Profile Image

Dr Tracy Burrows

Senior Lecturer

School of Health Sciences (Nutrition and Dietetics)

Fact, fad or fiction: Weighing in on obesity

TRACY BURROWS SHOWS THERE'S NO 'ONE SIZE FITS ALL' APPROACH TO MAINSTREAM NUTRITION, COMBINING PSYCHOLOGY, MEDICAL RADIATION IMAGING, AND BIOCHEMISTRY IN THE HUNT FOR MORE EFFECTIVE DIETARY ASSESSMENT METHODS AND TREATMENT

Tracy Burrows 

Sympathising with people trying to navigate a maze of media messages about dieting, Dr Burrows is seeking to address – and clear up – the confusion in her research. The engineer student-turned-dietitian has taken a particular interest in childhood obesity, experimenting with biochemical validation methods to help solidify our contemporary understanding of its causes and identify potential treatments.

Burrows' curiousity about diet-related disorders, such as obesity, was first sparked during her PhD candidateship, which saw her analyse the findings of a multi-centre probe into the best treatment options of child obesity. Run at the Universities of Newcastle and Wollongong, the project sought to determine the most effective treatment for child obesity and to oust biases in current diet assessment procedures by comparing them with more objective means. Researchers undertook an extensive series of outcome measures with parents and their school-aged children and followed them up for two years. As an advanced accredited dietitian, Burrows was specifically interested in if they could change their dietary intakes and further their fruit and vegetable consumption, and used biomarkers in the bloodstream to verify their responses.

'It's a unique approach because most dietitians would just take peoples' answers for what they are,' she says.

'But we were able to take away the issues with memory recall and social bias by creating a somewhat lie-detector test.'

The project also included a randomised control trial for the treatment of childhood obesity. Parent dietary support and physical activity were split between three groups, with one group receiving both interventions.

'To the general population the trial seems very straightforward, but at the time this was the first of its kind in Australia,' Burrows notes.

'It was new in the scientific world.'

Burrows continued looking into diet-related disorders after receiving her PhD in 2008, refining the approach of the Obesity Program to broaden its application to low-income families and Indigenous populations, as well as after-school care children. The expert dietitian also extended her biochemical validation method to include red blood cell membrane fatty acids, and conducted an additional study using Gold Standard procedures of doubly labelled water to help determine the most accurate reporter of child food intake.

'In the clinical world, everyone assumes the mum is going to be the best to talk to,' she says.

'But we disproved this, showing that the child is actually the better of all three, closely followed by the dad and then the mum.'

Shifting the focus

Burrows' research also helped identify another gap in our contemporary understanding of obesity. Taking an interdisciplinary approach to this latest study, she is collaborating with international academics in the psychology, biochemistry, and medical radiation imaging fields to dispel belief in a singular cause.

'If we can prove that food addiction is real, then we can also show cause for the behavioural components of obesity,' she says.

'It could be that treatments need to be reworked so they hit these targets as well as the more obvious diet and physical activity ones.'

Burrows has adapted the validation model used in her PhD for the ongoing probe, opting to access the traits of food addiction by conducting a cross-sectional survey of 600 young adults with her team and then 'fact checking' the self-reported findings in multiple brain scans.

'It's a young area of research but we know that objective measures are really important,' she says.

'We're in the process of getting some answers, which is quite exciting.'

Leading the specialist squad since the project's inception in 2012 has also allowed Burrows to distinguish herself from other fledgling researchers.

'It's my first time in the driver's seat,' she says.

'I was looking to become independent, but I wanted to continue the biochemical validation and obesity research I'd been a part of previously too.'

'My hard work paid off and I was lucky enough to get both.'

Engaging the masses

Still an active clinician, Burrows is simultaneously involved in the relaying of dietetic services and teaching to rural communities. Hoping to bridge 'what is' with 'what could be,' some of her recent grants are dedicated to the growing study of e-health resources.

'We're looking at ways social media – so things like mobile applications and digital face-to-face appointments – can better engage isolated individuals in nutrition information,' she says.

'It's all about increasing our reach.'

Balancing act

Burrows has moulded herself into a published author, a thesis examiner, a conference presenter, a postgraduate work supervisor, and a member of several national and international health associations. She is also in the top 1% of Australian dietitians with an advanced accreditation title. 

Giving weight to the old adage, 'success breeds success,' this expertise in paediatric nutrition contributed to a team led by Professor Phil Morgan, which was recognised in 2014 with an award from the World Health Organisation for Excellence in Obesity Prevention. Burrows received the nod for her involvement in the winning community-based initiative, Healthy Dads Healthy Kids, which aims to make healthy eating and exercise a regular part of father-child interactions. The program has since been delivered across a number of local government areas in NSW, with significant improvements in a host of physical and mental health outcomes readily observed.

Burrows was also shortlisted for the L'Oreal Women in Science Fellowship in 2014 – an achievement that stands out in a list of many.

'People don't often associate dietetics with science,' she concedes.

'But nutrition is science, and I'm really happy it's starting to get noticed as such.'

Dr Tracy Burrows

Fact, fad or fiction: Weighing in on obesity

TRACY BURROWS SHOWS THERE'S NO 'ONE SIZE FITS ALL' APPROACH TO MAINSTREAM NUTRITION, COMBINING PSYCHOLOGY, MEDICAL RADIATION IMAGING, AND BIOCHEMISTRY IN THE HUNT FOR MORE EFFECTIVE DIETARY ASSESSMENT METHODS AND TREATMENT Sympathising with people trying to navigate a maze of…

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Tracy Is Senior lecturer in the School of Health Sciences (Nutrition and Dietetics), at the University of Newcastle.Tracy is an Advanced Accredited Practising Dietitian and was awarded her PhD in 2008. Tracy has expertise in the areas of the assessment of dietary intake and conducting high quality research trials. More recently she has intiated investigation into the area of food addcition. Tracy has > 50 peer reviewed journal publications, supervises 4 PhD, 1 masters and 3 honours students and is involved in research studies regarding dietary validation and obesity treatment and expertise in working with paediatric populations.

Research Expertise
Obesity Child obesity treatment and prevention Dietary assessment methodology and validation Food addiction.

Teaching Expertise
Pediatric Nutrition Food Science Nutrition Education programs Peer review of Teaching E health.

Administrative Expertise
School of Health Sciences ethics and safety advisor.

Collaborations
Tracy Collaborates on research with Colleagues from: - University of Sydney - University of Wollongong - University of Canberra - University of South Australia - Monash University - University of Queensland - University of Michigan, USA -Queens University, Canada


Qualifications

  • PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (Honours), University of Newcastle
  • Graduate Certificate Practice of Tertiary Teaching, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Adult Obesity
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Child Obesity and Health
  • Dietary Assesment
  • Food Science
  • Honours
  • Nutrition Education Programs
  • Pediatrics
  • Peer reivew of Teaching

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
111499Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine not elsewhere classified30
111199Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified40
111799Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2015 - Senior LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia
17/07/2006 - 30/12/2006Casual AcademicUniversity of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia

Membership

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2010 - Membership - Nutrition Society of AustraliaNutrition Society of Australia
Australia
1/01/2008 - Membership - Australain Child and Adolescent Obesity Research NetworkAustralain Child and Adolescent Obesity Research Network
Australia
1/01/2004 - Membership - Dietitians Association of AustraliaDietitians Association of Australia

Professional appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2005 - 1/07/2008Clinical DietitanClued on Food
Australia
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2013Collins C, Hure A, Burrows T, Patterson A, 'Diet Quality and Its Potential Cost Savings', Diet Quality: An Evidenced-based Approach Volume 1, Humana Press, New York 41-49 (2013) [B1]
DOI10.1007/978-1-4614-7339-8_4
Co-authorsClare Collins, Amanda Patterson, Alexis Hure

Journal article (67 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2015Burrows TL, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Boggess MM, Guest M, Collins CE, 'Fruit and vegetable intake assessed by food frequency questionnaire and plasma carotenoids: a validation study in adults.', Nutrients, 7 3240-3251 (2015)
DOI10.3390/nu7053240Author URL
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsClare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2015Burrows T, Meule A, ''Food addiction'. What happens in childhood?', Appetite, 89 298-300 (2015)
DOI10.1016/j.appet.2014.12.209
2015Burrows T, Meule A, ''Food addiction'. What happens in childhood?', Appetite, (2015)
DOI10.1016/j.appet.2014.12.209
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
2015Collins CE, Burrows TL, Rollo ME, Boggess MM, Watson JF, Guest M, et al., 'The comparative validity and reproducibility of a diet quality index for adults: the Australian Recommended Food Score.', Nutrients, 7 785-798 (2015)
DOI10.3390/nu7020785Author URL
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsMelinda Hutchesson, Maya Guest, Megan Rollo, Clare Collins
2015Burrows TL, Khambalia AZ, Perry R, Carty D, Hendrie GA, Allman-Farinelli MA, et al., 'Great 'app-eal' but not there yet: A review of iPhone nutrition applications relevant to child weight management', Nutrition and Dietetics, (2015)

Aims: There is increasing interest in the use of smartphone applications (apps) for delivering child obesity management interventions and supporting lifestyle behaviour change; however, there has been very little academic research on their development. Our aim is to review nutrition-related apps designed for children currently available in Australia for their usefulness in education or support behavioural interventions for child obesity. Methods: Apps available for download in iTunes Australia between 2 April and 3 June 2013 which were suitable for children >12 years were identified. Key words were chosen to identify apps applicable to children, focusing on nutrition. Results: A total of 27 apps were included. Most apps (24/27) were not based on evidence-informed recommendations. A third of apps were developed in the USA (n = 10; 37%) and were free (67%), nine apps required upfront payment, with a mean cost of $A2.80 (range $A0.99-$A7.49). The most common nutrition features were the promotion of energy balance (n = 12 apps) and guidance on appropriate portion size (n = 15). The most common behaviour change feature was goal setting (n = 15). The five apps that scored most highly against the characteristics reviewed were: Calorie Counter Pro by My Net Diary, Weight Watchers, Swap It Don't Stop It, Control My Weight by CalorieKing and Rate What I Ate-Photo Diet Tracker. Conclusions: Very few apps were identified that could be used in education or support behavioural interventions for child obesity. There is a need to harness this technology and evaluate the applicability and use within childhood obesity research interventions.

DOI10.1111/1747-0080.12184
Co-authorsClare Collins
2015Rollo ME, Hutchesson MJ, Burrows TL, Krukowski RA, Harvey JR, Hoggle LB, Collins CE, 'Video Consultations and Virtual Nutrition Care for Weight Management', Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, (2015)
DOI10.1016/j.jand.2015.03.016
Co-authorsClare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2015Pursey KM, Collins CE, Stanwell P, Burrows TL, 'Foods and dietary profiles associated with 'food addiction' in young adults', Addictive Behaviors Reports, 2 41-48 (2015)

BackgroundIt has been suggested that addictive behaviors related to consumption of specific foods could contribute to overeating and obesity. Although energy-dense, hyper-palatable foods are hypothesized to be associated with addictive-like eating behaviors, few studies have assessed this in humans. ObjectiveTo evaluate in young adults whether intakes of specific foods are associated with 'food addiction', as assessed by the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS), and to describe the associated nutrient intake profiles. DesignAustralian adults aged 18-35. years were invited to complete an online cross-sectional survey including demographics, the YFAS and usual dietary intake. Participants were classified as food addicted (FAD) or non-addicted (NFA) according to the YFAS predefined scoring criteria. ResultsA total 462 participants (86% female, 73% normal weight) completed the survey, with 14.7% (n = 68) classified as FAD. The FAD group had a higher proportion of females (p =. 01) and higher body mass index (p< .001) compared to NFA. Higher YFAS symptom scores were associated with higher percentage energy intake (%E) from energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods including candy, take out and baked sweet products, as well as lower %E from nutrient-dense core foods including whole-grain products and breakfast cereals. These remained statistically significant when adjusted for age, sex and BMI category (p = .001). ConclusionsStatistically significant associations were identified between YFAS assessed food addiction and dietary intake, specifically intakes of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods. However, the effect sizes were small limiting clinical applications. Further examination of the relationship between addictive-like eating and intake of specific foods in a nationally representative sample is warranted.

DOI10.1016/j.abrep.2015.05.007
2015Burrows TL, Pursey KM, Stanwell P, 'The Application of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Investigate the Effect of a Commercial Energy Drink', European Journal of Nutrition & Food Safety, 5 75-87 (2015)
DOI10.9734/EJNFS/2015/9229
2014Marshall S, Burrows T, Collins CE, 'Systematic review of diet quality indices and their associations with health-related outcomes in children and adolescents.', J Hum Nutr Diet, 27 577-598 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1111/jhn.12208Author URL
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsClare Collins
2014Pursey K, Burrows TL, Stanwell P, Collins CE, 'How accurate is web-based self-reported height, weight, and body mass index in young adults?', J Med Internet Res, 16 e4 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.2196/jmir.2909Author URL
CitationsScopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authorsClare Collins
2014Pursey KM, Stanwell P, Gearhardt AN, Collins CE, Burrows TL, 'The prevalence of food addiction as assessed by the yale food addiction scale: A systematic review', Nutrients, 6 4552-4590 (2014) [C1]

Obesity is a global issue and it has been suggested that an addiction to certain foods could be a factor contributing to overeating and subsequent obesity. Only one tool, the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) has been developed to specifically assess food addiction. This review aimed to determine the prevalence of food addiction diagnosis and symptom scores, as assessed by the YFAS. Published studies to July 2014 were included if they reported the YFAS diagnosis or symptom score and were published in the English language. Twenty-five studies were identified including a total of 196,211 predominantly female, overweight/obese participants (60%). Using meta-analysis, the weighted mean prevalence of YFAS food addiction diagnosis was 19.9%. Food addiction (FA) diagnosis was found to be higher in adults aged >35 years, females, and overweight/obese participants. Additionally, YFAS diagnosis and symptom score was higher in clinical samples compared to non-clinical counterparts. YFAS outcomes were related to a range of other eating behavior measures and anthropometrics. Further research is required to explore YFAS outcomes across a broader spectrum of ages, other types of eating disorders and in conjunction with weight loss interventions to confirm the efficacy of the tool to assess for the presence of FA.

DOI10.3390/nu6104552
CitationsScopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authorsClare Collins
2014Burrows TL, Collins K, Watson J, Guest M, Boggess MM, Neve M, et al., 'Validity of the Australian Recommended Food Score as a diet quality index for Pre-schoolers', Nutrition Journal, 13 (2014) [C1]

Background: Diet quality tools provide researchers with brief methods to assess the nutrient adequacy of usual dietary intake. This study describes the development and validation of a pediatric diet quality index, the Australian Recommended Food Scores for Pre-schoolers (ARFS-P), for use with children aged two to five years. Methods. The ARFS-P was derived from a 120-item food frequency questionnaire, with eight sub-scales, and was scored from zero to 73. Linear regressions were used to estimate the relationship between diet quality score and nutrient intakes, in 142 children (mean age 4 years) in rural localities in New South Wales, Australia. Results: Total ARFS-P and component scores were highly related to dietary intake of the majority of macronutrients and micronutrients including protein, ß-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin A. Total ARFS-P was also positively related to total consumption of nutrient dense foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and negatively related to total consumption of discretionary choices, such as sugar sweetened drinks and packaged snacks. Conclusion: ARFS-P is a valid measure that can be used to characterise nutrient intakes for children aged two to five years. Further research could assess the utility of the ARFS-P for monitoring of usual dietary intake over time or as part of clinical management.

DOI10.1186/1475-2891-13-87
Co-authorsClare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Megan Rollo, Maya Guest
2014Gow ML, Ho M, Burrows TL, Baur LA, Stewart L, Hutchesson MJ, et al., 'Impact of dietary macronutrient distribution on BMI and cardiometabolic outcomes in overweight and obese children and adolescents: A systematic review', Nutrition Reviews, 72 453-470 (2014)
DOI10.1111/nure.12111
CitationsScopus - 2
Co-authorsClare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2014Gow ML, Ho M, Burrows TL, Baur LA, Stewart L, Hutchesson MJ, et al., 'Impact of dietary macronutrient distribution on BMI and cardiometabolic outcomes in overweight and obese children and adolescents: A systematic review', Nutrition Reviews, 72 453-470 (2014) [C1]

The present systematic review examined the effectiveness of weight management interventions comparing diets with varying macronutrient distributions on BMI and cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight or obese children and adolescents. A systematic search of seven databases for the period 1975-2013 identified 14 eligible randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials conducted with 6-18-year-old subjects. Seven trials compared a low-fat (=33% energy or <40g/day) to an isocaloric (n=2) or ad libitum (n=5) low-carbohydrate diet (<20% energy or <60g/day). Meta-analysis indicated a greater reduction in BMI in the low-carbohydrate group immediately after dietary intervention; however, the quality of the studies was limited and cardiometabolic benefits were inconsistent. Six trials compared increased-protein diets (19-30% energy) to isocaloric standard-protein diets (15-20% energy) and one compared an increased-fat diet (40% energy) to an isocaloric standard-fat diet (27% energy); there were no differences in outcomes in these studies. Current evidence suggests that improved weight status can be achieved in overweight or obese children and adolescents irrespective of the macronutrient distribution of a reduced-energy diet. Tailoring the macronutrient content to target specific cardiometabolic risk factors, such as a low-carbohydrate diet to treat insulin resistance, may be possible, but further research is needed before specific recommendations can be made. © 2014 International Life Sciences Institute.

DOI10.1111/nure.12111
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsMelinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2014Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Burrows T, Fletcher R, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community randomized controlled trial: A community-based healthy lifestyle program for fathers and their children', Preventive Medicine, 61 90-99 (2014) [C1]

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK)' program when delivered by trained facilitators in community settings. Method: A two-arm randomized controlled trial of 93 overweight/obese fathers (mean [SD] age=40.3 [5.3] years; BMI=32.5 [3.8] kg/m2) and their primary school-aged children (n=132) from the Hunter Region, Australia. In 2010-2011, families were randomized to either: (i) HDHK intervention (n=48 fathers, n=72 children) or (ii) wait-list control group. The 7-week intervention included seven sessions and resources (booklets, pedometers). Assessments were held at baseline and 14-weeks with fathers' weight (kg) as the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes for fathers and children included waist, BMI, blood pressure, resting heart rate, physical activity (pedometry), and self-reported dietary intake and sedentary behaviors. Results: Linear mixed models (intention-to-treat) revealed significant between-group differences for fathers' weight (P < .001, d= 0.24), with HDHK fathers losing more weight (- 3.3. kg; 95%CI, - 4.3, - 2.4) than control fathers (0.1. kg; 95%CI, - 0.9,1.0). Significant treatment effects (P < .05) were also found for fathers' waist (d= 0.41), BMI (d= 0.26), resting heart rate (d= 0.59), energy intake (d= 0.49) and physical activity (d= 0.46) and for children's physical activity (d= 0.50) and adiposity (d= 0.07). Discussion: HDHK significantly improved health outcomes and behaviors in fathers and children, providing evidence for program effectiveness when delivered in a community setting. © 2014 Published by Elsevier Inc.

DOI10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.12.019
CitationsScopus - 9Web of Science - 6
Co-authorsAndrew Miller, David Lubans, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan, Myles Young, Robin Callister, Richard Fletcher
2014Yang WY, Burrows T, Collins CE, MacDonald-Wicks L, Williams LT, Chee WSS, 'Prevalence of Energy Intake Misreporting in Malay Children Varies Based on Application of Different Cut Points', JOURNAL OF TROPICAL PEDIATRICS, 60 472-475 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1093/tropej/fmu052Author URL
Co-authorsLesley Wicks, Lauren Williams, Clare Collins
2014Burrows T, Collins CE, 'Issues to consider in children's dietary assessment', Clinical Nutrition, 33 728-728 (2014)
DOI10.1016/j.clnu.2014.04.005
Co-authorsClare Collins
2014Burrows T, Collins CE, 'Issues to consider in children's dietary assessment', Clinical Nutrition, 33 728-728 (2014) [C3]
DOI10.1016/j.clnu.2014.04.005
Co-authorsClare Collins
2014Collins CE, Boggess MM, Watson JF, Guest M, Duncanson K, Pezdirc K, et al., 'Reproducibility and comparative validity of a food frequency questionnaire for Australian adults', Clinical Nutrition, 33 906-914 (2014)
DOI10.1016/j.clnu.2013.09.015
CitationsScopus - 4
Co-authorsMegan Rollo, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Maya Guest
2014Collins CE, Boggess MM, Watson JF, Guest M, Duncanson K, Pezdirc K, et al., 'Reproducibility and comparative validity of a food frequency questionnaire for Australian adults', Clinical Nutrition, 33 906-914 (2014) [C1]

Background: Food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) are used in epidemiological studies to investigate the relationship between diet and disease. There is a need for a valid and reliable adult FFQ with a contemporary food list in Australia. Aims: To evaluate the reproducibility and comparative validity of the Australian Eating Survey (AES) FFQ in adults compared to weighed food records (WFRs). Methods: Two rounds of AES and three-day WFRs were conducted in 97 adults (31 males, median age and BMI for males of 44.9 years, 26.2 kg/m2, females 41.3 years, 24.0 kg/m2. Reproducibility was assessed over six months using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and comparative validity was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) estimated by fitting a mixed effects model for each nutrient to account for age, sex and BMI to allow estimation of between and within person variance. Results: Reproducibility was found to be good for both WFR and FFQ since there were no significant differences between round 1 and 2 administrations. For comparative validity, FFQ ICCs were at least as large as those for WFR. The ICC of the WFR-FFQ difference for total energy intake was 0.6 (95% CI 0.43, 0.77) and the median ICC for all nutrients was 0.47, with all ICCs between 0.15 (%E from saturated fat) and 0.7 (g/day sugars). Conclusions: Compared to WFR the AES FFQ is suitable for reliably estimating the dietary intakes of Australian adults across a wide range of nutrients. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.

DOI10.1016/j.clnu.2013.09.015
CitationsScopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authorsMaya Guest, Megan Rollo, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2014Robinson LN, Rollo ME, Watson J, Burrows TL, Collins CE, 'Relationships between dietary intakes of children and their parents: A cross-sectional, secondary analysis of families participating in the Family Diet Quality Study', Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, (2014)

Being overweight and obese in Australian children is common. Current evidence related to parental influence on child dietary intake is conflicting, and is particularly limited in terms of which parent exerts the stronger relationship. The present study aimed to assess mother-father and parent-child dietary relationships and to identify which parent-child relationship is stronger. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis was performed of dietary intake data from 66 families with one parent and one child aged 8-12 years who were participating in the Family Diet Quality Study, in the Hunter and Forster regions of New South Wales, Australia. Dietary intakes were assessed using adult and child specific, validated semi-quantitative 120-item food frequency questionnaires. Diet quality and variety subscores were assessed using the Australian Recommended Food Scores for adults and children/adolescents. Pearson's correlations were used to assess dietary relationships between mother-father, father-child and mother-child dyads. Results: Weak-to-moderate correlations were found between mother-child dyads for components of dietary intake (r = 0.27-0.47). Similarly, for father-child dyads, predominantly weak-to-moderate correlations were found (r = 0.01-0.52). Variety of fruit intake was the most strongly correlated in both parent-child dyads, with the weakest relationships found for fibre (g 1000 kJ-1) in father-child and percentage energy from total fats for mother-child dyads. Mother-father dyads demonstrated mostly moderate-to-strong correlations (r = 0.13-0.73), with scores for condiments showing the weakest relationship and vegetables the strongest. For all dyads, strong correlations were observed for overall diet quality (r = 0.50-0.59). Conclusions: Parent-child dietary intake is significantly related but differs for mother versus fathers. Further research is required to examine whether differing dietary components should be targeted for mothers versus fathers in interventions aiming to improve family dietary patterns. © 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

DOI10.1111/jhn.12261
Co-authorsClare Collins, Megan Rollo
2014Collins C, Duncanson K, Burrows T, 'A systematic review investigating associations between parenting style and child feeding behaviours', Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 27 557-568 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1111/jhn.12192
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsClare Collins
2014Yang WY, Burrows T, Macdonald-Wicks L, Williams LT, Collins C, Chee WSS, 'Quality of dietary assessment methodology and reporting in epidemiology studies examining relationship between dietary outcome and childhood obesity in developing asian countries: A systematic review', Nutrition and Dietetics, (2014) [C1]

Aim: The dramatic rise in childhood obesity incidence in developing countries is related to nutrition and lifestyle transition. The aim of this review was to evaluate the quality and reporting of dietary assessment methods used in studies examining the relationship between dietary outcome and childhood obesity in developing Asian countries. Methods: A three-step search strategy was conducted in databases between inception and 2011 with an English language restriction. Inclusion criteria were any cross-sectional or cohort studies in children =18 years who resided in developing countries in Asian region that included reporting on dietary intake. Papers were screened with standardised tools for quality and dietary methodology reporting. Results: The search process identified 2080 studies and 15 studies (in 16 articles) met inclusion criteria. The most commonly used dietary assessment method was dietary questionnaires (n = 10), followed by 24-hour diet recall (n = 4), food frequency questionnaire (n = 3) and an unweighed food record (n = 1). For dietary methodology reporting, 12 out of 16 articles were rated as 'poor', 3 rated as 'acceptable' and 1 as 'excellent'. Conclusions: The quality rating was influenced by the dietary assessment tool chosen, and a quality rating of 'poor' was mostly obtained by studies using non-standardised, non-validated study-specific dietary questionnaires. Significant gaps were identified in dietary intake methodological quality and hence, there is an urgent need for valid dietary measures and reporting of dietary intake among overweight children for studies conducted in Asian region. © 2014 Dietitians Association of Australia.

DOI10.1111/1747-0080.12113
Co-authorsLauren Williams, Lesley Wicks, Clare Collins
2014Schumacher TL, Dewar DL, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Watson J, Guest M, et al., 'Dietary patterns of adolescent girls attending schools in low-income communities highlight low consumption of core foods', Nutrition and Dietetics, 71 127-134 (2014) [C1]

Aim: Overweight and obesity prevalence is high among adolescent girls of low socioeconomic position and this increases their risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders in adulthood. The aim of this present study was to describe the dietary patterns of adolescent girls in terms of the relative contribution of core food groups to overall diet and by weight status category. Methods: Year 8 female students were recruited from schools in low-income communities. Weight status (i.e. underweight, healthy weight, overweight, obese) was determined using age- and sex-adjusted body mass index (BMI; z score). Dietary intakes were assessed using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Individual foods were collated into core food group or energy-dense, nutrient-poor categories in line with the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE) and the percentage contribution to total energy intake calculated. Results: Participants (n = 332) were (mean ± SD) 13.7 ± 0.4 years old with BMI z score 0.63 ± 1.22. Few girls met AGHE core food group recommendations for daily serves; meat and substitutes 69.3%, vegetables 28.6%, fruit 23.8%, dairy 15.7% and breads/cereals 5.7%. Total percentage energy derived from energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods was 46.6% (37.2-54.6%) (median (interquartile range)), with takeaways 9.8% (7.0-13.6%), confectionery 7.0% (4.1-10.9%) and packaged snacks 6.8% (4.0-10.7%), with no significant differences by weight status. Conclusions: Core food intakes are poor with excessive consumption of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods in these adolescent girls. Nutrition education programs targeting this population are needed to address this imbalance. Strategies could include substitution of unhealthy snacks for core food items and greater inclusion of core foods within main meals. © 2013 Dietitians Association of Australia.

DOI10.1111/1747-0080.12084
Co-authorsMaya Guest, David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2014Duncanson K, Burrows T, Collins C, 'Peer education is a feasible method of disseminating information related to child nutrition and feeding between new mothers', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 14 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1186/1471-2458-14-1262Author URL
Co-authorsClare Collins
2014Cliff DP, Jones RA, Burrows TL, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Baur LA, Okely AD, 'Volumes and bouts of sedentary behavior and physical activity: Associations with cardiometabolic health in obese children', Obesity, 22 (2014) [C1]

Objective To examine associations of volumes and bouts of sedentary behavior (SED) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with individual and clustered cardio-metabolic outcomes in overweight/obese children. Methods Cross-sectional data from 120 overweight/obese children (8.3 ± 1.1 years, 62% girls, 74% obese) with SED and MVPA assessed using accelerometry. Children were categorized into quartiles of mean bouts per day of SED (10, 20, and 30 min) and MVPA (5, 10, and 15 min). Associations with triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, glucose, insulin, systolic/diastolic blood pressure, and clustered cardio-metabolic risk (cMet) were examined using linear regression, adjusted for confounders. Results Independent of MVPA, SED volume was inversely associated with HDL cholesterol (ß [95% CI] = -0.29 [-0.52, -0.05]). MVPA volume was inversely associated with diastolic blood pressure, independent of SED (ß = -0.22 [-0.44, -0.001]), and cMet (ß = -0.19 [-0.36, -0.01]) although not after adjustment for SED (ß = -0.14 [-0.33, 0.06]). Independent of MVPA and SED volumes, participants in the highest quartile of 30 min bouts per day of SED had 12% lower HDL cholesterol than those in the lowest quartile (d = 0.53, P = 0.046, Ptrend = 0.11). Conclusions In addition to increasing MVPA, targeting reduced SED and limiting bouts of SED to <30 min may contribute to improved HDL cholesterol levels and cardio-metabolic health in overweight/obese children. Copyright © 2014 The Obesity Society.

DOI10.1002/oby.20698
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins
2014Schumacher T, Burrows T, Cliff D, Jones R, Okely A, Baur L, et al., 'Dietary Intake Is Related to Multifactor Cardiovascular Risk Score in Obese Boys', Healthcare, 2 282-298 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.3390/healthcare2030282
Co-authorsRobin Callister, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2014Golley RK, McNaughton SA, Collins CE, Magarey A, Garnett SP, Campbell KJ, et al., 'Australasian nutrition research for prevention and management of child obesity: innovation and progress in the last decade', PEDIATRIC OBESITY, 9 e132-e136 (2014) [C3]
DOI10.1111/j.2047-6310.2014.225.xAuthor URL
Co-authorsClare Collins
2014Pursey KM, Stanwell PT, Callister RJ, Brain K, Collins CE, Burrows TL, 'Neural responses to visual food cues according to weight status: a systematic review of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies', Frontiers in Nutrition, 1 1-11 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.3389/fnut.2014.00007
Co-authorsRobert Callister, Clare Collins
2013Collins CE, Burrows TL, Bray J, Asher R, Young MD, Morgan PJ, 'Effectiveness of parent-centred interventions for the prevention and treatment of childhood overweight and obesity in community settings: a systematic review', The JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports, 11 180-257 (2013) [C1]
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Myles Young, Clare Collins
2013Burrows TL, Pursey KM, Hutchesson MJ, Stanwell PT, 'What are the health implications associated with the consumption of energy drinks? A systematic review', Nutrition Reviews, 71 135-148 (2013) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 14Web of Science - 15
Co-authorsMelinda Hutchesson
2013Duncanson K, Burrows T, Holman B, Collins C, 'Parents' Perceptions of Child Feeding: A Qualitative Study Based on the Theory of Planned Behavior', JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENTAL AND BEHAVIORAL PEDIATRICS, 34 227-236 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1097/DBP.0b013e31828b2ccfAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authorsClare Collins
2013Burrows TL, Truby H, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Davies PSW, Collins CE, 'A comparison and validation of child versus parent reporting of children's energy intake using food frequency questionnaires versus food records: Who's an accurate reporter?', Clinical Nutrition, 32 613-618 (2013) [C1]

Background & aims: The aim of this study was to (i) to compare the accuracy of reporting for child's total energy intake from a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) completed independently by the mother, father and child in comparison to total energy expenditure (TEE) measured using doubly labeled water (DLW) (ii) compare the accuracy of the weighed food record (WFR) and DLW. Methods: Healthy weight children (mean±SD age 9.8±1.3years, n=6 girls/3 boys) and their parents independently completed an FFQ about children's intake. A 4-day WFR of child intake was recorded simultaneously. The accuracy of energy intakes reports were determined by the absolute and percentage differences between estimated energy intake and TEE measured by DLW. Results: The mean difference (limits of agreement LOA, ±2SD) when compared to DLW was; child 130 (-1518, 1258)kcal or (113±35% of TEE); father 398 (0,796)kcal or (121±13%); mother 807 (-213, 1824)kcal or (144±26%) and for the WFR-153 (1089,-1395)kcal or 95±32%. Conclusions: Children were the most accurate reporters when compared to their parents, with fathers more accurate than mothers. The 4-day WFR was approximately equal to the child report FFQ in estimating EI in children 8-11 years. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.

DOI10.1016/j.clnu.2012.11.006
CitationsScopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2013Duncanson K, Burrows T, Collins C, 'Effect of a low-intensity parent-focused nutrition intervention on dietary intake of 2- to 5-year olds', Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 57 728-734 (2013) [C1]

OBJECTIVES:: Community-based nutrition interventions aimed at influencing child dietary intake are rarely evaluated. We hypothesised that providing self-directed nutrition and parenting resources to parents living in rural northern New South Wales, Australia, would positively affect the dietary patterns of children ages 2 to 5 years. METHODS:: A total of 146 parent-child dyads (76 boys, ages 2.0-5.9 years) were randomly assigned to either a 12-month parent-centred intervention involving self-directed education provided in CD and DVD formats, or a participant-blinded control group who received generic nutrition and physical activity information. Data were collected at baseline, 3, and 12 months. RESULTS:: Total reported energy from nutrient-dense food groups and percentage energy from energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods were high at baseline relative to estimated total energy expenditure for child age. Using random effects modelling, there were significant group-by-time effects for a reduction in mean (standard deviation) total energy intake (EI) at 12 months (-461 kJ/day (196); Pâ¿¿=â¿¿0.04). An intervention group-by-time effect on carbohydrate intake (-17.4 g/day (10.6); Pâ¿¿<â¿¿0.05) was largely attributable to decreased consumption of breads and cereals (-180 g/day (80); Pâ¿¿=â¿¿0.007). Decreases in energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS:: The proportion of total EI from noncore foods in children in rural New South Wales is high and did not improve in response to a low-intensity nutrition intervention. Parents reported small changes in consumption frequency for core and noncore food intakes, leading to a reduction in total EI. Strategies to increase resource use such as prompting via e-mail are required to further explore the effectiveness of nutrition resource dissemination at a population level. Copyright © 2013 by European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology.

DOI10.1097/MPG.0000000000000068
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsClare Collins
2013Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Berry N, et al., 'The SHED-IT Community Trial: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Internet- and Paper-Based Weight Loss Programs Tailored for Overweight and Obese Men', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 45 139-152 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1007/s12160-012-9424-zAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 18Web of Science - 19
Co-authorsMyles Young, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2013Asher RCZ, Burrows TL, Collins CE, 'Very low-energy diets for weight loss in adults: A review', NUTRITION & DIETETICS, 70 101-112 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1747-0080.2012.01628.xAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsClare Collins
2013Burrows T, Bray J, Morgan PJ, Collins C, 'Pilot intervention in an economically disadvantaged community: The back-to-basics after-school healthy lifestyle program', Nutrition and Dietetics, 70 270-277 (2013) [C1]

Aim: The objective of the present study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of an after-school obesity prevention strategy for families. Methods: Ten children aged 5-12 years and their parents/guardians from an economically disadvantaged area participated in an after-school healthy lifestyle program, which was run over a school term. It consisted of five face-to-face sessions that were run fortnightly with an additional social barbeque session at program completion. Results: Feasibility was demonstrated by successful recruitment, retention (80%) and collection of a high percentage of usable data (96% at baseline, 80% at follow up). Acceptability was demonstrated by a session attendance of 83%, 100% positive enjoyment response. There was no significant change in anthropometrics, child or adult fruit and vegetable intake with no or little effect on all other dietary variables. Conclusions: The present study illustrated an approach to the translation of a program used in an evidence-based efficacious clinical trial into a sustainable community setting. © 2013 Dietitians Association of Australia.

DOI10.1111/1747-0080.12023
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins
2013Burrows T, Patterson A, Bacon A, Mitchell L, Wicks L, Baines S, Williams LT, 'Client satisfaction and weight loss outcomes of student centred dietetic outpatient clinics', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 7 e421-e430 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.orcp.2012.05.003
Co-authorsLauren Williams, Amanda Patterson, Surinder Baines
2013Cliff DP, Okely AD, Burrows TL, Jones RA, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Baur LA, 'Objectively measured sedentary behavior, physical activity, and plasma lipids in overweight and obese children', Obesity, 21 382-385 (2013) [C1]

Objective: This study examines the associations between objectively measured sedentary behavior, light physical activity (LPA), and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and plasma lipids in overweight and obese children. Design and Methods: Cross-sectional analyses were conducted among 126 children aged 5.5-9.9 years. Sedentary behavior, LPA, and MVPA were assessed using accelerometry. Fasting blood samples were analyzed for plasma lipids (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-C], low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], total cholesterol [TC], and triglycerides [TG]). Results: MVPA was not related to plasma lipids (P > 0.05). Independent of age, sex, energy intake, and waist circumference z-score, sedentary behavior and LPA were associated with HDL-C (ß = -0.23, 95% CI -0.42 to -0.04, P = 0.020; ß = 0.20, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.39, P = 0.036, respectively). The strength of the associations remained after additionally adjusting for MVPA (sedentary behavior: ß = -0.22, 95% CI -0.44 to 0.006, P = 0.056; LPA: ß = 0.19, 95% CI -0.005 to 0.38, P = 0.056, respectively). Conclusion: Substituting at least LPA for sedentary time may contribute to the development of healthy HDL-C levels among overweight and obese children, independent of their adiposity. Comprehensive prevention and treatment strategies to improve plasma HDL-C among overweight and obese children should target reductions in total sedentary time and promote the benefits of LPA, in addition to promoting healthy levels of adiposity, healthy dietary behaviors, and MVPA.

DOI10.1002/oby.20005
CitationsScopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins
2013Ho M, Garnett SP, Baur LA, Burrows T, Stewart L, Neve M, Collins C, 'Impact of Dietary and Exercise Interventions on Weight Change and Metabolic Outcomes in Obese Children and Adolescents A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Trials', JAMA PEDIATRICS, 167 759-768 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.1453Author URL
CitationsScopus - 23Web of Science - 20
Co-authorsMelinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2013Collins CE, Burrows TL, Truby H, Morgan PJ, Wright IMR, Davies PSW, Callister R, 'Comparison of Energy Intake in Toddlers Assessed by Food Frequency Questionnaire and Total Energy Expenditure Measured by the Doubly Labeled Water Method', Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 113 459-463 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.jand.2012.09.021Author URL
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan, Ian Wright, Robin Callister
2012Ho M, Garnett SP, Baur L, Burrows TL, Stewart L, Hutchesson MJ, Collins CE, 'Effectiveness of lifestyle interventions in child obesity: Systematic review with meta-analysis', Pediatrics, 130 e1647-e1671 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 65Web of Science - 58
Co-authorsMelinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2012Burrows TL, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Okely T, Bray JF, Collins CE, 'Dietary outcomes of the Healthy Dads Healthy Kids randomised controlled trial', Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 55 408-411 (2012) [C1]
DOI10.1097/MPG.0b013e318259aee6
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan, David Lubans, Robin Callister
2012Freeman EE, Fletcher R, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Burrows TL, Callister R, 'Preventing and treating childhood obesity: Time to target fathers', International Journal of Obesity, 36 12-15 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 19Web of Science - 16
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Emily Freeman, Richard Fletcher
2012Burrows TL, Berthon B, Garg ML, Collins CE, 'A comparative validation of a child food frequency questionnaire using red blood cell membrane fatty acids', European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 66 825-829 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 16Web of Science - 15
Co-authorsManohar Garg, Clare Collins
2012Burrows TL, Golley RK, Khambalia A, McNaughton SA, Magarey A, Rosenkranz RR, et al., 'The quality of dietary intake methodology and reporting in child and adolescent obesity intervention trials: A systematic review', Obesity Reviews, 13 1125-1138 (2012) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1467-789X.2012.01022.x
CitationsScopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authorsClare Collins
2012Duncanson KR, Burrows TL, Collins CE, 'Study protocol of a parent-focused child feeding and dietary intake intervention: The feeding healthy food to kids randomised controlled trial', BMC Public Health, 12 1-10 (2012) [C3]
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsClare Collins
2012Marshall S, Watson JF, Burrows TL, Guest M, Collins CE, 'The development and evaluation of the Australian child and adolescent recommended food score: A cross-sectional study', Nutrition Journal, 11 96 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authorsMaya Guest, Clare Collins
2012Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Okely AD, Burrows TL, Callister R, 'Mediators of weight loss in the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' pilot study for overweight fathers', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 9 45 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 7Web of Science - 4
Co-authorsDavid Lubans, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2011Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Burrows TL, Fletcher R, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community effectiveness trial: Study protocol of a community-based healthy lifestyle program for fathers and their children', BMC Public Health, 11 876 (2011) [C3]
DOI10.1186/1471-2458-11-876
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authorsRon Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Richard Fletcher, Robin Callister, David Lubans, Andrew Miller, Philip Morgan, Myles Young
2011Burrows TL, Collins CE, Garg ML, 'Omega-3 index, obesity and insulin resistance in children', International Journal of Pediatric Obesity, 6 e532-e539 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.3109/17477166.2010.549489
CitationsScopus - 19Web of Science - 16
Co-authorsClare Collins, Manohar Garg
2011Magarey A, Watson JF, Golley RK, Burrows TL, Sutherland R, McNaughton SA, et al., 'Assessing dietary intake in children and adolescents: Considerations and recommendations for obesity research', International Journal of Pediatric Obesity, 6 2-11 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.3109/17477161003728469
CitationsScopus - 39Web of Science - 26
Co-authorsClare Collins
2011Hall LE, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Burrows TL, Lubans DR, Callister R, 'Children's intake of fruit and selected energy-dense nutrient-poor foods is associated with fathers' intake', Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 111 1039-1044 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.jada.2011.04.008
CitationsScopus - 13Web of Science - 14
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, David Lubans
2011Burrows TL, Collins CE, 'Validation studies of diets of children and adolescents: Authors' response', Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 111 1125-1126 (2011) [C3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2011Collins CE, Okely AD, Morgan PJ, Jones RA, Burrows TL, Cliff DP, et al., 'Parent diet modification, child activity, or both in obese children: An RCT', Pediatrics, 127 619-627 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1542/peds.2010-1518
CitationsScopus - 37Web of Science - 32
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Kim Colyvas, Clare Collins
2011Burrows TL, Warren JM, Collins CE, 'Long-term changes in food consumption trends in overweight children in the HIKCUPS Intervention', Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 53 543-547 (2011) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authorsClare Collins
2011Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Okely AD, Burrows TL, Fletcher R, Collins CE, 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' randomized controlled trial: Efficacy of a healthy lifestyle program for overweight fathers and their children', International Journal of Obesity, 35 436-447 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1038/ijo.2010.151
CitationsScopus - 30Web of Science - 30
Co-authorsClare Collins, Robin Callister, Richard Fletcher, Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2011Burrows TL, Findlay NA, Killen CG, Dempsey SE, Hunter S, Chiarelli PE, Snodgrass SN, 'Using nominal group technique to develop a consensus derived model for peer review of teaching across a multi-school faculty', Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice, 8 1-9 (2011) [C1]
Co-authorsSuzanne Snodgrass, Sharyn Hunter, Pauline Chiarelli, Shane Dempsey
2010Jones RA, Warren JM, Okely AD, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Cliff DP, et al., 'Process evaluation of the Hunter Illawarra kids challenge using parent support study: A multisite randomized controlled trial for the management of child obesity', Health Promotion Practice, 11 917-927 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1177/1524839908328994
CitationsScopus - 5
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins
2010Burrows TL, Warren JM, Collins CE, 'The impact of a child obesity treatment intervention on parent child-feeding practices', International Journal of Pediatric Obesity, 5 43-50 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.3109/17477160902957158
CitationsScopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authorsClare Collins
2010Burrows TL, Martin RJ, Collins CE, 'A systematic review of the validity of dietary assessment methods in children when compared with the method of doubly labeled water', Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 110 1501-1510 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.jada.2010.07.008
CitationsScopus - 134Web of Science - 126
Co-authorsClare Collins
2010Okely AD, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Jones RA, Warren JM, Cliff DP, et al., 'Multi-site randomized controlled trial of a child-centered physical activity program, a parent-centered dietary-modification program, or both in overweight children: The HIKCUPS study', Journal of Pediatrics, 157 388-394 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.jpeds.2010.03.028
CitationsScopus - 38Web of Science - 37
Co-authorsKim Colyvas, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2010Collins CE, Watson JF, Burrows TL, 'Measuring dietary intake in children and adolescents in the context of overweight and obesity', International Journal of Obesity, 34 1103-1115 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1038/ijo.2009.241
CitationsScopus - 47Web of Science - 45
Co-authorsClare Collins
2010Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, McElduff P, Burrows TL, Warren JM, et al., 'The SHED-IT community trial study protocol: A randomised controlled trial of weight loss programs for overweight and obese men', BMC Public Health, 10 1-11 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1186/1471-2458-10-701
CitationsScopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Myles Young
2009Burrows TL, Warren JM, Colyvas KJ, Garg ML, Collins CE, 'Validation of overweight children's fruit and vegetable intake using plasma carotenoids', Obesity, 17 162-168 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1038/oby.2008.495
CitationsScopus - 37Web of Science - 28
Co-authorsClare Collins, Manohar Garg, Kim Colyvas
2008Burrows TL, Warren JM, Baur LA, Collins CE, 'Impact of a child obesity intervention on dietary intake and behaviors', International Journal of Obesity, 32 1481-1488 (2008) [C1]
DOI10.1038/ijo.2008.96
CitationsScopus - 25Web of Science - 24
Co-authorsClare Collins
2007Jones RA, Okely AD, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Steele JR, Warren JM, et al., 'The HIKCUPS trial: a multi-site randomized controlled trial of a combined physical activity skill-development and dietary modification program in overweight and obese children', BMC Public Health, 7 1-9 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.1186/1471-2458-7-15
CitationsScopus - 27Web of Science - 18
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins
Show 64 more journal articles

Conference (69 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2014Chai LK, MacDonald-Wicks L, Hure AJ, Burrows T, Collins C, 'Disparities exist between the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating and the dietary patterns of Australian pre-schoolers', ISBNPA 2014 Abstract Book, San Diego, USA (2014) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Lesley Wicks, Alexis Hure
2013Burrows T, Collins CE, Hutchesson M, Rollo M, Guest M, Boggess M, 'Validation of fruit and vegetable intakes assessed by food frequency questionnaire using plasma carotenoids in adults', Australasian Medical Journal, Brisbane, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsMaya Guest, Megan Rollo, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2013Pursey K, Stanwell P, Collins CE, Burrows T, 'The use of fMRI in food addiction: A systematic review', Obesity Facts: The European Journal of Obesity, Liverpool, UK (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2013Ho M, Garnett S, Baur L, Burrows T, Stewart L, Collins C, 'Impact of dietary and exercise interventions on anthropometric and metabolic outcomes in obese children and adolescents: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials', Obesity Facts: the European journal of obesity, Liverpool, UK (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2013Pursey K, Burrows T, Collins CE, Stanwell P, 'Does food addiction exist in the young Australian adult population?', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2013Gow M, Ho M, Burrows T, Baur LA, Stewart L, Hutchesson M, et al., 'Macronutrient distribution of the diet-impact on weight and cardio-metabolic outcomes in overweight and obese children and adolescents: A systematic review', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsMelinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2013Pursey K, Burrows T, Collins CE, Stanwell P, 'How accurate is web-based self-reported height and weight in young Australian adults?', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2013Ramadan S, Burrows TL, Pursey KM, Stanwell PT, 'Brain MRS after consumption of commercially available energy drink', Proceedings of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsSaadallah Ramadan
2013Collins CE, Burrows T, Lucas H, Morgan PJ, 'Translating an efficacious child obesity RCT to socio-economically disadvantaged communities', The Proceedings of The 2nd Annual NHMRC Research Translation Faculty Symposium: From Bench to Bourke, Sydney, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan
2012Watson J, Collins CE, Guest M, Pezdirc K, Duncanson K, Burrows T, Huxley S, 'Evaluation of an adult food frequency questionnaire and its associated diet quality score', The 8th International Conference on Diet Activity and Methods Abstract Book, Rome, Italy (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsMaya Guest, Clare Collins
2012Saunders KL, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, et al., 'Insights into engaging men in weight loss: Process evaluation of the SHED-IT RCT of gender-sensitised weight loss programs for overweight men', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Myles Young, Ron Plotnikoff
2012Cliff D, Okely T, Burrows TL, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Jones RA, Baur L, 'Levels and bouts of sedentary behaviour and physical activity: Associations with cardio-metabolic health in overweight and obese children', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan
2012Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Berry NJ, et al., 'Physical activity outcomes from the SHED-IT RCT: An evaluation of theoretically-based, gender-sensitised weight loss programs for men', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsRon Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan, Myles Young, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2012Baines SK, Hutchesson MJ, Palmer MA, Hure AJ, Burrows TL, MacDonald-Wicks LK, et al., 'Systematic review updating the evidence of the effect of low GI/GL diets in the treatment of overweight and obesity in adults', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsLauren Williams, Lesley Wicks, Surinder Baines, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Alexis Hure
2012Bray JF, Burrows TL, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'Evaluation of the 'Back to Basics' After-School Cooking Club for children and their families from a socio-economically disadvantaged community', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan
2012Duncanson KR, Holman B, Burrows TL, Collins CE, 'Above average but below par: A qualitative study exploring the child feeding paradox', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2012Ho M, Garnett SP, Burrows TL, Stewart L, Hutchesson MJ, Baur LA, Collins CE, 'Effectiveness of lifestyle interventions incorporating a dietary component in overweight and obese children and adolescents: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2012MacDonald-Wicks LK, Hutchesson MJ, Palmer MA, Williams LT, Hure AJ, Burrows TL, et al., 'Systematic review updating the evidence of the effect of omega 3 fatty acids in the treatment of overweight and obesity in adults', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsSurinder Baines, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Lesley Wicks, Alexis Hure, Lauren Williams
2012Hutchesson MJ, Palmer MA, MacDonald-Wicks LK, Williams LT, Burrows TL, Hure AJ, et al., 'Are best practice guidelines enough? A survey of dietitians to inform the revision of the Best Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsSurinder Baines, Lesley Wicks, Lauren Williams, Alexis Hure, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2012Pezdirc KB, Collins CE, Watson JF, Burrows TL, Guest M, Boggess M, Duncanson KR, 'Validation of an adult food frequency questionnaire', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsMaya Guest, Clare Collins
2012Burrows TL, Pursey KM, Hutchesson MJ, Stanwell PT, 'What are the health implications associated with the consumption of energy drinks? A systematic review', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsMelinda Hutchesson
2012Cliff D, Okely A, Burrows TL, Jones R, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Baur L, 'Associations between sedentary behaviour, physical activity and cardio-metabolic health in overweight and obese children', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Auckland, New Zealand (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins
2012Collins CE, Schumacher R, Dewar DL, Lubans DR, Finn TL, Morgan PJ, et al., 'Dietary patterns of adolescent girls attending schools in low-income communities highlight inadequate consumption of core food groups', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Auckland, New Zealand (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsDavid Lubans, Philip Morgan, Maya Guest, Clare Collins
2012Collins CE, Williams A, Morgan PJ, Lloyd AB, Burrows TL, 'The association between father-child dietary intakes: Results from the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids community randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Auckland, New Zealand (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins
2012Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Berry NJ, et al., 'The SHED-IT Community Trial: A randomised controlled trial of Internet- and paper-based weight loss programs tailored for overweight and obese men', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Auckland, New Zealand (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsRobin Callister, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Myles Young
2012Burrows TL, Collins CE, Truby H, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Davies P, 'Who is the most accurate reporter of child energy intake - mothers, fathers or the child? - A doubly labelled water validation study of an FFQ', 8th International Conference on Diet and Activity Methods (ICDAM 8). Abstract Book, Rome, Italy (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2012Collins CE, Burrows TL, Golley RK, Margarey A, 'The Australasian Child and Adolescent Obesity Research Network online decision tool to guide dietary intake method selection in the context of obesity', 8th International Conference on Diet and Activity Methods (ICDAM 8). Abstract Book, Rome, Italy (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2012Collins CE, Burrows TL, Truby H, Wright IM, Morgan PJ, Davies P, Callister R, 'Doubly labelled water validation of toddler total energy intake assessed by a food frequency questionnaire', 8th International Conference on Diet and Activity Methods (ICDAM 8). Abstract Book, Rome, Italy (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsIan Wright, Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2011Burrows TL, Collins CE, Truby H, Callister RJ, Morgan PJ, Davies PSW, 'Doubly labelled water validation of child versus parent report of total energy intake by food frequency questionnaire', Australasian Medical Journal, Queenstown, NZ (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Robert Callister, Clare Collins
2011Miller AD, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Okely AD, et al., 'Effective strategies for the recruitment of overweight men and their children into a community trial: The Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids recruitment story', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Adelaide (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Myles Young, Robin Callister, Richard Fletcher, Philip Morgan, Andrew Miller, David Lubans
2011Golley RK, Burrows TL, Khambalia A, McNaughton SA, Magarey A, Rozenkranz R, et al., 'What is the quality of dietary intake methodology and reporting in intervention studies on child and adolescent obesity management? A systematic review', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, Adelaide, SA (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2011Bray JF, Burrows TL, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Evaluation of a theory-based, after-school cooking club for children and their families living in a socio-economically disadvantaged community', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan
2011Cliff D, Okely A, Jones R, Burrows TL, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Baur L, 'Associations between objectively measured physical activity, sedentary behaviour and plasma lipids in overweight and obese children', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan
2011Duncanson K, Burrows TL, Collins CE, 'Twelve month outcomes of the feeding healthy food to kids randomised controlled trial', Journal of the American Dietetic Association, San Diego (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2011Duncanson K, Burrows T, Collins C, 'Twelve month outcomes of the feeding healthy food to kids randomised controlled trial', ANNALS OF NUTRITION AND METABOLISM (2011) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsClare Collins
2011Duncanson KR, Hudson N, Burrows TL, Collins CE, 'Associations between child feeding practises and parenting style', Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, Madrid, Spain (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2011Bray JF, Burrows TL, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'The Back to Basics Cooking Club study: A theory based, family-focussed nutrition intervention in a socio-economically disadvantaged community', Nutrition and Dietetics: Dietitians Association of Australia 29th National Conference Oral Program Abstracts, Adelaide (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan
2011Huxley S, Burrows TL, Watson JF, Collins CE, 'The development and evaluation of the Australian recommended food score for kids', Nutrition and Dietetics: Dietitians Association of Australia 29th National Conference Oral Program Abstracts, Adelaide (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2011Duncanson K, Collins CE, Burrows TL, ''Best bet' resources not enough to impact on what parents feed their children: A randomised controlled trial with three month outcomes', Nutrition and Dietetics: Dietitians Association of Australia 29th National Conference Oral Program Abstracts, Adelaide (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2011Burrows TL, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Okely T, Collins CE, 'The Healthy Dads Healthy Kids randomised controlled trial', Nutrition and Dietetics: Dietitians Association of Australia 29th National Conference Poster Abstracts, Adelaide (2011) [E3]
DOI10.1038/ijo.2010.151
Co-authorsClare Collins, Robin Callister, David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2010Bray JF, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Burrows TL, 'Effectiveness of parent-centred interventions for the prevention and treatment of childhood obesity in community settings: A systematic review', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan
2010Burrows TL, 'How much do we believe what families tell us about dietary change? Validation and reporting of dietary outcomes', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
2010Burrows TL, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Okely T, Collins CE, 'Dietary outcomes of the healthy dads healthy kids randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
DOI10.1097/MPG.0b013e318259aee6
Co-authorsDavid Lubans, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan
2010Burrows TL, Patterson AJ, Bacon A, Mitchell LJ, MacDonald-Wicks LK, Baines SK, Williams LT, 'Client satisfaction and weight loss outcomes of student centred dietetic outpatient clinics', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsAmanda Patterson, Lesley Wicks, Lauren Williams, Surinder Baines
2010Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Fletcher R, Burrows TL, Collins CE, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community program: Promoting family health through sustainable school and community partnerships', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsRon Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Richard Fletcher, Myles Young, Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2010Bray JF, Burrows TL, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'The prevention of childhood obesity in economically disadvantage communities: Process evaluation of an after-school program for families', Nutrition & Dietetics, Melbourne (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins
2010Burrows TL, Golley R, Collins CE, Margarey A, 'Development of an online decision tool to guide dietary intake methodology selection', Nutrition & Dietetics, Melbourne (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2010Duncanson KR, Burrows TL, Collins CE, 'Child feeding practices at baseline in the Feeding Healthy Food to Kids Study', Nutrition & Dietetics, Melbourne (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2010Hall L, Collins CE, Burrows TL, 'Relationship between father and child intakes of fruit, vegetables and non-core - the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids Study', Nutrition & Dietetics, Melbourne (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2010Burrows TL, Berthon B, Collins CE, 'A validation study of children's dietary fat intake using red blood cell membrane fatty acids', Nutrition & Dietetics, Melbourne, Vic (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2010Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Okely AD, Burrows TL, Fletcher R, Collins CE, 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' randomized controlled trial: Efficacy of a healthy lifestyle program for overweight fathers and their children', Obesity Reviews, Stockholm, Sweden (2010) [E3]
DOI10.1038/ijo.2010.151
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Richard Fletcher, Robin Callister, Clare Collins, David Lubans
2010Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Oakley AD, Burrows TL, Cliff DP, Jones RA, et al., 'HIKCUPS (Hunter Illawarra Kids Challenge Using Parent Support) reduces BMI z-score up to 2 years: Results of a multi-site randomized trial for overweight children', Obesity Reviews, Stockholm, Sweden (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins
2010Burrows TL, Berthon B, Garg ML, Collins CE, 'A novel approach to validating dietary change in children participating in the HIKCUPS (Hunter Illawarra Kids Challenge Using Parent Support) obesity intervention', Obesity Reviews, Stockholm, Sweden (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsManohar Garg, Clare Collins
2009Okely AD, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Jones RA, Burrows TL, Cliff DP, et al., 'Efficacy of HIKCUPS (Hunter Illawarra Kids Challenge Using Parent Support) in reducing BMI Z-score at 24 months: Results of a multi-site randomised trial for overweight 5-9 year olds', 17th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australia/New Zealand Obesity Society: Meeting Proceedings & Abstract Book, Melbourne, VIC (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins
2009Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Burrows TL, Bray JF, Fletcher R, et al., 'Using mediation analysis to explain weight loss in the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' pilot randomised controlled trial', National Men's Health Gathering 2009: Program and Abstracts, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Richard Fletcher, Robin Callister
2009Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Fletcher R, Bray JF, Okely T, et al., 'Engaging overweight men to improve their health: Lessons learnt from the 'SHED-IT' and 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' pilot randomised controlled trials', National Men's Health Gathering 2009: Program and Abstracts, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Richard Fletcher, Robin Callister
2009Berthon B, Burrows TL, 'A systematic review: Validation of children's dietary fat intake using biomarkers', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E3]
2009Martin R, Burrows TL, 'Measuring energy intake of children and adolescents: A systematic review of dietary assessment methods validated using the doubly labelled water method', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E3]
2009Burrows TL, Warren JM, Baur L, Collins CE, 'The two year impact of a dietary intervention on the eating behaviour of overweight children', International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries, Mumbai, India (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2009Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Bray JF, Burrows TL, Fletcher R, et al., 'Intervention description and preliminary findings of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' pilot randomised controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsRobin Callister, David Lubans, Clare Collins, Richard Fletcher, Philip Morgan
2007Burrows TL, Warren JM, Collins CE, 'The effect of a dietary intervention on the eating behaviours of overweight children', Nutrition & Dietetics, Hobart, TAS (2007) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2007Okely AD, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Jones RA, Patterson MJ, Warren JM, et al., 'Multi-site randomised trial of a weight management program for overweight and obese children: 6- and 12-mo outcomes from HIKUPS (Hunter Illawarra Kids Challenge using Parent Support)', ASSO 15th Annual Scientific Meeting 2007. Abstracts, Canberra (2007) [E3]
Co-authorsPhilip Morgan, Clare Collins
2007Burrows TL, Collins CE, Warren JM, 'Improvement in diet and plasma carotenoids one year after an intervention for child obesity', ASSO 15th Annual Scientific Meeting 2007. Abstracts, Canberra, ACT (2007) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2007Burrows TL, Collins CE, Warren J, 'A novel approach to validating dietary change in children participating in an obesity intervention', Annual Scientific Meeting of the North American Association for the Study of Obesity. Abstracts, New Orleans (2007) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2006Burrows TL, Warren JM, Collins CE, 'What do children enrolled in an obseity intervention program eat at baseline?', Nutrition & Dietetics, Sydney, Australia (2006) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2006Burrows TL, Warren JM, Cleary J, Collins CE, 'Nutrition for HIKCUPS: Description of a dietary intervention for overweight children', Obesity Reviews, Sydney, NSW (2006) [E3]
DOI10.1111/j.1467-7881.2006.00283_7.x
Co-authorsClare Collins
2005Burrows TL, Warren J, Cleary J, Collins CE, 'An overview on the nutrition component of the HICKUPS study in overweight children', Proceedings of the 14th Annual Scientific Meeting of Australasian Society for the Study of Obesity, Glenelg, SA (2005) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
2005Warren JM, Okley A, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Jones R, Burrows TL, et al., 'The realities of undertaking a randomised controlled trial in children : experience from the HICKUPS study', Proceedings of the 14th Annual Scientific Meeting of Australasian Society for the Study of Obesity, Glenelg, SA (2005) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins, Philip Morgan
2005Jones R, Okley A, Collins CE, Morgan P, Warren J, Burrows TL, et al., 'Design and quality control of a multi-site RCT : HICKUPS (Hunter Illawarra Kids Challenge Using Parent Support)', Proceedings of the 14th Annual Scientific Meeting of Australasian Society for the Study of Obesity, Glenelg, SA (2005) [E3]
Co-authorsClare Collins
Show 66 more conferences

Report (2 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2012Collins CE, Hutchesson MJ, Palmer MA, MacDonald-Wicks LK, Williams LT, Baines SK, et al., 'DAA Best Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults; Report to inform the 2011 revision of the 2005 guidelines', Dieticians Association of Australia, 173 (2012) [R1]
Co-authorsSurinder Baines, Lesley Wicks, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Lauren Williams, Alexis Hure
2011Probst Y, Ralston R, Riley M, Sutherland RL, Truby H, Walker K, et al., 'A review of the evidence to address targeted questions to inform the revision of the Australian Dietary Guidelines', National Health and Medical Research Council, 1078 (2011) [R1]
Co-authorsAlexis Hure, Lauren Williams, Lesley Wicks, Amanda Patterson, Surinder Baines, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants15
Total funding$891,031

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20141 grants / $25,000

Validation of a Food Frequency Questionnaire to detect changes in diet-related cardiovascular disease risk$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamProfessor Clare Collins, Professor Robin Callister, Doctor Tracy Burrows, Associate Professor Lisa Wood, Ms Tracy Schumacher
SchemeCardiovascular Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1301346
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

20123 grants / $40,915

Investigation of factors affecting the success of family based dietary interventions for parents experiencing CVD events$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamProfessor Clare Collins, Professor Robin Callister, Doctor Tracy Burrows
SchemeResearch Higher Degree Support Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200310
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

Feasibility of targeting parents with heart disease to improve the heart health of their children$15,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Tracy Burrows, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Robin Callister
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200172
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney Convention Centre, 5 - 8 September 2012$915

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamDoctor Tracy Burrows
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200613
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20111 grants / $9,675

Does the ingestion of new age beverages create changes in brain metabolites?$9,675

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Tracy Burrows
SchemeEarly Career Researcher Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1000935
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20106 grants / $735,560

The Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids community program: Promoting family health through sustainable school and community partnerships$524,453

Funding body: Coal & Allied Trust

Funding bodyCoal & Allied Trust
Project TeamProfessor Philip Morgan, Doctor Victoria Clay, Professor Clare Collins, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Richard Fletcher, Professor Robin Callister, Doctor Tracy Burrows, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Anthony Okely
SchemeProject Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000001
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Development of a short food frequency questionnaire which is validated for both children and adults for use as an educational tool by practitioners.$171,522

Funding body: Meat and Livestock Australia

Funding bodyMeat and Livestock Australia
Project TeamProfessor Clare Collins, Doctor Tracy Burrows, Doctor Maya Guest
SchemeHuman Nutrition Research Program
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000577
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Healthy Dads Healthy Kids for Indigenous populations$24,994

Funding body: Hunter Children`s Research Foundation

Funding bodyHunter Children`s Research Foundation
Project TeamProfessor Philip Morgan, Doctor Richard Fletcher, Mr Craig Hammond, Professor John Lester, Professor Robin Callister, Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Tracy Burrows
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG0900155
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

Preliminary work to revise the DAA Best Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults$9,091

Funding body: Dietitians Association of Australia

Funding bodyDietitians Association of Australia
Project TeamProfessor Clare Collins, Conjoint Professor Lauren Williams, Associate Professor Surinder Baines, Doctor Lesley MacDonald-Wicks, Doctor Tracy Burrows, Doctor Alexis Hure, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson
SchemeProject Consultancy
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1001022
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

PULSE Education Prize$4,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Tracy Burrows
SchemePULSE Education Prize
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG0900247
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

International Congress of Obesity, Stockholm, Sweden, 11 - 15 July 2010$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamDoctor Tracy Burrows
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000514
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20093 grants / $74,881

Does the HIKCUPS weight managment program for overweight children work in the parents' workplace or in sfter school care settings$68,181

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamProfessor Clare Collins, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Tracy Burrows
SchemeNewcastle Permanent Building Society
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0189768
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

Feeding healthly food to kids - the role of parents$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamMrs Kerith Duncanson, Doctor Tracy Burrows, Professor Clare Collins
SchemeNew Staff Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0189637
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Asia-Oceania Conference of Obesity, Mumbai India, 5-8 Feb 2009$1,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamDoctor Tracy Burrows
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0189895
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20081 grants / $5,000

Validation of child and parent reported dietary intake via The Australian Child and Adolescent Eating Survey$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Tracy Burrows, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Robin Callister
SchemeNew Staff Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0189394
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY
Edit

Research Supervision

Current Supervision

CommencedResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015Dietary Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Supplementation and the Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Medical Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2015Nutrition's Role in the Management of Chronic Pain
Nutrition & Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2013An Adaptation of the Existing Design and Technology/Food Technology Syllabus to Encourage Healthy Eating in Adolescents
Nutrition & Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2012The Neurobiology of Eating Behaviour: Is Food Addiction a Quantifiable Phenomenon?
Nutrition & Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2012Evidence to Practice Gap in Dietary Intake Advice in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention
Nutrition & Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2011The Family Diet Study - Dietary and Lifestyle Factors Associated With Weight Status of Malay Primary School Children and Their Main Carers at Urban Areas of Klang Valley, Malaysia
Nutrition & Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

YearResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015An Investigation into Parental Influences on the Dietary Intake of Australian Preschool Aged Children
Nutrition & Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
Edit

News

2014 Scopus Researchers

Scopus Young Researchers

September 22, 2014

UON academics have featured prominently in the 2014 Scopus Young Researcher of the Year Awards, receiving honours in three of five categories.

Food addiction

Food addiction

October 14, 2013

A University of Newcastle research team is hoping to determine whether 'addiction' to pleasurable foods high in salt, fat and sugar could be contributing to the obesity epidemic.

Girl with head in fridge eating donuts

Researchers delve into world of food addiction

March 14, 2013

A University of Newcastle research team is hoping to uncover the hidden world of food addiction with a new project launched this week.

Dr Tracy Burrows

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Nutrition and Dietetics

Contact Details

Emailtracy.burrows@newcastle.edu.au
Phone(02) 4921 5514
Fax(02) 4921 7053

Office

RoomHC34
BuildingHunter Building
LocationCallaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
Edit