Dr Vincent Candrawinata

Dr Vincent Candrawinata

Conjoint Fellow

School of Environmental and Life Sciences

Fruitful experiments

From solving complex industry problems to helping the public with functional food supplements, food science researcher Dr Vincent Candrawinata is certainly one to watch.

Vincent CandrawinataSecuring his Philosophy Doctorate at the tender age of 25, Vincent is an up-and-coming researcher and innovator within the University of Newcastle's School of Environmental and Life Sciences.

Apples and Oranges

Encouraged by lecturers to continue university studies, Vincent elected to undertake an Honours thesis and PhD after completing his undergraduate degree.

One of the things that sparked the graduate's interest was a comment made by his soon-to-be Honours supervisor, Professor Costas Stathopoulos, who simply asked Vincent to make apple juice from produce grown in Orange, New South Wales

"I said, 'Costas, this will win us a Nobel Prize; how will we make apple juice from oranges?'" Vincent recalls.

"Not being from Australia I didn't know that Orange is a town six hours away from the University," the Indonesian national chuckles.

Funded and supported by Horticulture Australia, NSW Department of Primary Industries and the University of Newcastle's Faculty of Science and IT Strategic Research Initiative Fund to tackle an ongoing problem faced by Apple Juice producers in Australia, Vincent's Honours program sought for the means to end their inability to compete with the low price of apple juice concentrate imported from China.

"It was so problematic that even if Australian manufacturers were given apples to process for free, the costs of labour, packaging and distribution would be more expensive than importing concentrate," Vincent shares.

"At first glance, there is not much difference between those made from imported concentrates and fresh Australian apples."

My Honours project concluded that juices made from Australian apples are higher in phenolic compounds than those from imported concentrates

"Phenolics are a natural compound in fruits and vegetables possessing very high antioxidant activity."

Studies show that these compounds are linked to reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases, respiratory diseases and even cancer. Vincent also discovered that the juicing process transfers these compounds to waste material: pomace.

"It could not just vanish into thin air," Vincent posits.

Promising pomace

Expanding upon his findings with encouragement from Professor Costas Stathopoulos, Dr John Golding and Dr Paul Roach, Vincent determined how to safely extract phenolics from pomace.

"We could have let the juice capitalise on its status as higher in antioxidant activity than imported concentrate drinks, or we could also create something out of a waste product with no value," Vincent says.

This PhD project was part of the ground-breaking Central Coast research partnership between the University of Newcastle and NSW Department of Primary Industries. This is an exemplary project of a successful collaboration with university, government and industry to solve industry problems.

"Having access to the combined knowledge and expertise of my University supervisor, Professor Costas Stathopoulos and Dr Paul Roach, as well as Dr John Golding—who is a Research Horticulturalist under NSW DPI and has kindly contributed his time and efforts into this project—has been invaluable to developing my project to ensure that my results will be useful for industry," Vincent says.

"Taking advantage of this combined knowledge and perspectives, I was able to employ waste management and economic points of view in my study, with the main aim being to increase the value of the whole industry."

This was not an easy task as chemicals used in the extraction process, such as acetone and methanol, needed to be taken out of the equation.

"The existing extraction process was not very food safe," Vincent attests. "It works in the lab, but for the industry's purpose, you cannot use the chemicals."

Developing entirely organic extraction techniques, Vincent applied for an international patent, with the help of Newcastle Innovation, during the second year of his doctorate.

Around this time, Vincent also won the University's Three Minute Thesis competition, presenting his evidence with flair.

Research reborn: Renovatio Bioscience

An international student, Vincent had the choice to return home to Indonesia or stay on as a researcher in the Australian academic environment. Seeing the commercial value of his PhD project, he sensed it was important to continue helping the industry.

"The aim of my research was to make a difference and help the apple growers of Australia," Vincent observes.

"I felt I had built a good rapport with the industry and decided to continue researching here."

Vincent thought forward to commercialise the idea, founding the company Renovatio Bioscience on the premise of people not having to be wealthy to be healthy.

"Renovatio means 'new life' in Latin, and in so many ways I feel this is a new chapter in my research life," Vincent beams.

Securing investors with his proof of concept, the patented process has been expanded into 120 countries.

Having worked part-time in a health food store as a nutrition consultant during his studies, Vincent was further intrigued at the prospect of producing a high-antioxidant supplement.

"Some people really need these supplements; I want people to be as healthy as possible using science," he says.

The manufacturing for the commercial product – a first for Ourimbah campus - has been supported by the Faculty of Science and Information Technology.

"This is a great project, not just for me, but also the Faculty and the University of Newcastle in total," Vincent demonstrates.

"Anyone can talk about innovation from research, but we are doing it together."

Vincent notes the Renovatio Bioscience story is a potential pilot study for future PhD students who are looking to launch their ideas and intellectual property with the University of Newcastle.

A new crop of academics

Having completed these degrees not so long ago, Vincent declares he's able to relate to his Food Science and Human Nutrition undergraduate students.

"I have the advantage of seeing the course from both perspectives as a student and a teacher," Vincent recognises.

A friendly fixture at the University of Newcastle's Ourimbah Campus, Vincent was named one of Ourimbah's Top 25 Graduates in the Campus' 25thyear.

Fruitful experiments

From solving complex industry problems to helping the public with functional food supplements, food science researcher Dr Vincent Candrawinata is certainly one

Read more

Career Summary

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Food Science&Human Nutrition(Food Tech, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Food Technology)(Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Bioactive Compounds
  • Food Science and Technology
  • Health and Nutrition
  • Innovation
  • Research Commercialisation

Languages

  • English (Fluent)
  • Mandarin (Working)
  • Indonesian (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
090899 Food Sciences not elsewhere classified 40
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified 40
150307 Innovation and Technology Management 20

Professional Experience

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/03/2015 -  Technical Director Renovatio Bioscience
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Candrawinata VI, Golding JB, Roach PD, Stathopoulos CE, 'Optimisation of the phenolic content and antioxidant activity of apple pomace aqueous extracts', CYTA - Journal of Food, 13 293-299 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Taylor and Francis.Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimise the parameters for phenolic extraction from apple pomace using water, extraction time, extractio... [more]

© 2014 Taylor and Francis.Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimise the parameters for phenolic extraction from apple pomace using water, extraction time, extraction temperature and pomace to water ratio. The responses from these parameters were evaluated by measuring the total phenolic content and antioxidant activity of extracts. The optimum extraction parameters found in this study were 30 min extraction time, 85°C extraction temperature and 0.05 pomace to water ratio. A verification experiment of these extraction parameters was performed, along with three other corroborative sets of parameters. There was no significant difference between the predicted and actual values, confirming that the predictions using the models obtained through RSM were valid.

DOI 10.1080/19476337.2014.971344
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Paul Roach
2014 Candrawinata VI, Golding JB, Roach PD, Stathopoulos CE, 'Total phenolic content and antioxidant activity of apple pomace aqueous extract: Effect of time, temperature and water to pomace ratio', International Food Research Journal, 21 2337-2344 (2014) [C1]

© All Rights Reserved.This study aimed to evaluate the effects of extraction time, extraction temperature and water to pomace ratio on the total phenolic content and antioxidant ... [more]

© All Rights Reserved.This study aimed to evaluate the effects of extraction time, extraction temperature and water to pomace ratio on the total phenolic content and antioxidant activity of apple pomace aqueous extracts. Pomace was extracted using water (20-90°C) for 5-60 min. The extracts were evaluated for their total phenolic content (Folin Ciocalteu assay) and antioxidant activity (DPPH, FRAP and ABTS assays). A methanol extract of the pomace was used as control. It was found that water to pomace ratio (p < 0.001), extraction temperature (p < 0.001) and time (p < 0.001) were significant factors in extracting the polyphenolics from apple pomace, with the optimum extraction conditions utilising water to pomace ratio of 20:1 at 90°C for 15 min yielding the most polyphenolic compounds (1148 µg g-1 fresh pomace Gallic Acid Equivalents). These results indicated that water was a good solvent for extracting polyphenolics from apple pomace, however, as compared to the methanol extract (control), the aqueous extracts had lower total phenolic content (63%) and antioxidant activity (73-80%).

Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Paul Roach
2013 Candrawinata VI, Golding JB, Roach PD, Stathopoulos CE, 'From Apple to Juice-The Fate of Polyphenolic Compounds', FOOD REVIEWS INTERNATIONAL, 29 276-293 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/87559129.2013.790049
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Paul Roach
2012 Candrawinata VI, Blades BL, Golding J, Stathopoulos C, Roach PD, 'Effect of clarification on the polyphenolic compound content and antioxidant activity of commercial apple juices', International Food Research Journal, 19 1055-1061 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9
Co-authors Paul Roach
Show 1 more journal article
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News

Dr Vincent Candrawinata

World's most potent antioxidant

September 28, 2016

Scientist develops most potent superfood on the planet

University of Newcastle (UON) scientist, Dr Vincent Candrawinata has developed the most potent dietary antioxidant available anywhere in the world, following a remarkable breakthrough in antioxidant extraction technology.

UON researchers shine in a glittering field of finalists

September 7, 2016

The University of Newcastle (UON) Alumni Awards Finalists have been announced, and we are delighted to see a broad range of UON researchers represented in the outstanding field.

Dr Vincent Candrawinata

Position

Conjoint Fellow
Food, Nutrition and Health Research Group
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email vincent.candrawinata@newcastle.edu.au
Phone Enter in format (02) 8262 6431

Office

Room .
Building Science Offices
Location Sydney City Campus 60 Castlereagh Street Sydney, NSW 2000 Ourimbah Campus 10 Chittaway Road Ourimbah, NSW 2258 Australia
10 Chittaway Road
Ourimbah, NSW 2258
Australia
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