Mr Deside Chibwe

Mr Deside Chibwe

Research Associate

School of Engineering

Career Summary

Biography

Dr. Chibwe is a Research Associate in the ARC Research Hub for Advanced Technologies for Australian Iron Ore at the University of Newcastle.  He completed his Bachelor of Science Honours degree in Metallurgical Engineering from the University of Zimbabwe, Harare, Zimbabwe followed by a Master of Science degree in Metallurgical Engineering from the University of Stellenbosch, Cape Town, South Africa and a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia.

Since the beginning of his career which kicked off in automotive and industrial battery manufacturing company, Smelting Process Department, he has worked in ferrous and non-ferrous pyro-metallurgical smelting operations in various capacities. Key interests and activities mainly involved the application of fundamental and applied research to solve, improve and address real- life process engineering problems related to mineral processing, bulk materials handling and pyro-metallurgy resulting in optimised utilisation of raw materials and process intensification. Initially, his research, which started in South Africa under the supervision of Professor Guven Akdogan at the University of Stellenbosch, mainly focused on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) investigations of submerged jets, mixing, mass transfer and phase distribution of high-temperature melt simulated at room temperature in lab scaled experimental rigs. The research involved a combination of experimental measurements and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. For the contributions made and in recognition of technical input to industrial solutions, he received a Certificate of Merit in 2016 from The Southern African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (SAIMM). View the link for more information on research output.

Dr. Chibwe’s research focus expanded to discrete element modelling (DEM) when he later moved to Australia to pursue his doctoral study at the University of Newcastle under the supervision of Professor Geoffrey Evans. His study principally looked at the optimization of burden (sinter, pellets, coke) delivery for blast furnaces operation. Particular interest was in furthering the understanding of particle dynamics in relation to mixing and segregation of handling of burden materials of variable size, size distribution, and densities. Discrete element modelling (DEM) was the key technique applied in the study and investigations. During this period, he was part of the ARC Research Hub for Australian Steel Manufacturing which was mainly focussed on developing and achieving uniquely competitive processing methodologies and differentiated end-user products, to ensure sustainable growth across the Australian steel value chain.

As a Research Associate in ARC Research Hub for Advanced Technologies for Australian Iron Ore which is focused on iron (ferrous) ore beneficiation, bulk materials handling and end-use functionality with major attention on developing innovative approaches on a suite of novel technologies to create enhanced value across the full value chain, Dr. Chibwe is currently reviewing the current blast furnace iron smelting practice and operation, particularly furthering the understanding of current process inefficiencies and interpret product requirements with more interest in the charging system and raw materials logistics, design and develop innovative solution concepts and flow sheets for the effective utilisation of ferrous burdens (sinter and lump iron ore) mixed with nut-coke that will improve the productivity of the iron blast furnace smelting process, improve pyro-metallurgical thermodynamics, mechanisms of chemical reactions and reduction of operational cost per tonne of hot metal (THM). He is carrying out proof of concepts and evaluation of the effectiveness of the new alternative mixed charging techniques with calibrated and validated discrete element modelling (DEM) numerical simulations.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science Engineering Honours, University of Zimbabwe
  • Master of Science (Engineering), University of Stellenbosch - South Africa

Keywords

  • Computational fluid dynamics (CFD)
  • Discrete element modelling (DEM)
  • Mixing and mass transfer
  • Multi-phase flow
  • Particle dynamics

Languages

  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
091499 Resources Engineering and Extractive Metallurgy not elsewhere classified 30
091307 Numerical Modelling and Mechanical Characterisation 50
090499 Chemical Engineering not elsewhere classified 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Associate University of Newcastle
School of Engineering
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/11/2011 - 30/12/2011 Commissioning Metallurgist Lonmin Platinum Limited
Smelting Division
South Africa
2/05/2005 - 31/12/2008 Process Engineer Zimbabwe Iron and Steel Company
Ironmaking Division
Zimbabwe
2/08/2004 - 29/04/2005 Process Engineer Chloride Central Africa Limited
Lead Smelting Operations
Zimbabwe
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Cloete JH, Akdogan G, Bradshaw SM, Chibwe DK, 'Physical and numerical modelling of a four-strand steelmaking tundish using flow analysis of different configurations', JOURNAL OF THE SOUTHERN AFRICAN INSTITUTE OF MINING AND METALLURGY, 115 355-362 (2015)
DOI 10.17159/2411-9717/2015/v115n5a3
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2015 Chibwe DK, Akdogan G, Taskinen P, Eksteen JJ, 'Modelling of fluid flow phenomena in Peirce-Smith copper converters and analysis of combined blowing concept', JOURNAL OF THE SOUTHERN AFRICAN INSTITUTE OF MINING AND METALLURGY, 115 363-374 (2015)
DOI 10.17159/2411-9717/2015/v115n5a4
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Chibwe DK, Akdogan G, Bezuidenhout GA, Kapusta JPT, Bradshaw S, Eksteen JJ, 'Sonic injection into a PGM Peirce-Smith converter: CFD modelling and industrial trials', JOURNAL OF THE SOUTHERN AFRICAN INSTITUTE OF MINING AND METALLURGY, 115 349-354 (2015)
DOI 10.17159/2411-9717/2015/v115n5a2
Citations Scopus - 2
2013 Chibwe DK, Akdogan G, Aldrich C, Taskinen P, 'Modelling of mixing, mass transfer and phase distribution in a Peirce-Smith converter model', CANADIAN METALLURGICAL QUARTERLY, 52 176-189 (2013)
DOI 10.1179/1879139512Y.0000000056
Citations Scopus - 3
2013 Chibwe DK, Akdogan G, Taskinen P, 'Numerical investigation of combined top and lateral blowing in a peirce-smith converter', Chemical Product and Process Modeling, 8 119-127 (2013)

Typical current operation of lateral-blown Peirce-Smith converters (PSCs) has the common phenomenon of splashing and slopping due to air injection. The splashing and wave motion i... [more]

Typical current operation of lateral-blown Peirce-Smith converters (PSCs) has the common phenomenon of splashing and slopping due to air injection. The splashing and wave motion in these converters cause metal losses and potential production lost time due to intermittent cleaning of the converter mouth and thus reduced process throughput. Understanding of the effect of combined top and lateral blowing could possibly lead to alternative technology advancement for increased process efficiency. In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of conventional common practice (lateral blowing) and combined (top and lateral blowing) in a PSC were carried out, and results of flow variables (bath velocity, turbulence kinetic energy, etc.) were compared. The two-dimensional (2-D) and threedimensional (3-D) simulations of the three-phase system (air-matte-slag) were executed utilizing a commercial CFD numerical software code, ANSYS FLUENT 14.0. These simulations were performed employing the volume of fluid and realizable k - e turbulence models to account for multiphase and turbulent nature of the flow, respectively. Upon completion of the simulations, the results of the models were analysed and compared by means of density contour plots, velocity vector plots, turbulent kinetic energy vector plots, average turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent intensity contour plots and average matte bulk velocity. It was found that both blowing configuration and slag layer thickness have significant effects on mixing propagation, wave formation and splashing in the PSC as the results showed wave formation and splashing significantly being reduced by employing combined top- and lateral-blowing configurations.

DOI 10.1515/cppm-2013-0036
Citations Scopus - 2
2011 Chibwe DK, Akdogan G, Aldrich C, Taskinen P, 'Characterisation of phase distribution in a Peirce-Smith converter using water model experiments and numerical simulation', Transactions of the Institutions of Mining and Metallurgy, Section C: Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy, 120 162-171 (2011)

In this study, we have experimentally and numerically studied fluid flow behaviour in industrial Peirce-Smith converter (PSC) using cold model simulations. The two- and three-dime... [more]

In this study, we have experimentally and numerically studied fluid flow behaviour in industrial Peirce-Smith converter (PSC) using cold model simulations. The two- and three-dimensional simulations of the three phase system were carried out using volume of fluid (VOF) and realisable k-e turbulence model to account for the multiphase and turbulence nature of the flow respectively. These models were implemented using commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical code FLUENT. The cold model for physical simulations was a 1 : 5 horizontal cylindrical container made of Perspex with seven tuyeres on one side of the cylinder typifying a PSC. Compressed air was blown into the cylinder through the tuyeres simulating oxygen enriched air injection into PSC. Industrial treated feed, product and byproduct referred to as matte-white metal and slag were simulated with water and kerosene respectively in this study. The influence of blowing conditions on the distribution of phases was studied with five different compressed air volumetric flowrates at constant simulated matte and slag ratios. Both numerical and experimental simulations were able to predict the dispersion characteristics of the system in relation to flow and have substantially added to the understanding of the fluid dynamics of PSC. © 2011 Institute of Materials.

DOI 10.1179/1743285511Y.0000000017
Citations Scopus - 4
2011 Chibwe DK, Akdogan G, Aldrich C, Eric RH, 'CFD modelling of global mixing parameters in a Peirce-Smith converter with comparison to physical modelling', International Journal of Green Economics, 6 (2011)

The flow pattern and mixing in an industrial Peirce-Smith converter (PSC) has been experimentally and numerically studied using cold model simulations. The effects of air volumetr... [more]

The flow pattern and mixing in an industrial Peirce-Smith converter (PSC) has been experimentally and numerically studied using cold model simulations. The effects of air volumetric flow rate and presence of overlaying slag phase on matte on the flow structure and mixing were investigated. The 2-D and 3-D simulations of the three phase system were carried out using volume of fluid (VOF) and realizable k - ? turbulence model to account for the multiphase and turbulence nature of the flow respectively. These models were implemented using commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) numerical code FLUENT. The cold model for physical simulations was a 1:5 horizontal cylindrical container made of Perspex with seven tuyeres on one side of the cylinder typifying a Peirce-Smith converter. Compressed air was blown into the cylinder through the tuyeres, simulating air or oxygen enriched air injection into the PSC. The matte and slag phases were simulated with water and kerosene respectively in this study. The influence of varying blowing conditions and simulated slag quantities on the bulk mixing was studied with five different air volumetric flow rates and five levels of simulated slag thickness. Mixing time results were evaluated in terms of total specific mixing power and two mixing time correlations were proposed for estimating mixing times in the model of PSC for low slag and high slag volumes. Both numerical and experimental simulations were in good agreement to predict the variation characteristics of the system in relation to global flow field variables set up in the converter through mathematical calculation of relevant integrated quantities of turbulence, Volume Fraction (VF) and velocity magnitudes. The findings revealed that both air volumetric flow rate and presence of the overlaying slag layer have profound effects on the mixing efficiency of the converter.

DOI 10.2202/1934-2659.1584
Citations Scopus - 6
2011 Chibwe DK, Akdogan G, Eksteen J, 'Solid-liquid mass transfer in a Peirce-Smith converter: A physical modelling study', Metallurgical and Mining Industry, 3 202-210 (2011)

Pyro-metallurgical processes are multiphase in nature involving gas-liquid-solid interactions. In the Peirce-Smith converter operation, the additions of cold solids in liquid matt... [more]

Pyro-metallurgical processes are multiphase in nature involving gas-liquid-solid interactions. In the Peirce-Smith converter operation, the additions of cold solids in liquid matte in the form of fluxing agents (silica sands) for slag liquidity, process scrap and reverts for temperature control is a common practice. It is reasonable to postulate that with such practice, solid-liquid mass transfer step may play an important role in the performance and attainment of liquid bath homogeneity of the process. In this work, solid additions were simulated with sintered benzoic acid compacts spatially positioned in a 1:5 water model of a Peirce-Smith converter. Water and kerosene were used to simulate matte and slag respectively. Solid-liquid mass transfer was characterized by experimentally determined mass transfer coefficient, K (ms-1) values of benzoic acid sintered compacts and calculated dimensionless turbulence characteristic, Tc values. The mass transfer coefficients and dimensionless turbulence characteristic values were highest at the bath surface and near plume region. The values decreased in identified dead zones in the regions close to the circular side walls of the model. The results revealed that the mass transfer coefficients and turbulence characteristics were different with respect to different submergence levels of the compacts. These findings lead to the conclusion that the fluid flow was stratified within the vessel. © Metallurgical and Mining Industry, 2011.

Citations Scopus - 3
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Conference (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Chibwe DK, Evans GM, Pinson DJ, Austin P, Biasutti M, Chew SJ, Monaghan BJ, 'Sinter - nut coke interaction and behaviour during conveyor belt transportation and discharge: A DEM study', Austria (2016)
Co-authors Geoffrey Evans
2014 Chibwe DK, Akdogan G, Bradshaw SM, Bezuidenhout GA, 'Physical and CFD modelling study of mixing and splashing phenomena in subsonic-sonic transition operated platinum group metals (PGMs) - Peirce-Smith converters', Mexico (2014)
2012 Chibwe DK, Akdogan G, Bradshaw SM, Bezuidenhout GA, Davis J, Eksteen JJ, Kapusta JPT, 'Towards sonic injection in Peirce-Smith converters: A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling study', Canada (2012)
2012 Chibwe DK, Akdogan G, Aldrich C, Taskinen P, 'Numerical simulation of the slag-matte distribution in a Peirce-Smith converter', Mexico (2012)
2012 Kapusta JPT, Davis J, Bezuidenhout GA, Lefume S, Chibwe DK, 'Industrial evaluation of sonic injection in a Peirce-Smith converter at the Lonmin platinum smelter', Canada (2012)
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Mr Deside Chibwe

Position

Research Associate
School of Engineering
Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment

Contact Details

Email deside.chibwe@newcastle.edu.au
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