Ms Carol Hills

Conjoint Lecturer

School of Health Sciences (Occupational Therapy)

Career Summary

Biography

Caroline qualified as an occupational therapist in London, England in 1981. After many years as a practitioner and manager, Caroline completed an honours degree in Health Studies (Occupational Therapy) in the UK. Moving to Ireland in 2001, Caroline continued as a community therapist and a manager, completing a Masters (1st class) in rehabilitation studies from University College Dublin. Caroline moved to Australia in 2009 as a lecturer in Occupational Therapy at the University of Newcastle. Caroline completed her post graduate certificate in tertiary education and registered for her PhD in 2011. The title of her PhD is 'The 21st century learner in occupational therapy: Developing competence in practice education. Caroline has published on practice education and clinical reasoning.

Research Expertise
Caroline is a PhD candidate with the University of Newcastle Australia. The title of her research is xxxx. Caroline has also supervised honours students on practice education for 6 health professions

Teaching Expertise
Caroline teaches second year occupational therapy students, focusing on physical disability, acute and community care, rehabilitation, health promotion and assistive technology including wheelchairs and seating. Carol prepares leads on practice education in the program.

Administrative Expertise
From 2009- 2011 Caroline co-ordinated the following courses: With the new revised occupational therapy program Caroline co-ordinates the following courses Caroline is chair of the Practice Education Development Group which is made up of the practice education administrator, students, practice educators and occupational therapy managers.

Collaborations
Primary research collaborations are within the School of Health Sciences at the University of Newcastle, Australia. Caroline has three PhD supervisors from Occupational Therapy, Radiation Therapy and Occupational Health and Safety. Interdisciplinary collaboration includes delivering an annual suite of courses for practice educators from 6 health disciplines. Interdisciplinary research in practice education has also been completed (Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy, Nutrition and Dietetics, Medical Radiation Sciences). Caroline also has collaborated with A/Professor Natasha Lannin and Professor Anne Cusick( University of Wollongong) on stroke rehabilitation research. Caroline is involved in inter-university research between University of Newcastle and University of South Australia. Caroline is part of a Project Leadership Team, delivering on the creation of a student website. This is funded by an Office of Learning and Teaching Grant. Collaborations exist between the Project Leadership Team and four other universities (James Cook University, University of Western Sydney, Charles Sturt University and La Trobe University). The project mentor is Professor David Boud (University of Technology, Sydney).


Qualifications

  • Master of Science (Rehabilitation), University College, Dublin - Ireland
  • Diploma of Occupational Therapy, College of Occupational Therapists - London
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours)(Hlth Stud-Occ Ther), Anatomical Society of Australia and New Zealand
  • Graduate Certificate Practice of Tertiary Teaching, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Assessment
  • Assistive technology
  • Community occupational therapy
  • Competence
  • Generation Y
  • Physical disability
  • Practice education
  • Practice reasoning
  • Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Stroke
  • Wheelchairs and seating

Languages

  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110321 Rehabilitation and Therapy (excl. Physiotherapy) 40
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 30
119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified 30
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


(36 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Lannin NA, Cusick A, Hills C, Kinnear B, Vogel K, Matthews K, Bowring G, 'Upper limb motor training using a Saebo¿ orthosis is feasible for increasing task-specific practice in hospital after stroke', Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 63 364-372 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia Background/aim: Assistive technologies have the potential to increase the amount of movement practice provided during inpatient stroke rehab... [more]

© 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia Background/aim: Assistive technologies have the potential to increase the amount of movement practice provided during inpatient stroke rehabilitation. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using the Saebo-Flex ¿ device in a subacute stroke setting to increase task-specific practice for people with little or no active hand movement. The secondary aim was to collect preliminary data comparing hand/upper limb function between a control group that received usual rehabilitation and an intervention group that used, in addition, the Saebo-Flex ¿ device. Methods: Nine inpatients (mean three months (median six weeks) post-stroke) participated in this feasibility study conducted in an Australian rehabilitation setting, using a randomised pre-test and post-test design with concealed allocation and blinded outcome assessment. In addition to usual rehabilitation, the intervention group received eight weeks of daily motor training using the Saebo-Flex ¿ device. The control group received usual rehabilitation (task-specific motor training) only. Participants were assessed at baseline (pre-randomisation) and at the end of the eight-week study period. Feasibility was assessed with respect to ease of recruitment, application of the device, compliance with the treatment programme and safety. Secondary outcome measures included the Motor Assessment Scale (upper limb items), Box¿and Block Test, grip strength and the Stroke Impact Scale. Results: Recruitment to the study was very slow because of the low number of patients with little or no active hand movement. Otherwise, the study was feasible in terms of being able to apply the Saebo-Flex ¿ device and compliance with the treatment programme. There were no adverse events, and a greater amount of upper limb rehabilitation was provided to the intervention group. While there were trends in favour of the intervention group, particularly for dexterity, no between-group differences were seen for any of the secondary outcomes. Conclusions: This pilot feasibility study showed that the use of assistive technology, specifically the Saebo-Flex ¿ device, could be successfully used in a sample of stroke patients with little or no active hand movement. However, recruitment to the trial was very slow. The use of the Saebo-Flex TM device had variable results on outcomes, with some positive trends seen in hand function, particularly dexterity.

DOI 10.1111/1440-1630.12330
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Hills C, Ryan S, Smith DR, Warren-Forward H, Levett-Jones T, Lapkin S, 'Occupational therapy students¿ technological skills: Are¿¿generation Y¿ ready for 21st century practice?', Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 63 391-398 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia Background/aim: Technology is becoming increasingly integral to the practice of occupational therapists and part of the everyday lives of cl... [more]

© 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia Background/aim: Technology is becoming increasingly integral to the practice of occupational therapists and part of the everyday lives of clients. ¿Generation Y¿ are purported to be naturally technologically skilled as they have grown up in the digital age. The aim of this study was to explore one cohort of ¿Generation Y¿ occupational therapy students¿ skills and confidence in the use of technologies relevant to contemporary practice. Methods: A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect data from a cohort of 274 students enrolled in an Australian undergraduate occupational therapy programme. Results: A total of 173 (63%) students returned the survey. Those born prior to 1982 were removed from the data. This left 155 (56%) ¿Generation Y¿ participants. Not all participants reported to be skilled in everyday technologies although most reported to be skilled in word, Internet and mobile technologies. Many reported a lack of skills in Web 2.0 (collaboration and sharing) technologies, creating and using media and gaming, as well as a lack of confidence in technologies relevant to practice, including assistive technology, specialist devices, specialist software and gaming. Conclusions: Overall, the results suggested that this group of ¿Generation Y¿ students were not universally skilled in all areas of technology relevant to practice but appear to be skilled in technologies they use regularly. Recommendations are therefore made with view to integrating social networking, gaming, media sharing and assistive technology into undergraduate programmes to ensure that graduates have the requisite skills and confidence required for current and future practice.

DOI 10.1111/1440-1630.12308
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Susan Ryan, Helen Warren-Forward, Tracy Levett-Jones
2016 Francis A, Hills C, MacDonald-Wicks L, Johnston C, James D, Surjan Y, Warren-Forward H, 'Characteristics of an ideal practice educator: Perspectives from practice educators in diagnostic radiography, nuclear medicine, nutrition and dietetics, occupational therapy and physiotherapy and radiation therapy', Radiography, 22 287-294 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The College of Radiographers Background Practice education is a compulsory component of health programs with practice educators playing a critical role in the education of... [more]

© 2016 The College of Radiographers Background Practice education is a compulsory component of health programs with practice educators playing a critical role in the education of students. Practice educator characteristics may positively or negatively affect student learning in practice settings. This study aimed to identify characteristics of the ideal practice educator that lead to successful practical experiences as perceived by current practice educators working in the Australian context of diagnostic radiography, nuclear medicine, nutrition and dietetics, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and radiation therapy. Methods All practice educators (n = 1063) on the University of Newcastle Practice Educator Database were invited to participate in this prospective, cross-sectional, descriptive study via online link or paper format. Results There was a 52% response rate. The five most valued characteristics were feedback skills, non-judgemental, professionalism, clarity and listening skills. The five least valued characteristics were scholarly activity, respect for students' autonomy, well-prepared, availability and being a role model. Comparisons between disciplines, genders, ages, years in practice and levels of supervisory experience indicated some statistically significant differences, though actual differences were small. Discussion Overall there was a high degree of agreement within and between disciplines on the characteristics of the ideal practice educator. The top five skills could be classed as generic skills and not specific clinical and practice skills, thus formal training and certification schemes may enhance practice educator competence.

DOI 10.1016/j.radi.2016.04.001
Co-authors Daphne James, Helen Warren-Forward, Cath Johnston, Lesley Wicks, Yolanda Surjan
2016 Hills C, Levett-Jones T, Warren-Forward H, Lapkin S, 'Generation Y occupational therapy students' views and preferences about the provision of feedback during clinical practice education', FOCUS ON HEALTH PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION-A MULTIDISCIPLINARY JOURNAL, 17 32-47 (2016) [C1]
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Helen Warren-Forward
2016 Perram A, Hills C, Johnston C, MacDonald-Wicks L, Surjan Y, James D, Warren-Forward H, 'Characteristics of an ideal practice educator: Perspectives from undergraduate students in diagnostic radiography, nuclear medicine, nutrition and dietetics, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and radiation therapy', Radiography, 22 295-305 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The College of Radiographers Background Practice education is a core component of undergraduate health programs, with the characteristics of the practice educator reported... [more]

© 2016 The College of Radiographers Background Practice education is a core component of undergraduate health programs, with the characteristics of the practice educator reported to have an influence on student experience during practical. This study analyses Australian student perceptions from six allied health professional undergraduate programs, to identify the characteristics of the ideal practice educator leading to successful placement experiences. Methods An existing survey developed for medical students was modified to incorporate both quantitative and qualitative responses. Participants included all students enrolled in six undergraduate health professions in the School of Health Sciences at the University of Newcastle, Australia (n = 1485). Students were invited to complete the survey via hard copy or online. Results There was a 54% response rate. The most valued characteristics were non-judgemental, clarity and feedback. The three least valued characteristics were scholarly activity, role model and practices evidence base practice. Students identified the importance of their relationship (respectful, inspirational and supportive) with the practice educator as being fundamental to a productive placement. Conclusion The characteristics identified by respondents were common to all six professions, with little differences between gender, year of program or number of placements completed. This study suggests that the attitude of the practice educator towards the student is one of the key factors that underpin the success of practice experience across allied health professions.

DOI 10.1016/j.radi.2016.04.007
Co-authors Lesley Wicks, Yolanda Surjan, Helen Warren-Forward, Cath Johnston, Daphne James
2016 Hills C, Levett-Jones T, Warren-Forward H, Lapkin S, 'Teaching and learning preferences of ¿Generation Y¿ occupational therapy students in practice education', International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, 23 371-379 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 MA Healthcare Ltd. Background/Aims: Practice education is integral to health professional curricula. There is emerging evidence that student generational attributes may be... [more]

© 2016 MA Healthcare Ltd. Background/Aims: Practice education is integral to health professional curricula. There is emerging evidence that student generational attributes may be impacting on practice education. Students born between 1982 and 2000, termed ¿Generation Y¿, are said to have a different outlook on learning to those students from other generational groups. However, there is little research from student perspectives to investigate these claims. This study aimed to identify ¿Generation Y¿ occupational therapy students¿ preferred teaching and learning approaches in practice education. Methods: Using a qualitative descriptive approach and purposive sampling, 22 semi-structured interviews were undertaken with third and fourth year ¿Generation Y¿ occupational therapy students from one Australian university. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically. Findings: Four themes emerged from the data: developing practice skills and confidence; essential communication; valued educational approaches; and the supervisory relationship and the team. Conclusion: Findings relate to ¿Generation Y¿ characteristics. Practice educators may need to consider that these students have unique learning preferences. Students prefer ¿doing¿ to observing, they want to be given clear expectations and responsibility for their own work tasks, they want to work in a team, they prefer to self-evaluate prior to feedback and access to the internet is essential for their learning.

DOI 10.12968/IJTR.2016.23.8.371
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones, Helen Warren-Forward
2015 Hills C, Jones LT, Forward WH, Ryan S, 'A review of the literature on 'Generation Y'', BRITISH JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Helen Warren-Forward, Susan Ryan, Tracy Levett-Jones
2015 Hills C, Levett-Jones T, Lapkin S, Boshoff K, Jewell K, ''Generation Y' students' preference for lecture and on-line learning. A systematic review', BRITISH JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Levett-Jones
2013 Hills C, Ryan S, Warren-Forward H, Smith DR, 'Managing "Generation Y' occupational therapists: Optimising their potential', AUSTRALIAN OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY JOURNAL, 60 267-275 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1440-1630.12043
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Susan Ryan, Helen Warren-Forward
2013 Hills C, Boshoff K, Jewell K, 'Preferred teaching and learning approaches of students considered ¿Generation Y¿ in health professions pre registration education: A comprehensive systematic review protocol.', The JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports, , n. 5, p. 140 -156, jun. 2013, [S.l.], v. 11 140-156 (2013) [C3]
2013 Lannin NA, Hills C, Cusick A, Kinnear B, Bowring G, 'Increasing practice after stroke to optimise upper limb rehabilitation: a phase II randomised trial', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2013) [E3]
2013 Ryan S, Studdert CL, Sijpkes P, Hills C, Nguyen K, 'Creating student-focussed, web-learning resources to support the development of and provide evidence of occupational therapy students' graduating competencies', Australian Government Office of Learning and Teaching, 88 (2013) [R1]
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2012 Ryan SE, Hills CM, 'Context and how it influences our professional thinking', Clinical Reasoning in Occupational Therapy: Controversies in Practice, Blackwell Publishing, Oxford 63-76 (2012) [B2]
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2012 Hills CM, Ryan SE, Smith DR, Warren-Forward H, 'The impact of Generation Y' occupational therapy students on practice education', Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 59 156-163 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Helen Warren-Forward, Susan Ryan
2012 Smith DR, Hills CM, Ryan SE, 'Tobacco use among occupational therapy students', British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 75 349 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2012 Ryan SE, Hills CM, Nguyen K, Studdert CL, 'Evidencing graduating competency: Student and practice educator views on resources required while on placement', Abstracts. 9th COTEC Congress of Occupational Therapy (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2012 Ryan SE, Hills CM, Nguyen K, Studdert CL, 'Researching learners' needs for modifying a curriculum', Abstracts. 9th COTEC Congress of Occupational Therapy (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2012 Ryan SE, Studdert CL, Nguyen K, Hills CM, 'Understanding professional reasoning in the continuum of practice', Abstracts. 9th COTEC Congress of Occupational Therapy (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2012 Ryan SE, Studdert CL, Hills CM, Nguyen K, 'Investigating and developing an occupational therapy student-focused website to progress and evidence competency', Abstracts. 9th COTEC Congress of Occupational Therapy (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2012 Hills CM, Ryan SE, Nguyen K, Studdert CL, 'Development of a web based framework to evidence graduating competency for Australian Occupational Therapy students', Conference Abstracts. 2012 OT State Conference (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2012 Hills CM, 'Changing the way students evidence their competencies', Occupational Therapy Australia 2012 NSW Forum (2012) [E3]
2012 Hills CM, Ryan SE, Studdert CL, Nguyen K, 'Evidencing graduating competency in occupational therapy: Resources and thresholds to evidence competence', Threshold Concepts. From Personal Practice to Communities of Practice (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2012 Studdert CL, Ryan SE, Hills CM, Nguyen K, 'Creating an occupational therapy student-centred website and e-portfolio using a threshold level framework to evidence competence and professional development', Threshold Concepts: From Personal Practice to Communities of Practice (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2012 Studdert CL, Ryan SE, Hills CM, Nguyen K, 'Creating an occupational therapy student-centred website to support and evidence competency development', British Journal of Occupational Therapy (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2012 Francis A, Hills CM, Buxton AJ, MacDonald-Wicks LK, Johnston CL, 'Characteristics of an ideal practice educator: Perspectives from five health professions', British Journal of Occupational Therapy (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Lesley Wicks, Cath Johnston
2012 Ryan SE, Hills CM, Studdert CL, Nguyen K, 'The challenge of combining competencies and holistic practice in a web-portal', British Journal of Occupational Therapy (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2012 Nguyen K, Studdert CL, Ryan SE, Hills CM, 'Converting graduating competencies into a holistic practice framework for occupational therapy students', ANZAHPE 2012. Conference Proceedings & Programme (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2011 Hills CM, Ryan SE, 'Practice educators' views of 'generation Y' students from Australia', The British Journal of Occupational Therapy: 2011 Conference Abstract Supplement (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2011 Ryan SE, Hills CM, Buxton AJ, 'Redesigning learning sessions and assignments for 'Generation Y' students', The British Journal of Occupational Therapy: 2011 Conference Abstract Supplement (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2011 Ryan SE, Hills CM, Buxton AJ, Smith DR, 'Generation 'Y' research: Informing & changing educational practices', Proceedings of the 24th Occupational Therapy Australia National Conference (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2011 Ryan SE, Hills CM, Buxton AJ, 'Generation 'Y' students on practice: Practice educators' views', Proceedings of the 24th Occupational Therapy Australia National Conference (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2011 Ryan SE, Hills CM, Buxton AJ, 'Generation 'Y's in peer-assisted learning: Developing creative thinking', Proceedings of the 24th Occupational Therapy Australia National Conference (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2010 Ryan SE, Hills CM, 'As complex as a rubrik cube: Generation 'Y' as occupational therapy students in Australia', 15th World Federation of Occupational Therapists Conference (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2010 Ryan SE, Hills CM, 'Work, study or play? The balance of life phenomenon', College of Occupational Therapists Annual Conference 2010 (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2010 Ryan SE, Hills CM, 'The 'Generation Y' phenomenon: professional lessons learnt and global implications', College of Occupational Therapists Annual Conference 2010 (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Susan Ryan
2009 Ryan SE, Hills CM, McMullen-Roach S, 'Creating professional identity: Initiating and participating with Gen 'Y' occupational therapy students', Inaugural Conference for OT Australia NSW-ACT 2009: Conference Abstract Handbook (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Susan Ryan
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 7
Total funding $304,479

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20132 grants / $66,500

Enhancing and expanding quality clinical supervision through the dissemination and evaluation of a student-focussed, competency-based website$65,000

Funding body: HETI (Health Education and Training Institute)

Funding body HETI (Health Education and Training Institute)
Project Team Professor Susan Ryan, Mrs Catherine Studdert, Mr Kim Nguyen, Ms Carol Hills, Mr Paul Sijpkes, Dr Carol McKinstry, Associate Professor Michael Curtin, Ms Lee Zakrzewski, Professor Matthew Yau, Ms Alicia Harris, Ms Karen Maurer, Ms Natasha Atkinson
Scheme NSW ICTN Local Project Fund
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1201153
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

AOTI Annual Conference 2013, Mullingar, Co, Westmeath, Ireland, 19 - 20 April 2013$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Ms Carol Hills
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300536
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20122 grants / $21,479

Increasing practice after stroke to optimise upper limb rehabilitation: A phase II trial$19,979

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding body National Stroke Foundation
Project Team Ms Carol Hills, Dr Natasha Lannin, Professor Anne Cusick
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1100913
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

COT, Annual Congress, 36th Annual Conference, Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre, (SECC), Glasgow, UK, 12 - 14 June 2012$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Ms Carol Hills
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200582
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20112 grants / $215,000

Creating student-focussed, web-learning resources to support the development of and provide evidence of occupational therapy students' graduation competencies$214,000

Funding body: Australian Learning and Teaching Council

Funding body Australian Learning and Teaching Council
Project Team Professor Susan Ryan, Ms Carol Hills, Mr Kim Nguyen
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100023
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

College of Occupational Therapists 35th Annual Conference 2011, Brighton Centre, Brighton, Sussex, UK, 28 June - 1 July 2011$1,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Ms Carol Hills
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100143
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20101 grants / $1,500

World Congress of Occupational Therapists, Santiago, Chile, 3-7 May 2010$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Ms Carol Hills
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000094
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Ms Carol Hills

Position

Conjoint Lecturer
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Occupational Therapy

Contact Details

Email caroline.hills@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 6508

Office

Room HA25
Building Hunter Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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