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Associate Professor David Palmer

Associate Professor

School of Education

Career Summary

Biography

I have a BSc (Hons) from the ANU, and PhD from LaTrobe University. I have taught for many years in schools and have been involved in teacher education since 1992. I have taught science education for many years and have written five science resource books for teachers.

Research Expertise

Science education, particularly primary science and technology.



Qualifications

  • PhD, La Trobe University
  • Bachelor of Science, La Trobe University
  • Diploma in Education, Charles Sturt University

Keywords

  • Curriculum
  • Pedagogy
  • Science education

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
130299 Curriculum and Pedagogy not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
Executive Member - Environmental Institute Environmental Institute
Australia
Member - Science Education Review Science Education Review
Australia

Invitations

Participant

Year Title / Rationale
2002 Curriculum Science and Technology
Organisation: Avondale College

PhD Examiner

Year Title / Rationale
2004 the effectiveness of the predict-observe-explain technique
Organisation: Curtin University of Technology
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2008 Palmer DH, 'Constructivist-informed classroom teaching: The importance and potential of motivation research', Science Education Issues and Development, Nova Science Publishers, Hauppauge 201-222 (2008) [B1]

Journal article (39 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Palmer D, 'Wanting and Liking: Components of Situated Motivation Constructs?', Mind, Brain, and Education, 11 99-108 (2017)

© 2017 International Mind, Brain, and Education Society and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Brain studies have revealed that 2 neurological systems, one for ¿wanting¿ and one for ¿lik... [more]

© 2017 International Mind, Brain, and Education Society and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Brain studies have revealed that 2 neurological systems, one for ¿wanting¿ and one for ¿liking,¿ are responsible for many instances of motivated behavior. If wanting and liking are fundamental elements of motivation, then we should also expect to see them represented in educational models of motivation for learning. However, it has not yet been established whether this is the case. Situated instances of motivation, such as when a student feels motivated to immediately engage in learning, can potentially be informed by education constructs such as curiosity, situational interest, intrinsic motivation, achievement emotions, and flow. The purpose of this article is to investigate whether the two elements, wanting and liking, can be identified in each of these constructs. The analysis revealed that the education constructs could be inferred to include wanting and liking. It is proposed that a focus on these fundamental elements might aid our understanding of motivation in educational settings.

DOI 10.1111/mbe.12141
2017 Palmer D, 'The action tendency for learning: Characteristics and antecedents in regular lessons', International Journal of Educational Research, 82 99-109 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd An emotion is often accompanied by an action tendency, which is a feeling of wanting to take action. This study investigated whether students experience an ac... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd An emotion is often accompanied by an action tendency, which is a feeling of wanting to take action. This study investigated whether students experience an action tendency for learning (a feeling of wanting-to-learn). Interviews were carried out with 52 Australian grade 10 students immediately following a regular lesson. Students were asked whether they had experienced a feeling of wanting-to-learn, and if so, to identify its causes and effects. Triangulation was used to establish validity. Students reported a valenced and dynamic action tendency for learning, which had occurred during the lesson. Antecedents included, but were not limited to, perceptions of control and value, and their associated achievement emotions. There was a consistently positive relationship between this action tendency and learning behaviours.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijer.2017.01.010
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2017 Palmer D, Dixon J, Archer J, 'Using Situational Interest to Enhance Individual Interest and Science-Related Behaviours', Research in Science Education, 47 731-753 (2017)

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. Situational interest is a relatively transient reaction to highly stimulating factors in the immediate environment, whereas ind... [more]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. Situational interest is a relatively transient reaction to highly stimulating factors in the immediate environment, whereas individual interest is a relatively long-term preference for a particular subject or activity. It has been proposed that regular experiences of situational interest in a subject may eventually lead to the development of individual interest in that subject. Importantly, this should also result in an increase in behaviours related to that domain. For example, a student who develops an individual interest in science would be expected to spend more time on science-related activities such as reading about science, talking with other people about science, or watching science shows on TV. However, the extent to which this does happen has not yet been established. The purposes of this study were to find out whether regular experiences of situational interest in science classes can enhance individual interest in science and whether there is an associated increase in science-related activities. The participants were primary teacher education students who were enrolled in a semester-length science course. Data were collected using a survey, an interest inventory, open-ended questionnaires and interviews. It was found that regular experiences of situational interest during the course were associated with positive changes in individual interest in science and increased participation in science-related activities. These changes remained relatively stable over a delay period of 10¿months after the end of the course.

DOI 10.1007/s11165-016-9526-x
Co-authors Jennifer Archer
2017 Palmer DH, Dixon J, Archer J, 'Identifying Underlying Causes of Situational Interest in a Science Course for Preservice Elementary Teachers', Science Education, 100 1039-1061 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/sce.21244
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jennifer Archer
2016 Palmer D, 'Motivation for Learning: An Implicit Decision-Making Process', Creative Education, 07 2380-2388 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.4236/ce.2016.716229
2015 Palmer D, Dixon J, Archer J, 'Changes in science teaching self-efficacy among primary teacher education students', Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 40 26-40 (2015) [C1]

Many preservice primary teachers have low self-efficacy for science teaching. Although science methods courses have often been shown to enhance self-efficacy, science content cour... [more]

Many preservice primary teachers have low self-efficacy for science teaching. Although science methods courses have often been shown to enhance self-efficacy, science content courses have been relatively ineffective in this respect. This study investigated whether a tailored science content course would enhance self-efficacy. The participants were preservice primary teachers and data collection was by survey and interview. Self-efficacy increased during the course and the increases were stable after a 10-month delay period. The factors that enhanced self-efficacy were: learning science content, perceptions of learning how to teach science, and teacher enthusiasm.

DOI 10.14221/ajte.2015v40n12.3
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jennifer Archer
2015 Palmer D, 'Maintaining the Balance: Creative Practices in University-School Partnerships for Teacher Education', Creative Education, 06 1530-1535 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.4236/ce.2015.614153
2014 Basu P, Pawson E, Akhter M, Palmer D, Mervine VM, 'Connecting high school and university teachers in national and international contexts: Perspectives from the 2012 Bangalore workshop of the AAG-CGGE', Journal of Geography in Higher Education, 38 40-48 (2014)

This paper focuses on the Center for Global Geography Education teaching workshop held in Bangalore, India, in March 2012 which served as a collaborative forum linking geography t... [more]

This paper focuses on the Center for Global Geography Education teaching workshop held in Bangalore, India, in March 2012 which served as a collaborative forum linking geography teachers in secondary and higher education in the USA and India. It considers the inclusion of the Advanced Placement Human Geography teachers from the USA and the building of global teaching content in collaborative teams as a useful way to connect geography teachers across institutional contexts. Based on a survey of workshop participants, it also highlights some of the issues that need to be addressed for further strengthening of high school-university linkages within national and across international contexts. © 2014 © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

DOI 10.1080/03098265.2013.833897
2011 Palmer DH, 'Sources of efficacy information in an inservice program for elementary teachers', Science Education, 95 577-600 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/sce.20434
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 23
2009 Palmer DH, 'Student interest generated during an inquiry skills lesson', Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 46 147-165 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/tea.20263
Citations Scopus - 84Web of Science - 67
2008 Palmer DH, 'Practices and Innovations in Australian Science Teacher Education Programs', Research in Science Education, 38 167-188 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11165-007-9043-z
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
2007 Palmer DH, 'What is the best way to motivate students in science?', Teaching Science, 53 38-42 (2007) [C1]
2006 Palmer DH, 'Sources of self-efficacy in a science methods course for primary teacher education students', Research in Science Education, 36 337-353 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11165-005-9007-0
Citations Scopus - 76Web of Science - 67
2006 Palmer DH, 'Durability of changes in self-efficacy of preservice primary teachers', International Journal of Science Education, 28 655-671 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09500690500404599
Citations Scopus - 55Web of Science - 51
2005 Palmer DH, 'A Motivational View of Constructivist-informed Teaching', International Journal of Science Education, 27 1853-1881 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09500690500339654
Citations Scopus - 51Web of Science - 51
2004 Palmer DH, 'Situational Interest and the Attitudes Towards Science of Primary Teacher Education Students. Research Report', International Journal of Science Education, 26 895-908 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/0950069032000177262
2004 Palmer DH, 'Theory into Practice: Ideas for Arousing Student Interest in Science Classes', Teaching Science, 50 51-53 (2004) [C1]
2004 Palmer D, 'Situational interest and the attitudes towards science of primary teacher education students', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SCIENCE EDUCATION, 26 895-908 (2004)
DOI 10.1080/0950069042000177262
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 31
2003 Palmer DH, 'Investigating the Relationship between Refutational Text and Conceptual Change', Science Education, 87 663-684 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/sce.1056
Citations Scopus - 49Web of Science - 43
2003 Palmer DH, 'Modelling the transmission of sound', Science Scope, 26 32-34 (2003) [C1]
2003 Palmer DH, 'Narrowing student investigations', Science Scope, 27 42-44 (2003) [C1]
2002 Palmer DH, 'Preservice elementary teachers'' perceptions after visiting an interactive science centre', Networks: an online journal for Teacher Research, 5 (2002) [C1]
2001 Palmer DH, 'Factors contributing to attitude exchange amongst preservice elementary teachers', Science Education, 6 Nov.2001 122-138 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 62Web of Science - 27
2001 Palmer DH, 'Investigating the relationship between students' multiple conceptions of action and reaction in cases of static equilibrium', Research in Science & Technological Education, 19 (2) 193-204 (2001) [C1]
2001 Palmer DH, 'Students' alternative conceptions and scientifically acceptable conceptions about gravity', The International Journal of Science Education, 23 (7) 691-706 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 30
1999 Palmer DH, 'Exploring the link between students' scientific and nonscientific conceptions', Science Education, 83 (6) 639-653 (1999) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 34
1999 Palmer DH, 'Students' perceptions of high quality science teaching', Australian Science Teachers' Journal, 45 (3) 41-44 (1999) [C1]
1999 Palmer DH, 'Using dramatizations to present science concepts', Journal of College Science Teaching, 29 (3) 187-190 (1999) [C1]
1998 Palmer DH, 'Measuring contextual error in the diagnosis of alternative conceptions in science', Issues in Educational Research, 8 (1) 65-76 (1998) [C1]
1998 Palmer DH, 'Modification of a teaching strategy during is implementation in the science classroom', Journal of Science and Mathematics Education in Southeast Asia, XX1 (2) 68-77 (1998) [C1]
1998 Palmer DH, 'The use of role plays for science teaching', Teaching Review, 3 10-12 (1998) [C3]
1998 Palmer DH, 'Book Review - Convection Demonstration', The Science Teacher, 65 (6) 72, 75 (1998) [C3]
1997 Palmer DH, 'Students' Application of the Concept of Interdependence to the Issue of Preservation of Species: Observations on the Ability to Generalize', Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 34 837-850 (1997)

One of the aims of science education is that students should be able to apply scientific principles to contemporary issues. Individual interviews were used to investigate the way ... [more]

One of the aims of science education is that students should be able to apply scientific principles to contemporary issues. Individual interviews were used to investigate the way in which students (63 12-year-olds and 60 16-year-olds) applied the ecological concept of interdependence of species to the issue of preservation of species. Students were shown a list of items representing a range of living things and were asked to select those which they would want to save from extinction and explain their reasoning. Although most students used the concept of interdependence for some items, they did not apply it in a scientifically consistent way to all types of living things. Three probable reasons for this lack of consistency were anthropocentricism, mixed reasons (students appeared to spontaneously choose another type of reason depending on what image the item immediately provoked), and opposite reasons (students interpreted the idea of interdependence as applying to some types of living things but not to others).

Citations Scopus - 9
1997 Palmer DH, Flanagan RB, 'Readiness to change the conception that "motion-implies-force": A comparison of 12-year-old and 16-year-old students', Science Education, 81 317-331 (1997)

Several investigators have reported difficulties in changing the alternative conceptions which high school students hold about aspects of mechanics. It has been suggested that stu... [more]

Several investigators have reported difficulties in changing the alternative conceptions which high school students hold about aspects of mechanics. It has been suggested that students should be introduced to mechanics at a younger age because as they get older they become less willing or less able to change their ideas. To test this proposal, the present study was designed to find out whether older students were less ready to change their conceptions than younger students. Individual interviews were carried out with 63 students in year 6 (ages 11-12) and 66 students in year 10 (ages 15-16). Those students who held the alternative conception that "motion-implies-force" were asked to read a refutational text. This text was "student-centered" in that it was not presented as the correct answer, but rather as just another possible alternative which the student could consider. Immediate and delayed posttests, and the metacognitive responses of the students, showed that conceptual change had occurred in 35% of the year 6 group and 44% of the year 10 group who had read the text (although the difference in percentages was not significant). Therefore, there was no evidence to suggest that conceptual change is more difficult for older students. © 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Citations Scopus - 6
1997 Palmer D, 'The effect of context on students¿ reasoning about forces', International Journal of Science Education, 19 681-696 (1997)

When attempting to solve closely related problems in science, students will often respond to irrelevant contextual features in the questions rather than generalizing their concept... [more]

When attempting to solve closely related problems in science, students will often respond to irrelevant contextual features in the questions rather than generalizing their conceptions over the range of relevant situations. In this study, a group of 40 students (one group of 15-16-year-olds and another of preservice science teachers) was surveyed and interviewed to determine the effect of context on the reasoning which they used to solve problems concerning the forces acting on objects in linear motion. It was found that the younger group of students were influenced by contextual features such as the speed, weight and position of the moving object, the direction of the motion and their own personal experience of the context. There were clearly two types of contextual effects ¿ primary and secondary, which are described. The older group of students was generally less affected by context and thus more consistent in their reasoning. © 1997, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1080/0950069970190605
Citations Scopus - 29
1996 Palmer D, 'Students' application of a biological concept: Factors affecting consistency', Research in Science Education, 26 409-419 (1996)

This study investigated factors affecting students' ability to apply consistently the concept of adaptations (Le., characteristics which suit an organism to its environment).... [more]

This study investigated factors affecting students' ability to apply consistently the concept of adaptations (Le., characteristics which suit an organism to its environment). Individual interviews were carried out with 74 Year 10 students, of whom only 47% showed an understanding of the concept. These students were asked to indicate on a list of living and non-living items which ones would have adaptations. It was found that they were more likely to apply the concept to vertebrates than to other types of living things. In addition, many students appeared to be unable to separate consistently the idea of "adaptations as characteristics" from the other everyday and scientific meanings of the terms "adapt" and "adaptation.".

Citations Scopus - 2
1995 Palmer D, 'The POE in the primary school: An evaluation', Research in Science Education, 25 323-332 (1995)

The POE (Predict-Observe-Explain) is a technique for identifying students' knowledge and understanding of science concepts. It has mainly been used for physical science topic... [more]

The POE (Predict-Observe-Explain) is a technique for identifying students' knowledge and understanding of science concepts. It has mainly been used for physical science topics at secondary and tertiary levels. In the present study, 60 preservice teachers each implemented and evaluated POEs with groups of primary children. The children were studying a range of topics from the NSW Science and Technology K-6 Syllabus and represented a range of year levels. The evaluations were generally positive. The children responded to the technique enthusiastically and the teachers were able to identify both their understandings and their process skills development. The main problems were the difficulty of inventing suitable POEs in some topics, especially topics on communication, and problems caused by the use of oral rather than written responses. The study concluded that it is a suitable technique for primary science. © 1995 Australasian Science Education Research Association.

DOI 10.1007/BF02357405
Citations Scopus - 21
1994 Palmer D, 'The effect of the direction of motion on students' conceptions of forces', Research in Science Education, 24 253-260 (1994)

The ability to generalise principles to a range of situations is generally considered to be important in science education. However, several studies have found that students do no... [more]

The ability to generalise principles to a range of situations is generally considered to be important in science education. However, several studies have found that students do not consistently apply their conceptions in the study of mechanics, and that they respond to irrelevant contextual features of the question, such as the type of object in motion. The present study was designed to investigate whether the direction of the motion (i.e. vertical or horizontal) was a contextual feature which influenced students' ideas about the forces involved in motion. The results indicated that 14% of the university science teaching students studied and 25% of the Year 10 students were influenced by the direction of the motion. Some of these students described a 'motion force' in one direction (usually vertical) but not the other, while others described forces opposing the motion in one direction (which was always vertical) but not the other. © 1994 Australasian Science Education Research Association.

DOI 10.1007/BF02356351
Citations Scopus - 5
1993 Palmer D, 'How consistently do students use their alternative conceptions?', Research in Science Education, 23 228-235 (1993)

Existing research indicates that many students hold an alternative conception that "an object in motion must have a force pushing it along", but they do not apply this c... [more]

Existing research indicates that many students hold an alternative conception that "an object in motion must have a force pushing it along", but they do not apply this conception consistently to problems involving different types of motion. This project was designed to investigate the degree of consistency of student responses to questions concerned with linear motion. The results indicated that most students were unable to consistently apply either the alternative conception or the correct scientific response. The students appeared to have a general problem in recognising similarities between contexts, even when the contexts were closely related. The results also suggested that the responses of some students were influenced by contextual factors such as the nature of the moving body, the direction of the motion and the speed of the motion. © 1993 Australasian Science Education Research Association.

DOI 10.1007/BF02357065
Citations Scopus - 14
Show 36 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2008 Palmer DH, 'Durability of changes in self-efficacy amongst primary teacher education students', Teacher Educators at Work: What Works and Where is the Evidence? Proceedings of the 2008 Australian Teacher Education Association National Conference, Sunshine Coast, QLD (2008) [E3]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 20
Total funding $240,111

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20091 grants / $1,700

Association for Science Education anuual Conference, University of Reading, 8/1/2009 - 10/1/2009$1,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Associate Professor David Palmer
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189440
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20082 grants / $57,488

Comparative analysis of two contrasting approaches to professional experience$56,063

Funding body: Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations

Funding body Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations
Project Team Associate Professor Ruth Reynolds, Associate Professor David Palmer, Associate Professor Erica Southgate
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189462
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Australian Teacher Education Association, Novotel Twin Water, Sunshine Coast, 8/7/2008 - 11/7/2008$1,425

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor David Palmer
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189188
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20073 grants / $53,374

Science and Technology on Show$50,408

Funding body: Department of Education, Science and Training

Funding body Department of Education, Science and Training
Project Team Associate Professor David Palmer
Scheme Australian School Innovation in Science, Technology & Mathematics
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187104
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Hawii International Conference on Education, Honolulu, 5/1/2008 - 8/1/2008$1,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor David Palmer
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0188265
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

ASERA 07 (Aust Science Education Research Assoc), Freeemantle, 11/7/2007 - 14/7/2007$1,266

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor David Palmer
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187769
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20052 grants / $7,666

Students' drink-driving misconceptions$7,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor David Palmer
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0184631
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Australasian Science Education Research Association, 6-9 July 2005$666

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor David Palmer
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0185388
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20042 grants / $7,625

Situational interest in science classes$7,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor David Palmer
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0183361
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

ASERA 2004, the Annual Conference of the Australasian Science Education Research Association, 7-10 July 2004$625

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor David Palmer
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0184043
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20031 grants / $6,000

Attitude change in science.$6,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor David Palmer
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo G0182480
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20021 grants / $820

Annual Conference of the Australasian Science Education Research Association 2002 Queensland, July 11-14, 2002$820

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor David Palmer
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2002
GNo G0181708
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20011 grants / $77,055

Proposal for a study on the preparation of teachers to teach science, maths and technology.$77,055

Funding body: Department of Education, Training & Youth Affairs

Funding body Department of Education, Training & Youth Affairs
Project Team Emeritus Professor Geoffrey Lawrance, Associate Professor David Palmer
Scheme Evaluations & Investigations Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2001
GNo G0180677
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20002 grants / $10,525

The remediation of students' misconceptions in science$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor David Palmer
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2000
Funding Finish 2000
GNo G0178812
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

CONASTA 2000 UWA, Perth$525

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor David Palmer
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2000
Funding Finish 2000
GNo G0180258
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

19991 grants / $7,000

Students' reasoning in science.$7,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor David Palmer
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1999
Funding Finish 1999
GNo G0178058
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

19981 grants / $648

CONASTA 47, Darwin 5-10 July 1998$648

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor David Palmer
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1998
Funding Finish 1998
GNo G0180393
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

19961 grants / $210

CONASTA 45 Annual Conference of the Australian Science Teachers' Association - Canberra - 7-12/7/96$210

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor David Palmer
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1996
Funding Finish 1996
GNo G0176312
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

19951 grants / $5,000

Primary school students conception of selected science topics$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor David Palmer
Scheme Enhancement of The Research Skills Base
Role Lead
Funding Start 1995
Funding Finish 1995
GNo G0175441
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

19931 grants / $5,000

Factors affecting the ability of students to consistenly generalise a misconception in physics.$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor David Palmer
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1993
Funding Finish 1993
GNo G0174300
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current2

Total current UON EFTSL

Masters0.5
PhD0.25

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 Masters Preservice Teachers’ Perceptions of how to Increase their Students’ Long-Term Interest in Science M Philosophy (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2010 PhD A History of Scientific Literacy as a Goal of Primary School Science in Australia PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Investigating the Role of Situational Interest in Developing Individual Interest in Science and Self-Efficacy to Teach Science in Preservice Primary Teachers PhD (Education), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Investigating the Role of Situational Interest in Developing Individual Interest in Science and Self-Efficacy to Teach Science in Preservice Primary Teachers PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Online Instruction in Saudi Arabian Universities: Attitudes and Satisfaction Towards E-Learning Systems PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Associate Professor David Palmer

Position

Associate Professor
School of Education
Faculty of Education and Arts

Contact Details

Email david.palmer@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5715
Fax (02) 4921 7887

Office

Room HA87
Building Hunter Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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