Dr Anitha Kunhikrishnan

Research Associate

Global Centre for Environmental Remediation

Career Summary

Biography

Anitha holds a Bachelor’s degree in Microbiology and a Master’s in Biotechnology. She graduated with a PhD in Environmental Remediation and Public Health from the University of South Australia in 2011. Her PhD focussed on heavy metal dynamics in recycled water irrigated soils. As part of her PhD program, she undertook a number of bioavailability/ecotoxicity studies using higher plants, earthworms and microorganisms. Following PhD, she worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute of Agricultural Science in South Korea until 2016. In Korea, her research work primarily involved characterisation of metal contaminated soils and water sources for plant and microbial studies, and ecotoxicity tests using soil and aquatic biota. She also conducted field studies on arsenic uptake and speciation in rice grown in contaminated upland and paddy soils.

After a brief stint at the NSW Department of Industry as a Research Officer, Anitha joined the University of Newcastle in 2017. Her research interests include wastewater reuse and management, nutrient recovery from wastes, soil-plant-microbe interactions and remediation of trace elements in soil. Currently, she is involved in a Soil CRC funded project focussing on recovery of nutrients from waste streams using cost-effective techniques.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of South Australia

Keywords

  • Nutrient recovery
  • Trace elements
  • Waste utilisation
  • Wastewater reuse and management

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
050304 Soil Chemistry (excl. Carbon Sequestration Science) 20
090703 Environmental Technologies 40
039901 Environmental Chemistry (incl. Atmospheric Chemistry) 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Associate University of Newcastle
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (13 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Singh BP, Setia R, Weismeier M, Kunhikrishnan A, 'Agricultural management practices and soil organic carbon storage', Soil Carbon Storage: Modulators, Management and Modelling, Elsevier Science Publishing Co Inc, U.S. 207-244 (2018)
2017 Kunhikrishnan A, Park JH, Bolan SS, Naidu R, Bolan N, 'Phosphorus-induced (im)mobilization of heavy metal(loid)s in soil', Phosphate in Soils: Interaction with Micronutrients, Radionuclides and Heavy Metals, CRC Press, Boca Raton (2017)
2017 Kunhikrishnan A, Bolan NS, Chowdhury S, Park J, Kim HS, Choppala G, et al., 'Dynamics of heavy metal(loid)s in mine soils', Spoil to Soil: Mine Site Rehabilitation and Revegetation, CRC press, Boca Raton 259-288 (2017)
2017 Kunhikrishnan A, Choppala G, Seshadri B, Park JH, Mbene K, Yan Y, Bolan NS, 'Biotransformation of heavy metal(loid)s in relation to the remediation of contaminated soils', Handbook of Metal-Microbe Interactions and Bioremediation 67-86 (2017)

© 2017 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. The dynamics of trace elements in soils is dependent on both their physicochemical interactions with inorganic and organic soil consti... [more]

© 2017 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. The dynamics of trace elements in soils is dependent on both their physicochemical interactions with inorganic and organic soil constituents and their biological interactions linked to the microbial activities of soil-plant systems. Microorganisms control the transformation (microbial or biotransformation) of trace elements by several mechanisms that include oxidation, reduction, methylation, demethylation, complex formation, and biosorption. Microbial transformation plays a major role in the behavior and fate of toxic elements, especially arsenic (As), chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), and selenium (Se) in soils and sediments. Biotransformation processes can alter the speciation and redox state of these elements and hence control their solubility and subsequent mobility. These processes play an important role in the bioavailability, mobility, ecotoxicity, and environmental health of these trace elements. A greater understanding of biotransformation processes is necessary to efficiently manage and utilize them for contaminant removal and to develop in situ bioremediation technologies. In this chapter, the key microbial transformation processes, including biosorption, redox reactions, and methylation/demethylation reactions controlling the fate and behavior of As, Cr, Hg, and Se, are addressed. The factors affecting these processes in relation to the bioavailability and remediation of trace elements in the environment are also examined, and possible future research directions are recommended.

DOI 10.1201/9781315153353
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Balaji Seshadri
2017 Kumarathilaka P, Wijesekara H, Bolan N, Kunhikrishnan A, Vithanage M, 'Phytoremediation of landfill leachates', Phytoremediation: Management of Environmental Contaminants, Volume 5, Springer, Cham, Switzerland 439-467 (2017) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-52381-1_17
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2016 Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, Choppala G, Shankar S, Thangarajan R, Bolan N, 'Redox reactions of heavy metal(loid)s in soils and sediments in relation to bioavailability and remediation', Trace Elements in Waterlogged Soils and Sediments, CRC Press, Boca Raton (2016)
2016 Choppala G, Bolan N, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, Bush R, 'Reduction induced immobilization of chromium and its bioavailability in soils and sediments', Trace Elements in Waterlogged Soils and Sediments, CRC Press, Boca Raton (2016)
2016 Mandal S, Kunhikrishnan A, Bolan NS, Wijesekara H, Naidu R, 'Application of Biochar Produced From Biowaste Materials for Environmental Protection and Sustainable Agriculture Production', Environmental Materials and Waste: Resource Recovery and Pollution Prevention, Academic Press, London 73-89 (2016) [B1]
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-803837-6.00004-4
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2016 Wijesekara H, Bolan NS, Kumarathilaka P, Geekiyanage N, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, et al., 'Biosolids Enhance Mine Site Rehabilitation and Revegetation', Environmental Materials and Waste: Resource Recovery and Pollution Prevention, Elsevier, Amerstand, Netherlands 45-71 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-803837-6.00003-2
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Balaji Seshadri
2015 Thangarajan R, Bolan N, Mandal S, Kunhikrishnan A, Choppala G, Karunanithi R, Qi F, 'Biochar for inorganic contaminant Management in Soil', Biochar Production, Characterization, and Applications, CRC Press, Boca Raton (2015)
2015 Kunhikrishnan A, Bibi I, Bolan N, Seshadri B, Choppala G, Niazi NK, et al., 'Biochar for inorganic contaminant management in waste and wastewater', Biochar Production, Characterization, and Applications, CRC Press, Boca Raton (2015)
2015 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Kunhikrishnan A, Chowdhury S, Thangarajan R, Chuasavathi T, 'Recycled water irrigation in Australia', Environmental Sustainability: Role of Green Technologies, Springer, New Delhi, India 39-48 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/978-81-322-2056-5_2
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan
2012 Thangarajan R, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Naidu R, 'Greenhouse gas emission from wastewater irrigated soils', 225-236 (2012)

With increasing demand for world water supply, wastewater reuse is a great opportunity to meet the water need, especially for agricultural and industrial development. Wastewater o... [more]

With increasing demand for world water supply, wastewater reuse is a great opportunity to meet the water need, especially for agricultural and industrial development. Wastewater originates from many sources and hence its composition differs from origin and treatment processes. Wastewater rich in organic matter acts as a soil conditioner, thereby enhancing soil health. Wastewater also acts as a source of nutrient input in agriculture which in turn can reduce, or even eliminate the need for commercial fertilisers. However, wastewater usage in agriculture poses several threats like eutrophication, salinity, toxic chemicals (heavy metal(loids), pesticides), pathogen contamination, and most notably, nutrient leaching, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. These threats affect public health, soil and ground water resources, environment, crop quality, ecological, and property values. Biological degradation of the organic matter present in wastewater is considered one of the anthropogenic sources of major GHGs (carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O), and methane (CH4). In this paper, an overview of various sources of wastewater, effects of wastewater application on GHG emission from soil, and the strategies to mitigate wastewater-induced GHG emission from soils is presented. © 2012 WIT Press.

DOI 10.2495/SI120191
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
Show 10 more chapters

Journal article (53 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Choppala G, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, Park JH, Bush R, Bolan N, 'Comparative sorption of chromium species as influenced by pH, surface charge and organic matter content in contaminated soils', Journal of Geochemical Exploration, 184 255-260 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.gexplo.2016.07.012
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Richard Bush, Nanthi Bolan, Balaji Seshadri
2018 Wijesekara H, Bolan N, Bradney L, Obadamudalige N, Seshadri B, Kunhikrishnan A, et al., 'Trace element dynamics of biosolids-derived microbeads', Chemosphere, 199 331-339 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.01.166
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Raja Dharmarajan, Balaji Seshadri
2018 Thangarajan R, Bolan NS, Kunhikrishnan A, Wijesekara H, Xu Y, Tsang DCW, et al., 'The potential value of biochar in the mitigation of gaseous emission of nitrogen', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 612 257-268 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.08.242
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2018 Kim HS, Kim KR, Lee SH, Kunhikrishnan A, Kim WI, Kim KH, 'Effect of gypsum on exchangeable sodium percentage and electrical conductivity in the Daeho reclaimed tidal land soil in Korea¿a field scale study', Journal of Soils and Sediments, 18 336-341 (2018)

© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: A reclaimed tidal land along the shore has poor soil properties such as high exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), and electric... [more]

© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: A reclaimed tidal land along the shore has poor soil properties such as high exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), and electrical conductivity (EC) due to excess sodium (Na) content. Therefore, Na content should be decreased to improve the land productivity, and for this, gypsum has been widely used. The objective of this study was to determine the changes in ESP and EC of the gypsum-treated reclaimed tidal soil in a field scale. Materials and methods: For this, gypsum was applied to Daeho reclaimed tidal land (500¿ha) in Korea for 5¿years (2006 to 2010). The Daeho reclaimed tidal land has been used as reclaimed paddy fields since 1993. The application rate of gypsum was calculated based on exchangeable calcium (Ca) contents and soil cation exchange capacity (CEC) to maintain 60¿% exchangeable calcium percentage (ECP) of CEC in soil and the average amount treated was 1570¿kg¿ha-1¿year-1. The changes in ESP and EC were monitored from 2006 to 2010, and 2013. Results and discussion: The ESP dropped from 80¿% in 2006 to 34¿% in 2013. The EC of the soil was decreased by 73¿%, from 11.5¿dS¿m-1in 2006 to 3.1¿dS¿m-1in 2013. Eventually, it was estimated that the ESP will be lowered below 15¿% in 2023 with continuous treatment of gypsum according to ECP calculation, and EC will be declined to reach at 0.5¿dS¿m-1in 2035, the average EC level of Korean rice paddy. Conclusions: This field scale study evidenced that gypsum application effectively improves the soil properties of reclaimed tidal soil by decreasing ESP and EC.

DOI 10.1007/s11368-016-1446-x
Citations Scopus - 2
2017 Chowdhury S, Thangarajan R, Bolan N, O'Reilly-Wapstra J, Kunhikrishnan A, Naidu R, 'Nitrification potential in the rhizosphere of Australian native vegetation', SOIL RESEARCH, 55 58-69 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/SR16116
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
2017 Bolan S, Kunhikrishnan A, Chowdhury S, Seshadri B, Naidu R, Ok YS, 'Comparative analysis of speciation and bioaccessibility of arsenic in rice grains and complementary medicines', CHEMOSPHERE, 182 433-440 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.04.126
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Balaji Seshadri
2017 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Choppala G, Kunhikrishnan A, Sanderson P, Wang H, et al., 'Potential value of phosphate compounds in enhancing immobilization and reducing bioavailability of mixed heavy metal contaminants in shooting range soil', Chemosphere, 184 197-206 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Shooting range soils contain mixed heavy metal contaminants including lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and zinc (Zn). Phosphate (P) compounds have been used to immobil... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Shooting range soils contain mixed heavy metal contaminants including lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and zinc (Zn). Phosphate (P) compounds have been used to immobilize these metals, particularly Pb, thereby reducing their bioavailability. However, research on immobilization of Pb's co-contaminants showed the relative importance of soluble and insoluble P compounds, which is critical in evaluating the overall success of in situ stabilization practice in the sustainable remediation of mixed heavy metal contaminated soils. Soluble synthetic P fertilizer (diammonium phosphate; DAP) and reactive (Sechura; SPR) and unreactive (Christmas Island; CPR) natural phosphate rocks (PR) were tested for Cd, Pb and Zn immobilization and later their mobility and bioavailability in a shooting range soil. The addition of P compounds resulted in the immobilization of Cd, Pb and Zn by 1.56¿76.2%, 3.21¿83.56%, and 2.31¿74.6%, respectively. The reactive SPR significantly reduced Cd, Pb and Zn leaching while soluble DAP increased their leachate concentrations. The SPR reduced the bioaccumulation of Cd, Pb and Zn in earthworms by 7.13¿23.4% and 14.3¿54.6% in comparison with earthworms in the DAP and control treatment, respectively. Bioaccessible Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations as determined using a simplified bioaccessibility extraction test showed higher long-term stability of P-immobilized Pb and Zn than Cd. The differential effect of P-induced immobilization between P compounds and metals is due to the variation in the solubility characteristics of P compounds and nature of metal phosphate compounds formed. Therefore, Pb and Zn immobilization by P compounds is an effective long-term remediation strategy for mixed heavy metal contaminated soils.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.05.172
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Peter Sanderson, Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan
2017 Kunhikrishnan A, Choppala G, Seshadri B, Wijesekara H, Bolan NS, Mbene K, Kim W-I, 'Impact of wastewater derived dissolved organic carbon on reduction, mobility, and bioavailability of As(V) and Cr(VI) in contaminated soils', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, 186 183-191 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jenvman.2016.08.020
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan
2017 Ashraf A, Bibi I, Niazi NK, Ok YS, Murtaza G, Shahid M, et al., 'Chromium(VI) sorption efficiency of acid-activated banana peel over organo-montmorillonite in aqueous solutions', International Journal of Phytoremediation, 19 605-613 (2017)

© 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. In the present study, we examined sorption of chromate (Cr(VI)) to acid-activated banana peel (AABP) and organo-montmorillonite (O-mont)... [more]

© 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. In the present study, we examined sorption of chromate (Cr(VI)) to acid-activated banana peel (AABP) and organo-montmorillonite (O-mont) as a function of pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration at a sorbent dose of 4 g L -1 and at 20 ± 1°C in aqueous solutions. In sorption edge experiments, maximum Cr(VI) removal was obtained at pH 3 after 2 hours by AABP and O-mont (88% and 69%). Sorption isotherm data showed that the sorption capacity of AABP was higher than O-mont (15.1 vs. 6.67 mg g -1 , respectively, at pH 4). Freundlich and Langmuir models provided the best fits to describe Cr(VI) sorption onto AABP (R 2 = 0.97) and O-mont (R 2 = 0.96). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy elucidated that for AABP mainly the ¿OH, ¿COOH, ¿NH 2 , and for O-mont intercalated amines and ¿OH surface functional groups were involved in Cr(VI) sorption. The scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) analyses, although partly, indicate that the (wt. %) proportion of cations (e.g., Ca, Mg) in AABP decreased after Cr(VI) sorption. This may be due to ion exchange of chromite (Cr(III)) (produced from Cr(VI) reduction) with cationic elements in AABP. Also, Cr(VI) desorption (using phosphate solution) from AABP was lower (29%) than that from O-mont (51%) up to the third regeneration cycle. This bench scale comparative study highlights that the utilization of widely available and low-cost acid-activated biomaterials has a greater potential than organo-clays for Cr(VI) removal in aqueous media. However, future studies are warranted to precisely delineate different mechanisms of Cr(VI) sorption/reduction by acid-activated biomaterials and organo-clays.

DOI 10.1080/15226514.2016.1256372
Citations Scopus - 26
2017 Kim HS, Kim KR, Yang JE, Ok YS, Kim WI, Kunhikrishnan A, Kim KH, 'Amelioration of Horticultural Growing Media Properties Through Rice Hull Biochar Incorporation', Waste and Biomass Valorization, 8 483-492 (2017)

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. The current study was conducted in order to examine the applicability of rice hull derived biochar (BC) to improve the propertie... [more]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. The current study was conducted in order to examine the applicability of rice hull derived biochar (BC) to improve the properties of growing media (GM). Biochar was incorporated into a growing media composed of coir dust, perlite and vermiculite at 0, 1, 2 and 5¿% (w/w). Subsequently, the physicochemical properties of the GM-BC mixtures were determined in the cultivation of kale (Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala) for 25¿days through the observation of the plant growth response. During kale cultivation in the GM-BC mixtures, the leachates were collected and analyzed to determine the changes in nutrient levels due to BC amendment. Application of rice hull-derived BC increased the retention of nutrients in the growing media due to a biochar-induced increase in cation exchange capacity, in addition to the biochar nutrient supply such as potassium and phosphorus. Furthermore, a higher water content of the growing media was observed when BC was used as an amendment, mainly due to the increased proportion of pore space available for water storage. The growth rate of kale was also increased as the biochar incorporation rate was increased. For example, the dry weight of the kale shoots was 150¿% higher when grown in media containing 5¿% GM-BC mixture than with the control growing media (with no biochar). From these results, it can be concluded that the rice hull-derived biochar would be a practically applicable amendment to improve the properties of the growing media.

DOI 10.1007/s12649-016-9588-z
Citations Scopus - 5
2017 Bolan S, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, Choppala G, Naidu R, Bolan NS, et al., 'Sources, distribution, bioavailability, toxicity, and risk assessment of heavy metal(loid)s in complementary medicines', ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, 108 103-118 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2017.08.005
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu, Balaji Seshadri
2016 Chowdhury S, Bolan NS, Seshadri B, Kunhikrishnan A, Wijesekara H, Xu Y, et al., 'Co-composting solid biowastes with alkaline materials to enhance carbon stabilization and revegetation potential', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 23 7099-7110 (2016) [C1]

© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Co-composting biowastes such as manures and biosolids can be used to stabilize carbon (C) without impacting the quality of these biowast... [more]

© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Co-composting biowastes such as manures and biosolids can be used to stabilize carbon (C) without impacting the quality of these biowastes. This study investigated the effect of co-composting biowastes with alkaline materials on C stabilization and monitored the fertilization and revegetation values of these co-composts. The stabilization of C in biowastes (poultry manure and biosolids) was examined by their composting in the presence of various alkaline amendments (lime, fluidized bed boiler ash, flue gas desulphurization gypsum, and red mud) for 6¿months in a controlled environment. The effects of co-composting on the biowastes¿ properties were assessed for different physical C fractions, microbial biomass C, priming effect, potentially mineralizable nitrogen, bioavailable phosphorus, and revegetation of an urban landfill soil. Co-composting biowastes with alkaline materials increased C stabilization, attributed to interaction with alkaline materials, thereby protecting it from microbial decomposition. The co-composted biowastes also increased the fertility of the landfill soil, thereby enhancing its revegetation potential. Stabilization of biowastes using alkaline materials through co-composting maintains their fertilization value in terms of improving plant growth. The co-composted biowastes also contribute to long-term soil C sequestration and reduction of bioavailability of heavy metals.

DOI 10.1007/s11356-015-5411-9
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan
2016 Bolan S, Naidu R, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, Ok YS, Palanisami T, et al., 'Speciation and bioavailability of lead in complementary medicines', Science of the Total Environment, 539 304-312 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Complementary medicines have associated risks which include toxic heavy metal(loid) and pesticide contamination. The objective of this study was to examine th... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Complementary medicines have associated risks which include toxic heavy metal(loid) and pesticide contamination. The objective of this study was to examine the speciation and bioavailability of lead (Pb) in selected complementary medicines. Six herbal and six ayurvedic medicines were analysed for: (i) total heavy metal(loid) contents including arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), Pb and mercury (Hg); (ii) speciation of Pb using sequential fractionation and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques; and (iii) bioavailability of Pb using a physiologically-based in vitro extraction test (PBET). The daily intake of Pb through the uptake of these medicines was compared with the safety guidelines for Pb. The results indicated that generally ayurvedic medicines contained higher levels of heavy metal(loid)s than herbal medicines with the amount of Pb much higher than the other metal(loid)s. Sequential fractionation indicated that while organic-bound Pb species dominated the herbal medicines, inorganic-bound Pb species dominated the ayurvedic medicines. EXAFS data indicated the presence of various Pb species in ayurvedic medicines. This implies that Pb is derived from plant uptake and inorganic mineral input in herbal and ayurvedic medicines, respectively. Bioavailability of Pb was higher in ayurvedic than herbal medicines, indicating that Pb added as a mineral therapeutic input is more bioavailable than that derived from plant uptake. There was a positive relationship between soluble Pb fraction and bioavailability indicating that solubility is an important factor controlling bioavailability. The daily intake values for Pb as estimated by total and bioavailable metal(loid) contents are likely to exceed the safe threshold level in certain ayurvedic medicines. This research demonstrated that Pb toxicity is likely to result from the regular intake of these medicines which requires further investigation.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.08.124
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Ravi Naidu, Balaji Seshadri
2016 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Wijesekara H, Kunhikrishnan A, Thangarajan R, Qi F, et al., 'Phosphorus-cadmium interactions in paddy soils', Geoderma, 270 43-59 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Regular application of phosphate (P) fertilisers has been identified as the main source of heavy metal(loid) contamination including cadmium (Cd) in agricultu... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Regular application of phosphate (P) fertilisers has been identified as the main source of heavy metal(loid) contamination including cadmium (Cd) in agricultural soils. Some of these P fertilisers that act as a source of Cd contamination of soils have also been found to act as a sink for the immobilisation of this metal(loid). In paddy soils, redox reactions play an important role in the (im)mobilisation of nutrients and heavy metal(loid)s, as a result of flooding of the rice plains. Although a number of studies have examined the potential value of P compounds in the immobilisation of metals in contaminated soils, there has been no comprehensive review on the mechanisms involved in the P-induced (im)mobilisation of Cd in paddy soils. There are a number of factors that influences P induced Cd (im)mobilisation in paddy soils that include pH, redox reactions, liming effect, rhizosphere acidification and root iron plaques. Following a brief overview of the reactions of Cd and common P compounds that are used as fertiliser in soils, the review focuses on the above mentioned mechanisms for the (im)mobilisation of Cd by P compounds in paddy soils. The role of iron plaques on Cd status in soil and rice plants is also discussed followed by a summary and future research needs.

DOI 10.1016/j.geoderma.2015.11.029
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan
2016 Shakoor MB, Niazi NK, Bibi I, Murtaza G, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, et al., 'Remediation of arsenic-contaminated water using agricultural wastes as biosorbents', Critical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology, 46 467-499 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Arsenic (As) contamination of groundwater reservoirs is a global environmental and health issue given to its toxic and carcinogenic natur... [more]

© 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Arsenic (As) contamination of groundwater reservoirs is a global environmental and health issue given to its toxic and carcinogenic nature. Over 170 million people have been affected by As due to the ingestion of As-contaminated groundwater. Conventional methods such as reverse osmosis, ion exchange, and electrodialysis are commonly used for the remediation of As-contaminated water; however, the high cost and sludge production put limitations on their application to remove As from water. This review critically addresses the use of various agricultural waste materials (e.g., sugarcane bagasse, peels of various fruits, wheat straw) as biosorbents, thereby offering an eco-friendly and low-cost solution for the removal of As from contaminated water supplies. The effect of solution chemistry such as solution pH, cations, anions, organic ligands, and various other factors (e.g., temperature, contact time, sorbent dose) on As biosorption, and safe disposal methods for As-loaded biosorbents to reduce secondary As contamination are also discussed.

DOI 10.1080/10643389.2015.1109910
Citations Scopus - 50Web of Science - 46
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan
2016 Chaney RL, Kim WI, Kunhikrishnan A, Yang JE, Ok YS, 'Integrated management strategies for arsenic and cadmium in rice paddy environments', Geoderma, 270 1-2 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.geoderma.2016.03.001
Citations Scopus - 5
2016 Abid M, Niazi NK, Bibi I, Farooqi A, Ok YS, Kunhikrishnan A, et al., 'Arsenic(V) biosorption by charred orange peel in aqueous environments', International Journal of Phytoremediation, 18 442-449 (2016)

© 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Biosorption efficiency of natural orange peel (NOP) and charred orange peel (COP) was examined for the immobilization of arsenate (As(V))... [more]

© 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Biosorption efficiency of natural orange peel (NOP) and charred orange peel (COP) was examined for the immobilization of arsenate (As(V)) in aqueous environments using batch sorption experiments. Sorption experiments were carried out as a function of pH, time, initial As(V) concentration and biosorbent dose, using NOP and COP (pretreated with sulfuric acid). Arsenate sorption was found to be maximum at pH 6.5, with higher As(V) removal percentage (98%) by COP than NOP (68%) at 4¿g L-1 optimum biosorbent dose. Sorption isotherm data exhibited a higher As(V) sorption (60.9¿mg g-1) for COP than NOP (32.7¿mg g-1). Langmuir model provided the best fit to describe As(V) sorption. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses revealed that the ¿OH, ¿COOH, and ¿N-H surface functional groups were involved in As(V) biosorption and the meso- to micro-porous structure of COP sequestered significantly (2-times) higher As(V) than NOP, respectively. Arsenate desorption from COP was found to be lower (10%) than NOP (26%) up to the third regeneration cycle. The results highlight that this method has a great potential to produce unique ¿charred¿ materials from the widely available biowastes, with enhanced As(V) sorption properties.

DOI 10.1080/15226514.2015.1109604
Citations Scopus - 22
2016 Khan N, Seshadri B, Bolan N, Saint CP, Kirkham MB, Chowdhury S, et al., 'Root iron plaque on wetland plants as a dynamic pool of nutrients and contaminants 1-96 (2016) [B1]
DOI 10.1016/bs.agron.2016.04.002
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan
2016 Choppala G, Bolan N, Kunhikrishnan A, Bush R, 'Differential effect of biochar upon reduction-induced mobility and bioavailability of arsenate and chromate', Chemosphere, 144 374-381 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Heavy metals such as chromium (Cr) and arsenic (As) occur in ionic form in soil, with chromate [Cr(VI)] and arsenate As(V) being the most pre-dominant forms. ... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Heavy metals such as chromium (Cr) and arsenic (As) occur in ionic form in soil, with chromate [Cr(VI)] and arsenate As(V) being the most pre-dominant forms. The application of biochar to Cr(VI) and As(V) spiked and field contaminated soils was evaluated on the reduction processes [(Cr(VI) to Cr(III)] and [As(V) to As(III))], and subsequent mobility and bioavailability of both As(V) and Cr(VI). The assays used in this study included leaching, soil microbial activity and XPS techniques. The reduction rate of As(V) was lower than that of Cr(VI) with and without biochar addition, however, supplementation with biochar enhanced the reduction process of As(V). Leaching experiments indicated Cr(VI) was more mobile than As(V). Addition of biochar reversed the effect by reducing the mobility of Cr and increasing that of As. The presence of Cr and As in both spiked and contaminated soils reduced microbial activity, but with the addition of biochar to these soils, the microbial activity increased in the Cr(VI) contaminated soils, while it was further decreased with As(V) contaminated soils. The addition of biochar was effective in mitigating Cr toxicity by reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III). In contrast, the conversion process of As(V) to As(III) hastened by biochar was not favourable, as As(III) is more toxic in soils. Overall, the presence of functional groups on biochar promotes reduction by providing the electrons required for reduction processes to occur as determined by XPS data.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.08.043
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Richard Bush, Nanthi Bolan
2016 Kunhikrishnan A, Thangarajan R, Bolan NS, Xu Y, Mandal S, Gleeson DB, et al., 'Functional Relationships of Soil Acidification, Liming, and Greenhouse Gas Flux', Advances in Agronomy, 139 1-71 (2016) [B1]
DOI 10.1016/bs.agron.2016.05.001
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Balaji Seshadri, Ravi Naidu
2016 Makino T, Maejima Y, Akahane I, Kamiya T, Takano H, Fujitomi S, et al., 'A practical soil washing method for use in a Cd-contaminated paddy field, with simple on-site wastewater treatment', Geoderma, 270 3-9 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Published by Elsevier B.V. Heavy metal contamination in rice paddies is a serious problem in monsoon Asia, and these fields require appropriate restoration measures. Althou... [more]

© 2016 Published by Elsevier B.V. Heavy metal contamination in rice paddies is a serious problem in monsoon Asia, and these fields require appropriate restoration measures. Although soil washing is a promising remediation technology, high cost for the treatment on soil washing leachate (wastewater) is one of the critical problems. This study sought to develop a simple method for the restoration of paddy fields by soil washing, with simplified wastewater treatment. Ferric chloride solution (FeCl3) was used as a washing chemical to extract Cd from a soil, which produced the wastewater containing Cd and other metals. Three alkali materials (NaOH, MgO, and CaCO3) were tested to treat the wastewater and determined MgO is optimal. In an on-site experiment, the target pH for wastewater treatment was controlled between 8 and 9 by using MgO. All metals in the wastewater could be effectively removed, reaching levels substantially lower than those permitted by Japanese standards. The treated wastewater could be discharged to agricultural canal. Therefore, our novel simplified method effectively removed heavy metals from the wastewater produced by on-site soil washing and contribute drive down the cost.

DOI 10.1016/j.geoderma.2016.01.006
Citations Scopus - 9
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2016 Yong SK, Skinner WM, Bolan NS, Lombi E, Kunhikrishnan A, Ok YS, 'Sulfur crosslinks from thermal degradation of chitosan dithiocarbamate derivatives and thermodynamic study for sorption of copper and cadmium from aqueous system', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 23 1050-1059 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-015-5654-5
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2015 Kunhikrishnan A, Go W-R, Park J-H, Kim K-R, Kim H-S, Kim K-H, et al., 'Heavy Metal(loid) Levels in Paddy Soils and Brown Rice in Korea', Korean Journal of Soil Science and Fertilizer, 48 515-521 (2015)
DOI 10.7745/kjssf.2015.48.5.515
2015 Bolan N, Mahimairaja S, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, Thangarajan R, 'Bioavailability and ecotoxicity of arsenic species in solution culture and soil system: implications to remediation', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 22 8866-8875 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1827-2
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan
2015 Yong SK, Shrivastava M, Srivastava P, Kunhikrishnan A, Bolan N, 'Environmental Applications of Chitosan and Its Derivatives', REVIEWS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, VOL 233, 233 1-43 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-10479-9_1
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2015 Choppala G, Bolan N, Kunhikrishnan A, Skinner W, Seshadri B, 'Concomitant reduction and immobilization of chromium in relation to its bioavailability in soils', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 22 8969-8978 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1653-6
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Balaji Seshadri
2015 Kunhikrishnan A, Shon HK, Bolan NS, El Saliby I, Vigneswaran S, 'Sources, distribution, environmental fate, and ecological effects of nanomaterials in wastewater streams', Critical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology, 45 277-318 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/10643389.2013.852407
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2014 Kim WI, Kunhikrishnan A, Go WR, Jeong SH, Kim GJ, Lee S, et al., 'Influence of Various Biochars on the Survival, Growth, and Oxidative DNA Damage in the Earthworm Eisenia Fetida', Korean Journal of Environmental Agriculture, 33 231-238 (2014)
DOI 10.5338/kjea.2014.33.4.231
2014 Bolan N, Kunhikrishnan A, Thangarajan R, Kumpiene J, Park J, Makino T, et al., 'Remediation of heavy metal(loid)s contaminated soils - To mobilize or to immobilize?', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 266 141-166 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2013.12.018
Citations Scopus - 561Web of Science - 486
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2014 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Kunhikrishnan A, Choppala G, Naidu R, 'Effect of coal combustion products in reducing soluble phosphorus in soil II: Leaching study', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 225 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1777-9
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu, Balaji Seshadri
2014 Seshadri B, Kunhikrishnan A, Bolan N, Naidu R, 'Effect of industrial waste products on phosphorus mobilisation and biomass production in abattoir wastewater irrigated soil', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 21 10013-10021 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-014-3030-5
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2014 Choppala G, Saifullah, Bolan N, Bibi S, Iqbal M, Rengel Z, et al., 'Cellular Mechanisms in Higher Plants Governing Tolerance to Cadmium Toxicity', Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences, 33 374-391 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/07352689.2014.903747
Citations Scopus - 86Web of Science - 85
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2014 Thangarajan R, Chowdhury S, Kunhikrishnan A, Bolan N, 'Interactions of soluble and solid organic amendments with priming effects induced by glucose', Vadose Zone Journal, 13 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.2136/vzj2014.01.0002
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2013 Choppala G, Bolan N, Lamb D, Kunhikrishnan A, 'Comparative sorption and mobility of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) species in a range of soils: Implications to bioavailability topical collection on remediation of site contamination', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 224 (2013) [C1]

The sorption of chromium (Cr) species to soil has become the focus of research as it dictates the bioavailability and also the magnitude of toxicity of Cr. The sorption of two env... [more]

The sorption of chromium (Cr) species to soil has become the focus of research as it dictates the bioavailability and also the magnitude of toxicity of Cr. The sorption of two environmentally important Cr species [Cr(III) and Cr(VI)] was examined using batch sorption, and the data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms. The effects of soil properties such as pH, CEC, organic matter (OM), clay, water-extractable SO42- and PO43-, surface charge, and different iron (Fe) fractions of 12 different Australian representative soils on the sorption, and mobility of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were examined. The amount of sorption as shown by K f was higher for Cr(III) than Cr(VI) in all tested soils. Further, the amount of Cr(III) sorbed increased with an increase in pH, CEC, clay, and OM of soils. Conversely, the chemical properties of soil such as positive charge and Fe (crystalline) had a noticeable influence on the sorption of Cr(VI). Desorption of Cr(VI) occurred rapidly and was greater than desorption of Cr(III) in soils. The mobility of Cr species as estimated by the retardation factor was higher for Cr(VI) than for Cr(III) in all tested soils. These results concurred with the results from leaching experiments which showed higher leaching of Cr(VI) than Cr(III) in both acidic and alkaline soils indicating the higher mobility of Cr(VI) in a wide range of soils. This study demonstrated that Cr(VI) is more mobile and will be bioavailable in soils regardless of soil properties and if not remediated may eventually pose a severe threat to biota. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1699-6
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Nanthi Bolan
2013 Kim W-I, Lee J-H, Kunhikrishnan A, Kim D-H, 'Dietary exposure estimates of trace elements in selected agricultural products grown in greenhouse and associated health risks in Korean population', Journal of Agricultural Chemistry and Environment, 02 35-41 (2013)
DOI 10.4236/jacen.2013.23006
2013 Bolan N, Mahimairaja S, Kunhikrishnan A, Choppala G, 'Phosphorus-arsenic interactions in variable-charge soils in relation to arsenic mobility and bioavailability', Science of the Total Environment, 463-464 1154-1162 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.04.016
Citations Scopus - 55Web of Science - 50
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2013 Bolan N, Kunhikrishnan A, Gibbs J, 'Rhizoreduction of arsenate and chromate in Australian native grass, shrub and tree vegetation', Plant and Soil, 367 615-625 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11104-012-1506-y
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2013 Thangarajan R, Bolan NS, Tian G, Naidu R, Kunhikrishnan A, 'Role of organic amendment application on greenhouse gas emission from soil', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 465 72-96 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.01.031
Citations Scopus - 133Web of Science - 114
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
2013 Bolan NS, Kunhikrishnan A, Naidu R, 'Carbon storage in a heavy clay soil landfill site after biosolid application', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 465 216-225 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.12.093
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2013 Bolan NS, Makino T, Kunhikrishnan A, Kim P-J, Ishikawa S, Murakami M, et al., 'Cadmium Contamination and Its Risk Management in Rice Ecosystems', ADVANCES IN AGRONOMY, VOL 119, 119 183-273 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-407247-3.00004-4
Citations Scopus - 49Web of Science - 41
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2013 Bolan NS, Choppala G, Kunhikrishnan A, Park J, Naidu R, 'Microbial Transformation of Trace Elements in Soils in Relation to Bioavailability and Remediation', REVIEWS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, VOL 225, 225 1-56 (2013)
DOI 10.1007/978-1-4614-6470-9_1
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
2013 Bolan N, Mahimairaja S, Kunhikrishnan A, Naidu R, 'Sorption-bioavailability nexus of arsenic and cadmium in variable-charge soils', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 261 725-732 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2012.09.074
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
2013 Kunhikrishnan A, Bolan NS, Naidu R, Kim W-I, 'Recycled water sources influence the bioavailability of copper to earthworms', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 261 784-792 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2012.10.015
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2013 Kim JY, Kim WI, Kunhikrishnan A, Kang DW, Kim DH, Lee YJ, et al., 'Determination of arsenic species in rice grains using HPLC-ICP-MS', Food Science and Biotechnology, 22 1509-1513 (2013)

Determination of As species in rice is necessary because inorganic As species (arsenate (AsV) and arsenite (AsIII)) are more toxic than organic As (monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) an... [more]

Determination of As species in rice is necessary because inorganic As species (arsenate (AsV) and arsenite (AsIII)) are more toxic than organic As (monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA)). This study evaluated the As species in Korean and USA rice grains. Levels were determined using microwave extraction and high performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICPMS). Arsenite and DMA were the major species detected in Korean and USA rice. The percentage of inorganic As was 76.94% (54.50-87.86%) for Korean rice and 69.28% (52.94-72.92%) for USA samples. The order and percentage of As species observed in Korean and USA rice were AsIII (70%)>DMA (24%)>AsV (5%)>MMA (1%), and AsIII (64%)>DMA (28%)>AsV(5%)>MMA (3%), respectively. The AsIII concentrations were not significantly different in Korean rice grains, compared to USA grains. The high AsIII predominance indicates an elevated toxic effect of As in rice grains and needs further attention. © 2013 The Korean Society of Food Science and Technology and Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

DOI 10.1007/s10068-013-0245-z
Citations Scopus - 15
2013 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Kunhikrishnan A, 'Effect of Clean Coal Combustion Products in Reducing Soluble Phosphorus in Soil I. Adsorption Study', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 224 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1524-2
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Balaji Seshadri
2013 Singh J, Kunhikrishnan A, Bolan NS, Saggar S, 'Impact of urease inhibitor on ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions from temperate pasture soil cores receiving urea fertilizer and cattle urine', Science of the Total Environment, 465 56-63 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.02.018
Citations Scopus - 55Web of Science - 47
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2013 Panneerselvam P, Choppala G, Kunhikrishnan A, Bolan N, 'Potential of novel bacterial consortium for the remediation of chromium contamination', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 224 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1716-9
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2012 Bolan NS, Kunhikrishnan A, Choppala GK, Thangarajan R, Chung JW, 'Stabilization of carbon in composts and biochars in relation to carbon sequestration and soil fertility', Science of the Total Environment, 424 264-270 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.02.061
Citations Scopus - 72Web of Science - 61
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2012 Kunhikrishnan A, Bolan NS, Mueller K, Laurenson S, Naidu R, Kim W-I, 'THE INFLUENCE OF WASTEWATER IRRIGATION ON THE TRANSFORMATION AND BIOAVAILABILITY OF HEAVY METAL (LOID)S IN SOIL', ADVANCES IN AGRONOMY, VOL 115, 115 215-297 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-394276-0.00005-6
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
2011 Anitha D, Kumar NS, Vijayan D, Ajithkumar K, Gurusubramanian G, 'Characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis isolates and their differential toxicity against Helicoverpa armigera populations', Journal of Basic Microbiology, 51 107-114 (2011)
DOI 10.1002/jobm.201000141
2011 Bolan NS, Adriano DC, Kunhikrishnan A, James T, McDowell R, Senesi N, 'DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER: BIOGEOCHEMISTRY, DYNAMICS, AND ENVIRONMENTAL SIGNIFICANCE IN SOILS', ADVANCES IN AGRONOMY, VOL 110, 110 1-75 (2011)
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-385531-2.00001-3
Citations Scopus - 179Web of Science - 143
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2011 Kunhikrishnan A, Bolan NS, Naidu R, 'Phytoavailability of copper in the presence of recycled water sources', PLANT AND SOIL, 348 425-438 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11104-011-0899-3
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
Laurenson S, Kunhikrishnan A, Bolan NS, Naidu R, McKay J, Keremane G, 'Management of recycled water for sustainable production and environmental protection: A casestudy with Northern Adelaide Plains recycling scheme', International Journal of Environmental Science and Development, 176-180
DOI 10.7763/ijesd.2010.v1.32
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Conference (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Kim WI, Kunhikrishnan A, Paik MK, Yoo JH, Cho N, Kim JY, 'Water management for arsenic and cadmium mitigation in rice grains', Arsenic Research and Global Sustainability - Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016 (2016)

© 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, London. Managing arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) together in rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants is challenging and different strategies are being dev... [more]

© 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, London. Managing arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) together in rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants is challenging and different strategies are being developed for mitigating As and Cd loading into the rice grains. This study investigated the effect of water management on As and Cd accumulation in brown rice. A field plot experiment was conducted with five water management regimes [Flooded control, alternate wetting drying (AWD ¿ 60 and 40) and row (R-60 and R-40)] using two rice cultivars (Indica and Japonica). Compared to the flooded control, all the four treatments significantly reduced the concentration of As in brown rice with R-40 showing the least concentration. AWD and row treatments reduced As levels by 45¿60% and by 32¿55% in Indica and Japonica cultivars, respectively. However, increased Cd concentrations were noticed in row and AWD treatments. AWD-60 treatment for As and Cd in Indica cultivar reduced As without greatly increasing Cd concentration in brown rice. AWD water management offers some promising solutions, however, additional field studies and As bioaccessibility research are required to control both As and Cd in paddy soils and rice grains.

2013 Kim JY, Kim WI, Yoo JH, Lee JH, Kunhikrishnan A, Kim DH, 'Speciation of six-arsenic species of rice in Korea by HPLC/ICPMS', E3S Web of Conferences (2013)

© Owned by the authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2013. Determination of arsenic (As) speciation in rice is necessary because inorganic As species are more toxic than organic As.... [more]

© Owned by the authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2013. Determination of arsenic (As) speciation in rice is necessary because inorganic As species are more toxic than organic As. Arsenic levels of rice in Korea were determined by microwave extraction and High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled with Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry. The extraction method showed a high recovery and low Limit of Detection (LOD) and Limit of Quantitation (LOQ). Most of the As species in rice were noticed to be inorganic [Arsenite (AsIII), Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA)]. The percentage of inorganic As/total As is 69.01 % (36.40-87.86 %). Arsenite and DMA were the major compounds in rice in Korea when compare to U.S. rice. The order and percentage of As species showed were AsIII (56-70 %)>DMA (23-38 %)>AsV (5 %)>MMA(1 %).

DOI 10.1051/e3sconf/20130139008
Citations Scopus - 1
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $973,861

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20182 grants / $973,861

New cost-effective pathways to recover and evaluate high-grade fertilisers from organic waste streams$793,861

Funding body: CRC for High Performance Soils

Funding body CRC for High Performance Soils
Project Team Doctor Dane Lamb, Doctor Anitha Kunhikrishnan, Doctor Liang Wang, Doctor Balaji Seshadri, Professor Nanthi Bolan, Professor Ravi Naidu, Mr Peter Matthews, Dr Maryam Esfandbod, Professor Andrew Rose, Helen McMillan, David Bonser, Dr Aravind Suapaneni, Dr Aravind Suapaneni, Lawrence Di Bella, Dr David Davenport, Dr Surinder Saggar
Scheme Major Investment Round
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1800825
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Biophysical processes for unlocking the soil nutrient bank to increase soil productivity$180,000

Funding body: CRC for High Performance Soils

Funding body CRC for High Performance Soils
Project Team Doctor Dane Lamb, Doctor Anitha Kunhikrishnan, Dr Lukas Van Zwieten, Dr Terry Rose, Dr Chengrong Chen, Ms Helen McMillian
Scheme RAAP Special Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800592
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y
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Dr Anitha Kunhikrishnan

Position

Research Associate
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email anitha.kunhikrishnan@newcastle.edu.au

Office

Room ATC
Building Advanced Technology Center
Location Callaghan University Drive Callaghan, NSW 2308 Australia
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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