Dr Chethana Illankoon

Dr Chethana Illankoon

Associate Lecturer

School of Architecture and Built Environment

Career Summary

Biography

Dr. Chethana Illankoon joined the School of Architecture and Built Environment, in February 2019 after completing her PhD from Western Sydney University. She obtained her BSc (Quantity Surveying) Degree with First Class Honours from the University of Moratuwa, Sri Lanka in 2012. She was awarded the “Professor H.P.S. Caldera Memorial Award” for the Best Dissertation.  After pursuing her degree, Chethana joined the University of Moratuwa as an academic. Afterwards, she started working as a Quantity Surveyor in Middle-East, attached to many iconic projects.

In 2015, she was awarded the “Discovery Postgraduate Research Award’ from Western Sydney University which enabled her to complete her doctoral studies. After completing her PhD, she worked as a researcher at the University of Hong Kong engaging in many research projects. She has published many scholarly articles in high impact refereed journals, refereed book chapters and refereed conference papers in in leading conferences. Dr. Chethana has also received two awards from major conferences in Australia and New Zealand. 

As an academic she has undertaken teaching in a wide range of subjects in Quantity Surveying/Construction Management cohort, supervised undergraduate dissertations and directly involved in curriculum review for undergraduate degrees. Currently, she is the Editorial Secretary of International Journal of Construction Management. 


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Western Sydney University
  • Bach Of Science (Hons) in Quality Surveying (Degree), University of Moratuwa, Sri Lanka

Keywords

  • Cost-benefit analysis
  • Green buildings
  • Life-cycle analysis
  • Life-cycle costing
  • Sustainable development

Languages

  • Sinhalese (Mother)
  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
120201 Building Construction Management and Project Planning 80
120299 Building not elsewhere classified 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Architecture and Built Environment
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
15/12/2018 - 8/02/2019 Research Assistant The University of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
20/07/2016 - 8/12/2016 Research Assistant Western Sydney University
Australia
25/10/2012 - 25/11/2013 Lecturer University of Moratuwa
Building Economics- Quantity Surveying
Sri Lanka
1/10/2012 - 1/11/2013 Visiting Lecturer College of Quantity Surveying
Sri Lanka

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2012 -  Associate professional Green Building Council of Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
7/09/2016 -  Editorial Secretary International Journal of Construction Management
China
1/12/2014 - 5/06/2015 Quantity Surveyor Arkiteknik International Consulting Engineers
United Arab Emirates
1/12/2012 - 15/10/2013 Quantity Surveyor Northcroft Middle East (Pvt) Ltd
Qatar

Teaching appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/07/2018 - 31/12/2018 Casual Academic Western Sydney University
Australia
1/07/2017 - 31/12/2017 Casual Academic Western Sydney University
Australia
1/07/2016 - 1/12/2016 Teaching Assistant Western Sydney University
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2017 Australasian Joint Research Centre for Building Information Modelling (BIM) Best Paper Award
International conference on Innovation Production and Construction (IPC) 2017

Nomination

Year Award
2012 VidyaJyothi Professor Dayantha S Wijeyesekera Award for the Most Outstanding Graduand of the Year (Nominated)
University of Moratuwa

Prize

Year Award
2016 Highly commended post-graduate student
The 20th Pacific Association on Quantity Surveyors Congress 2016
2012 Prof H.P.S. Caldera memorial award for the best dissertation
University of Moratuwa
2011 University Colours Insignia (Carrom - Women)
University of Moratuwa
2010 University Colours Insignia (Carrom - Women)
University of Moratuwa

Scholarship

Year Award
2015 Discovery Postgraduate Research Award
Western Sydney University
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Illankoon IMCS, Tam VWY, Le KN, Karimipour H, 'Chapter 1 - Introduction', Sustainable Construction Technologies : Life-cycle Assessment, Butterworth-Heinemann, United Kingdom 1-28 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-811749-1.00001-8

Journal article (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Tam VWY, Le KN, Tran CNN, Illankoon IMCS, 'A review on international ecological legislation on energy consumption: greenhouse gas emission management', International Journal of Construction Management, (2019)

© 2019, © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. One of several reasons that lead to global warming appears to be due to the large contribution of green... [more]

© 2019, © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. One of several reasons that lead to global warming appears to be due to the large contribution of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) contributes about 39% of global GHG emissions. Although OECD already has a legal environmental framework for its members, the regulations is still based on its members self-awareness rather than mandatory. Simultaneously, each country also has its own legal system for the protection and preservation of the environment. Consequently, the unification of the environmental law system for the whole organization is needed to reduce anthropogenic GHG emissions. The paper reviews international legal and regulation system of ten countries in OECD that have the largest amount of GHG emissions till 2014. Finally based on the analysis, the paper provides recommendations for improving environmental mandatory regulations for the organization.

DOI 10.1080/15623599.2019.1576259
2018 Ding Z, Fan Z, Tam VWY, Bian Y, Li S, Illankoon IMCS, Moon S, 'Green building evaluation system implementation', BUILDING AND ENVIRONMENT, 133 32-40 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.buildenv.2018.02.012
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
2018 Illankoon IMCS, Tam VWY, Le KN, Wang JY, 'Life cycle costing for obtaining concrete credits in green star rating system in Australia', JOURNAL OF CLEANER PRODUCTION, 172 4212-4219 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.11.202
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2018 Tam VWY, Le KN, Wang JY, Illankoon IMCS, 'Practitioners Recycling Attitude and Behaviour in the Australian Construction Industry', SUSTAINABILITY, 10 (2018)
DOI 10.3390/su10041212
2017 Tam VWY, Senaratne S, Le KN, Shen LY, Perica J, Illankoon IMCS, 'Life-cycle cost analysis of green-building implementation using timber applications', Journal of Cleaner Production, 147 458-469 (2017)

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Green buildings are gaining popularity in Australia with the applications of Green Star rating scheme. However, the credit for using timber materials in the ra... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Green buildings are gaining popularity in Australia with the applications of Green Star rating scheme. However, the credit for using timber materials in the rating scheme, while timber being a significantly used material in the fast growing residential construction industry, does not adequately guide designers and builders on the selection of the best timber types for residential applications from the life cycle perspective. This research presents the analysis on the life cycle cost of timber materials in their various applications for residential buildings in Australia and thereby provides guidance on how to best meet the requirement set out in the timber credit in the Green Start rating scheme. Structured interviews were used to collect the data on the cost of timber materials in their lifetime from builders, tradesmen and other residential construction professionals. Three sets of cost information were received under each application, for the individual timber species against three conditions (low, medium and extreme weather) with reference to residential buildings. Based on life cycle cost analysis results, the most suitable timbers for different applications are recommended.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.01.128
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13
2017 Illankoon IMCS, Tam VWY, Le KN, Shen L, 'Key credit criteria among international green building rating tools', Journal of Cleaner Production, 164 209-220 (2017)

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd The construction industry has a significant contribution towards numerous adverse environmental impacts. Therefore, green building concept has gained wide reco... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd The construction industry has a significant contribution towards numerous adverse environmental impacts. Therefore, green building concept has gained wide recognition. In line with this, numerous international green building rating tools have been developed providing a yardstick for measuring green building performance. These rating tools have different credit criteria for evaluating the green building performance. According to the existing literature, there are many researches comparing different green building rating tools on specific credit criteria such as ¿Energy¿. However, there is a clear lack of research on establishing a baseline to develop new green building rating tools and to evaluate existing green building rating tools. Therefore, this research aims to establish key credit criteria based on an extensive literature study and evaluate these criteria based on widely used eight green building rating tools. The comparison analysis is based on a quantitative measure, namely, a normalised score, which is obtained through allocating credit points of selected green building rating tools to the established key credit criteria. The comparison result is presented with radar diagrams and bar charts. This research established seven key credit criteria for these rating tools which are namely (1) Site, (2) Energy, (3) Water, (4) Indoor Environment Quality (IEQ), (5) Material, (6) Waste and pollution, and (7) Management. It is found that ¿Energy¿ criterion is the most widely considered key credit criteria and then followed by ¿IEQ¿ and ¿Water¿ criteria. Apart from that, credit criteria such as ¿Triple bottom line reporting¿, ¿Education and awareness¿, ¿Economic aspects relating to various costs¿, ¿Sustainable designing and planning¿ and ¿Stakeholder relations¿ are identified as possible credit criteria which can be included in developing the rating tools in future. These key credit criteria can be adopted as a baseline to develop new green building rating tools, and it provides fruitful results to develop the existing tools further.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.06.206
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 25
2017 Illankoon IMCS, Tam VWY, Le KN, 'Environmental, Economic, and Social Parameters in International Green Building Rating Tools', Journal of Professional Issues in Engineering Education and Practice, 143 (2017)

© 2016 American Society of Civil Engineers. The concept of sustainability is regarded to be threefold: environmental, economic, and social. This is usually identified as the tripl... [more]

© 2016 American Society of Civil Engineers. The concept of sustainability is regarded to be threefold: environmental, economic, and social. This is usually identified as the triple bottom line of sustainability and is often represented by three intertwined circles. Therefore, for a construction to be sustainable, it should be environmentally, economically, and socially sustainable. However, the extent to which green building rating tools evaluate the three pillars of sustainability is questionable. This research aims to analyze the effectiveness of eight international green building rating tools in evaluating environmental, economic, and social sustainability in buildings. The credit points of each rating tool was initially categorized based on the related category of sustainability and a comparison analysis was carried out based on a normalized score. Finally, the comparison result is presented with a radar diagram. Further, three case study buildings were also analyzed based on the credit points achieved. Accordingly, environmental sustainability is widely considered in green building rating tools while economic sustainability is rarely evaluated. Further, social sustainability is evaluated in all the green building rating tools, which would approximately amount to 20% of the credit points allocated by each rating tool.

DOI 10.1061/(ASCE)EI.1943-5541.0000313
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
2017 Tam VWY, Le KN, Zeng SX, Wang X, Illankoon IMCS, 'Regenerative practice of using photovoltaic solar systems for residential dwellings: An empirical study in Australia', Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 75 1-10 (2017)

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Solar electricity that is produced from photovoltaic solar systems has the potential to deliver clean sustainable energy. Positive steps are being undertaken t... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Solar electricity that is produced from photovoltaic solar systems has the potential to deliver clean sustainable energy. Positive steps are being undertaken to minimise greenhouse gas emissions in Australia and photovoltaic solar systems are contributing towards sustainability. The current amount of installed photovoltaic solar systems cannot address the global warming issues in whole, however renewable energy production is contributing towards minimising carbon emissions. One of the main concerns for the residential householders is the economic issue on the use of photovoltaic solar systems. This paper examines life cycle cost effectiveness in using photovoltaic solar systems with capacities ranging from 1.5¿kW to 5¿kW in relation to the number of occupants and consumption for residential dwellings over a 25-year period. Eight major cities in Australia, including Sydney, Canberra, Melbourne, Brisbane, Hobart, Adelaide, Darwin and Perth, are investigated. Life cycle cost comparisons among different types of electricity grid connected systems, including a gross-feed-in-tariff (GFIT) scheme, a net-feed-in-tariff (NFIT) scheme and a buy-back scheme, are also explored. It is found that all major cities can receive life cycle cost saving in installing photovoltaic solar systems in their residential dwellings. The life cycle cost saving is between 273 and 53,021 and the percentage of cost saving is between 0.35% and 123.83% in a 15-year period. It appears that the GFIT and NFIT schemes offer better benefits than the buy-back scheme in installing photovoltaic solar systems. It is also found that the higher the capacity of the photovoltaic solar systems, the higher the life cycle cost saving can be received. This paper contributes to prove the cost effectiveness of using photovoltaic solar systems with the example from Australian residential dwellings.

DOI 10.1016/j.rser.2016.10.040
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Gan Y, Shen L, Chen J, Tam VWY, Tan Y, Illankoon IMCS, 'Critical factors affecting the quality of industrialized building system projects in China', Sustainability (Switzerland), 9 (2017)

© 2017 by the author. Whilst the benefits of applying an industrialized building system (IBS) have been well recognized globally in the construction industry, the application of I... [more]

© 2017 by the author. Whilst the benefits of applying an industrialized building system (IBS) have been well recognized globally in the construction industry, the application of IBS is particularly limited in developing countries such as China, and quality is considered one of the key issues affecting its application. This paper identifies a number of the key quality factors which present barriers to the promotion of IBS within the context of the Chinese construction industry. These include key factors such as "Inaccurate design of the connecting points between core components", "Lack of design norms and standards for IBS components", "Lack of quality criteria for IBS components", "Lack of production norms and standards for IBS components", "Lack of quality management system in production process", and "Lack of technical guidelines for the construction of IBS projects". The data used for analysis are derived from a comprehensive practical survey. The validity of the data is examined by using a statistical method. The findings from the study provide valuable references for formulating effective measures to mitigate the negative effects of these quality factors on IBS application in China, thereby ensuring that practice of the IBS system can be further developed within the country.

DOI 10.3390/su9020216
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Illankoon IMCS, Tam VWY, Le KN, Wang X, Wang J, 'Optimal roofing solutions for Australian green buildings: a life-cycle cost perspective', Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Engineering Sustainability, 1-12
DOI 10.1680/jensu.17.00064
Show 7 more journal articles

Conference (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Illankoon IMCS, Tam VWY, Le KN, Weerakoon SV, 'Life-cycle cost model for green star office buildings in Australia', Smart Innovation, Systems and Technologies (2019)

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019. The green building is a widely discussed topic worldwide as a solution to increasing adverse impacts on the environment. The paradigm shift ... [more]

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019. The green building is a widely discussed topic worldwide as a solution to increasing adverse impacts on the environment. The paradigm shift from conventional to green buildings is expected to yield environmental, social, and economic benefits. However, green building implementation is adversely affected by initial cost premiums. Therefore, there is a clear need to analyse the initial stages of green building development regarding life-cycle impacts, considering massive savings in energy, water, and other resources. Although it may be cheaper to select inappropriate technologies during the initial decision-making stages, more importantly, this may preclude life-cycle savings and the desired outcomes of green buildings. In order to aid the initial decision-makers with the selection of credit points considering the life-cycle costs of green buildings, this research develops a life-cycle cost model that incorporates developer constraints while maximising the number of credit points achieved when using the Green Star Australia environmental rating system. The model identified green building credits with cost savings such as the use of photovoltaic panels, which are ignored during the initial stages owing to high initial costs. Certain inter-dependent credits with lower life-cycle costs have not yet been considered in green building implementation.

DOI 10.1007/978-3-030-04293-6_19
2018 Illankoon IMCS, Tam VWY, Le KN, 'Life cycle costing for insulated pitched roof structures', Proceedings of the 21st International Symposium on Advancement of Construction Management and Real Estate, 2016 (2018)
DOI 10.1007/978-981-10-6190-5_88
2017 Chong HY, Tam VWY, Lai WC, Sutrisna M, Wang X, Illankoon IMCS, 'Cost implications for certified Green Building Index buildings', Proceedings of Institution of Civil Engineers: Waste and Resource Management (2017)

The impact of worsening global weather conditions has led to a growing awareness of the importance of sustainability in the global context, including in Malaysia. As a consequence... [more]

The impact of worsening global weather conditions has led to a growing awareness of the importance of sustainability in the global context, including in Malaysia. As a consequence, the Green Building Index rating tool was adopted in Malaysia from 2009 as a yardstick to guide the green buildings. The research aims to identify the initial cost premium for a residential green building to achieve certified green status with the use of basic green options. The primary data were mainly collected from bills of quantities, semi-structured discussions with project personnel, cost experts and suppliers. Finally, a sensitivity analysis is also carried out to analyse the impact of incremental costs to the changes in prices of green material. The findings show an incremental cost of 2·2% of the contract sum to develop a certified residential green building with basic green options. The research provides cost guidelines about the actual premium needed to embark on green building projects. The outcomes of this research can support the decisions of the developer to promote a greener-built environment.

DOI 10.1680/jwarm.16.00019
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 13
China 12
Korea, Republic of 2
Hong Kong 1
Malaysia 1
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Dr Chethana Illankoon

Position

Associate Lecturer
School of Architecture and Built Environment
Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment

Contact Details

Email chethana.illankoon@newcastle.edu.au

Office

Room AG07
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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