Dr Donna Read

Dr Donna Read

Research Associate

Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health

Career Summary

Biography

Donna is a Research Associate at the Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health. Donna brings to this role over 30 years of diverse research experience working in the university, health and private sectors.  

Donna was born in the UK and migrated to Australia in 1991.  In the UK, her passion for research and health related matters developed from her initial training and work in medical microbiology and immunology.  Since living in Australia, Donna has been involved in research in the areas of mental health, sociology, microbiology, agricultural ecology, economics, business and tertiary education. Working in these areas she has established a solid publications track record. 

Donna’s expanding range of interests is reflected in her PhD research in which she explored the agency of women with children around their childbearing.  This research came out of her interest in women’s wellbeing and the social policies that shape their lives and affect their wellbeing.  The research enabled her to develop expertise in qualitative research methodology.  It also fostered a mounting fascination with issues of identity in general, but particularly the interrelationship between identity, wellbeing and self-determination.

   Research Expertise

Donna’s major research strengths are in qualitative research and conducting literature reviews.  Donna’s work and PhD have enabled her to develop skills in writing academic manuscripts, and grant and ethics applications; recruiting, arranging and conducting face-to-face semi-structured interviews and focus groups; analysing qualitative (using NVivosoftware program for data management) and quantitative data (using Excel and SPSS); and project organisation (including planning, budgeting and reporting).

Teaching Expertise


Administrative Expertise


Collaborations


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Sydney
  • Graduate Certificate in Management Communication, TAFE (NSW)

Keywords

  • Qualitative
  • agency
  • gender identity
  • health
  • wellbeing
  • women

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111714 Mental Health 50
111708 Health and Community Services 25
160804 Rural Sociology 25

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Associate University of Newcastle
Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Biodiversity and Insect Pests: Key Issues for Sustainable Management, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK, 347 (2012)
DOI 10.1002/9781118231838
Citations Scopus - 25
2012 Biodiversity and Insect Pests: Key Issues for Sustainable Management, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK, 347 (2012)
DOI 10.1002/9781118231838
Citations Scopus - 25

Chapter (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Simpson M, Read DMY, Gurr GM, 'Application of Chemical Cues in Arthropod Pest Management for Organic Crops', Chemical Ecology of Insect Parasitoids 266-281 (2013)

Pest management is a major aspect in organic farming and remains a challenging task. The use of herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) as chemical cues for arthropod pest manag... [more]

Pest management is a major aspect in organic farming and remains a challenging task. The use of herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) as chemical cues for arthropod pest management appears to be set to make a significant contribution to future organic agriculture systems. HIPVs have been tested widely in a range of crop species and on several continents, with promising results. This chapter first reviews the current knowledge about HIPVs for field use, and then looks at arthropod pest management strategies currently used in organic systems. Finally, the chapter looks at the opportunities for the extended application of HIPVs and related technologies involving chemical cues in organic agriculture. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

DOI 10.1002/9781118409589.ch12
Citations Scopus - 1
2012 Gurr GM, Wratten SD, Snyder WE, Read DMY, 'Conclusion: Biodiversity as an Asset rather than a Burden', Biodiversity and Insect Pests: Key Issues for Sustainable Management, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK 329-339 (2012)
DOI 10.1002/9781118231838.ch20

Journal article (12 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Morrison M, Greig J, Waller D, McCulloch R, Read D, 'Effective communication with difficult to reach landholders', Australasian Journal of Environmental Management, 24 133-145 (2017)

© 2017 Environment Institute of Australia and New Zealand Inc. While considerable research has been undertaken to understand which communication channels are most effective at re... [more]

© 2017 Environment Institute of Australia and New Zealand Inc. While considerable research has been undertaken to understand which communication channels are most effective at reaching landholders, much less research has examined which communication channels are most effective for reaching those landholder segments characterised by low program participation (i.e. ¿lifestylers¿, traditional and absentee segments). Even less research has examined what messages most effectively engage these landholders, or landholders in general. In this study, eight communications campaigns were developed with specific messages and appeals that allowed us to examine the perceptions of difficult-to-reach landholders towards rational versus emotional, inform versus persuade and individual versus community-based appeals, using a qualitative methodology. The findings indicate that landholder¿s perceptions of both rational and emotional messages depended on the congruence with segment values. Inform messages were found often to be well regarded, especially when they clarified eligibility and program benefits. Persuade messages could be effective, but this also depended on the consistency of the message with segment values. Community-based messages were often not well received, but they could be effective at reaching lifestylers.

DOI 10.1080/14486563.2017.1300953
2017 Fletcher R, Hammond C, Faulkner D, Turner N, Shipley L, Read D, Gwynn J, 'Stayin' on Track: The feasibility of developing Internet and mobile phone-based resources to support young Aboriginal fathers', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 23 329-334 (2017)

© La Trobe University 2017. Young Aboriginal fathers face social and emotional challenges in the transition to fatherhood, yet culturally appropriate support mechanisms are lacki... [more]

© La Trobe University 2017. Young Aboriginal fathers face social and emotional challenges in the transition to fatherhood, yet culturally appropriate support mechanisms are lacking. Peer mentoring to develop online- and mobile phone-based resources and support may be a viable approach to successfully engage these young men. This feasibility study engaged two trusted Aboriginal mentors and researchers to partner with one regional and two rural Aboriginal communities in New South Wales, Australia. Early in the research process, 20 young Aboriginal fathers were recruited as co-investigators. These fathers were integral in the development of web-based resources and testing of mobile phone-based text messaging and mood-tracking programs tailored to provide fathering and mental health support. Overwhelmingly positive feedback from evaluations reinforced community pride in and ownership of the outcomes. The young men's involvement was instrumental in not only developing culturally appropriate support, but also in building their capacity as role models for other fathers in the community. The positive results from this feasibility study support the adoption of participatory approaches in the development of resources for Aboriginal communities.

DOI 10.1071/PY16151
Co-authors Richard Fletcher, Josephine Gwynn
2015 Morrison M, Greig J, Read DMY, Waller DS, McCulloch R, 'Communicating information to difficult-to-reach landholders: Perspectives of natural resource management communication practitioners', Australasian Journal of Environmental Management, 22 315-328 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Environment Institute of Australia and New Zealand Inc. Landholder participation in conservation programs is vital for achieving the environmental goals of natural resourc... [more]

© 2015 Environment Institute of Australia and New Zealand Inc. Landholder participation in conservation programs is vital for achieving the environmental goals of natural resource management organisations. However, some landholders can be difficult to reach. This article presents findings based on telephone interviews with communications practitioners within 22 Australian organisations involved with promoting national resource management. The research provides insights into how communication with difficult-to-reach landholders might be improved by investigating the perceptions and communication practices of Australian national resource management communications officers and their organisations. Overall, the results indicate that differing communication strategies were used and perceived as necessary to reach different groups of landholders. Nevertheless, while organisations used a range of communication channels, there is relatively little targeting of difficult-to-reach landholders, nor evaluation of the effectiveness of communications with difficult-to-reach landholders. We suggest that greater commitment, investment, effort and careful tailoring of channel-message combinations to landholder groups are likely to be necessary to improve communications and thereby achieve greater engagement in national resource management.

DOI 10.1080/14486563.2014.954013
Citations Scopus - 3
2014 Lu ZX, Zhu PY, Gurr GM, Zheng XS, Read DMY, Heong KL, et al., 'Mechanisms for flowering plants to benefit arthropod natural enemies of insect pests: Prospects for enhanced use in agriculture', Insect Science, 21 1-12 (2014) [C1]

Reduction of noncrop habitats, intensive use of pesticides and high levels of disturbance associated with intensive crop production simplify the farming landscape and bring about ... [more]

Reduction of noncrop habitats, intensive use of pesticides and high levels of disturbance associated with intensive crop production simplify the farming landscape and bring about a sharp decline of biodiversity. This, in turn, weakens the biological control ecosystem service provided by arthropod natural enemies. Strategic use of flowering plants to enhance plant biodiversity in a well-targeted manner can provide natural enemies with food sources and shelter to improve biological control and reduce dependence on chemical pesticides. This article reviews the nutritional value of various types of plant-derived food for natural enemies, possible adverse effects on pest management, and the practical application of flowering plants in orchards, vegetables and field crops, agricultural systems where most research has taken place. Prospects for more effective use of flowering plants to maximize biological control of insect pests in agroecosystem are good but depend up on selection of optimal plant species based on information on the ecological mechanisms by which natural enemies are selectively favored over pest species. © 2012 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

DOI 10.1111/1744-7917.12000
Citations Scopus - 26
2012 Read DMY, Crockett J, Mason R, '"It was a horrible shock": The experience of motherhood and women's family size preferences', Women's Studies International Forum, 35 12-21 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.wsif.2011.10.001
Citations Scopus - 10
2012 Gurr GM, Read DMY, Catindig JLA, Cheng J, Liu J, Lan LP, Heong KL, 'Parasitoids of the rice leaffolder Cnaphalocrocis medinalis and prospects for enhancing biological control with nectar plants', Agricultural and Forest Entomology, 14 1-12 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1461-9563.2011.00550.x
Citations Scopus - 18
2011 Gurr GM, Liu J, Read DMY, Catindig JLA, Cheng JA, Lan LP, Heong KL, 'Parasitoids of Asian rice planthopper (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) pests and prospects for enhancing biological control by ecological engineering', Annals of Applied Biology, 158 149-176 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1744-7348.2010.00455.x
Citations Scopus - 50
2009 Read D, Parton K, 'Economic deregulation and trade liberalization in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda: Growth and poverty', Journal of Economic Issues, 43 567-586 (2009)

With economic growth as a principal target, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda have implemented deregulation and trade liberalization policies. By tracing the trends in major economic agg... [more]

With economic growth as a principal target, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda have implemented deregulation and trade liberalization policies. By tracing the trends in major economic aggregates, the progress of these economies is reviewed. While acknowledging the conceptual arguments supporting the measures adopted, constraints in both the international economy and domestically have resulted in disappointing outcomes. International trade rules and practices, particularly in the agricultural sector, have worked against all three countries. Moreover, their domestic economies lack crucial resources. The results suggest that it may be a long time before the deregulation policies lead to a reduction in poverty. © 2009, Journal of Economic Issues / Association for Evolutionary Economics.

DOI 10.2753/JEI0021-3624430301
Citations Scopus - 2
2007 Read D, Crockett J, Watson G, 'What's behind recent fertility trends - Government policy, alarms on biological clocks or lessons learned from childhood?', People and Place, 15 22-29 (2007)

Fertility in Australia has risen since 2001. Some have attributed this to the universal Maternity Payment introduced with the 2004 budget, or to Treasurer Peter Costello's ca... [more]

Fertility in Australia has risen since 2001. Some have attributed this to the universal Maternity Payment introduced with the 2004 budget, or to Treasurer Peter Costello's call to parents to have three children, also made in 2004. But these interventions occurred after fertility had begun to rise. Moreover, qualitative interviews with 15 mothers in regional New South Wales show that they had had little effect on these women. Factors that did affect them included anxiety about beating the biological clock, the desire to have the number of children that their own childhood had taught them to prefer and constraints such as lack of social support and fears about their inability to pay for the education of their children.

Citations Scopus - 6
2003 Pilkington LJ, Gibb KS, Gurr GM, Fletcher MJ, Nikandrow A, Elliott E, et al., 'Detection and identification of a phytoplasma from lucerne with Australian lucerne yellows disease', Plant Pathology, 52 754-762 (2003)

Foliar and root symptoms are described for Australian lucerne yellows (ALuY), a disease common in Australian lucerne seed crops. A phytoplasma was detected in plants exhibiting sy... [more]

Foliar and root symptoms are described for Australian lucerne yellows (ALuY), a disease common in Australian lucerne seed crops. A phytoplasma was detected in plants exhibiting symptoms, but not in symptomless lucerne plants. Oligonucleotide primers specific to the phytoplasma 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region (SR) were used in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays on DNA extracted from lucerne plants with and without symptoms. Identical restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) enzyme profiles were obtained for PCR products amplified from 10 yellows-affected lucerne samples. RFLP profiles obtained for four restriction enzymes were different from those of the tomato big bud (TBB) phytoplasma. ALuY phytoplasma PCR products were sequenced to determine phylogeny and were found to fall within the faba bean phyllody phytoplasma group, or phytoplasma group 16srII. Transmission electron microscopy revealed phytoplasmas in the phloem of yellows-affected plant samples, but not in symptomless plant samples. Fungal, bacterial and viral agents in the aetiology of Australian lucerne yellows were ruled out.

DOI 10.1111/j.1365-3059.2003.00934.x
Citations Scopus - 11
2002 Pilkington LJ, Gibb KS, Gurr GM, Fletcher MJ, Nikandrow A, Elliott E, et al., 'First report of a phytoplasma associated with Australian lucerne yellows disease', Plant Pathology, 51 390 (2002)
DOI 10.1046/j.1365-3059.2002.00703.x
Citations Scopus - 5
1993 Fecondo JV, Pavuk NC, Silburn KA, Read DM, Mansell AS, Boyd AW, McPhee DA, 'Synthetic peptide analogs of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) inhibit HIV-1 replication in MT-2 cells.', AIDS research and human retroviruses, 9 733-740 (1993)
DOI 10.1089/aid.1993.9.733
Show 9 more journal articles

Conference (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Perkins D, Leary J, McGeorge P, Ridoutt L, Hirst V, Dalton H, Read DMY, '17th International Conference on Integrated Care' (2017)
2016 Davies K, Turner N, Read D, Livingstone F, 'Evaluating the impact of Farm-Link¿s Aboriginal suicide prevention activities' (2016)
Co-authors Kate Davies
2016 Livingstone F, Turner N, Davies K, Read D, Booth A, Dalton H, Perkins D, 'Connecting the dots ¿ a strengths-based approach to Aboriginal suicide prevention' (2016)
Co-authors Angela Booth, Kate Davies
2014 Hunter C, Hard L, D'Netto B, Ridolfo H, Read D, 'Developing deep, widespread and sustained improvements in online learning in a Faculty of Business: An analysis of the change process', Proceedings of ASCILITE 2014 - Annual Conference of the Australian Society for Computers in Tertiary Education (2014)

The Faculty of Business at Charles Sturt University initiated the Online Course Innovation (OCI) project in 2012. This project focuses on the transition of 280 print-based subject... [more]

The Faculty of Business at Charles Sturt University initiated the Online Course Innovation (OCI) project in 2012. This project focuses on the transition of 280 print-based subjects into quality online offerings through the mindful redesign of resources, interactions and experiences. It is led by the Associate Dean (Courses), and involves a multi-disciplinary team of educational designers, academics and divisional staff. The aim of this research project is to explore this transition to the online learning and teaching environment and identify critical organisational elements that contribute to achieving quality outcomes. Specifically, this study seeks to identify factors that support or inhibit the academic's ability to effectively design and teach quality online subjects, and the impact of leadership on the design and teaching process. Data is currently being collected from a range of institutional stakeholders involved with the project. Initial findings from the data analysis will be shared through the conference presentation.

2011 Hyde S, Yabsley P, Read D, 'Transformation of student academic regulation over a PBL year' (2011)
2011 Read D, '¿One for the country¿ (and it¿s her choice)' (2011)
2011 Read D, Crockett J, Mason R, 'Agency over childbearing: perceptions of women with children' (2011)
2009 Hyde S, Yabsley P, Read D, 'Problem based learning and students¿ ability to self-regulate in the context of the Bachelor of Clinical Science' (2009)
Show 5 more conferences

Report (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Dalton H, Read D, Handley TE, Perkins D, 'Low Intensity Mental Health Services: A Rapid Review', A multi-state collective of Primary Health Networks, 124 (2017)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $133,604

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $133,604

Central Coast LHD Integrated Care Formative Evaluation$133,604

Funding body: Central Coast Local Health District

Funding body Central Coast Local Health District
Project Team Professor David Perkins, Doctor Hazel Dalton, Doctor Kate Davies, Doctor Tonelle Handley, Doctor Donna Read, Mrs Angela Booth
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700888
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y
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Dr Donna Read

Position

Research Associate
Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health
Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email donna.read@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 6363 8474

Office

Location Orange

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