Dr Alison Beck

Dr Alison Beck

Project Manager

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Alison Beck is an early-mid career researcher with part-time appointments at the University of Newcastle and University of Wollongong. She is a registered Clinical Psychologist, a member of the Australian Psychological Society College of Clinical Psychologists and is currently undertaking a PhD (Psychiatry) through the University of Newcastle. Dr Beck has considerable clinical and research experience working with adults with severe mental illness and/ or substance related disorders. She has been involved in the development, delivery and/ or evaluation of psychological interventions since 2005, including two NHMRC funded clinical trials. 

Dr Beck completed a Bachelor of Psychology at the University of Newcastle in 2004 and was awarded first class honours and a faculty medal. After completing her Professional Doctorate (Clinical Psychology) in 2009, she secured a competitive postdoctoral position at The Spectrum Centre, Lancaster University, UK. As part of her role, she worked as a facilitator on a group therapy trial for adults with experience of bipolar disorder. Upon returning to Australia, she has worked as a facilitator on a pilot trial of a group therapy intervention for adults in residential drug and alcohol settings (focusing on diet, exercise and smoking), as a Clinical Psychologist on the Mood Disorders Unit, Northside Clinic, Greenwich and more recently, as a contract Clinical Psychologist at the R.E.A.D. Clinic, Erina.  She is currently the trial-coordinator for a SMART Recovery project developing and evaluating an mHealth Routine Outcome Monitoring system. 

Dr Beck has published 20 peer-reviewed journal articles (10 as primary/ senior author), including the first systematic review of SMART Recovery evaluation articles. She has also contributed to four treatment manuals, more than twenty conference proceedings and has secured over $600,000 in funding as CI or AI. She provides regular peer reviews for a range of leading journals, including Psychological Medicine, Addiction and Addictive Behaviors.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Clinical Psychology, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Addiction
  • Behaviour Change
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Mental Health
  • Mood Disorders
  • Psychiatry
  • Substance Use

Professional Experience

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
8/1/2018 -  Trial Co-ordinator

Routine outcome monitoring (ROM) plus feedback in SMART Recovery Australia: A feasibility study examining Smart Track. This is a mixed-methods open pilot study examining the use of a novel mHealth Routine Outcome Monitoring and Feedback app (“Smart Track”) in SMART Recovery mutual support groups in New South Wales, Australia. The aim of this study is to develop and then examine the feasibility and acceptability of using a mHealth routine outcome monitoring and feedback app in SMART Recovery mutual support groups.

Responsibilities:

  • Contributing to the conceptualisation, development and modification of a mHealth ROM and feedback app for adults with experience of addictive behaviours
  • Engaging study sites and taking responsibility for managing recruitment across the 22 SMART Recovery groups held across the 12 study sites (including conducting all screening, consent and enrolment procedures)
  • Offering training and support in the use of the app to facilitators and participants across the study sites
  • Conducting baseline and follow-up assessments with study participants
  • Leading a paper detailing the theoretical underpinnings and participatory research methods used to inform app development
  • Contributing significantly to the protocol for the pilot study
Project management activities (e.g. applications for ethics, site-specific approvals and trial registration; progress monitoring reports for funding bodies and ethics committees; monitoring data transmission and participant accrual, chairing and participating in project management meetings and the steering committee).

University of Wollongong
School of Psychology
Australia
26/5/2014 - 8/6/2018 Clinical Psychologist

The R.E.A.D. Clinic, Erina was established over 25 years ago by child psychologist, author and media personality, Dr John Irvine, and his brother, Clinical Neuropsychologist, Warwick Irvine. Today the Clinic is the longest established and largest private psychology practice on the NSW Central Coast.

 Key Responsibilities:

  • Providing evidence based assessment and intervention for adults with complex psychological problems (including mood disorders, substance misuse and anxiety)

R.E.A.D. Clinic
Australia
2/7/2012 - 30/5/2014 Clinical Psychologist

Responsibilities:

  • Planning and facilitating a range of evidence based group therapy sessions
  • Working within a multidisciplinary team to plan and deliver brief, focused, evidence based interventions with individual clients
  • Offering support and guidance to intern psychologists

Northside Clinic (Mood Disorders Unit)
Australia
5/3/2012 - 31/8/2012 Group Facilitator/ Research Assistant

‘Healthy Recovery’ was a four month pilot group therapy programme led by Dr Peter Kelly in collaboration with the Salvation Army. The aim was to provide pilot data on an 8 session group therapy programme designed to assist individuals in residential drug and alcohol rehabilitation programmes to stop smoking and improve their diet and activity levels.

 

Responsibilities:

  • Facilitating an eight session group therapy programme with up to 10 clients per group
  • Developing resources to support the delivery of the group programme
  • Using a range of psychometrically validated measures to conduct comprehensive baseline assessments
  • Weekly carbon monoxide monitoring

University of Wollongong
School of Psychology
Australia
5/4/2010 - 30/11/2011 Senior Research Associate

The Spectrum Centre is dedicated to psychological research into bipolar disorder and associated conditions. Key roles of the Spectrum Centre include a) the development, evaluation and dissemination of novel support options for service users and their families b) research into the psychological factors involved in the onset and maintenance of bipolar spectrum disorders and c) education and training.

Responsibilities

  • Working alongside a psychiatric nurse and service user to facilitate both arms (psychoeducation and peer support) of a 21 session group therapy trial
  • Listening to SCID interviews and providing clinical feedback to junior staff members
  • Leading on the design and development of a case series study to explore a recovery focused CBT intervention
  • Writing grant applications for competitive funding bodies (including the Wellcome Trust and Medical Research Council)

Special Projects

  • Working with Prof Steven Jones to co-edit a Special Edition (Self Management) for the Journal of Mental Health
  • Implementing and co-ordinating monthly peer clinical supervision sessions

Lancaster University
Spectrum Centre for Mental Health Research
United Kingdom
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (29 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Beck AK, Larance B, Deane FP, Baker AL, Manning V, Hides L, et al., 'The use of Australian SMART Recovery groups by people who use methamphetamine: Analysis of routinely-collected nationwide data', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 225 (2021)

Introduction: Mutual support groups (e.g. SMART Recovery) are an important source of support for people experiencing addictive behaviours. Little is known about the use of mutual ... [more]

Introduction: Mutual support groups (e.g. SMART Recovery) are an important source of support for people experiencing addictive behaviours. Little is known about the use of mutual support groups by people who use methamphetamine, or the factors that may influence group cohesion. Methods: This study uses post-group data reported by SMART Recovery facilitators in Australia between 2018 and 2020. Group cohesion was indexed by facilitator ratings of The Group Entitativity measure (GEM-GP). Participant characteristics (gender, age, new or returning group member, voluntary or mandated attendance) and group location (major city vs. regional/remote vs. online) were used to (a) compare methamphetamine and non-methamphetamine related attendances; and (b) explore relationships to group cohesion within groups where the majority attended for methamphetamine. Results: Methamphetamine use was the second most common reason for attending SMART Recovery groups (n = 4929; 22.2 % service occasions). Methamphetamine-related service occasions were more likely amongst men, people aged <45 years, returning attendees and regional/rural groups (allp < .05). GEM-GP scores were high (signalling strong cohesion), and did not significantly differ according to proportion of participants attending for methamphetamine (F(1,2) = 0.482, p = .618). Group cohesion increased with larger group size, proportion of women and proportion of younger people (F(4, 504) = 11.058, p < .001)). Discussion and conclusions: This study improves current understanding of service utilisation by people who use methamphetamine. SMART Recovery groups offer an avenue for supporting a diverse range of people who use methamphetamine, outside the formal treatment system. This provides an important foundation for improving community support options for people who use methamphetamine.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2021.108814
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2021 Hall K, Youssef G, Simpson A, Sloan E, Graeme L, Perry N, et al., 'An Emotion Regulation and Impulse Control (ERIC) Intervention for Vulnerable Young People: A Multi-Sectoral Pilot Study', Frontiers in Psychology, 12 (2021) [C1]

Objective: There is a demonstrated link between the mental health and substance use comorbidities experienced by young adults, however the vast majority of psychological intervent... [more]

Objective: There is a demonstrated link between the mental health and substance use comorbidities experienced by young adults, however the vast majority of psychological interventions are disorder specific. Novel psychological approaches that adequately acknowledge the psychosocial complexity and transdiagnostic needs of vulnerable young people are urgently needed. A modular skills-based program for emotion regulation and impulse control (ERIC) addresses this gap. The current one armed open trial was designed to evaluate the impact that 12 weeks exposure to ERIC alongside usual care had on young people's ability to regulate emotions, as well as examine potential moderating mechanisms. Methods: Seventy nine young people (50.6% male; M = 19.30; SD = 2.94) were enrolled to the 12 week intervention period. Twenty one practitioners from youth and community health services delivered relevant ERIC modules adjunct to usual care. Linear mixed effects regression (with random intercept) was used to examine change over time across the primary outcome of emotion dysregulation and secondary outcomes of depression, anxiety, stress, experiential avoidance and mindfulness. Moderation analyses were conducted to test whether the magnitude of change in emotion dysregulation moderated change over time in secondary outcomes. Results: Analyses revealed significant improvement in the primary outcome of emotion dysregulation with a moderate effect size (Mean Change = -10.24, 95% CI (-14.41, -6.06; Cohen's dav = -0.53), in addition to decreases in the secondary outcomes of depression, anxiety, stress and experiential avoidance. No improvements in mindfulness were reported. Moderation analyses revealed that the residualised change over time in emotion dysregulation moderated the change over time in symptoms of distress, depression, anxiety, stress, experiential avoidance, and mindfulness. Conclusion: Reductions in the severity of emotion dysregulation, depression, anxiety, stress and experiential avoidance are promising, and were evident despite the complexity of the participants and the diversity of the service setting. The improvements found in each outcome were only observed for those young people whose emotion regulation also improved, providing preliminary evidence for the role of emotion regulation as a key treatment target in this population.

DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.554100
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2021 Kelly PJ, Baker AL, Deane FP, Callister R, Collins CE, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Healthy recovery: A stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial of a healthy lifestyle intervention for people attending residential alcohol and other drug treatment', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 221 (2021) [C1]

Background: Unhealthy lifestyle behaviours contribute to the poor health of people attending alcohol and other drug (AOD) treatment. Healthy Recovery is an 8-session group-based i... [more]

Background: Unhealthy lifestyle behaviours contribute to the poor health of people attending alcohol and other drug (AOD) treatment. Healthy Recovery is an 8-session group-based intervention that targets smoking, diet and physical inactivity as part of an integrated healthy lifestyle approach. The current study aimed to examine the effectiveness of Healthy Recovery when delivered within residential AOD treatment settings. Methods: The study design was a stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial. Participants were 151 current smokers attending residential AOD programs provided by the Australian Salvation Army (n = 71, Control condition; n = 80, Intervention condition). The primary outcome was number of cigarettes smoked per day. Secondary outcomes examined other smoking behaviours (7-day point prevalence, use of nicotine replacement therapy [NRT]), diet (servings and variety of fruit and vegetables), and physical activity. Results: The mean number of cigarettes smoked per day was significantly lower in the Intervention condition at 2-, 5-, and 8-month follow-up. There were also significant differences in favour of the Intervention condition for number of quit attempts, use of NRT and variety of fruit. There were no other significant differences for other dietary or physical activity variables. Conclusions: Healthy Recovery had a positive impact on smoking behaviours. Future research should consider strategies to further promote smoking cessation (e.g. promoting longer-term use of NRT), as well as addressing physical activity and dietary behaviours. The introduction of broader organisational approaches (e.g. smoke free policies, organised group exercise and cooking activities) might help to enhance healthy lifestyle approaches within AOD treatment settings.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2021.108557
Co-authors Clare Collins, Christopher Oldmeadow, Robin Callister, Amanda Baker
2021 Beck AK, Kelly PJ, Deane FP, Baker AL, Hides L, Manning V, et al., 'Developing a mHealth Routine Outcome Monitoring and Feedback App ("SMART Track") to Support Self-Management of Addictive Behaviours', FRONTIERS IN PSYCHIATRY, 12 (2021)
DOI 10.3389/fpsyt.2021.677637
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2021 Beck AK, Baker AL, Carter G, Robinson L, McCarter K, Wratten C, et al., 'Is fidelity to a complex behaviour change intervention associated with patient outcomes? Exploring the relationship between dietitian adherence and competence and the nutritional status of intervention patients in a successful stepped-wedge randomised clinical trial of eating as treatment (EAT).', Implement Sci, 16 46 (2021)
DOI 10.1186/s13012-021-01118-y
Co-authors Gregory Carter, Amanda Baker, Kristen Mccarter, Luke Wolfenden, Benjamin Britton
2020 Gray RM, Kelly PJ, Beck AK, Baker AL, Deane FP, Neale J, et al., 'A qualitative exploration of SMART Recovery meetings in Australia and the role of a digital platform to support routine outcome monitoring', ADDICTIVE BEHAVIORS, 101 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.106144
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2020 Beck AK, Baker AL, Carter G, Wratten C, Bauer J, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Assessing adherence, competence and differentiation in a stepped-wedge randomised clinical trial of a complex behaviour change intervention', Nutrients, 12 1-18 (2020) [C1]

Background: A key challenge in behavioural medicine is developing interventions that can be delivered adequately (i.e., with fidelity) within real-world consultations. Accordingly... [more]

Background: A key challenge in behavioural medicine is developing interventions that can be delivered adequately (i.e., with fidelity) within real-world consultations. Accordingly, clinical trials should (but tend not to) report what is actually delivered (adherence), how well (competence) and the distinction between intervention and comparator conditions (differentiation). Purpose: To address this important clinical and research priority, we apply best practice guidelines to evaluate fidelity within a real-world, stepped-wedge evaluation of ¿EAT: Eating As Treatment¿, a new dietitian delivered health behaviour change intervention designed to reduce malnutrition in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients undergoing radiotherapy. Methods: Dietitians (n = 18) from five Australian hospitals delivered a period of routine care and following a randomly determined order each site received training and began delivering the EAT Intervention. A 20% random stratified sample of audio-recorded consultations (control n = 196; intervention n = 194) was coded by trained, independent, raters using a study specific checklist and the Behaviour Change Counselling Inventory. Intervention adherence and competence were examined relative to apriori benchmarks. Differentiation was examined by comparing control and intervention sessions (adherence, competence, non-specific factors, and dose), via multiple linear regression, logistic regression, or mixed-models. Results: Achievement of adherence benchmarks varied. The majority of sessions attained competence. Post-training consultations were clearly distinct from routine care regarding motivational and behavioural, but not generic, skills. Conclusions: Although what level of fidelity is ¿good enough¿ remains an important research question, findings support the real-world feasibility of integrating EAT into dietetic consultations with HNC patients and provide a foundation for interpreting treatment effects.

DOI 10.3390/nu12082332
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Benjamin Britton, Amanda Baker, Gregory Carter, Kristen Mccarter, Luke Wolfenden
2020 Kelly PJ, Beck AK, Baker AL, Deane FP, Hides L, Manning V, et al., 'Feasibility of a mobile health app for routine outcome monitoring and feedback in mutual support groups coordinated by SMART recovery Australia: Protocol for a pilot study', JMIR Research Protocols, 9 (2020)

Background: Despite the importance and popularity of mutual support groups, there have been no systematic attempts to implement and evaluate routine outcome monitoring (ROM) in th... [more]

Background: Despite the importance and popularity of mutual support groups, there have been no systematic attempts to implement and evaluate routine outcome monitoring (ROM) in these settings. Unlike other mutual support groups for addiction, trained facilitators lead all Self-Management and Recovery Training (SMART Recovery) groups, thereby providing an opportunity to implement ROM as a routine component of SMART Recovery groups. Objective: This study protocol aims to describe a stage 1 pilot study designed to explore the feasibility and acceptability of a novel, purpose-built mobile health (mHealth) ROM and feedback app (Smart Track) in SMART Recovery groups coordinated by SMART Recovery Australia (SRAU) The secondary objectives are to describe Smart Track usage patterns, explore psychometric properties of the ROM items (ie, internal reliability and convergent and divergent validity), and provide preliminary evidence for participant reported outcomes (such as alcohol and other drug use, self-reported recovery, and mental health). Methods: Participants (n=100) from the SMART Recovery groups across New South Wales, Australia, will be recruited to a nonrandomized, prospective, single-arm trial of the Smart Track app. There are 4 modes of data collection: (1) ROM data collected from group participants via the Smart Track app, (2) data analytics summarizing user interactions with Smart Track, (3) quantitative interview and survey data of group participants (baseline, 2-week follow-up, and 2-month follow-up), and (4) qualitative interviews with group participants (n=20) and facilitators (n=10). Feasibility and acceptability (primary objectives) will be analyzed using descriptive statistics, a cost analysis, and a qualitative evaluation. Results: At the time of submission, 13 sites (25 groups per week) had agreed to be involved. Funding was awarded on August 14, 2017, and ethics approval was granted on April 26, 2018 (HREC/18/WGONG/34; 2018/099). Enrollment is due to commence in July 2019. Data collection is due to be finalized in October 2019. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to use ROM and tailored feedback within a mutual support group setting for addictive behaviors. Our study design will provide an opportunity to identify the acceptability of a novel mHealth ROM and feedback app within this setting and provide detailed information on what factors promote or hinder ROM usage within this context. This project aims to offer a new tool, should Smart Track prove feasible and acceptable, that service providers, policy makers, and researchers could use in the future to understand the impact of SMART Recovery groups.

DOI 10.2196/15113
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Amanda Baker, Andrew Searles
2019 Murray R, Baker A, Halpin S, Britton B, McCarter K, Palazzi K, Beck AK, 'Therapeutic Alliance Between Dietitians and Patients With Head and Neck Cancer: The Effect of Training in a Health Behavior Change Intervention', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 53 756-768 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/abm/kay083
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Kristen Mccarter, Sean Halpin, Benjamin Britton
2019 Britton B, Baker AL, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, Bauer J, Beck AK, et al., 'A Randomised Controlled Trial of a Health Behaviour Change Intervention Provided by Dietitians to Improve Nutrition in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Radiotherapy (TROG 12.03) Reply', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS, 103 1283-1284 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2018.12.017
Co-authors Benjamin Britton, Christopher Oldmeadow, Kristen Mccarter, Gregory Carter, Luke Wolfenden, Amanda Baker
2019 Beck AK, Forbes E, Baker AL, Britton B, Oldmeadow C, Carter G, 'Adapted motivational interviewing for brief healthcare consultations: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis of treatment fidelity in real-world evaluations of behaviour change counselling', BMJ OPEN, 9 (2019)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-028417
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Gregory Carter, Benjamin Britton, Amanda Baker, Christopher Oldmeadow, Erin Forbes
2019 Kelly PJ, Baker AL, Townsend CJ, Deane FP, Callister R, Collins CE, et al., 'Healthy Recovery: A Pilot Study of a Smoking and Other Health Behavior Change Intervention for People Attending Residential Alcohol and Other Substance Dependence Treatment', JOURNAL OF DUAL DIAGNOSIS, 15 207-216 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/15504263.2019.1612537
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Amanda Baker
2018 McCarter KL, Baker A, Britton B, Halpin S, Beck A, Carter G, et al., 'Head and neck cancer patient experience of a new dietitian-delivered health behaviour intervention: "You know you have to eat to survive ', SUPPORTIVE CARE IN CANCER, 26 2167-2175 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-017-4029-5
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Gregory Carter, Kristen Mccarter, Luke Wolfenden, Amanda Baker, Benjamin Britton, Sean Halpin, Erin Forbes
2018 McCarter KL, Baker A, Britton B, Beck A, Carter G, Bauer J, et al., 'Effectiveness of clinical practice change strategies in improving dietitian care for head and neck cancer patients according to evidence based clinical guidelines: A stepped wedge randomised controlled trial.', Translational Behavioral Medicine, 8 166-174 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/tbm/ibx016
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Benjamin Britton, Luke Wolfenden, Amanda Baker, Sean Halpin, Christopher Oldmeadow, Kristen Mccarter, Gregory Carter
2018 Baker AL, Turner A, Beck A, Berry K, Haddock G, Kelly PJ, Bucci S, 'Telephone-delivered psychosocial interventions targeting key health priorities in adults with a psychotic disorder: Systematic review', Psychological Medicine, 48 2637-2657 (2018) [C1]

Background The mental and physical health of individuals with a psychotic illness are typically poor. Access to psychosocial interventions is important but currently limited. Tele... [more]

Background The mental and physical health of individuals with a psychotic illness are typically poor. Access to psychosocial interventions is important but currently limited. Telephone-delivered interventions may assist. In the current systematic review, we aim to summarise and critically analyse evidence for telephone-delivered psychosocial interventions targeting key health priorities in adults with a psychotic disorder, including (i) relapse, (ii) adherence to psychiatric medication and/or (iii) modifiable cardiovascular disease risk behaviours.Methods Ten peer-reviewed and four grey literature databases were searched for English-language studies examining psychosocial telephone-delivered interventions targeting relapse, medication adherence and/or health behaviours in adults with a psychotic disorder. Study heterogeneity precluded meta-analyses.Results Twenty trials [13 randomised controlled trials (RCTs)] were included, involving 2473 participants (relapse prevention = 867; medication adherence = 1273; and health behaviour = 333). Five of eight RCTs targeting relapse prevention and one of three targeting medication adherence reported at least 50% of outcomes in favour of the telephone-delivered intervention. The two health-behaviour RCTs found comparable levels of improvement across treatment conditions.Conclusions Although most interventions combined telephone and face-to-face delivery, there was evidence to support the benefit of entirely telephone-delivered interventions. Telephone interventions represent a potentially feasible and effective option for improving key health priorities among people with psychotic disorders. Further methodologically rigorous evaluations are warranted.

DOI 10.1017/S0033291718001125
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2018 McCarter K, Baker A, Britton B, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, bauer J, et al., 'Smoking, drinking, and depression: comorbidity in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy', Cancer Medicine, 7 2382-2390 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/cam4.1497
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Benjamin Britton, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher Oldmeadow, Sean Halpin, Kristen Mccarter, Gregory Carter, Amanda Baker
2018 Beck AK, Baker A, Jones S, Lobban F, Kay-Lambkin F, Attia J, Banfield M, 'Exploring the feasibility and acceptability of a recovery-focused group therapy intervention for adults with bipolar disorder: Trial protocol', BMJ Open, 8 (2018)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-019203
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin, John Attia, Amanda Baker
2018 McCarter K, Britton B, Baker AL, Halpin SA, Beck AK, Carter G, et al., 'Interventions to improve screening and appropriate referral of patients with cancer for psychosocial distress: Systematic review', BMJ Open, 8 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017959
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Benjamin Britton, Erin Forbes, Sean Halpin, Kristen Mccarter, Gregory Carter, Luke Wolfenden, Amanda Baker
2017 Beck AK, Britton B, Baker A, Odelli C, Wratten C, Bauer J, et al., 'Preliminary report: training head and neck cancer dietitians in behaviour change counselling', Psycho-Oncology, 26 405-407 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pon.4129
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Benjamin Britton, Amanda Baker, Gregory Carter
2017 Beck AK, Forbes E, Baker AL, Kelly PJ, Deane FP, Shakeshaft A, et al., 'Systematic review of SMART Recovery: Outcomes, process variables, and implications for research.</', Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 31 1-20 (2017) [C1]

Clinical guidelines recommend Self-Management and Recovery Training (SMART Recovery) and 12-step models of mutual aid as important sources of long-term support for addiction recov... [more]

Clinical guidelines recommend Self-Management and Recovery Training (SMART Recovery) and 12-step models of mutual aid as important sources of long-term support for addiction recovery. Methodologically rigorous reviews of the efficacy and potential mechanisms of change are available for the predominant 12-step approach. A similarly rigorous exploration of SMART Recovery has yet to be undertaken. We aim to address this gap by providing a systematic overview of the evidence for SMART Recovery in adults with problematic alcohol, substance, and/or behavioral addiction, including (i) a commentary on outcomes assessed, process variables, feasibility, current understanding of mental health outcomes, and (ii) a critical evaluation of the methodology. We searched six electronic peer-reviewed and four gray literature databases for English-language SMART Recovery literature. Articles were classified, assessed against standardized criteria, and checked by an independent assessor. Twelve studies (including three evaluations of effectiveness) were identified. Alcohol-related outcomes were the primary focus. Standardized assessment of nonalcohol substance use was infrequent. Information about behavioral addiction was restricted to limited prevalence data. Functional outcomes were rarely reported. Feasibility was largely indexed by attendance. Economic analysis has not been undertaken. Little is known about the variables that may influence treatment outcome, but attendance represents a potential candidate. Assessment and reporting of mental health status was poor. Although positive effects were found, the modest sample and diversity of methods prevent us from making conclusive remarks about efficacy. Further research is needed to understand the clinical and public health utility of SMART as a viable recovery support option.

DOI 10.1037/adb0000237
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Erin Forbes, Amanda Baker
2016 McCarter K, Martinez U, Britton B, Baker A, Bonevski B, Carter G, et al., 'Smoking cessation care among patients with head and neck cancer: a systematic review', BMJ OPEN, 6 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012296
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 57
Co-authors Sean Halpin, Benjamin Britton, Amanda Baker, Luke Wolfenden, Gregory Carter, Billie Bonevski, Kristen Mccarter, Ashleigh Guillaumier
2016 Beck AK, Baker A, Kelly PJ, Deane FP, Shakeshaft A, Hunt D, et al., 'Protocol for a systematic review of evaluation research for adults who have participated in the "SMART recovery' mutual support programme', BMJ OPEN, 6 (2016)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-009934
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Erin Forbes, Amanda Baker
2015 Beck AK, Baker A, Turner A, Haddock G, Kelly PJ, Berry K, Bucci S, 'Protocol for a systematic review of telephone delivered psychosocial interventions on relapse prevention, adherence to psychiatric medication and health risk behaviours in adults with a psychotic disorder', BMJ OPEN, 5 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-009985
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2015 Beck AK, Baker AL, Todd J, 'Smoking in schizophrenia: Cognitive impact of nicotine and relationship to smoking motivators', Schizophrenia Research: Cognition, 2 26-32 (2015) [C1]

Smoking prevalence in schizophrenia is significantly elevated relative to other clinical and to non-clinical groups. The cognitive self-medication hypothesis attributes this to th... [more]

Smoking prevalence in schizophrenia is significantly elevated relative to other clinical and to non-clinical groups. The cognitive self-medication hypothesis attributes this to the beneficial effects of nicotine on illness-related cognitive deficits. Significant effects of nicotine have been observed on visual spatial working memory (VSWM), sustained attention (Continuous Performance Test - Identical Pairs; CPT-IP) and prepulse inhibition (PPI). It remains unclear whether these neurophysiological and neurocognitive effects of nicotine influence self-reported smoking motivation. To explore the relationship between nicotine effects on cognition and self-reported smoking motivation in schizophrenia and non-psychiatric control smokers, the impact of smoking abstinence and reinstatement was examined across three cognitive indices (VSWM, CPT-IP, PPI) and compared to self-reported smoking motivation (Modified Reasons for Smoking Scale revised to include 'cognitive motivators'). Cognitive function was assessed after 'typical' smoking and overnight abstinence. Schizophrenia smokers (but not controls) demonstrated significantly less error on the VSWM task in the smoking relative to abstinent condition. Control (but not schizophrenia) smokers, showed evidence of CPT-IP improvement in the smoking relative to abstinent condition. The overall profile of smoking motivation was comparable between groups. However, significant relationships between subjective and objective indices of smoking related cognitive change were observed for controls. Differential effects of nicotine on cognition have been hypothesised to influence the pattern and persistence of smoking in schizophrenia. These preliminary findings indicate that evidence for such effects is apparent even in small samples - particularly for VSWM. This is the first study to show that neurocognitive effects of smoking may influence self-reported smoking motivation.

DOI 10.1016/j.scog.2014.12.001
Citations Scopus - 11
Co-authors Juanita Todd, Amanda Baker
2015 McCarter KL, Britton B, Baker A, Halpin S, Beck A, Carter G, et al., 'Interventions to improve screening and appropriate referral of patients with cancer for distress: Systematic review protocol', BMJ Open, 5 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008277
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Sean Halpin, Kristen Mccarter, Erin Forbes, Luke Wolfenden, Gregory Carter, Amanda Baker, Benjamin Britton
2015 Britton B, McCarter K, Baker A, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, Bauer J, et al., 'Eating As Treatment (EAT) study protocol: a stepped-wedge, randomised controlled trial of a health behaviour change intervention provided by dietitians to improve nutrition in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy.', BMJ open, 5 e008921 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008921
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Sean Halpin, Patrick Mcelduff, Benjamin Britton, Kristen Mccarter, Luke Wolfenden, Amanda Baker, Gregory Carter
2015 Beck AK, Baker A, Britton B, Wratten C, Bauer J, Wolfenden L, Carter G, 'Fidelity considerations in translational research: Eating As Treatment - a stepped wedge, randomised controlled trial of a dietitian delivered behaviour change counselling intervention for head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy', Trials, 16 (2015) [C3]

Background: The confidence with which researchers can comment on intervention efficacy relies on evaluation and consideration of intervention fidelity. Accordingly, there have bee... [more]

Background: The confidence with which researchers can comment on intervention efficacy relies on evaluation and consideration of intervention fidelity. Accordingly, there have been calls to increase the transparency with which fidelity methodology is reported. Despite this, consideration and/or reporting of fidelity methods remains poor. We seek to address this gap by describing the methodology for promoting and facilitating the evaluation of intervention fidelity in The EAT (Eating As Treatment) project: a multi-site stepped wedge randomised controlled trial of a dietitian delivered behaviour change counselling intervention to improve nutrition (primary outcome) in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Methods/Design: In accordance with recommendations from the National Institutes of Health Behaviour Change Consortium Treatment Fidelity Workgroup, we sought to maximise fidelity in this stepped wedge randomised controlled trial via strategies implemented from study design through to provider training, intervention delivery and receipt. As the EAT intervention is designed to be incorporated into standard dietetic consultations, we also address unique challenges for translational research. Discussion: We offer a strong model for improving the quality of translational findings via real world application of National Institutes of Health Behaviour Change Consortium recommendations. Greater transparency in the reporting of behaviour change research is an important step in improving the progress and quality of behaviour change research. Trial registration number:ACTRN12613000320752(Date of registration 21 March 2013)

DOI 10.1186/s13063-015-0978-5
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Benjamin Britton, Amanda Baker, Gregory Carter, Luke Wolfenden
2011 Jones S, Beck A, Deville M, 'Enhancing self-management for service users and carers: How can technology help?', JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH, 20 505-508 (2011)
DOI 10.3109/09638237.2011.608751
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2005 Beck AK, Tape N, Hodgson DM, 'Impact of early-life infection on pain perception: A developmental perspective', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 57 184-184 (2005)
Co-authors Deborah Hodgson
Show 26 more journal articles

Conference (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Beck AK, Baker AL, Carter G, Wratten C, Bauer J, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Oral Presentation Abstracts', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2020)
Co-authors Kristen Mccarter, Gregory Carter, Luke Wolfenden, Benjamin Britton, Amanda Baker
2019 Britton B, Baker AL, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, Bauer J, Beck AK, et al., 'Eating As Treatment (EAT): A Stepped-Wedge, Randomized Controlled Trial of a Health Behavior Change Intervention Provided by Dietitians to Improve Nutrition in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy (TROG 12.03)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2018.09.027
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Gregory Carter, Kristen Mccarter, Patrick Mcelduff, Amanda Baker, Benjamin Britton, Christopher Oldmeadow
2017 Britton B, Wratten C, Baker A, Wolfenden L, Bauer J, Beck A, Carter G, 'Eating As Treatment: A Stepped Wedge Randomized Controlled Trial to Improve Nutrition in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS, San Diego, CA (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2017.06.283
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Gregory Carter, Amanda Baker, Benjamin Britton
2017 Britton B, Baker A, Beck A, McCarter K, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, Bauer J, 'Eating as Treatment (EAT): Improving Treatment Outcomes for Head and Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy with a Health Behavior Intervention', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Luke Wolfenden, Benjamin Britton
2016 Britton B, McCarter K, Beck A, Baker A, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, et al., 'EATING AS TREATMENT (EAT): A HEALTH BEHAVIOR CHANGE INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE TREATMENT OUTCOMES FOR HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS UNDERGOING RADIOTHERAPY', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Gregory Carter, Amanda Baker, Kristen Mccarter, Sean Halpin, Benjamin Britton
2015 McCarter K, Wolfenden L, Baker A, Britton B, Beck A, Carter G, et al., 'A CLINICAL PRACTICE CHANGE INTERVENTION TO INCREASE DIETITIAN PROVISION OF DEPRESSION SCREENING AND REFERRAL FOR HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Sean Halpin, Benjamin Britton, Amanda Baker, Gregory Carter, Luke Wolfenden, Patrick Mcelduff, Kristen Mccarter
2015 McCarter K, Baker A, Britton B, Carter G, Beck A, Bauer J, et al., 'CONTINUED TOBACCO SMOKING, ALCOHOL USE AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS IN A SAMPLE OF HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS ABOUT TO UNDERGO RADIOTHERAPY', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Kristen Mccarter, Luke Wolfenden, Gregory Carter, Amanda Baker, Benjamin Britton, Sean Halpin, Patrick Mcelduff
2014 McCarter K, Baker AL, Britton B, Beck A, Carter G, Bauer J, et al., 'PREVALENCE OF ALCOHOL USE AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS IN A SAMPLE OF HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS ABOUT TO UNDERGO RADIOTHERAPY', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Sean Halpin, Kristen Mccarter, Luke Wolfenden, Gregory Carter, Amanda Baker, Benjamin Britton, Patrick Mcelduff
2014 McCarter K, Forbes E, Baker A, Britton B, Beck A, Carter G, et al., 'PREVALENCE OF TOBACCO SMOKING IN A SAMPLE OF HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS ABOUT TO UNDERGO RADIOTHERAPY', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Erin Forbes, Billie Bonevski, Luke Wolfenden, Gregory Carter, Amanda Baker, Patrick Mcelduff, Sean Halpin, Kristen Mccarter, Benjamin Britton
Show 6 more conferences

Report (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin F, Geddes J, Beck A, Sakrouge R, Filia S, et al., 'Treatment Manual for Health Lifestyles Program, Session 1, March 2010', Centre for Brain and Mental Health Research, University of Newcastle (2010)
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Frances Kaylambkin
2010 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin F, Geddes J, Beck A, Sakrouge R, Filia S, et al., 'Treatment Manual for Health Lifestyles Program (Telephone Follow Up), March 2010', Centre for Brain and Mental Health Research, University of Newcastle. (2010)
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Frances Kaylambkin
2010 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin F, Geddes J, Beck A, Sakrouge R, Filia S, et al., 'Treatment Manual for Health Lifestyles Program, Sessions 2-11, March 2010', Centre for Brain and Mental Health Research, University of Newcastle. (2010)
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Frances Kaylambkin
2009 Baker AL, Kay-Lambkin F, Beck A, Geddes J, Sakrouge R, Filia S, Turner A, 'Contingency Management Resource Booklet for Healthy Lifestyles Program, August 2009', Centre for Brain and Mental Health Research, University of Newcastle. (2009)
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Frances Kaylambkin
Show 1 more report
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 7
Total funding $689,205

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20192 grants / $252,950

FullFix: A pilot randomised control trial of a telephone delivered transdiagnostic intervention for comorbid substance and mental health problems in young people$230,950

Funding body: Australian Rotary Health

Funding body Australian Rotary Health
Project Team

Hides, L., Walter, Z., Elphinston, R., Quinn, C., De Andrade, D., Dingle, G., Toombs, M., Baker, A., Beck., A

Scheme Mental Health Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

StartSMART: Engaging Young People in a SMART Recovery program for substance use$22,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Kristen McCarter, Doctor Kylie Bailey, Doctor Alison Beck, Dr Stephen Hirneth, Associate Professor Peter Kelly, Dr Leanne Hides, Dr Angela Argent
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1901496
Type Of Funding C3300 – Aust Philanthropy
Category 3300
UON Y

20183 grants / $408,913

Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM) plus feedback in SMART Recovery Australia: A feasibility study examining SMART ROM. $358,913

Funding body: New South Wales health

Funding body New South Wales health
Project Team

McGlaughlin, R., Kelly, P., Baker, A., Deane, F., Shakeshaft, A., Hides, L., Kelly, J., Neale, J., Oldmeadow, C., Searles, A., Beck, A. & Argent, A.

Scheme Alcohol and Other Drugs Early Intervention Innovation Fund
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

Translating Eating as Treatment for Head and Neck Cancer (TREAT)$30,000

Funding body: HCRA Hunter Cancer Research Alliance

Funding body HCRA Hunter Cancer Research Alliance
Project Team

Britton, B., Baker, A., Beck, A., Carter, G., Wratten, C., Bauer, J., Wolfenden, L. & McCarter, K.

Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

Translating Eating as Treatment for Head and Neck Cancer (TREAT)$20,000

Funding body: NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation (ACI)

Funding body NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation (ACI)
Project Team Doctor Ben Britton, Professor Amanda Baker, Doctor Kristen McCarter, Doctor Alison Beck, Conjoint Professor Gregory Carter, Doctor Chris Wratten
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800807
Type Of Funding C2300 – Aust StateTerritoryLocal – Own Purpose
Category 2300
UON Y

20171 grants / $7,593

Head and neck cancer patient experience of EAT: A new dietitian-delivered health behaviour intervention$7,593

Funding body: Calvary Mater Newcastle

Funding body Calvary Mater Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Kristen McCarter, Professor Amanda Baker, Associate Professor Sean Halpin, Doctor Ben Britton, Doctor Alison Beck, Conjoint Professor Gregory Carter, Doctor Chris Wratten, Professor Luke Wolfenden, Associate Professor Judith Bauer
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700913
Type Of Funding C3200 – Aust Not-for Profit
Category 3200
UON Y

20141 grants / $19,749

Improving radiotherapy outcomes with smoking cessation: Pilot trial in had and neck cancer patients$19,749

Funding body: Calvary Mater Newcastle

Funding body Calvary Mater Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Ben Britton, Professor Amanda Baker, Doctor Chris Wratten, Conjoint Professor Gregory Carter, Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Alison Beck, Doctor Craig Sadler, Associate Professor Judith Bauer
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400766
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y
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Dr Alison Beck

Position

Project Manager
School of Medicine and Public Health
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Contact Details

Email alison.beck@newcastle.edu.au
Phone Reception: (02) 4033 5690
Mobile 0409942847

Office

Room Room 5016
Building McAuley Centre, Mater Hospital
Location Room 5016, McAuley Centre, Mater Hospital

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