Dr Evan Doran

Dr Evan Doran

Senior Lecturer

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography


I am a Health Social Scientist currently employed part-time as a Senior Lecturer with the Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics. I have been researching and teaching with the University of Newcastle since 1998. Most of my research has been with the Discipline of Clinical Pharmacology, School of Medical Practice and Public Health. From 2010-2013 I was also a Senior Research Fellow with the Centre for Values, Ethics and Law in Medicine (VELiM) at Sydney University.

Broadly, my research to date has been 'pharmaco-epidemiological' with a social science slant. My PhD (2003) looked at issues around pharmaceutical affordability. My PhD work led to my being awarded an ARC Discovery Project grant in 2007 to research the  extent of 'moral hazard' (low cost results in sub-optimal use) associated with the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). In 2008 I was awarded my second ARC Discovery Project grant to investigate the extent of 'disease-mongering' associated with commercial pharmaceutical enterprise in Australia. Work from these studies has been published in Social Science and Medicine, Australian Health Review, PloS One, The Qualitative Health Report, Health Expectations, Medical Journal of Australia, Australian Journal of Public Health.

My other UoN research work has included investigating the impact of the Australia United States Free Trade Agreement on the PBS; and examining how the notion of 'innovation' shapes material developments in Australia's pharmaceutical regulation; investigating the relationship between pharmaceutical companies and medical specialist; and looking at who wins and loses in pharmaceutical promotion policy. I have published papers on all these areas in journals such as Medical Journal of Australia, Archives of Internal Medicine, Social Science and Medicine, PLoS Medicine, Journal of Public Health Policy, Australian Health Review, Journal of Australian Political Economy.

My research with VELiM at Sydney University involved investigating the process of and support for ethically difficult clinical decisions in a major NSW hospital. The report for the ethnography for this project was published in the Medical Journal of Australia (Doran et al 2015; there is also a survey report from the study in the Australian Health Review (Doran et al 2015) and book chapter in the Handbook of Health Care Management (2016) published by OUP.

From 2016-2017 I worked as a research development officer with the Universitas Muhammadiyah Makassar in South Sulawesi, Indonesia as part of the Australian Volunteers for International Development (a Commonwealth Government initiative).



Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of New England
  • Graduate Diploma in Health Social Science, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Health Social Science
  • Pharmaceutical Policy
  • Pharmacoepidemiology
  • Qualitative Methods

Languages

  • Indonesian (Working)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 35
111599 Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences not elsewhere classified 35
160599 Policy and Administration not elsewhere classified 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Senior Lecturer Priority Research Centre (PRC) for Healthy Lungs | The University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Doran E, Newson A, Jordens C, Kerridge I, 'Clinical ethics support in contemporary healthcare: origins, practices and evaluation', The Oxford Handbook of Health Care Management, Oxford University Press, Oxford University (2016)

Journal article (32 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Doran E, 'Trouble Spots in Online Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: Teaching Drug Marketers How to Inform Better or Spin Better? Comment on "Trouble Spots in Online Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: A Content Analysis of FDA Warning Letters"', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HEALTH POLICY AND MANAGEMENT, 5 333-335 (2016)
DOI 10.15171/ijhpm.2016.20
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2016 Blair W, Kable A, Courtney-Pratt H, Doran E, 'Mixed method integrative review exploring nurses' recognition and response to unsafe practice', Journal of Advanced Nursing, 72 488-500 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Aim: To determine how nurses recognize and respond to unsafe practice. Background: Practice guidelines and standards outline safe practice. Nur... [more]

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Aim: To determine how nurses recognize and respond to unsafe practice. Background: Practice guidelines and standards outline safe practice. Nurses face challenges in recognizing and responding unsafe practice. Design: Whittemore and Knafl's revised framework for integrative reviews guided the analysis. Data sources: A comprehensive search of literature exploring the identification and response to unsafe practice, was undertaken in CINAHL, Medline, Embase and PsychoINFO databases for the period 2004-2014. Review methods: Nineteen articles from 15 studies were included in the review. A mixed method integrative approach was used to review data and draw conclusions. Results: Behaviours and cues that indicate unsafe practice are influenced by organizational and individual characteristics. Individual nurses responses are variable and there are professional and personal costs associated with being reported or reporting unsafe practice. Conclusion: The small number of studies reviewed limits the conclusions that can be drawn from the review but suggest that nurses can identify unsafe practice in their peers. Individual nurses' recognition and response to unsafe practice in their peers contributes to patient outcomes and safety. Nurses need awareness training and strategies to respond to unsafe practice and reporting systems that protect reporters from repercussions. Further research investigating organizational factors and individual factors that contribute to a shift in practice across safety boundaries is required.

DOI 10.1111/jan.12855
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ashley Kable, Helen Courtney-Pratt
2015 Doran E, Fleming J, Jordens C, Stewart CL, Letts J, Kerridge IH, 'Managing ethical issues in patient care and the need for clinical ethics support', Australian Health Review, 39 44-50 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 AHHA. Objective To investigate the range, frequency and management of ethical issues encountered by clinicians working in hospitals in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Met... [more]

© 2015 AHHA. Objective To investigate the range, frequency and management of ethical issues encountered by clinicians working in hospitals in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted of a convenience sample of 104 medical, nursing and allied health professionals in two NSW hospitals. Results Some respondents did not provide data for some questions, therefore the denominator is less than 105 for some items. Sixty-two (62/104; 60%) respondents reported occasionally to often having ethical concerns. Forty-six (46/105; 44%) reported often to occasionally having legal concerns. The three most common responses to concerns were: talking to colleagues (96/105; 91%); raising the issue in a group forum (68/105; 65%); and consulting a relevant guideline (64/105; 61%). Most respondents were highly (65/99; 66%) or moderately (33/99; 33%) satisfied with the ethical environment of the hospital. Twenty-two (22/98; 22%) were highly satisfied with the ethical environment of their department and 74 (74/98; 76%) were moderately satisfied. Most (72/105; 69%) respondents indicated that additional support in dealing with ethical issues would be helpful. Conclusion Clinicians reported frequently experiencing ethical and legal uncertainty and concern. They usually managed this by talking with colleagues. Although this approach was considered adequate, and the ethics of their hospital was reported to be satisfactory, most respondents indicated that additional assistance with ethical and legal concerns would be helpful. Clinical ethics support should be a priority of public hospitals in NSW and elsewhere in Australia. What is known about the topic? Clinicians working in hospitals in the US, Canada and UK have access to ethics expertise to help them manage ethical issues that arise in patient care. How Australian clinicians currently manage the ethical issues they face has not been investigated. What does this paper add? This paper describes the types of ethical issues faced by Australian clinicians, how they manage these issues and whether they think ethics support would be helpful. What are the implications for practitioners? Clinicians frequently encounter ethically and legally difficult decisions and want additional ethics support. Helping clinicians to provide ethically sound patient care should be a priority of public hospitals in NSW and elsewhere in Australia.

DOI 10.1071/AH14034
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Doran E, Fleming J, Jordens C, Stewart CL, Letts J, Kerridge IH, 'Part of the fabric and mostly right: An ethnography of ethics in clinical practice', Medical Journal of Australia, 202 587-591 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, Australasian Medical Publishing Co. Ltd. All rights reserved. Objectives: To describe how ethics is practised in a health care setting, and to ascertain whether there was ... [more]

© 2015, Australasian Medical Publishing Co. Ltd. All rights reserved. Objectives: To describe how ethics is practised in a health care setting, and to ascertain whether there was interest in establishing clinical ethics support services. Design and setting: Observations and interviews undertaken between April and November 2012 in a large NSW urban hospital with newborn care, maternity and oncology departments and analysed by coding and categorising the data. Main outcome measures: Key themes in the participants¿ attitudes to professional ethics were identified. Results: Ethics is not typically an explicit feature of clinical deliberations, and clinicians tend to apply basic ethical principles when ethical problems are identified. They also discuss difficult decisions with colleagues, and try to resolve ethical differences by discussion. Participants judged the ethics of clinical practice to be ¿mostly right¿, primarily because ethics is ¿part of the fabric¿ of everyday clinical work that aspires to ¿optimising care¿. Nevertheless, most clinicians would welcome ethics support because ethics is integral to health care practice, is not always ¿done well¿, and may be the source of conflict. Conclusions: Ethics is very much a part of the fabric of clinical practice, and the ethical challenges that arise in patient care in this particular setting are generally managed adequately. However, many clinicians have concerns about the ethical aspects of some practices and decisions, and believe that access to expert ethics support would be useful. Helping clinicians to provide ethically sound patient care should be a priority for health care providers across Australia.

Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 1
2015 Doran E, Fleming J, Jordens C, Stewart CL, Letts J, Kerridge IH, 'Part of the fabric and mostly right: an ethnography of ethics in clinical practice', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 202 587-+ (2015)
DOI 10.5694/mja14.00208
Citations Web of Science - 3
2014 Doran E, Hogue C, 'Potency, hubris, and susceptibility: The disease mongering critique of pharmaceutical marketing', Qualitative Report, 19 (2014) [C1]

© 2014: Evan Doran, Clare Hogue, and Nova Southeastern University. The phrase ¿disease mongering¿ has become a prominent feature of the wider critique of pharmaceutical marketing.... [more]

© 2014: Evan Doran, Clare Hogue, and Nova Southeastern University. The phrase ¿disease mongering¿ has become a prominent feature of the wider critique of pharmaceutical marketing. Disease mongering refers to drug companies¿ involvement in informing the lay public and health professionals about the illnesses targeted by their products. Typically, drug promotion is claimed to intentionally distort perceptions of the seriousness or treatability of disease or condition to sell drugs. The main concern is that drug promotion results in excessive drug demand. ¿Disease mongering¿ is clearly aimed at drug companies, however, the phrase reaches further and extends to us all with its often implicit critical commentary on contemporary social life. In this report, describe the results of an interview study with critics of pharmaceutical marketing. We explore what disease mongering implies or assumes about the contemporary world, particularly the doctors and consumers who inhabit it, and why such a critique is considered necessary. The potency of the drug promotion, the hubris of doctors and the susceptibility of consumers were the main themes interpreted in the data. The disease mongering critique can be seen as part of a more general critique of the processes of ¿biomedicalisation¿ and ¿pharmaceuticalisation.¿

Citations Scopus - 1
2014 Robertson J, Doran E, Henry DA, Salkeld G, 'Prescription medicines: Decision-making preferences of patients who receive different levels of public subsidy', Health Expectations, 17 15-26 (2014) [C1]

Objective To compare the relative importance of medicine attributes and decision-making preferences of patients with higher or lower levels of insurance coverage in a publicly fun... [more]

Objective To compare the relative importance of medicine attributes and decision-making preferences of patients with higher or lower levels of insurance coverage in a publicly funded health care system. Design and setting Cross-sectional telephone survey of randomly selected regular medicine users aged =18years in the Hunter Valley, NSW, Australia. Main variables studied Questions about 27 medicine attributes and active involvement in decisions to start a new medicine. Results After adjustment, there were few differences between the 408 concession card holders (high insurance) and 410 general beneficiaries (low insurance) in their assessment of the importance of medicine attributes. For both groups, the explanation of treatment options, establishing the need for the medicine, and medicine efficacy and safety were the most important considerations. Medicine costs, the treatment burden and medicine familiarity were less important; the views of family and friends ranked lowest. There was a statistically significantly greater influence of the regular doctor for the concession card holders than general beneficiaries (93.6 vs. 84%, adjusted OR 2.80, 95% CI 1.31, 5.99). Concession card holders were more likely to favour doctors having more say in the decision-making process (crude OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.28, 2.24), and more likely to report the most recent treatment decision being made by the doctor alone, compared with general beneficiaries (61.2 vs. 40.3%). Conclusion Medicine need, efficacy and safety are viewed as paramount for most patients, irrespective of insurance status. While patients report the importance of participation in treatment decisions, delegation of decision making to the doctor was common in practice. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/j.1369-7625.2011.00715.x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Mddah01
2014 Lipworth W, Doran E, Kerridge I, Day R, 'Challenges to pharmaceutical policymaking: Lessons from Australia's national medicines policy', Australian Health Review, 38 160-168 (2014)

Objective National medicines policies (NMP) provide a means for governments to achieve their objectives in relation to pharmaceuticals and other medicines. This research aimed to ... [more]

Objective National medicines policies (NMP) provide a means for governments to achieve their objectives in relation to pharmaceuticals and other medicines. This research aimed to identify challenges to implementing the objectives of the Australian NMP from the perspective of key stakeholders. Methods In 2012 and 2103, we conducted 30 semistructured interviews with stakeholders involved in the discovery, clinical testing, regulation and funding of medicines in Australia. We asked participants to describe their careers and to give their opinions on specific issues surrounding drug development, clinical research, regulation and subsidisation in Australia. Data were analysed using Morse's outline of the cognitive basis of qualitative research and Charmaz's outline of data analysis in grounded theory. The initial phase of 'open coding' revealed findings that could be mapped to three of the four objectives of the NMP. We then conducted 'focussed coding' for themes relevant to these objectives. Results Participants identified many issues relevant to the ongoing evolution of the NMP, relating primarily to ongoing tensions between the commercial objective of ensuring a viable medicines industry, and the non-commercial objectives of ensuring that medicines are safe, effective and affordable. There were also several other challenges identified to the achievement of both the commercial and non-commercial objectives of the NMP. These included limits to government funding, globalisation, consumer advocacy, changing scientific paradigms and new information technologies. Conclusions There are many issues that need to be addressed if policymakers are to achieve the best outcomes from the NMP. Tensions between the commercial and non-commercial objectives of the NMP suggest the need to ensure that one stakeholder group's imperatives do not stifle those of other groups. At the same time, there are several emerging issues that are likely to concern all stakeholders equally, and these are both challenges and opportunities for new kinds of collaboration. What is known about the topic? We know that stakeholders have several concerns about medicines policy, but little is known about the specific challenges to implementing medicines policy from the perspective of those involved. What does this paper add? We demonstrate that stakeholders have many concerns that could impact the implementation of medicines policies. These relate primarily to ongoing tensions between the objective of ensuring a viable medicines industry, and the objectives of ensuring that medicines are safe, effective and affordable. There are also several issues that potentially pose a challenge to achieving both the commercial and non-commercial objectives of the NMP. These include limits to government funding, globalisation, consumer advocacy, changing scientific paradigms and new information technologies. What are the implications for practitioners? Policymakers need to systematically address the barriers to the ongoing implementation of the NMP. Policymakers should also ensure that one imperative (such as the commercial imperative) does not stifle other objectives. Other emerging issues are likely to concern all stakeholders, and these provide opportunities for new kinds of collaboration among stakeholders. © AHHA 2014.

DOI 10.1071/AH13240
2014 Lewis JRR, Lipworth W, Kerridge I, Doran E, 'Dilemmas in the compassionate supply of investigational cancer drugs', Internal Medicine Journal, 44 841-845 (2014) [C2]

© 2014 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians. In Australia, patients who want to access medicines that are not yet approved have ... [more]

© 2014 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians. In Australia, patients who want to access medicines that are not yet approved have only two options: to enrol in a clinical trial if they are eligible, or obtain their medicine through 'compassionate supply', which is provided at the discretion of the manufacturer. In this article, we explore ethical issues associated with the provision of oncology medicines that are still in development, either prior to regulatory approval or government reimbursement.

DOI 10.1111/imj.12530
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
2013 Searles A, Doran E, Faunce TA, Henry D, 'The affordability of prescription medicines in Australia: are copayments and safety net thresholds too high?', AUSTRALIAN HEALTH REVIEW, 37 32-40 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/AH11153
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Andrew Searles, Mddah01
2013 Doran E, Lofgren H, 'Drug Promotion in Australia: Policy Contestation and the Tightening of Regulation', Australian Review of Public Affairs., 11 19-41 (2013) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 3
2012 Hogue M-CB, Doran E, Henry DA, 'A prompt to the web: The media and health information seeking behaviour', PLOS One, 7 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0034314
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
2011 Parkinson L, Dolja-Gore X, Gibson RE, Doran E, Notley L, Stewart Williams JA, et al., 'An observational study of the discrediting of COX-2 NSAIDs in Australia: Vioxx or class effect?', BMC Public Health, 11 892 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Julie Byles, Jenny Stewartwilliams, Paul Kowal, L Parkinson, Xenia Doljagore
2011 Doran E, Robertson J, Salkeld G, 'Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme cost sharing, patient cost consciousness and prescription affordability', Australian Health Review, 35 37-44 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/ah10902
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2010 Macneill PU, Kerridge IH, Newby DA, Stokes BJ, Doran E, Henry DA, 'Attitudes of physicians and public to pharmaceutical industry 'gifts'', Internal Medicine Journal, 40 335-341 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-5994.2010.02233.x
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Mddah01, Barrie Stokes, David Newby
2010 Macneill PU, Kerridge IH, Newby DA, Stokes BJ, Doran E, Henry DA, 'Questioning the ethics of the ethicists. Reply', Internal Medicine Journal, 40 799-800 (2010) [C3]
Co-authors Barrie Stokes, David Newby
2010 Macneill PU, Kerridge IH, Newby DA, Stokes BJ, Doran E, Henry DA, 'Reply', Internal Medicine Journal, 40 799-800 (2010) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-5994.2010.02351.x
Co-authors David Newby, Barrie Stokes
2009 Doran E, Robertson J, 'Australia's pharmaceutical cost sharing policy: Reducing waste or affordability?', Australian Health Review, 33 231-240 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/AH090231
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
2008 Doran E, Henry DA, 'Disease mongering: Expanding the boundaries of treatable disease', Internal Medicine Journal, 38 858-861 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-5994.2008.01814.x
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Mddah01
2008 Moynihan R, Doran E, Henry DA, 'Disease mongering is now part of the global health debate', PLoS Medicine, 5 0684-686 (2008) [C2]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pmed.0050106
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Mddah01
2008 Doran E, Henry DA, Faunce TA, Searles AM, 'Australian pharmaceutical policy and the idea of innovation', Journal of Australian Political Economy, 62 39-61 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Mddah01, Andrew Searles
2008 Doran E, Henry DA, 'Australian pharmaceutical policy: Price control, equity, and drug innovation in Australia', Journal of Public Health Policy, 29 106-120 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1057/palgrave.jphp.3200170
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Mddah01
2007 Doran E, 'Global pharmaceuticals: Ethics, markets, practices', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 31 91-92 (2007) [C3]
2007 Searles AM, Jefferys S, Doran E, Henry DA, 'Reference pricing, generic drugs and proposed changes to the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme', Medical Journal of Australia, 187 236-239 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Andrew Searles, Mddah01
2006 Doran E, Kerridge I, McNeill P, Henry DA, 'Empirical uncertainty and moral contest: A qualitative analysis of the relationship between medical specialists and the pharmaceutical industry in Australia', Social Science & Medicine, 62 1510-1519 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.socscimed.2005.07.037
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Mddah01
2006 Doran E, Henry DA, 'Pharmaceutical benefits scheme policy: confused and tough on patients (Editorial)', Internal Medicine Journal, 36 211-213 (2006) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Mddah01
2005 Henry DA, Doran E, Kerridge I, Hill SR, McNeill PM, Day R, 'Ties that bind - Multiple relationships between clinical researchers and the pharmaceutical industry', Archives of Internal Medicine, 165 2493-2496 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1001/archinte.165.21.2493
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Mddah01
2005 Doran E, Robertson J, Henry DA, 'Moral hazard and prescription medicine use in Australia - the patient perspective', Social Science & Medicine, 60 1437-1443 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.socscimed.2004.08.005
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Mddah01
2005 Henry DA, Kerridge IH, Hill SR, McNeill PM, Doran E, Newby DA, et al., 'Medical specialists and pharmaceutical industry-sponsored research: a survey of the Australian experience', Medical Journal of Australia, 182 557-560 (2005) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 33
Co-authors Barrie Stokes, David Newby, Mddah01
2005 Faunce T, Doran E, Henry DA, Drahos P, Searles A, Pekarsky B, Neville W, 'Assessing the impact of the Australian-United States free trade agreement on Australian and global medicines policy', Globalization and Health, 1 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1744-8603-1-15
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Andrew Searles, Mddah01
2004 Doran E, Robertson J, Rolfe IE, Henry DA, 'Patient co-payments and use of prescription medicines', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 28 62-67 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2004.tb00634.x
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Mddah01
2003 Doran E, Henry DA, 'The PBS community awareness campaign: how helpful is blaming patients', Medical Journal of Australia, 179 544-545 (2003) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Mddah01
Show 29 more journal articles

Review (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2009 Doran E, 'Crazy like us (Book Review) (2009)

Conference (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Parkinson L, Dolja-Gore X, Robertson J, Doran E, Byles JE, 'Rofecoxib withdrawal and health outcomes for older Australian women', Abstracts. National Medicines Symposium 2012, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authors L Parkinson, Xenia Doljagore, Julie Byles
2012 Parkinson L, Harris MA, Moxey AJ, Robertson J, Doran E, Byles JE, 'Older women's experience of the withdrawal of Vioxx and discrediting of the COX-2s', Australasian Journal on Ageing, Brisbane, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Julie Byles, Margaret Harris, L Parkinson

Report (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Doran E, Fleming J, Kerridge I, 'Building Clinical Ethics Capacity, Final Report of the Developing Clinical Ethics Capacity in NSW Partnership Project', NSW Ministry of Health, 158 (2012)
2006 Doran E, Henry D, Faunce TA, 'Australian pharmaceutical subsidisation policies and their likely impact on industry investment in Australia. Briefing paper commissioned by the NSW Office for Science and Medical Research', NSW Office for Science and Medical Research, 34 (2006)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 9
Total funding $1,550,403

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20084 grants / $1,142,000

Tracking the impact of drug regulatory actions: consumer health outcomes, risk-benefit issues and policy framework$421,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Conjoint Associate Professor Lynne Parkinson, Associate Professor Anne Young, Doctor Evan Doran, Doctor Jane Robertson
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0187610
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Tracking the impact of drug regulatory actions: consumer health outcomes, risk-benefit issues and policy framework $421,000

Tracking the impact of drug regulatory actions: consumer health outcomes, risk-benefit issues and policy framework 

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Byles J, Parkinson L, Doran E, Young A, Robertson J

Scheme Ageing Well Ageing Productively Research Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Pharmaceutical Promotion: Productive or Problematic?$150,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Evan Doran, Conjoint Professor David Henry, Mr Ray Moynihan
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0187476
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Pharmaceutical Promotion: Productive or problematic? $150,000

This project investigated issues surrounding the commercial promotion of pharmaceutical products

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

Evan Doran, David Henry, Ray Moynihan

Scheme Discovery Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20072 grants / $332,000

Moral Hazard and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme$166,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Evan Doran, Conjoint Professor David Henry, Associate Professor G Salkeld, Doctor Jane Robertson
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0186334
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Moral Hazard and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme $166,000

Research of Australia’s prescription medicine cost-sharing policy and its impact on affordability

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team

Evan Doran, David Henry Glenn Salkeld, Jane Robertson

Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20051 grants / $710

36th Public Health Association of Australia Annual Conference, 25-28 September 2005$710

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Evan Doran
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0185774
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20041 grants / $693

National Medicine Symposium 2004, 27-31 July 2004, Brisbane$693

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Evan Doran
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0184484
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

19991 grants / $75,000

Pharmaceutical Affordability and the Quality Use of Medicines.$75,000

Funding body: Commonwealth Department of Health & Aged Care

Funding body Commonwealth Department of Health & Aged Care
Project Team Doctor Evan Doran, Conjoint Professor David Henry
Scheme Pharmaceutical Education Program (PEP)
Role Lead
Funding Start 1999
Funding Finish 2001
GNo G0178749
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2013 PhD The behaviours, cues and factors that nurses recognise as indications of unsafe practice and their response to recognising unsafe practice in their peers PhD (Nursing), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2013 PhD Pharmaceutical Promotion and Consumers: Unpacking the Assumptions PhD (Clinical Pharm), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2010 PhD A Preliminary Analysis of the Pharmaceutical Provisions in the Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement on Prescription Medicines in Australia PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2009 PhD The Practice of Western Herbal Medicine in Australia PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Evan Doran

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email evan.doran@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 1677
Fax (02) 4960 2088

Office

Room NM2-540
Building Mater Hospital Level 5 - New Med 2
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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