The University of Newcastle, Australia

2015 ASICS Award winners

Thursday, 29 October 2015

The Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition's (PAN) Professor David Lubans and Professor Philip Morgan have both been recognised with 'Best Paper' awards at the 2015 Asics Sports Medicine Australia Conference.

Professor Philip Morgan with General Manager of Asics Oceania Mark Doherty at the 2015 Asics Sports Medicine Australia Conference.
Professor Philip Morgan with General Manager of Asics Oceania Mark Doherty at the 2015 Asics Sports Medicine Australia Conference.

This is a nationally-recognised achievement that was initiated by the Australian Sports Medicine Federation Fellows – an elite group within Sports Medicine Australia – in 1985.

Professor Lubans and his Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time (ATLAS) project team: Jordan Smith, Philip Morgan, Kerry Dally, Andrew Miller, Mark Beauchamp, Chris Lonsdale and Phil Parker, received a 'Best Paper – Exercise Science' award for their article titled Improving muscular fitness enhances psychological wellbeing in low income adolescent boys: findings from the ATLAS cluster RCT.

The ATLAS project is supported by an ARC Discovery Project grant and involves a collaboration with the NSW Department of Education School Sport Unit.

Professor Morgan's program 'Dads and Daughters Exercising and Empowering (DADEE)' program received a 'Best Paper – Physical Activity and Health Promotion' award for the article Engaging dads to increase physical activity and well-being in girls: The DADEE (Dads And Daughters Exercising and Empowered) RCT. His team includes David Lubans, Alyce Barnes, Myles Young, Narelle Eather and Emma Pollock.

Sponsored by Port Waratah Coal Services, Hunter Children's Research Foundation and Hunter Medical Research Foundation, DADEEis a world-first lifestyle program developed to enhance the physical and social-emotional wellbeing of young girls.

Research shows that more than 80 per cent of girls fail to meet physical activity recommendations and fewer than 10 per cent can adequately perform fundamental movement skills such as kicking and throwing – results that are significantly worse than for boys of the same age.

Professor Morgan says fathers are one of the key role models and motivators in a girl's life.

"Our research has demonstrated the unique and powerful influence dads can wield in shaping physical activity behaviours, self-esteem, social skills and resilience of their daughters," Professor Morgan said.

Find out more

Contact
  • Wayne.Durand@newcastle.edu.au

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