Ms Alix Woolard

Ms Alix Woolard

Casual Academic

School of Psychology

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Alix Woolard is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Brain and Mind Centre, University of Sydney. Alix is also a casual academic at the University of Newcastle, lecturing in Psychology.

Dr Woolard is currently working on a project which aims to improve the employment outcomes of autistic adults. This project, funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency, works with stakeholders in the autism community, as well as workplaces, in order to provide supportive employment for autistic adults who are seeking employment.

Dr Woolard completed her PhD at the University of Newcastle in 2020. Alix’s research focussed on caregiver-infant interactions, and how the vocal communication used during interactions could be related to infant characteristics (such as temperament or autism characteristics). This research was the first to evidence a relationship between infant temperament and infant autism characteristics, and parent infant-directed speech.

Dr Woolard’s research is multidisciplinary utilising collaboration from areas including Psychology, Occupational Therapy and Linguistics.


Keywords

  • Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Developmental Psychology
  • Fundamental Frequency
  • Infant Development
  • Infant Temperament
  • Infant-Directed Speech
  • Pitch Contours
  • Preterm Infants
  • employment

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
170102 Developmental Psychology and Ageing 60
200499 Linguistics not elsewhere classified 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Casual Academic University of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia
Casual Academic University of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
29/2/2020 -  Postdoctoral research fellow Brain and Mind Centre, University of Sydney
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2019 Award for improving psychological science in the face of challenge (as contributor to the Manybabies1 collaboration)
Society for Improvement of Psychological Science Mission
2018 Travel Award
International Society for Autism Research
2016 Faculty Medal
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia
2016 Australian Postgraduate Award
Australian Government Department of Education

Prize

Year Award
2019 Three-minute thesis People's Choice
University of Newcastle
2019 Three-minute Thesis, Faculty of Science winner
Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle
2016 Most Popular Presentation
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
PSYC1020 Psychology Introduction 2
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia
Laboratory Demonstrator 1/7/2017 - 11/10/2017
SCIM1040 Foundations of Science and Technology
The University of Newcastle
Laboratory Demonstrator 1/3/2017 - 1/6/2017
PSYC3800 Advanced Special Topics in Psychology
Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle
Course co-ordinator 1/2/2020 - 31/7/2020
PSYC1010 Psychology Introduction 1
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia
Laboratory Demonstrator 1/3/2017 - 1/6/2017
PSYC3800 Advanced Special Topics in Psychology
Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle
Tutor 1/1/2019 - 31/7/2019
PSYC3800 Advanced Special Topics in Psychology
Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle
Tutor 1/8/2019 - 1/12/2019
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Mallise CA, Lane AE, Woolard AJ, Whalen OM, Murphy VE, Karayanidis F, Campbell LE, 'The temperament features associated with autism spectrum disorder in childhood: A systematic review', Research in Developmental Disabilities, 104 (2020) [C1]

© 2020 Elsevier Ltd Background: Temperament is an important construct that shapes child development. Temperament is suggested to present differently in different groups, such as c... [more]

© 2020 Elsevier Ltd Background: Temperament is an important construct that shapes child development. Temperament is suggested to present differently in different groups, such as children with neurodevelopmental disorders. However, it is not known whether there are specific temperament features associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Aim: This systematic review aimed to synthesise extant literature to determine whether there are temperament features associated with ASD in infancy, toddlerhood and childhood. Methods and Procedures: Following the PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews, we searched PsycINFO, CINAHL, Academic Search Ultimate and ProQuest for all available articles from database conception until January 2020. The Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal checklists were used to assess the methodological quality of included articles. Outcomes and Results: Twenty-six articles met the selection criteria: (1) reported on the temperament of children (0¿12 years of age) diagnosed with ASD, (2) peer-reviewed; and (3) published in English. Articles varied in overall methodological quality. Infants later diagnosed with ASD were found to more frequently be described as having ¿easy¿ temperament features in early infancy, compared to typically developing infants and infants with developmental concerns but not ASD. Once diagnosed, children with ASD were reported to, as a group, display more negative affect, less extraversion and less effortful control than typically developing children. Conclusions and Implications: The literature suggests that more challenging temperament features are associated with ASD in childhood, but less is known about within group variability. Overall, this review highlights the need for further investigation into the variability of temperament in children with ASD.

DOI 10.1016/j.ridd.2020.103711
Co-authors Vanessa Murphy, Frini Karayanidis, Linda E Campbell, Alison Lane, Alix Woolard Uon
2020 Whalen OM, Campbell LE, Murphy VE, Lane AE, Gibson PG, Mattes J, et al., 'Observational study of mental health in asthmatic women during the prenatal and postnatal periods', Journal of Asthma, 57 829-841 (2020) [C1]

© 2019, © 2019 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Objective: We aimed to examine the prevalence and severity of psychological distress of women with asthma in both the prenatal an... [more]

© 2019, © 2019 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Objective: We aimed to examine the prevalence and severity of psychological distress of women with asthma in both the prenatal and postnatal periods, and to determine whether asthmatic women with and without mental health problems differ in self-management, medications knowledge, and asthma symptoms. Methods: We assessed spirometry performance and asthma symptoms in 120 women (mean age 29.8 years) before 23 weeks gestation, as part of the Breathing for Life Trial (Trial ID: ACTRN12613000202763). Prenatal depression data was obtained from medical records. At 6 weeks postpartum, we assessed general health, self-reported asthma control, depression symptoms (with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale) and adaptive functioning (with the Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment scales). Results: Twenty percent of our sample reported having a current mental health diagnosis, 14% reported currently receiving mental health care, while 47% reported having received mental health care in the past (and may/may not have received a diagnosis). The sample scored high on the Aggressive Behavior, Avoidant Personality, and Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity scales. Poorer self-reported postnatal asthma control was strongly correlated with elevated somatic complaints, externalizing problems, antisocial personality problems, and greater withdrawal. Prenatal spirometry or asthma severity and control were largely not associated with measures of psychopathology. Conclusions: These findings indicate that pregnant women with asthma frequently report issues with psychopathology during the prenatal and postnatal periods, and that the subjective perception of asthma control may be more related to psychopathology than objective asthma measures. However, due to sample bias, these findings are likely to be understated.

DOI 10.1080/02770903.2019.1621888
Co-authors Alix Woolard Uon, Adam Collison, Alison Lane, Frini Karayanidis, Peter Gibson, Joerg Mattes, Linda E Campbell, Vanessa Murphy
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $8,308

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20191 grants / $3,000

Travel Scholarship$3,000

Funding body: Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle | Australia

Funding body Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle | Australia
Scheme Faculty Small Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20181 grants / $2,260

PhD Research Grant$2,260

Funding body: Apex Foundation Trust for Autism

Funding body Apex Foundation Trust for Autism
Scheme PhD Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

20171 grants / $3,048

Many Babies - Pilot International Collaboration$3,048

Funding body: Association for Psychological Science

Funding body Association for Psychological Science
Project Team Doctor Linda Campbell, Professor Frini Karayanidis, Professor Alison Lane, Ms Alix Woolard
Scheme Research Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700652
Type Of Funding C3212 - International Not for profit
Category 3212
UON Y
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Research Projects

BabyMinds- Infant Development Study 2017 -


SDPrem- Characteristics and moderators of sensory modulation in preterm infants, in the first year of life 2016 -


Breathing for Life- Infant Development 2015 -


Improving employment opportunities for autistic adults 2019 -


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Ms Alix Woolard

Positions

Casual Academic
School of Psychology
Faculty of Science

Casual Academic
School of Psychology
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email alix.woolard@newcastle.edu.au
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