Ms Alycia Jacob

Ms Alycia Jacob

Research Assistant

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Career Summary

Biography

Alycia is a research assistant for the Joint Chair of Evidence Based Nursing working with the Mid North Coast Health District in Port Macquarie. Alycia has a background in public health and a strong research interest in rural healthcare and the responses of the healthcare workforce to incidences of patient aggression.

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Arts (Honours), University of Western Australia

Keywords

  • Healthcare Systems
  • Rural Health
  • Violence Against Healthcare Staff

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/4/2016 - 28/2/2019 Research Assistant Edith Cowan University, Western Australia
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Jacob ER, Jacob AM, Davies HT, Stoneman LJ, Coventry L, 'Peripheral intravenous cannulas for blood drawing: Nurses' views through content analysis', Collegian, (2021)

© 2020 Australian College of Nursing Ltd Background: Peripheral intravenous cannulas are commonly used for blood sampling. Conflicting evidence on the safety and reliability of bl... [more]

© 2020 Australian College of Nursing Ltd Background: Peripheral intravenous cannulas are commonly used for blood sampling. Conflicting evidence on the safety and reliability of blood sampling from peripheral intravenous cannulas provides little support to guide practice of clinicians. Aim: To elicit views of nurses working in acute care of their opinions on the safety and efficacy of obtaining blood samples from peripheral intravenous cannulas. Methods: A cross-sectional electronic survey was utilised. Participants included nurses working in Australian acute care services nationally. The STROBE checklist was followed. The survey was distributed by two professional nursing bodies to their members between September and December 2017. Content analysis was used to analyse open-ended responses. Findings: Of the 338 participants who completed the survey, 269 provided comments. Themes supporting the use of peripheral intravenous cannulas for blood sampling included ¿efficiency¿, ¿patient care¿, ¿last resort¿, and ¿other¿. Reasons for not using a peripheral intravenous cannula for sampling provided themes of ¿PIVC use¿, ¿dwell time¿, ¿test type required¿, ¿patency/insertion site care¿, ¿preference¿, and ¿other¿. Discussion: The choice regarding method of blood sampling is left to the discretion of individual practitioners. Diverse rationales were provided by respondents to support their practice in sampling blood. This may be influenced by variations in hospital policies and conflicting research evidence to support or refute the practice. Conclusion: Blood sampling from peripheral intravenous cannulas or venepuncture is practiced differently between nurses based on multiple rationales. Research is needed to provide evidence for safe practice and support hospital policies.

DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2020.12.002
2020 Jacob A, Coventry L, Davies H, Jacob E, 'Are current clinical guidelines on the use of Peripheral Intravenous Cannula for blood draws supported by evidence? An organizational case study', Nursing Open, 7 1746-1754 (2020)

© 2020 The Authors. Nursing Open published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Aim: To examine the quality of evidence used to inform health policies. Policies on peripheral intravenou... [more]

© 2020 The Authors. Nursing Open published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Aim: To examine the quality of evidence used to inform health policies. Policies on peripheral intravenous cannulas were used as exemplars. Design: An organizational case study design was used, using the STROBE reporting guidelines. Methods: Policy guidelines were sourced between June and September 2018 from health departments in Australia. Seven documents were compared regarding intravenous cannula dwell times and blood collection use. Evidence used in the documents was critiqued using assessment guideline from the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine. Results: Large variations exist between policies regarding blood sampling and dwell time. Evidence used a variety of sources. Few references received an A evidence rating and policies differed in their interpretation of evidence.

DOI 10.1002/nop2.559
Citations Scopus - 1
2020 Lower T, Kinsman L, Dinh MM, Lyle D, Cheney R, Allan J, et al., 'Patterns of emergency department use in rural and metropolitan New South Wales from 2012 to 2018', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 28 490-499 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ajr.12668
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Leigh Kinsman, John Wiggers
2020 Davies H, Coventry LL, Jacob A, Stoneman L, Jacob E, 'Blood sampling through peripheral intravenous cannulas: A look at current practice in Australia', Collegian, 27 219-225 (2020) [C1]

© 2019 Background: Sampling blood from a peripheral intravenous cannula offers an alternative to venepuncture. This practice can reduce frequency of venepuncture and patient disco... [more]

© 2019 Background: Sampling blood from a peripheral intravenous cannula offers an alternative to venepuncture. This practice can reduce frequency of venepuncture and patient discomfort. Opponents argue the practice increases the chance of haemolysis, risk of infection and device failure. Aim: To describe the prevalence and practice of blood sampling from peripheral intravenous cannulas by Australian nurses. Methods: This study used a descriptive cross-sectional design and data were collected using an electronic survey. The survey examined Australian nurses¿ practice of sampling blood from peripheral intravenous cannulas. Quantitative descriptive data was analysed and presented as frequencies, percentages, medians and ranges. Findings: A total of 542 nurses participated in the survey. Of these, 338 (62.4%) completed the survey. The majority of responses came from the State of Victoria (n = 137, 40.5%) and one-third were emergency nurses (n = 112, 33.1%). Sampling of blood from peripheral intravenous cannulas occurred between 37.5% and 66.7% throughout the State and Territories of Australia. Peripheral intravenous cannula blood sampling was most common in the emergency department (n = 93, 53.4%). The most frequent reasons given were difficulty of access (n = 223, 66.0%) followed by patient comfort (n = 194, 57.4%). Discussion: Blood sampling is required to diagnose and monitor treatment responses. A peripheral intravenous cannula offers the opportunity to sample blood without the need for venepuncture. Practice recommendations on when to sample blood and correct sampling technique are based on limited or conflicting evidence. Conclusion: Findings from this study indicate it is common practice to draw blood samples from a peripheral intravenous cannula. Further research is required to examine the accuracy and safety of this practice to further inform policy.

DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2019.07.010
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2020 Vafeas C, Jacob E, Jacob A, 'A younger onset dementia toolkit: Innovative practice', Dementia, 19 1299-1307 (2020)

© The Author(s) 2017. A diagnosis of younger onset dementia requires specific care tailored to the individual and the family. Dementia care workers often do not have the skills an... [more]

© The Author(s) 2017. A diagnosis of younger onset dementia requires specific care tailored to the individual and the family. Dementia care workers often do not have the skills and experience necessary to offer this care within the residential and community environment. This article reports the development of an interactive resource to educate those employed to care for people living with younger onset dementia. Prescription for Life, a talking e-Flipbook was developed and piloted in two states of Australia. Feedback from the pilots was incorporated in the resource prior to a national rollout. The project was supported by an expert panel, including experts from national aged care providers.

DOI 10.1177/1471301217738402
2020 Kinsman L, Radford J, Elmer S, Ogden K, Randles S, Jacob A, et al., 'Engaging "hard-to-reach" men in health promotion using the OPHELIA principles: Participants' perspectives.', Health Promot J Austr, (2020)
DOI 10.1002/hpja.403
Co-authors Leigh Kinsman
2019 Coventry LL, Jacob AM, Davies HT, Stoneman L, Keogh S, Jacob ER, 'Drawing blood from peripheral intravenous cannula compared with venepuncture: A systematic review and meta-analysis', JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, 75 2313-2339 (2019)
DOI 10.1111/jan.14078
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
2019 Jacob ER, Duffield C, Jacob AM, 'Validation of data using RASCH analysis in a tool measuring changes in critical thinking in nursing students', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, 76 196-199 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2019.02.012
2016 Jacob E, Raymond A, Jones J, Jacob A, Drysdale M, Isaacs AN, 'Exploration of nursing degree students' content expectations of a dedicated Indigenous health unit', COLLEGIAN, 23 313-319 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2015.06.001
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Jacob A, Vafeas C, Stoneman L, Jacob E, 'Rural dialysis nurses experiences with challenging patients: a thematic qualitative analysis', Renal Society of Australasia Journal, 16 13-19
DOI 10.33235/rsaj.16.1.13-19
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $38,000

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20202 grants / $38,000

Health Literacy Initiative – Priority Population Engagement Coordinators$28,000

Funding body: Mental Health Commission

Funding body Mental Health Commission
Project Team Professor Leigh Kinsman, Associate Professor Graeme Browne, Ms Alycia Jacob
Scheme Request for Tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G2000582
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON Y

Investigating the health effects of bushfire smoke exposure, specifically on people with asthma, including pregnant women with asthma, and their children$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Professor Peter Gibson, Doctor Vanessa Murphy, Professor Vanessa McDonald, Doctor Adam Collison, Conjoint Associate Professor Anne Vertigan, Doctor Megan Jensen, Doctor Dennis Thomas, Associate Professor Jay Horvat, Professor Maralyn Foureur, Professor Leigh Kinsman, Associate Professor Liz Holliday, Doctor Erin Harvey, Ms Alycia Jacob, Professor Joerg Mattes, Graeme Zosky, Wilfried Karmaus, Michele Goldman, Dr Craig Dalton
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G2000414
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y
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Ms Alycia Jacob

Position

Research Assistant
School of Nursing and Midwifery
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Contact Details

Email alycia.jacob@newcastle.edu.au
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