shown to be effective, however, there remains a significant gap between those in need of treatment and those receiving it, particularly in young people. The increased availability of Internet-based programs to complement health care presents a unique opportunity in the treatment of these conditions. Objective: The objective of our study was to evaluate whether a brief, Internet-based, self-help intervention (the DEAL [DEpression-ALcohol] Project) can be effective in treating co-occurring depression and problematic alcohol use in young people (18-25 years old). Methods: The evaluation will take the form of a randomized controlled trial (RCT), comparing the DEAL Project with an attention-control condition (HealthWatc h). The RCT will consist of a four-week intervention phase and a 24-week follow-up. It will be entirely Internet-based and open Australia-wide to young people 18 to 25 years old. The primary outcomes will be change in depression symptoms and alcohol use at 5, 12, and 24 weeks post baseline. Secondary outcomes include change in general functioning and quality of life, anxiety/stress symptomatology, and a number of other depression/alcohol related outcomes. Process analysis will also measure engagement across the conditions. Results: This study is currently ongoing with preliminary results expected in late 2014. Conclusions: This study, to our knowledge, will be the first RCT of a Internet-based treatment for comorbid depression and problematic alcohol use in any age group. If successful, the program represents a novel and innovative approach to addressing the significant harms associated with these conditions and will be an invaluable resource to those not receiving help elsewhere.

DOI 10.2196/resprot.3192
Citations Scopus - 1
2014 Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Forder PM, Powers J, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Risky drinking patterns are being continued into pregnancy: a prospective cohort study.', PLoS One, 9 e86171 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0086171
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Amy Anderson, Peta Forder, Jenny Powers, Deborah Loxton
2014 Tait RJ, McKetin R, Kay-Lambkin F, Carron-Arthur B, Bennett A, Bennett K, et al., 'A web-based intervention for users of amphetamine-type stimulants: 3-month outcomes of a randomized controlled trial', JMIR Mental Health, 16 1-12 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/mental.3278
Citations Scopus - 6
2014 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Simpson AL, Bowman J, Childs S, 'Dissemination of a computer-based psychological treatment in a drug and alcohol clinical service: an observational study.', Addiction science & clinical practice, 9 1-9 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1940-0640-9-15
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Jenny Bowman
2014 Baker AL, Turner A, Kelly PJ, Spring B, Callister R, Collins CE, et al., ''Better Health Choices' by telephone: A feasibility trial of improving diet and physical activity in people diagnosed with psychotic disorders', Psychiatry Research, (2014) [C1]

The study objective was to evaluate the feasibility of a telephone delivered intervention consisting of motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioural strategies aimed at imp... [more]

The study objective was to evaluate the feasibility of a telephone delivered intervention consisting of motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioural strategies aimed at improving diet and physical activity in people diagnosed with psychotic disorders. Twenty participants diagnosed with a non-acute psychotic disorder were recruited. The intervention consisted of eight telephone delivered sessions targeting fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption and leisure screen time, as well as smoking and alcohol use (as appropriate). F&V frequency and variety, and overall diet quality (measured by the Australian Recommended Food Score, ARFS), leisure screen time, overall sitting and walking time, smoking, alcohol consumption, mood, quality of life, and global functioning were examined before and 4-weeks post-treatment. Nineteen participants (95%) completed all intervention sessions, and 17 (85%) completed follow-up assessments. Significant increases from baseline to post-treatment were seen in ARFS fruit, vegetable and overall diet quality scores, quality of life and global functioning. Significant reductions in leisure screen time and overall sitting time were also seen. Results indicated that a telephone delivered intervention targeting key cardiovascular disease risk behaviours appears to be feasible and relatively effective in the short-term for people diagnosed with psychosis. A randomized controlled trial is warranted to replicate and extend these findings. © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.psychres.2014.06.035
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Amanda Baker
2014 Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Women's perceptions of information about alcohol use during pregnancy: a qualitative study.', BMC Public Health, 14 1048 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-14-1048
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Amy Anderson, Alexis Hure
2014 Law J, Richmond RL, Kay-Lambkin F, 'The contribution of personality to longevity: Findings from the Australian Centenarian Study', Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 59 528-535 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Objectives: To examine whether centenarians have a unique set of personality traits, which may in part explain their longevity. Methods: 79 Australia... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Objectives: To examine whether centenarians have a unique set of personality traits, which may in part explain their longevity. Methods: 79 Australian centenarians completed the NEO Five Factory Inventory (NEO-FFI), Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) and Life Orientation Test Revised (LOT-R) to assess different dimensions of their personalities. Centenarians were asked to answer items of the NEO-FFI, CD-RISC and LOT-R based on current views, and were then asked to recall in the presence of an informant (e.g. carers, offspring) on past personality (i.e. at mid-adult-life). Both sets of answers were recorded and analysed. Results: Centenarians were currently low in Openness and Extraversion and high in Neuroticism, but were low in Openness and high in Neuroticism, Conscientiousness and Extraversion when reflecting on past traits. Currently, centenarians in high care facilities reported higher levels of Neuroticism, as did centenarians who did not socialize. Cognitively intact centenarians reported higher levels of Agreeableness; and males reported lower Neuroticism compared to females when reflecting on past experiences. Discussion: Centenarians were characterized by several personality traits, which facilitated positive health behaviors and thus contributed to their longevity. It is possible that personality may not be static across the lifespan, but instead, reflect advancing age, psychosocial factors and changes in life circumstances.

DOI 10.1016/j.archger.2014.06.007
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
2014 Baker AL, Kavanagh DJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Hunt SA, Lewin TJ, Carr VJ, McElduff P, 'Randomized controlled trial of MICBT for co-existing alcohol misuse and depression: Outcomes to 36-months', Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 46 281-290 (2014) [C1]

Integrated psychological treatment addressing co-existing alcohol misuse and depression has not been compared with single-focused treatment. This trial evaluates changes over 36. ... [more]

Integrated psychological treatment addressing co-existing alcohol misuse and depression has not been compared with single-focused treatment. This trial evaluates changes over 36. months following randomization of 284 outpatients to one of four motivational interviewing and cognitive-behavior therapy (MICBT) based interventions: (1) brief integrated intervention (BI); or BI plus 9 further sessions with (2) an integrated-, (3) alcohol-, or (4) depression-focus. Outcome measures included changes in alcohol consumption, depression (BDI-II: Beck Depression Inventory) and functioning (GAF: Global Assessment of Functioning), with average improvements from baseline of 21.8 drinks per week, 12.6 BDI-II units and 8.2 GAF units. Longer interventions tended to be more effective in reducing depression and improving functioning in the long-term, and in improving alcohol consumption in the short-term. Integrated treatment was at least as good as single-focused MICBT. Alcohol-focused treatment was as effective as depression-focused treatment at reducing depression and more effective in reducing alcohol misuse. The best approach seems to be an initial focus on both conditions followed by additional integrated- or alcohol-focused sessions. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsat.2013.10.001
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Sally Hunt, Patrick Mcelduff, Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin
2014 Handley TE, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Inder KJ, Attia JR, Lewin TJ, Kelly BJ, 'Feasibility of internet-delivered mental health treatments for rural populations', Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 49 275-282 (2014) [C1]

Purpose: Rural populations face numerous barriers to mental health care. Although internet-delivered mental health treatments may offer an accessible and cost-effective answer to ... [more]

Purpose: Rural populations face numerous barriers to mental health care. Although internet-delivered mental health treatments may offer an accessible and cost-effective answer to these barriers, there has been little evaluation of the feasibility of this approach among rural communities. Methods: Data were obtained from a random rural community sample through the third wave of the Australian Rural Mental Health Study. Attitudes towards internet-delivered mental health treatments and availability of internet access were explored. Data were analysed to identify sub-groups in whom internet-delivered treatments may be usefully targeted. Results: Twelve hundred and forty-six participants completed the survey (mean age 59 years, 61 % females, 22 % from remote areas). Overall, 75 % had internet access and 20 % would consider using internet-based interventions, with 18 % meeting both of these feasibility criteria. Logistic regression revealed feasibility for internet-delivered mental health treatment was associated with younger age, male gender, being a carer, and a 12-month mental health problem. Participants who had used internet-delivered services in the past were significantly more likely to endorse these treatments as acceptable. Conclusions: There is considerable potential for internet-delivered treatments to increase service accessibility to some sub-groups, particularly among people with mental health problems who are not currently seeking help. Resistance to internet treatments appears to be largely attitudinal, suggesting that enhancing community education and familiarity with such programs may be effective in improving perceptions and ultimately access. © 2013 Springer-Ve rlag Berlin Heidelberg.

DOI 10.1007/s00127-013-0708-9
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Kerry Inder, Brian Kelly, John Attia, Terry Lewin
2014 Kelly PJ, Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin F, 'ADDRESSING MULTIPLE HEALTH RISK BEHAVIOURS IN DISADVANTAGED POPULATIONS: RESEARCH BEING LED BY THE NATIONAL HEALTH AND MEDICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL CENTRE OF RESEARCH EXCELLENCE IN MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE USE', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 33 37-37 (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2014 Deady M, Kay-Lambkin F, Teesson M, Mills K, 'Developing an integrated, Internet-based self-help programme for young people with depression and alcohol use problems', Internet Interventions, 1 118-131 (2014) [C1]

© 2014. Depression and alcohol use problems represent two of the major causes of disease burden in young people today. These conditions frequently co-occur and this co-occurrence... [more]

© 2014. Depression and alcohol use problems represent two of the major causes of disease burden in young people today. These conditions frequently co-occur and this co-occurrence is associated with increased risks and poorer outcomes than either disorder in isolation. Integrated treatments have been shown to be effective, however, there remains a significant gap between those in need of treatment and those receiving it, particularly in young people. The increa sed availability of Internet-based programmes to complement health care presents a unique opportunity in the treatment of these conditions. This paper presents the findings of a development stage of the first Internet-based programme for young people (aged 18-25. years) with co-occurring depression and alcohol use problems: the DEAL Project (DEpression-ALcohol). This stage involved engaging young people and mental health professionals to provide feedback regarding the acceptability and feasibility of a draft version of the programme. The 4-module draft programme incorporated evidence-based cognitive-behavioural therapy techniques and motivational enhancement principles. A series of focus groups with young people (n = 25) and interviews of key professionals (n = 6) were conducted. The feedback provided by this phase of testing was used to inform revisions to the programme. Overall, the DEAL Project programme was well-received and provides an innovative new platform for the treatment of co-occurring depression and alcohol use problems in young people. The next phase will include an evaluation of programme efficacy. If found to be efficacious, the programme has the potential to improve outcomes, reduce disease burden, and increase treatment uptake in this vulnerable group.

DOI 10.1016/j.invent.2014.06.004
Citations Scopus - 2
2014 Handley TE, Hiles SA, Inder KJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Kelly BJ, Lewin TJ, et al., 'Predictors of Suicidal Ideation in Older People: A Decision Tree Analysis', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY, 22 1325-1335 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jagp.2013.05.009
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Kerry Inder, Roseanne Peel, John Attia, Mark Mcevoy, Brian Kelly, Terry Lewin, Sarah Hiles
2014 Handley TE, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Inder KJ, Lewin TJ, Attia JR, Fuller J, et al., 'Self-reported contacts for mental health problems by rural residents: Predicted service needs, facilitators and barriers', BMC Psychiatry, 14 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Handley et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Background: Rural and remote Australians face a range of barriers to mental health care, potentially limiting the extent to wh... [more]

© 2014 Handley et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Background: Rural and remote Australians face a range of barriers to mental health care, potentially limiting the extent to which current services and support networks may provide assistance. This paper examines self-reported mental health problems and contacts during the last 12¿months, and explores cross-sectional associations between potential facilitators/barriers and professional and non-professional help-seeking, while taking into account expected associations with socio-demographic and health-related factors. Methods: During the 3-year follow-up of the Australian Rural Mental Health Study (ARMHS) a self-report survey was completed by adult rural residents (N = 1,231; 61% female 77% married; 22% remote location; mean age = 59¿years), which examined socio-demographic characteristics, current health status factors, predicted service needs, self-reported professional and non-professional contacts for mental health problems in the last 12¿months, other aspects of help-seeking, and perceived barriers. Results: Professional contacts for mental health problems were reported by 18% of the sample (including 14% reporting General Practitioner contacts), while non-professional contacts were reported by 16% (including 14% reporting discussions with family/friends). Perceived barriers to health care fell under the domains of structural (e.g., costs, distance), attitudinal (e.g., stigma concerns, confidentiality), and time commitments. Participants with 12-month mental health problems who reported their needs as met had the highest levels of service use. Hierarchical logistic regressions revealed a dose-response relationship between the level of predicted need and the likelihood of reporting professional and non-professional contacts, together with associations with socio-demographic characteristics (e.g., gender, relationships, and financial circumstances), suicidal ideation, and attitudinal factors, but not geographical remoteness. Conclusions: Rates of self-reported mental health problems were consistent with baseline findings, including higher rural contact rates with General Practitioners. Structural barriers displayed mixed associations with help-seeking, while attitudinal barriers were consistently associated with lower service contacts. Developing appropriate interventions that address perceptions of mental illness and attitudes towards help-seeking is likely to be vital in optimising treatment access and mental health outcomes in rural areas.

DOI 10.1186/s12888-014-0249-0
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors John Attia, Natasha Weaver, Terry Lewin, Kerry Inder, Brian Kelly
2014 Hamall KM, Heard TR, Inder KJ, McGill KM, Kay-Lambkin F, 'The Child Illness and Resilience Program (CHiRP): a study protocol of a stepped care intervention to improve the resilience and wellbeing of families living with childhood chronic illness', BMC Psychology, 2 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/2050-7283-2-5
Co-authors Katherine Mcgill, Kerry Inder
2014 Mills KL, Ewer P, Dore G, Teesson M, Baker A, Kay-Lambkin F, Sannibale C, 'The feasibility and acceptability of a brief intervention for clients of substance use services experiencing symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder', Addictive Behaviors, 39 1094-1099 (2014) [C1]

Background: Trauma exposure and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common among clients of substance use services. Existing treatments for these co-occurring conditions ten... [more]

Background: Trauma exposure and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common among clients of substance use services. Existing treatments for these co-occurring conditions tend to be lengthy, treatment retention is relatively poor, and they require extensive training and clinical supervision. The aim of the present study was to conduct a preliminary examination of the feasibility and acceptability of a brief intervention for PTSD symptoms among individuals seeking substance use treatment. Methods: An uncontrolled open-label pilot study was conducted among 29 inpatients of a medicated detoxification unit in Sydney, Australia. All participants completed a baseline interview followed by the brief intervention. The intervention consists of a single, one-hour manualised session providing psychoeducation pertaining to common trauma reactions and symptom management. PTSD and substance use outcomes were assessed at 1-week, 1-month and 3-month post-intervention. Results: PTSD symptom severity (assessed using the Clinicians Administered PTSD Scale) decreased significantly from baseline to 1-week follow up (ß - 10.87, 95%CI: - 19.75 to - 1.99) and again between the 1-week and 3-month follow-ups (ß - 15.38, 95%CI: - 23.20 to - 7.57). Despite these reductions, the majority of participants continued to meet criteria for a diagnosis of PTSD and there was no change in participants' negative post-traumatic cognitions. Participants expressed high levels of satisfaction with the intervention. Conclusions: Brief psychoeducation for traumatised clients attending substance use services appears to be feasible, acceptable, and may be of some benefit in reducing PTSD symptoms. However, participants continued to experience symptoms at severe levels; thus, brief intervention may best be conceptualised as a "stepping stone" to further trauma treatment. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2014.03.013
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2014 Deady M, Teesson M, Kay-Lambkin FJ, 'Treatments for co-occurring depression and substance use in young people: a systematic review.', Current drug abuse reviews, 7 3-17 (2014) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3
2013 Handley TE, Attia JR, Inder KJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Barker D, Lewin TJ, Kelly BJ, 'Longitudinal course and predictors of suicidal ideation in a rural community sample.', Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 47 1032-1040 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0004867413495318
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Terry Lewin, Kerry Inder, John Attia
2013 Healey A, Kay-Lambkin F, Bowman J, Childs S, 'Avoiding emotional bonds: An examination of the dimensions of therapeutic alliance among cannabis users', Frontiers in Psychiatry, 4 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fpsyt.2013.00070
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Jenny Bowman
2013 Handley TE, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Lewin TJ, Kelly BJ, Inder KJ, et al., 'Incidental treatment effects of CBT on suicidal ideation and hopelessness', JOURNAL OF AFFECTIVE DISORDERS, 151 275-283 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2013.06.005
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Amanda Baker, John Attia, Brian Kelly, Kerry Inder, Terry Lewin
2013 Connolly JM, Kavanagh DJ, Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Lewin TJ, Davis PJ, Quek L-H, 'Craving as a predictor of treatment outcomes in heavy drinkers with comorbid depressed mood', ADDICTIVE BEHAVIORS, 38 1585-1592 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2012.06.003
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker
2013 Wolfe S, Kay-Lambkin F, Bowman J, Childs S, 'To enforce or engage: The relationship between coercion, treatment motivation and therapeutic alliance within community-based drug and alcohol clients', Addictive Behaviors, 38 2187-2195 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2013.01.017
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Jenny Bowman
2013 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Gilligan C, Kavanagh DJ, Baker F, Lewin TJ, 'When does change begin following screening and brief intervention among depressed problem drinkers?', Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 44 264-270 (2013) [C1]

Brief interventions are effective for problem drinking and reductions are known to occur in association with screening and assessment. The present study sought to assess, among pa... [more]

Brief interventions are effective for problem drinking and reductions are known to occur in association with screening and assessment. The present study sought to assess, among participants (N= 202) in a clinical trial, how much change occurred between baseline assessment and a one-session brief intervention (S1), and the predictors of early change. The primary focus was on changes in the Beck Depression Inventory Fast Screen scores and alcohol consumption (standard drinks per week) prior to random allocation to nine further sessions addressing either depression, alcohol, or both problems. There were large and clinically significant reductions between baseline and S1, with the strongest predictors being baseline scores in the relevant domain and change in the other domain. Client engagement was also predictive of early depression changes. Monitoring progress in both domains from first contact, and provision of empathic care, followed by brief intervention appear to be useful for this high prevalence comorbidity. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsat.2012.07.009
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker, Conor Gilligan
2013 Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Forder P, Powers JR, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Predictors of antenatal alcohol use among Australian women: A prospective cohort study', BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 120 1366-1374 (2013) [C1]

Objective To identify predictors of antenatal alcohol consumption among women who usually consume alcohol. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Australian Longitudinal Study o... [more]

Objective To identify predictors of antenatal alcohol consumption among women who usually consume alcohol. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH). Population or Sample A total of 1969 women sampled from the ALSWH 1973-78 cohort. Methods Women were included if they were pregnant in 2000, 2003, 2006 or 2009. The relationship between antenatal alcohol consumption and sociodemographics, reproductive health, mental health, physical health, health behaviours, alcohol guidelines and healthcare factors was investigated using a multivariate logistic regression model. Main outcome measures Alcohol use during pregnancy. Results Most (82.0%) women continued to drink alcohol during pregnancy. Women were more likely to drink alcohol during pregnancy if they had consumed alcohol on a weekly basis before pregnancy (odds ratio [OR] 1.47; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.13-1.90), binge drank before pregnancy (OR 2.28; 95% CI 1.76-2.94), or if they were pregnant while alcohol guidelines recommended low alcohol versus abstinence (OR 1.60; 95% CI 1.26-2.03). Drinking during pregnancy was less likely if women had a Health Care Card (OR 0.63; 95% CI 0.45-0.88) or if they had ever had fertility problems (OR 0.64; 95% CI 0.48-0.86). Conclusions Most Australian women who drank alcohol continued to do so during pregnancy. Prepregnancy alcohol consumption was one of the main predictors of antenatal alcohol use. Alcohol guidelines, fertility problems and Health Care Card status also impacted antenatal alcohol consumption. © 2013 RCOG.

DOI 10.1111/1471-0528.12356
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Amy Anderson, Peta Forder, Deborah Loxton, Jenny Powers
2013 Allen J, Inder KJ, Lewin TJ, Attia JR, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, et al., 'Integrating and extending cohort studies: lessons from the eXtending Treatments, Education and Networks in Depression (xTEND) study', BMC Medical Research Methodology, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2288-13-122
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Brian Kelly, Terry Lewin, Kerry Inder, John Attia
2013 Kay-Lambkin F, Edwards S, Baker A, Kavanagh D, Kelly B, Bowman J, Lewin T, 'The Impact of Tobacco Smoking on Treatment for Comorbid Depression and Alcohol Misuse', International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction, 11 619-633 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11469-013-9437-2
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker, Brian Kelly
2013 Killackey E, Allott K, Cotton SM, Jackson H, Scutella R, Tseng Y, et al., 'A randomized controlled trial of vocational intervention for young people with first-episode psychosis: method', Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 7 329-337 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/eip.12066
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Sally Hunt
2012 Thornton LK, Baker AL, Lewin TJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Kavanagh D, Richmond R, et al., 'Reasons for substance use among people with mental disorders', Addictive Behaviors, 37 427-434 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker, Martin Johnson
2012 Thornton LK, Baker AL, Johnson MP, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Lewin TJ, 'Reasons for substance use among people with psychotic disorders: Method triangulation approach', Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 26 279-288 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Martin Johnson, Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker
2012 Gardner AJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Stanwell PT, Donnelly J, Williams WH, Hiles A, et al., 'A systematic review of diffusion tensor imaging findings in sports-related concussion', Journal of Neurotrauma, 29 2521-2538 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 57Web of Science - 51
Co-authors Christopher Levi, Peter Schofield, Peter Stanwell, Andrew Gardner
2012 Handley T, Inder KJ, Kelly BJ, Attia JR, Lewin TJ, Fitzgerald MN, Kay-Lambkin FJ, 'You've got to have friends: The predictive value of social integration and support in suicidal ideation among rural communities', Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 47 1281-1290 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Terry Lewin, Kerry Inder, John Attia
2012 Kelly PJ, Baker AL, Deane FP, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Bonevski B, Tregarthen J, 'Prevalence of smoking and other health risk factors in people attending residential substance abuse treatment', Drug and Alcohol Review, 31 638-644 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Billie Bonevski
2012 Holsinger RMD, Brown R, Richmond R, Law J, Kay-Lambkin F, Kirby AC, Chan DKY, 'Prevalence of the Long-Allele Genotype of the Serotonin Transporter-Linked Gene in Female Centenarians', JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, 60 1786-1788 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1532-5415.2012.04127.x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2012 Tait RJ, McKetin R, Kay-Lambkin F, Bennett K, Tam A, Bennett A, et al., 'Breakingtheice: A protocol for a randomised controlled trial of an internet-based intervention addressing amphetamine-type stimulant use', BMC Psychiatry, 12 67 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
2012 Handley T, Inder KJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Stain HJ, Fitzgerald M, Lewin TJ, et al., 'Contributors to suicidality in rural communities: Beyond the effects of depression', BMC Psychiatry, 12 105 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Kerry Inder, Brian Kelly, Helen Stain, John Attia
2012 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Healey A, Wolfe S, Simpson A, Brooks M, et al., 'Study protocol: A dissemination trial of computerized psychological treatment for depression and alcohol/other drug use comorbidity in an Australian clinical service', BMC Psychiatry, 12 77 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Amanda Baker
2012 Kelly PJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Deane FP, Brooks AC, Mitchell A, et al., 'Study protocol: A randomized controlled trial of a computer-based depression and substance abuse intervention for people attending residential substance abuse treatment', BMC Public Health, 12 113 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2012 Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Powers JR, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Determinants of pregnant women's compliance with alcohol guidelines: A prospective cohort study', BMC Public Health, 12 1-10 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Deborah Loxton, Amy Anderson, Alexis Hure
2012 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Kelly BJ, Lewin TJ, 'It's worth a try: The treatment experiences of rural and urban participants in a randomized controlled trial of computerized psychological treatment for comorbid depression and alcohol/other drug use', Journal of Dual Diagnosis, 8 262-276 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker, Brian Kelly
2012 Brooks M, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Bowman JA, Childs S, 'Self-compassion amongst clients with problematic alcohol use', Mindfulness, 3 308-317 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Jenny Bowman
2011 Kay-Lambkin FJ, White A, Baker AL, Kavanagh DJ, Klein B, Proudfoot J, et al., 'Assessment of function and clinical utility of alcohol and other drug web sites: An observational, qualitative study', BMC Public Health, 11 277 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2011 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Richmond R, Filia S, Castle D, Williams J, Lewin TJ, 'Study protocol: A randomised controlled trial investigating the effect of a healthy lifestyle intervention for people with severe mental disorders', BMC Public Health, 11 10 (2011) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker
2011 Thornton LK, Baker AL, Johnson MP, Kay-Lambkin FJ, 'Perceptions of anti-smoking public health campaigns among people with psychotic disorders', Mental Health and Substance Use: Dual Diagnosis, 4 110-115 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/17523281.2011.555066
Citations Scopus - 13
Co-authors Martin Johnson, Amanda Baker
2011 Filia SL, Baker AL, Richmond R, Castle DJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Sakrouge RE, et al., 'Health behaviour risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD) in smokers with a psychotic disorder: Baseline results', Mental Health and Substance Use: Dual Diagnosis, 4 158-171 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/17523281.2011.555088
Citations Scopus - 10
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2011 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Richmond R, Filia S, Castle D, Williams J, Thornton LK, 'Healthy lifestyle intervention for people with severe mental disorders', Mental Health and Substance Use: Dual Diagnosis, 4 144-157 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/17523281.2011.555086
Citations Scopus - 8
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2011 Richmond RL, Law J, Kay-Lambkin FJ, 'Physical, mental, and cognitive function in a convenience sample of centenarians in Australia', Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 59 963-1163 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1532-5415.2011.03404.x
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 14
2011 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Kelly BJ, Lewin TJ, 'Clinician-assisted computerised versus therapist-delivered treatment for depressive and addictive disorders: A randomised controlled trial', Medical Journal of Australia, 195 S44-S50 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 60Web of Science - 45
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker, Brian Kelly
2011 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Lee NM, Jenner L, Lewin TJ, 'The influence of depression on treatment for methamphetamine use', Medical Journal of Australia, 195 S38-S43 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker
2011 Richmond R, Law J, Kay-Lambkin F, 'Higher Blood Pressure Associated With Higher Cognition and Functionality Among Centenarians in Australia', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION, 24 299-303 (2011)
DOI 10.1038/ajh.2010.236
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 22
2011 Lee N, Jenner L, Baker AL, Ritter A, Hides L, Norman J, et al., 'Screening and intervention for mental health problems in alcohol and other drug settings: Can training change practitioner behaviour?', Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy, 18 157-160 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/09687631003727847
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2011 Handley T, Inder KJ, Kelly BJ, Attia JR, Kay-Lambkin FJ, 'Urban-rural influences on suicidality: Gaps in the existing literature and recommendations for future research', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 19 279-283 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2011.01235.x
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Kerry Inder, John Attia
2011 Kay-Lambkin F, Baker AL, Lewin TJ, Carr V, 'Acceptability of a clinician-assisted computerized psychological intervention for comorbid mental health and substance use problems: Treatment adherence data from a randomized controlled trial', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 13 254-264 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.1522
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker
2010 Kay-Lambkin F, 'Mindfulness- & Acceptance-Based Behavioral Therapies in Practice', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 29 463-464 (2010)
2010 Baker AL, Richmond R, Lewin TJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, 'Cigarette smoking and psychosis: Naturalistic follow up 4 years after an intervention trial', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 44 342-350 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/00048670903489841
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker
2010 Adamson SJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Lewin TJ, Thornton LK, Kelly BJ, Sellman JD, 'An improved brief measure of cannabis misuse: The Cannabis Use Disorders Identification Test-Revised (CUDIT-R)', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 110 137-143 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2010.02.017
Citations Scopus - 63Web of Science - 56
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Brian Kelly, Amanda Baker
2010 Lee NK, Pohlman S, Baker AL, Femis J, Kay-Lambkin FJ, 'It's the thought that counts: Craving metacognitions and their role in abstinence from methamphetamine use', Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 38 245-250 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsat.2009.12.006
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2010 White A, Kavanagh DJ, Stallman HM, Klein B, Kay-Lambkin F, Proudfoot J, et al., 'ONLINE ALCOHOL INTERVENTIONS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 29 13-13 (2010)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2010 Kay-Lambkin F, White A, Baker A, Kavanagh DJ, Klein B, Proudfoot J, et al., 'ASSESSMENT OF FUNCTION AND CLINICAL UTILITY OF ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG WEB SITES: AN OBSERVATIONAL, QUALITATIVE STUDY', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 29 13-14 (2010)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2010 Kavanagh D, Klein B, Austin D, Proudfoot J, Kay-Lambkin F, Connor J, et al., 'ONTRACK: EVALUATING ONLINE PSYCHOLOGICAL INTERVENTIONS FOR ALCOHOL AND DEPRESSION', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 29 14-14 (2010)
2010 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, McKetin R, Lee N, 'Stepping through treatment: Reflections on an adaptive treatment strategy among methamphetamine users with depression', Drug and Alcohol Review, 29 475-482 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2010.00203.x
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2010 Baker AL, Kavanagh DJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Hunt SA, Lewin TJ, Carr VJ, Connolly J, 'Randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioural therapy for coexisting depression and alcohol problems: Short-term outcome', Addiction, 105 87-99 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2009.02757.x
Citations Scopus - 67Web of Science - 55
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker, Sally Hunt
2010 Klein B, White A, Kavanagh D, Shandley K, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Proudfoot J, et al., 'Content and functionality of alcohol and other drug websites: Results of an online survey', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 12 e51 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.1449
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2010 White A, Kavanagh D, Stallman H, Klein B, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Proudfoot J, et al., 'Online alcohol Interventions: A systematic review', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 12 1-9 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.1479
Citations Scopus - 141Web of Science - 113
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2009 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Lee N, 'When less is more: Addressing symptoms of mental health problems in drug and alcohol treatment settings', Mental Health and Substance Use: Dual Diagnosis, 2 130-139 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/17523280902930106
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2009 Baker AL, Richmond R, Castle D, Kulkarni J, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Sakrouge RE, et al., 'Coronary heart disease risk reduction intervention among overweight smokers with a psychotic disorder: Pilot trial', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 43 129-135 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/00048670802607147
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin
2009 Gilligan C, Sanson-Fisher RW, Eades S, D'Este CA, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Scheman S, 'Identifying pregnant women at risk of poor birth outcomes', Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 29 181-187 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/01443610902753713
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Conor Gilligan, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2009 Baker AL, Turner A, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Lewin TJ, 'The long and the short of treatments for alcohol or cannabis misuse among people with severe mental disorders', Addictive Behaviors, 34 852-858 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2009.02.002
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin
2009 Kay-Lambkin FJ, 'Adapting cognitive therapy for depression: Managing complexity and comorbidity', Drug and Alcohol Review, 28 331-332 (2009) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2009.00073_1.x
2009 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Lewin TJ, Carr VJ, 'Computer-based psychological treatment for comorbid depression and problematic alcohol and/or cannabis use: A randomized controlled trial of clinical efficacy', Addiction, 104 378-388 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2008.02444.x
Citations Scopus - 134Web of Science - 111
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin
2008 Kay-Lambkin FJ, 'Technology and innovation in the psychosocial treatment of methamphetamine use, risk and dependence', Drug and Alcohol Review, 27 318-325 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09595230801914768
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
2007 Hides L, Elkins K, Catania LS, Mathias S, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Lubman DI, 'Feasibility and outcomes of an innovative cognitive-behavioural skill training programme for co-occurring disorders in the youth alcohol and other drug (AOD) sector', Drug and Alcohol Review, 26 517-523 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09595230701499134
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
2007 Kay-Lambkin FJ, 'Contracts in counselling and psychotherapy: professional skills for counsellors', Drug and Alcohol Review, 26 568-569 (2007) [C3]
DOI 10.1080/09595230701499209
2006 Turner A, Hambridge J, Baker A, Grace C, Kay-Lambkin F, Bowman J, 'BraveHeart: a new development in cognitive behaviour therapy for co-existing depression and coronary heart disease', JOURNAL OF AFFECTIVE DISORDERS, 91 S27-S27 (2006)
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Amanda Baker
2006 Baker AL, Ivers RG, Bowman JA, Butler T, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Wye PM, et al., 'Where there's smoke, there's fire: high prevalence of smoking among some sub-populations and recommendations for intervention', Drug and Alcohol Review, 25 85-96 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09595230500459552
Citations Scopus - 76Web of Science - 70
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Jenny Bowman
2006 Wilhelm K, Wedgwood L, Niven H, Kay-Lambkin FJ, 'Smoking cessation and depression: current knowledge and future directions', Drug and Alcohol Review, 25 97-107 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09595230500459560
Citations Scopus - 68Web of Science - 53
2006 Bucci S, Baker A, Kay-Lambkin F, Lewin T, Carr V, 'A randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behaviour therapy among people with a psychotic illness and coexisting alcohol and other drug problems', ACTA PSYCHIATRICA SCANDINAVICA, 114 57-57 (2006)
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker
2006 Baker AL, Bucci SR, Lewin TJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Constable PM, Carr VJ, 'Cognitive-behavioural therapy for substance use disorders in people with psychotic disorders - Randomised controlled trial', British Journal of Psychiatry, 188 439-448 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1192/bjp.188.5.439
Citations Scopus - 95Web of Science - 80
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker
2006 Turner A, Hambridge J, Baker A, Kay-Lambkin F, Phillips L, Bowman J, 'Depression and anxiety in cardiac rehabilitation patients: characteristics, treatment and outcome.', Acta Neuropsychiatr, 18 310 (2006)
DOI 10.1017/S092427080003177X
Co-authors Jenny Bowman
2005 Baker AL, Lee NK, Claire MR, Lewin TJ, Grant T, Pohlman S, et al., 'Brief cognitive behavioural interventions for regular amphetamine users: a step in the right direction', Addiction, 100 367-378 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2005.01002.x
Citations Scopus - 104Web of Science - 87
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker
2004 Kay-Lambkin F, 'Schema therapy: A practitioner's guide', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 23 373-374 (2004)
2004 Kay-Lambkin F, 'Integrated treatment for dual disorders: A guide to effective practice', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 23 491-492 (2004)
DOI 10.1080/09595230412331324617
2004 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Lewin TJ, 'The 'co-morbidity roundabout': a framework to guide assessment and intervention strategies and engineer change among people with co-morbid problems', Drug and Alcohol Review, 23 407-423 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09595230412331324536
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 34
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin
2004 Baker AL, Lee NK, Claire MR, Lewin TJ, Grant T, Pohlman S, et al., 'Drug use patterns and mental health of regular ampthetamine users during a reported 'heroin drought'', Addiction, 99 875-884 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2004.00741.x
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin
2003 Claire M, Baker A, Lee N, Pohlman S, Saunders J, Lewin T, et al., 'Nonpharmacological interventions for psychostimulant use', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 55 101-101 (2003)
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin
2003 Haile M, Baker A, Richmond R, Carr V, Lewin T, Wilhelm K, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of an intervention for tobacco dependence among people with a psychotic illness', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 55 102-103 (2003)
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin
2003 Kay-Lambkin F, Baker A, Bucci S, Lewin T, Rajkumar S, Carr V, 'Computer-based therapy for depression and alcohol/other drug (AOD) problems', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 55 104-104 (2003)
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker
2003 Bucci SR, Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Lewin (Ext) T, Carr VJ, Constable PM, 'Randomised controlled trial of cognitive behavioural therapy for comorbid psychotic illness and alcohol and other drug problems', Australian Journal of Psychology, 55 100 (2003) [C3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin
2003 Kay-Lambkin F, 'Male depression, alcohol and violence', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 22 239-240 (2003)
DOI 10.1080/095952301001006714
2002 Kay-Lambkin F, Pearson SA, Rolfe I, 'The influence of admissions variables on first year medical school performance: a study from Newcastle University, Australia', MEDICAL EDUCATION, 36 154-159 (2002)
DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2923.2002.01071.x
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 30
2002 Pearson S-A, Rolfe IE, Ringland CL, Kay-Lambkin FJ, 'A comparison of practice outcomes of graduates from traditional and non-traditional medical schools in Australia', Medical Education, 36 985-991 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 7
2001 Grey M, Pearson S, Rolfe IE, Kay F, Powis D, 'How do Australian Doctors with Different Pre-medical School Backgrounds Perform as Interns', Education for Health, 14 87-96 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 13
1998 Rolfe IE, Pearson SA, Fardell SD, Kay FJ, 'Monitoring the performance of junior doctors in the first two years of postgraduate training', Education for Health, 11 183-192 (1998)

A clinical supervisors' rating form addressing thirteen competences was used to assess the performance of Australian doctors in their first (intern) and subsequent first year of p... [more]

A clinical supervisors' rating form addressing thirteen competences was used to assess the performance of Australian doctors in their first (intern) and subsequent first year of postgraduate hospital training. After adjusting for the effects of age and gender, comparisons were made between graduates from Newcastle medical school (which has a problem-based curriculum) and Sydney medical school (a traditional curriculum at the time of the study). Data on 349 doctors (79% response rate) indicated that there were no significant differences between graduates from different educational backgrounds during internship or residency. This is probably not surprising as past research has shown that both Newcastle and Sydney graduates perform very well when compared to their peers from other institutes in the state. Older graduates were rated better at 'teaching' during the intern year only, and younger graduates better than their older counterparts on 'clinical clerking', 'clinical judgement' and 'diagnostic skills' in the resident year. Females were rated better than males on seven competences. Our study suggests that gender and age are factors influencing junior doctors' performance.

Citations Scopus - 3
1998 Rolfe IE, Pearson S, Sanson-Fisher R, Fardell SD, Kay FJ, Gordon J, 'Measuring the hospital experiences of junior doctors', MEDICAL EDUCATION, 32 312-319 (1998)
DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2923.1998.00206.x
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
1998 Rolfe IE, Gordon J, Atherton S, Pearson S, Kay FJ, Fardell SD, 'A system for maintaining the educational and training standards of junior doctors', MEDICAL EDUCATION, 32 426-431 (1998)
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Show 122 more journal articles

Review (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Kay-Lambkin F, Baker A, 'Substance Use and Mood Disorders (2013) [D1]
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-398336-7.00052-8
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2004 Kay-Lambkin FJ, 'Integrated Treatment for Dual Disorders: A Guide to Effective Practice', Drug and Alcohol Review (2004) [D2]

Conference (55 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Gardner AJ, Kay-Lambkin F, Shultz S, Iverson GL, 'Level of knowledge and attitude towards sport-related concussion among the general public' (2016)
Co-authors Andrew Gardner
2016 Hookham G, Bewick B, Kay-Lambkin F, Nesbitt K, 'A concurrent think aloud study of engagement and usability in a serious game', Serious Games. Second Joint International Conference, JCSG 2016 (2016) [E1]
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-45841-0_20
Co-authors Keith Nesbitt
2016 Baker A, Richmond R, Kay-Lambkin F, Filia S, Castle D, Callister R, et al., 'A HEALTHY LIFESTYLES AND SMOKING INTERVENTION AMONG PEOPLE WITH A PSYCHOTIC DISORDER: OUTCOMES OF A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL.', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Sean Halpin, Robin Callister, Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker
2016 Marel C, Mills KL, Kingston R, Gournay K, Deady M, Kay-Lambkin F, et al., 'GUIDELINES ON THE MANAGEMENT OF CO-OCCURRING ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG AND MENTAL HEALTH CONDITIONS: AN EVIDENCE-BASED RESOURCE FOR ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG WORKERS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2016)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2016 Hookham G, Nesbitt K, Kay-Lambkin F, 'Comparing Usability and Engagement Between a Serious Game and a Traditional Online Program', Proceedings of the Australasian Computer Science Week Multiconference (2016) [E1]
DOI 10.1145/2843043.2843365
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Keith Nesbitt
2016 Hookham G, Kay-Lambkin F, Blackmore K, Nesbitt K, 'Using startle probe to compare affect and engagement between a serious game and an online intervention program', ACM International Conference Proceeding Series (2016) [E1]

Copyright 2016 ACM. The widespread popularity of computer games have led to their expanded use in more serious applications for training and education. In many cases serious games... [more]

Copyright 2016 ACM. The widespread popularity of computer games have led to their expanded use in more serious applications for training and education. In many cases serious games are being advanced as more compelling than traditional face-to-face or interactive online training. A typically reported motivation for developing serious games is to try and increase engagement of participants and thus ultimately the effectiveness of the training experience. In this paper we discuss the relation of affect to engagement. The training reported in this study relates to a psychological counseling program developed to assist patients with comorbidity in depression and alcohol use disorders. A pre-existing online intervention program, called "SHADE", had been found to provide effective treatment when participants completed the program. However, a significant number of participants failed to complete the program, with most exits occurring when Cognitive Based Training (CBT) was integrated into the online program. To try and increase the number of participants completing the program a serious game, called "Shadow" is being developed to cover similar material. This paper reports on a study that uses the startle reflex modulation measure to try and objectively quantify the affective engagement of players in the two treatment approaches, Shadow, the serious game, versus SHADE, the online intervention program. Also reported are the issues associated with using affective processing, as measured by the startle probe technique, as a means of evaluating engagement in serious games.

DOI 10.1145/2843043.2843481
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Karen Blackmore, Keith Nesbitt
2015 Rich JL, Tynan R, Considine R, kay-lambkin F, inder K, Skehan J, et al., 'Mental Health Help Seeking in the Mining Industry' (2015)
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Jane Rich, Kerry Inder
2015 Gardner AJ, Iverson GL, Wojtowicz M, Levi C, Kay-Lambkin F, Schofield PW, et al., 'Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy findings in retired professional rugby league players.', Sports Psychology Society (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Stanwell, Andrew Gardner, Peter Schofield, Christopher Levi
2014 Woodcock K, Stanwell P, Gardner A, Teesson M, Baker A, Mills K, Kay-Lambkin F, 'A systematic review of blast related mild traumatic brain injuries, posttraumatic trauma symptoms and substance misuse.', Australasian Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (2014) [O1]
Co-authors Peter Stanwell, Andrew Gardner
2013 Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Forder P, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Predictors of Antenatal Alcohol Consumption in Australia' (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Peta Forder, Alexis Hure, Amy Anderson
2013 Baker A, Richmond R, Kay-Lambkin F, Filia S, Castle D, Williams J, et al., 'A MULTIPLE HEALTH BEHAVIOR CHANGE INTERVENTION AMONG PEOPLE WITH PSYCHOTIC DISORDERS: RESULTS FROM A RCT', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2013)
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker
2013 Kelly PJ, Baker AL, Beck A, Townsend CJ, Deane FP, Kay-Lambkin FJ, et al., 'MULTIPLE HEALTH BEHAVIOR CHANGE IN SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2013)
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Billie Bonevski
2013 Woodcock K, Stanwell P, Gardner A, Teesson M, Baker A, Mills K, Kay-Lambkin F, 'A systematic review of blast related mild traumatic brain injuries, posttraumatic trauma symptoms and substance misuse.', Australasian Society for Psychiatric Research (2013)
Co-authors Peter Stanwell, Andrew Gardner
2012 Deady M, Teesson M, Kay-Lambkin F, 'SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF INTEGRATED TREATMENTS FOR DEPRESSION AND SUBSTANCE USE IN YOUNG PEOPLE', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2012)
2012 Baker A, Richmond R, Kay-Lambkin F, Castle D, Filia S, Williams J, Clark V, 'SMOKING AND OTHER CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE RISK BEHAVIOURS AMONG PEOPLE WITH SEVERE MENTAL DISORDERS', SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH (2012)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2012 Kelly PJ, Baker AL, Deane FP, Townsend C, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Bonevski B, Hull P, 'PRESENTATION 3-HEALTHY RECOVERY: CHANGES IN SMOKING AND SMOKING RELATED BEHAVIOURS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Billie Bonevski
2012 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Gilligan C, Baker FA, Lewin TJ, 'When does change begin following screening and brief intervention among depressed problem drinkers?', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012 (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin, Conor Gilligan
2012 Baker AL, Richmond R, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Filia S, Castle D, Williams J, et al., 'Smoking and healthy lifestyles intervention among people with psychotic disorders: Preliminary results from a randomised controlled trial', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012 (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker, Vanessa Clark
2012 Thornton LK, Baker AL, Johnson MP, Kay-Lambkin FJ, 'Perceived harmfulness of tobacco, alcohol or cannabis use', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012 (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Martin Johnson, Amanda Baker
2012 Thornton LK, Baker AL, Johnson MP, Kay-Lambkin FJ, ''I guess because sometimes cigarettes have been my only friend': Perceived positive effects of substance use', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012 (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Martin Johnson, Amanda Baker
2012 Kelly PJ, Baker AL, Deane FP, Townsend C, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Bonevski B, Hull P, 'Healthy recovery: Changes in smoking and smoking related behaviours', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012 (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Amanda Baker
2012 Anderson AE, Loxton DJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Powers JR, 'Compliance with alcohol guidelines for pregnant women: Using data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Journal of Women's Health (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Deborah Loxton, Amy Anderson
2012 Baker AL, Richmond R, Kay-Lambkin F, Filia S, Castle D, Williams J, et al., 'A smoking intervention among people with psychotic disorders: Preliminary results from a randomized controlled trial', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker, Vanessa Clark
2011 Adamson S, Schroder R, Kay-Lambkin F, 'MEASURING CANNABIS TREATMENT OUTCOME: SENSITIVITY TO CHANGE OF THE CANNABIS USE DISORDERS IDENTIFICATION TEST - REVISED (CUDIT-R)', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2011)
2011 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Kelly BJ, Lewin TJ, 'Presentation 1: Randomised controlled trial of computerised cognitive behaviour therapy for depression and substance use comorbidity: 3 year follow-up', Drug and Alcohol Review (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker, Brian Kelly
2011 Baker AL, Kavanagh DJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Hunt SA, Lewin TJ, Carr VJ, McElduff P, 'Randomised controlled trial of CBT for co-existing depression and alcohol problems: 6-, 12-, 24-and 36-month outcomes', Drug and Alcohol Review (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Sally Hunt, Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker, Patrick Mcelduff
2011 Ewer P, Mills K, Teesson M, Sannibale C, Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin F, Dore G, 'A brief intervention for alcohol and other drug users who have experienced trauma', Drug and Alcohol Review (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2011 Kavanagh D, Klein B, Austin D, Proudfoot J, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Connor J, et al., 'Presentation 1: Ontrack: Evaluating online psychological interventions for alcohol and depression', Drug and Alcohol Review (2011) [E3]
2011 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Mills K, Bailey KA, Thornton L, 'Symposium - Comorbidity: Informing psychosocial interventions', Drug and Alcohol Review (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2010 Baker AL, 'Randomised controlled trial of CBT for co-existing depression and alcohol problems: 6-12 month outcomes', Proceedings of the Australasian Society for Psychiatric Research (ASPR) 2010 Conference (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin, Sally Hunt
2010 Filia S, Baker AL, Richmond R, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Castle D, Williams J, et al., 'Randomised controlled trial of a healthy lifestyles intervention to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among smokers with psychosis: Interim results', Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2010) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Vanessa Clark
2010 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Kavanagh D, Kelly B, Mcketin R, 'STEPPED CARE FOR DEPRESSION AND ALCOHOL/OTHER DRUG USE COMORBIDITY', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Amanda Baker
2008 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Kelly BJ, Lewin TJ, Carr VJ, 'Randomised controlled trial of computerised cognitive behaviour therapy for depression and sustance use comoribidity', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin, Brian Kelly
2008 Thornton LK, Baker AL, Johnson MP, Loughland CM, Lewin TJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, 'An exploration of drug attitudes and knowledge among people with psychotic disorders', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Carmel Loughland, Amanda Baker, Martin Johnson
2008 Simpson AL, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Childs S, Bowman JA, 'Integrating multimedia treatments into a drug and alcohol service in NSW', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Jenny Bowman
2008 Hunt SA, Baker AL, Kavanagh D, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Lewin TJ, Carr VJ, 'A randomised controlled trial of integrated and single focused interventions for co-morbid depression and alcohol use disorders', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin, Sally Hunt
2008 Turner A, Hambridge J, Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Bowman JA, Oak S, 'Braveheart: Group cognitive behaviour therapy for cardiac depression', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Jenny Bowman
2008 Adamson S, Sellman D, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Lewin TJ, Thornton LK, Kelly BJ, 'A revised screening measure for cannabis misuse: The Cannabis Use Disorders Identification Test', International Journal of Psychology (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Brian Kelly, Amanda Baker
2007 Filia S, Richmond R, Baker AL, Castle D, Kulkani PJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, et al., 'The Healthy Lifestyles Project: Pilot data from a multicomponent risk factor intervention for people with severe mental illness', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2007 Hides L, Lubman DI, Carroll S, Catania L, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, 'The effectiveness of an integrated CBT intervention for co-occurring depression and substance abuse in young people: A pilot study', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2006 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Kelly B, Lewin TJ, Carr VJ, 'The SHADE project: Self-help for alcohol/other drug use and depression', ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH (2006)
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin, Brian Kelly
2006 Kavanagh DJ, Young R, Baker A, Saunders JB, Kay-Lambkin F, 'Outcomes of a correspondence-based trial to assist general practitioners to address cooccurrence of depression and alcohol-related problems', ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH (2006)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2006 Kavanagh DJ, Young R, Baker AL, Saunders J, Kay-Lambkin FJ, 'Outcomes of a correspondence-based trial to assist general practitioners to address cooccurrence of depression and alcohol related problems', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2006 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Lewin TJ, Carr VJ, 'Integrated treatment for co-existing depression and alcohol/other drug use problems', Journal of Affective Disorders (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin
2006 David K, Ross Y, John S, Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin FJ, 'Correspondence-based treatment for coexisting depression and alcohol misuse', Journal of Affective Disorders (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2006 Dr LH, Lubman DD, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, 'Treating coexisting depression and alcohol/other drug misuse in young people', Journal of Affective Disorders (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2006 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Lewin (Ext) T, 'Synthesis', Journal of Affective Disorders (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin
2006 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Carr VJ, Lewin (Ext) T, Kelly BJ, Baker AL, 'The Shade Project: self-help for alcohol/other drug use and depression', Acta Neuropsychiatrica (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Brian Kelly, Amanda Baker
2006 Baker A, Bucci S, Lewin T, Kay-Lambkin F, Constable P, Carr V, '01-06 Cognitive behaviour therapy for substance use disorders in people with psychotic disorders.', Acta neuropsychiatrica (2006)
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker
2006 Kay-Lambkin F, Carr V, Lewin T, Kelly B, Baker A, 'The SHADE project: self-help for alcohol/other drug use and depression.', Acta neuropsychiatrica (2006)
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker
2005 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Kelly BJ, Lewin (Ext) T, Carr VJ, 'The Shade Project: self help for alcohol/other drug use and depression', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research (2005) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Brian Kelly
2005 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Lewin (Ext) T, Kelly BJ, Carr VJ, Hunt SA, Baker AL, Kavanagh DJ, 'Combined versus single focused interventions for comorbid depression and alcohol problems: introduction to the daisi project', Abstracts for The Royal Australian & NZ College of Psychiatrists Joint CINP/ASPR Scientific Meeting (2005) [E3]
Co-authors Sally Hunt, Amanda Baker, Brian Kelly
2005 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Lewin (Ext) T, Kelly BJ, Carr VJ, 'The shade project: Self help for alcohol/other drug use and depression', Abstracts for The Royal Australian & NZ College of Psychiatrists Joint CINP/ASPR Scientific Meeting (2005) [E3]
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Amanda Baker
2005 Clack VM, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Kelly BJ, Lewin (Ext) T, Underwood (Ext) L, 'Computerised cognitive behaviour therapy for depression and comorbid substance misuse: rural and remote perspectives', Abstracts for The Royal Australian & NZ College of Psychiatrists Joint CINP/ASPR Scientific Meeting (2005) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Brian Kelly
2005 Baker AL, Kavanagh DJ, Carr VJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Lewin (Ext) T, 'Integrated approaches for co-existing depression and substance use problems', Journal of Affective Disorders (2005) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin
Show 52 more conferences

Report (21 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Marel C, Mills K, Kingston R, Gournay K, Deady M, Kay-Lambkin F, et al., 'Guidelines on the management of co-occurring alcohol and other drug and mental health conditions in alcohol and other drug treatment settings (2nd ed.).', Sydney, NSW: NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Mental Health and Substance Use. (2016)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2014 Deady M, Barrett E, Mills K, Kay-Lambkin F, Haber P, Shand F, et al., 'Effective models of care for comorbid mental illness and illicit substance use', An Evidence Check rapid review brokered by the Sax Institute for the NSW Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (2014)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2013 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin F, Geddes, 'Healthy Lifestyles Project: Treatment Manual for the management of cardiovascular risk in smokers with psychosis', University of Newcastle (2013)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2012 Kay-Lambkin, Baker AL, Hunt, Kavanagh, Bucci, 'The DAISI Treatment Manual: Integrated treatment for depression and alcohol use', NDARC Technical Report (2012)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2011 Mills K, Marel C, Baker AL, Teesson M, Dore G, Kay-lambkin F, et al., 'Mood and substance use.', National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre: Sydney (2011)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2011 Mills K, Ewer P, Baker AL, Teesson M, Dore G, Sannibale C, Kay-Lambkin, 'Trauma and Substance Use.', Sydney: National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre. (2011)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2011 Mills K, Marel C, Baker AL, Teesson M, Dore G, Kay-Lambkin F, et al., 'Psychosis and substance use.', National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre: Sydney (2011)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2011 Mills K, Marel C, Baker AL, Teeson M, Dore G, Kay-Lambkin F, et al., 'Anxiety and substance use.', National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre: Sydney (2011)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2011 Mills K, Marel C, Baker AL, Teesson M, Dore G, Kay-Lambkin F, et al., 'Personality and substance use.', National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre: Sydney (2011)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2010 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin F, Geddes J, Beck A, Sakrouge R, Filia S, et al., 'Treatment Manual for Health Lifestyles Program, Session 1, March 2010', Centre for Brain and Mental Health Research, University of Newcastle (2010)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2010 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin F, Geddes J, Beck A, Sakrouge R, Filia S, et al., 'Treatment Manual for Health Lifestyles Program (Telephone Follow Up), March 2010', Centre for Brain and Mental Health Research, University of Newcastle. (2010)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2010 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin F, Geddes J, Beck A, Sakrouge R, Filia S, et al., 'Treatment Manual for Health Lifestyles Program, Sessions 2-11, March 2010', Centre for Brain and Mental Health Research, University of Newcastle. (2010)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2009 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin F, Beck A, Geddes J, Sakrouge R, Filia S, Turner A, 'Contingency Management Resource Booklet for Healthy Lifestyles Program, August 2009', Centre for Brain and Mental Health Research, University of Newcastle. (2009)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2007 Lee NK, Jenner L, Kay-Lambkin F, Hall K, Dann F, Roeg S, et al., 'PsyCheck: Responding to mental health issues within alcohol and drug treatment.', Canberra ACT: Commonwealth of Australia (2007)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2004 Baker AL, Bucci S, Kay-Lambkin F, 'Intervention for Alcohol, Cannabis and Amphetamine Use Among People with a Psychotic Illness', NDARC Technical Report No. 193. Sydney: National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre. (2004)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2004 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin F, Bucci S, Haile M, Richmond R, 'Smoking cessation for people with a psychotic illness: A Treatment Manual.', NDARC Technical Report 192, University of New South Wales, Australia. (2004)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2004 Baker AL, Bucci S, Kay-Lambkin F, 'Co-occurring psychosis and alcohol/other drug use problems: Treatment Manual for the Health Sketch Project.', NDARC Technical Report 193, University of New South Wales, Australia. (2004)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2004 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin F, Bucci S, Haile M, Richmond R, Carr V, 'Intervention for Tobacco Dependence Among People with a Mental Illness. NDARC Technical Report No. 192.', Sydney: National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre. (2004)
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2004 Baker AL, Bucci SR, Kay-Lambkin FJ, 'Intervention for Alcohol, Cannabis and Amphetamine Use among People with a Psychotic Illness', National Drug & Alcohol Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, 100 (2004) [R1]
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2004 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Bucci SR, Haile MJ, Richmond R, Carr VJ, 'Intervention for Tobacco Dependence among People with a Mental Illness', National Drug & Alcohol Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, 77 (2004) [R1]
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2003 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Lee NK, Claire M, Jenner L, 'A Brief Cognitive Behavioural Intervention for Regular Amphetamine Users: A Treatment Guide', University of Newcastle for the Department of Health and Ageing, 80 (2003) [R1]
Co-authors Terry Lewin, Amanda Baker
Show 18 more reports

Thesis / Dissertation (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Gardner AJ, Concussion in Professional Rugby League, University of Newcastle (2015)
Co-authors Andrew Gardner
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 28
Total funding $5,900,918

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20173 grants / $610,892

SHED-IT Recharge: Development and evaluation of a gender-tailored program designed to improve men's physical and mental health$142,500

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Myles Young, Professor Philip Morgan, Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Robin Callister, Professor Brian Kelly
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1701279
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

An internet delivered, evidenced-based treatment program for mental health and alcohol use in contemporary veterans$123,068

Funding body: Defence Health Foundation

Funding body Defence Health Foundation
Project Team Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin, Associate Professor Carole James, Doctor Jane Rich, Mr John Shephard
Scheme Booster Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1600670
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20165 grants / $1,684,749

CHECKMATE - An online intervention and support package for families/friends supporting loved ones using methamphetamines$708,735

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin, Professor Maree Teesson
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1600946
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Right Person, Right Treatment, Right Time: Engaging comorbid populations with eHealth interventions across the lifespan$572,052

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin
Scheme Research Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1600940
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Health-eMines: Virtual Health System to Improve Mental Health, Reduce Alcohol/Other Drug Use and Fatigue Related Problems$289,984

Funding body: Australian Coal Research Limited

Funding body Australian Coal Research Limited
Project Team Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin, Professor Brian Kelly
Scheme Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1600176
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

SMS4dadsDefence Health$64,120

Funding body: Defence Health Foundation

Funding body Defence Health Foundation
Project Team Associate Professor Richard Fletcher, Doctor Chris May, Doctor Geoffrey Skinner, Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin, Professor John Attia, Professor Brian Kelly
Scheme Booster Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1601266
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

SMS4dadsRCT$49,858

Funding body: Beyond Blue Ltd

Funding body Beyond Blue Ltd
Project Team Associate Professor Richard Fletcher, Doctor Chris May, Doctor Geoffrey Skinner, Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin, Professor John Attia, Professor Jan Nicholson, Professor Louise Newman, Professor Brian Kelly, Associate Professor Adrian Dunlop, Professor Alan Hayes
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1601020
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20152 grants / $325,000

SMS4Dads – a project to develop and pilot a smartphone-based messaging service (SMS) for new fathers offering fathering information, mood assessment and support$300,000

Funding body: Beyond Blue Ltd

Funding body Beyond Blue Ltd
Project Team Associate Professor Richard Fletcher, Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin, Doctor Geoffrey Skinner, Professor Brian Kelly
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1401458
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

The HEY MAN pilot study: using eHeatlh to enhance your mental health, physical activity and nutrition in young men$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Megan Rollo, Professor Robin Callister, Doctor Geoffrey Skinner, Doctor Shamus Smith, Mr Lee Ashton
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401510
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20141 grants / $25,000

Combining startle reflex modulation with serious gaming technologies to determine engagement and impact on depression and binge drinking in young people: The SHADoW Study$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin, Professor Peter Walla, Doctor Keith Nesbitt
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301431
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20112 grants / $456,948

Follow-up of Healthy Lifestyles Intervention for Cardiovascular Disease among People with a Psychotic Disorder$436,085

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Amanda Baker, Professor Robyn Richmond, Professor David Castle, Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1000121
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Exploring Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) amongst current and former professional rugby league players$20,863

Funding body: NSW Sporting Injuries Committee

Funding body NSW Sporting Injuries Committee
Project Team Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin, Dr Andrew Gardner, Associate Professor Peter Stanwell, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Professor Mark Parsons
Scheme Research & Injury Prevention Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100822
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20102 grants / $624,809

Men, Depression and Social Networks in Rural Communities: Linking Epidemiologic Evidence to Effective Interventions$324,809

Funding body: Beyond Blue Ltd

Funding body Beyond Blue Ltd
Project Team Professor Brian Kelly, Professor John Attia, Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin, Conjoint Associate Professor Terry Lewin, Professor Amanda Baker, Mr Trevor Hazell, Doctor Kerry Inder
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1000456
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Xstrata Coal Fellow in Depression$300,000

Funding body: Xstrata Coal Australia Pty Ltd

Funding body Xstrata Coal Australia Pty Ltd
Project Team Professor Brian Kelly, Professor John Attia, Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin, Conjoint Associate Professor Terry Lewin, Professor Amanda Baker, Mr Trevor Hazell, Doctor Kerry Inder
Scheme Xstrata Coal Fellow in Depression
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G0900102
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20092 grants / $31,575

LDX analyser (fingerprick unit) x4, piCo Smokerlyzer (Carboxymeter)x4, Universal cardboard disposable mouthpieces for piCo smokerlyzer x4 and Universal d pieces for piCo Smokerlyzer x4$20,775

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Amanda Baker, Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin, Doctor Alyna Turner, Associate Professor Juanita Todd, Professor Robin Callister, Doctor Sally Hunt, Professor Brian Kelly, Professor John Attia, Professor Jennifer Bowman, Doctor Paula Wye
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189849
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

The provision of strategies to support drug and alcohol online activities$10,800

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Professor Amanda Baker, Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin
Scheme Consultancy/Tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189926
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20082 grants / $264,150

Long term follow-up of two randomised controlled trials of treatment for depression and alcohol/other drug comorbidity$244,150

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Amanda Baker, Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin, Professor David Kavanagh, Professor Brian Kelly
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0187640
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Reducing cardiovascular risk among people with psychotic disorders$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Amanda Baker, Professor Robyn Richmond, Professor Jayashri Kulkarni, Professor David Castle, Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188398
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20072 grants / $168,891

Evaluation of an integrated best practice intervention for amphetamine users with comorbid depression$100,000

Funding body: Beyond Blue Ltd

Funding body Beyond Blue Ltd
Project Team

Nicole Lee

Scheme Unknown
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

CBT intervention for regular amphetamine use and depression: a stepped care approach$68,891

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin, Professor Amanda Baker, Dr Rebecca McKetin, Professor Maree Teesson, Conjoint Professor Robert Batey, Dr N Lee
Scheme Mental Health Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0186994
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20063 grants / $192,000

Multicomponent risk factor intervention for people with a severe mental illness: a feasibility study$132,000

Funding body: Commonwealth Department of Health & Aged Care

Funding body Commonwealth Department of Health & Aged Care
Project Team

Amanda Baker

Scheme Unknown
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON N

Braveheart: Group CBT for comorbid depression and cardiovascular problems$35,000

Funding body: Australian Rotary Health

Funding body Australian Rotary Health
Project Team

Amanda Baker

Scheme Unknown
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

Neurocognitive profiles of people receiving cognitive behaviour therapy$25,000

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Doctor Sally Hunt, Professor Amanda Baker, Emeritus Professor Patricia Michie, Conjoint Professor Vaughan Carr, Professor David Kavanagh, Mr Terry Lewin, Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin
Scheme Drug and Alcohol Council Research Grants Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186724
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20051 grants / $750,000

Integrated versus single focussed treatment for comorbid depression and alcohol use problems$750,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Amanda Baker

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20031 grants / $675,000

Computer-based CBT for depression and comorbid alcohol/other drug use in rural and urban NSW$675,000

Funding body: Alcohol Education & Rehabilitation Foundation

Funding body Alcohol Education & Rehabilitation Foundation
Project Team

Frances Kay-Lambkin

Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

20021 grants / $27,746

The development of a CD-ROM intervention for people with comorbid alcohol use problems and depression.$27,746

Funding body: Australian Brewers Foundation

Funding body Australian Brewers Foundation
Project Team Professor Amanda Baker, Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin, Professor P Wilson
Scheme Alcohol-related Medical Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2002
GNo G0180852
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20011 grants / $64,158

The Development and Evaluation of a CD-ROM Intervention for People with Co-Occurring Alcohol and other Drug Use Problems and Depression$64,158

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin
Scheme Scholarships - Medical and Dental Postgraduate Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0183110
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current3

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.65

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Lifestyle Interventions: Utilising Technology to Help Predict and Prevent Relapse in Bipolar Disorder PhD (Psychiatry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Intimate Partner Violence and Recovery Paradigms PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Gamification for Engagement: Evaluating Engagement and Efficacy in Serious Games for Education, Training and Therapy PhD (Information Technology), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Alcohol Use in Pregnancy: Mixed Methods Applied to The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Concussion in Professional Rugby League PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Suicide in Urban and Rural Australia: Determinants, Moderators and Treatment Options for Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviours PhD (Psychiatry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Projects

Start Well: A research project supporting resilience and wellbeing in beginning teachers 2015 - 2016

Collaborators

Name Organisation
Associate Professor Frances Joy Kay-Lambkin University of Newcastle

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News

Veterans mental health program receives grant

November 14, 2016

University of Newcastle (UON) researchers from the Centre for Resources Health and Safety (CRHS) have been successful in receiving a grant from the Defence Health Foundation to the value of $123,068 over two years.

Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin

Position

Associate Professor
SMPH / PRCBMH / UoN
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email frances.kaylambkin@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 6023
Fax (02) 4033 5692
Links Twitter
Facebook

Office

Room 5021
Building McAuley Centre, Calvary Mater Hospital
Location Calvary Mater Hospital, Waratah, 2298

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