Miss Emily Hyde

Miss Emily Hyde

Research Associate

School of Engineering

Career Summary

Biography

Emily Hyde completed her combined bachelor degrees in Chemical Engineering (Hons) and Science (Chemistry) at the University of Newcastle (UoN) in 2013. In 2014, she began her PhD studies at the UoN with the aim to investigate heavy metal ion extraction and mineral separation utilising silica-coated magnetic particles. Currently, Emily’s research is focused on the biomimetic fabrication of silica shells on magnetic particles and the adsorption/extraction of heavy metal ions from solution using these magnetic-silica core-shell particles.

Over the course of her postgraduate and undergraduate degrees, Emily has authored several publications. These publications include original research publications in The Journal of Physical Chemistry B and Advanced Powder Technology, and a review published in the Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research journal. Emily’s most recent professional achievements include being the recipient of an Engineers Australia scholarship to attend Young Women Scientist 2014 conference in Seoul, Republic of Korea and being an awardee at the Engineering Faculties Poster Prize Competition 2014 and 2015. 


Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Engineering (Chemical Eng ) (Honours), University of Newcastle

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Casual Academic University of Newcastle
School of Engineering
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Hyde EDER, Moreno-Atanasio R, Neville FC, 'Fabrication of Magnetic Core PEI-Silica Shell Particles', Materials Research Bulletin, (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.materresbull.2017.02.045
Co-authors Frances Neville, Roberto Moreno-Atanasio
2016 Neville F, Dixon L, Hyde EDER, 'A comparative study of hydrophobic silica particle synthesis', Advanced Powder Technology, 27 2317-2323 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Society of Powder Technology Japan The process to commercially synthesise silica particles with specific properties is a topic of ongoing research since their use in i... [more]

© 2016 The Society of Powder Technology Japan The process to commercially synthesise silica particles with specific properties is a topic of ongoing research since their use in industrial applications including catalysis, coatings and separation materials has dramatically increased in the last decade. Here, silica particles were made using hydrolysed trimethoxymethylsilane (TMOMS) in the presence of either polyethyleneimine or aqueous sodium hydroxide catalysts. This work presents the first in depth study of the effect of TMOMS concentration on silica particles produced by both of these synthetic methods by comparing their size, morphology and chemical structure. The PEI-silica particles were larger in size and greater in yield than the NaOH-silica particles. It was also determined that both species of silica particles are hydrophobic without requiring further surface modification; and that those made with PEI have a higher contact angle, perhaps due to more complete polymerisation. The results demonstrate how relatively facile synthesis routes can wield a high degree of control over the physicochemical properties of silica particles, which is of paramount importance in silica production process intensification.

DOI 10.1016/j.apt.2016.07.007
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Frances Neville
2016 Hyde EDER, Seyfaee A, Neville F, Moreno-Atanasio R, 'Colloidal Silica Particle Synthesis and Future Industrial Manufacturing Pathways: A Review', Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research, 55 8891-8913 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 American Chemical Society. Colloidal silica is used in many applications including catalysis, pharmaceuticals, and coatings. Although naturally formed silica materials are... [more]

© 2016 American Chemical Society. Colloidal silica is used in many applications including catalysis, pharmaceuticals, and coatings. Although naturally formed silica materials are widely available, they are often in forms that are difficult to process or are even harmful to health. Therefore, uniform colloidal silicas are generally manufactured using synthetic chemical processes. While established high temperature gaseous synthesis methods fall out of favor in our energy conscious society, liquid synthesis methods are current industrial leaders. The precipitated silica method provides the majority share of commercially produced specialty silicas with its economic advantages predicted to continue to grow in the future. The biomimetic method and microemulsion methods of synthesis provide a superior level of surface chemistry and morphological control than current industrial processes and are the major focus of current silica synthesis research. Movement toward more tailor-made products and ecologically friendly production methods will likely provide incentive for biomimetic methods, in particular, to take more of a market share. However, the lack of procedures to viably scale up the biomimetic and microemulsion methods still forms significant gaps in the literature. In this review, the current methods of colloidal silica synthesis are discussed alongside significant models and mechanisms of silica formation.

DOI 10.1021/acs.iecr.6b01839
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Roberto Moreno-Atanasio, Frances Neville
2015 Hyde EDE, Moreno-Atanasio R, Millner PA, Neville F, 'Surface charge control through the reversible adsorption of a biomimetic polymer on silica particles.', J Phys Chem B, 119 1726-1735 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/jp5100439
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Roberto Moreno-Atanasio, Frances Neville
2012 Robertson MJ, Hadzic G, Ambrus JI, Pome DY, Hyde EDE, Whiting A, et al., 'The Rhodadyns, a new class of small molecule inhibitors of Dynamin GTPase Activity', ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters, 3 352-356 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Adam Mccluskey
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Conference (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Seyfaee A, Hyde EDER, Aubin J, Moreno-Atanasio R, Neville F, 'Effect of mixing on bioinspired polyethyleneimine-silica particle formation', CHEMECA 2016: Chemical Engineering - Regeneration, Recovery and Reinvention (2016) [E1]
Co-authors Roberto Moreno-Atanasio, Frances Neville
2015 Hyde E, Seyfaee A, Moreno-Atanasio R, Aubin J, Neville F, 'Covalent surface modification of biomimetic silica particles', Proceedings of APCCHE 2015 Congress Incorporating Chemeca 2015 (2015) [E1]
Co-authors Frances Neville, Roberto Moreno-Atanasio
2015 Seyfaee A, Hyde E, Aubin J, Moreno-Atanasio R, Neville F, Neville F, 'Investigation of polymeric nuclei and their role in biomimetic silication: Effect of physical conditions', Proceedings of APCCHE 2015 Congress Incorporating Chemeca 2015 (2015) [E1]
Co-authors Frances Neville, Roberto Moreno-Atanasio
2012 Hyde EDE, Mohr S, Randall L, Dennis P, Chhillar R, Pagnutti T, et al., 'Peak phosphorus: Its existence and the way we treat our wastewater streams', Conference Proceedings. Oz Water '12. Australia's National Water Conference and Exhibition (2012) [E1]
Co-authors Geoffrey Evans
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Other (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Hyde EDE, 'Magnetic Core PEI-Silica Shell Particle Synthesis and Magnetic Purification', (2017) [O1]
2016 Hyde EDE, 'Fabrication and Magnetic Purification of Magnetic Core PEI-Silica Shell Particles', (2016) [O1]
2015 Hyde EDE, 'Covalent Surface Modification of Biomimetic Silica Particles', (2015) [O1]
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Miss Emily Hyde

Positions

Research Associate
School of Engineering
Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment

Casual Academic
School of Engineering
Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment

Contact Details

Email emily.hyde@newcastle.edu.au
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