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Career Summary

Biography

I have continued to develop a reputation in the area of architectural history. I have a sustained and long term research program with international outputs. In March 2007, I began a five year contract as a Research Fellow in Architectural History and in March 2008 I begun a ARC Discovery Grant 2008-2010. Australian Postdoctoral Fellowship entitled 'Isaac Newton s Temple of Solomon and his analysis of sacred architecture: An interpretation and discussion of Babson Manuscript 0434.' Babson Manuscript 0434 on Solomon's Temple was written by Isaac Newton in c1680. It is written in four languages: English, Latin, Greek and Hebrew. This research has resulted in a monograph entitled 'Isaac Newton's Temple of Solomon and his Reconstruction of Sacred Architecture," published by Birkhauser in 2011.

A current research project on utopia cities has developed from this grant. This project is examining and reconstructing utopia cities from the 16th- 17th centuries, that were motivated by the religious wars and oppressive political situations, and cities from the 19th century, that were motivated by social, economic and health problems which were caused by the industrial revolution.

My research is multi-disciplinary and incorporates a number of research areas including philosophy, mathematics and the history of architecture. It also is multi-skilled research as far as it requires palaeography, graphic skills ie ArchiCAD as well as traditional archival research and analysis. My translation skills, palaeography in Medieval and Early Modern Latin, enable me to translated manuscripts that have not been researched before. I have also been nominated for the Early Research Leaders program at the University of Newcastle in 2012.

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle, 12/12/2003
  • Graduate Diploma in Mathematical Studies, University of Newcastle, 09/12/1998

Research

Research keywords

  • 17th and 18th Sacred Architecture
  • Architectural History
  • Computer Modelling
  • Space Sintax
  • Urban Studies
  • Utopian Cities

Research expertise

My research is multi-disciplinary and incorporates a number of research areas including philosophy, mathematics and the history of architecture. It also is multi-skilled research as far as it requires palaeography, graphic skills (ie ArchiCAD, Artlantis & 3D Studio Max) as well as traditional archival research and analysis. My translation skills, palaeography in Medieval and Early Modern Latin, enable me to translate manuscripts that have not been researched before. Currently researching 16th-19th utopian cities, that have never been built but have had significant influence through the centuries.

Languages

  • Latin

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
120100Architecture75
219900Other History And Archaeology25

Memberships

Body relevant to professional practice.

  • Member - The Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand
  • Member - The Australian Early Medieval Association
  • Member - The Australan and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies
  • Member - The Society of Utopian Studies

Committee/Associations (relevant to research).

  • Project Officer and book review editor - The Australian Early Medieval Association

Appointments

Fellowship APD (level A)
Australian Research Council (Australia)
01/02/2008 - 01/01/2011

Awards

Research Award.

2012Pro Vice-Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Research Creative Works 2012
The University of Newcastle (Australia)
Was awarded for the exhibition entitled 'Isaac Newton and Solomon's Temple,' which was exhibited in Newcastle, Sydney, Central Coast, and Bathurst. The exhibition was a result of an ARC research Fellowship
2009Pro Vice-Chancellor's Award for Research Excellence
The Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcasle (Australia)
For research into Juan Bautista Villalpando's Ezechielem Explanations

Invitations

The Art and History of the Celtic Spiral
Italian-Celtic Festival, Australia (Invited Presenter)
2005
Architectural Precedence of Rosslyn Chapel
Sydney Medieval and Renascence Group, Australia (Invited Presenter)
2007
Examining the design foundations (fact and myth) of Rosslyn Chapel
Celtic Studies Foundation, Australia (Invited Presenter)
2006
Villalpandos Sacred Architecture in the light of Isaac Newtons Commentary
Sydney Medieval and Renascence Group, Australia (Invited Presenter)
2008
Saltiar na Rann: Cosmos and the Celestial city
Celtic Studies Foundation, Sydney University, Australia (Invited Presenter)
2009
A Medieval Riddle VII from VIII equal VI,
Moore Institute, National University of Ireland, Galway,, Ireland (Invited Presenter)
2008
The Image of the Medieval Utopian City
The University of Leeds, England, United Kingdom (Invited Presenter)
2007
History on the Art of Mosaics
Australian Early Medieval Association, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia (Invited Presenter)
2005
Isaac Newton and the Temple of Solomon
Griffith University Gold Coast, Australia (Invited Presenter)
2012
Reconstructing Victorian Newcastle
Newcastle regional Museum, Australia (Invited Presenter)
2012

Collaboration

In addition in the last year I have been researching how the architectural historian can use mobile technologies to enhance historic and design research. I am currently collaborating with Dr Helen Giggins on a project entitled ‘Reconstructing Victorian Newcastle through Augmented Reality and Mobile Technology.’ This project reconstructs Victorian Newcastle using Augmented Reality and Mobile Technology. The project has two levels, both public and academic: 1) the reconstruction– the viewer will be able to see Victoria photographs of the building site in-situ along with the historical information 2) embedded data – there will be an extra layer of information for each site this will consist of the changes in the propose of the building, its architecture, voting patterns, ethnicity, etc. This will enable a full study of the city and its development. This is a pilot grant and will eventually be extended beyond the Victorian era. ’

Teaching

Teaching keywords

  • Research in the Built Environment
Edit

Highlighted Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2004Morrison T, 'The Dance of the Angels, the Mysteries of Pseudo-Dionysius and the Architecture of Gothic Cathedrals', Analecta Husserliana - The Yearbook of Phenomenological Research - Metamorphosis, Kluwer Academic Publishers, USA 299-320 (2004) [B1]

The bliss of heaven has been characterised by the dance of the angels and the illumination of light. The dance of the angels was commonly depicted on church ceilings and in Medieval and Renaissance paintings. An example of this is the dance of the angels and the blessed from Angleo da Fiesle's 'Last Judgement' painted in 1425 in the collection of the Academia della Belle Arte in Florence. Clement of Alexandria claimed that with the revelation of the Christian mysteries the initiated shall dance with the angels.' In Medieval hymns there are numerous references to the ring dance of angels or the virgins.2 The spheres of Dante's Paradise are full of light, music and dance, with the exception of the sphere of Saturn, which was the sphere of contemplation. In the sphere of the sun, the souls of the wise and learned performed a ring dance that encircled Dante and Beatrice. The ethereal light, harmony and the bliss of heaven radiated from this dance of the souls.' In Pseudo-Dionysius's 'Celestial Hierarchy' the nine spheres of angels dance a celestial choral dance. The angels' task was to receive and to pass on the divine light, and through this illumination comes the understanding that brings perfection.' Cosmic dance became linked with the Christian mysteries of baptism and the Eucharist. Pseudo-Dionysius's Ecclesiastical Hierarchy was patterned on the Celestial Hierarchy. The direct connection of the corporeal world to the incorporeal world was the mysteries. However, the mysteries were much more than just a connection with the invisible world they gave the incorporeal world their shape or pattern in the corporeal world. This paper examines these patterns. First, through an examination of the connection of dance and the mysteries, from Philo Judaeus to Pseudo-Dionysius, circa fifth century; second through the influences of Pseudo-Dionysius in the designs of the Gothic cathedrals and the patterns and designs they contain within.

2008Morrison T, 'Villalpando's sacred architecture in the light of Isaac Newton's commentary', Nexus VII: Architecture and Mathematics, Kim Williams Books, Turin, Italy 79-91 (2008) [B1]

The second volume of Ezechielem Explanationes by Juan Battista Villalpando, published in 1604, contains a re-creation of the Temple of Solomon illustrated by a portfolio of exceptionally detailed architectural drawings. His designs were built on the principles of Platonic musical harmonies and his interpretation of ancient measurements. Villalpando envisaged the temple as a building encapsulating the entire formal grammar of classical architecture. Villalpando’s architecture, harmonic proportions and measurements appear to be a flawless system and his design exerted an extraordinary influence on the architects and historians of architecture in Europe for at least the next two centuries. His reconstruction inspired not only other commentaries and other reconstructions of Solomon’s Temple, but it also stimulated discussion on the very origins of architecture. However, his reconstruction was not without its critics. In the seventeenth and eighteen centuries critics included Louis Cappel, Samuel Lee, Louis Compiègne de Veil, Nicolaus Goldmann and others who produced alternative reconstructions of Solomon’s Temple. In the twentieth century criticism from what appears to be an unusual source was uncovered. In Sir Isaac Newton’s unpublished manuscripts he claimed that although Villalpando had created the best of the reconstructions of the Temple of Solomon, the reconstruction had many problems. This paper examines Villalpando’s reconstruction of the Temple in the light of Newton’s unpublished commentary.

2006Morrison T, 'The Art of Early Medieval Number Symbolism', Journal of The Australian Early Medieval Association, 2 169-181 (2006) [C1]

Christian number symbolism built upon the strong tradition of Platonic philosophy, Pythagorean lore and Babylonian astronomy. Numbers such as 1, 7, 8, 12 and 40 had magical and talismanic properties and were strongly represented in the Hebrew Scriptures and apocrypha. God was praised: 'you have ordered all things in measure, number and weight' (Wisdom 11:21). In the Christian Scriptures, when John the Divine was perplexed with the events happening around him, he was given a golden reed to measure the temple of God, the altar and those who worshipped within the temple (Revelation 11:1). Understanding would come from the process of measuring. Saint Augustine claimed that 'to ascend the path towards wisdom, we discover that numbers transcend our mind and remain unchangeable in their own'. Numbers had an ethereal existence. Augustine, Ambrose, Macrobius, Marcianus Capella, Isidore, Boethius, Thierry of Chartres, Abelard and many others praised the divine quality of particular numbers at length. Numbers were a model for theology and an analogy of creation. This paper examines the manifestation of this number symbolism in early medieval art, literature and architecture.

2009Morrison T, Labyrinthine Symbols in Western Culture: An Exploration of Their History, Philosophy and Iconography, VDM Verlag, Saarbrucken, 311 (2009) [A1]

Labyrinthine symbols are one of the most enduring symbols through history. There is a sense of ?universality? about these symbols that crosses religious and cultural boundaries. One labyrinthine symbol commonly called the Cretan labyrinth has endured for over 3300 years. It has a unicursal pattern - one path to the centre and no dead ends. Through time the Cretan labyrinth became part of other cultural symbols. The purpose of this book is two-fold: first, to develop a paradigm for the classification of unicursal patterns. With this classification, the variations and the transformation from one structure to another can be examined. The second and major purpose is to use this classification system to track the unicursal pattern from the Bronze Age to the early Renaissance in order to examine its developments. Through this method it will be possible to understand the origins, cultural connections and transference of designs and ideas through the structure of this symbol. In turn, this book will cast significant light upon the effectiveness of this form of visual communication as an extension of language and as a conveyer of the history of ideas.

2011Morrison T, Isaac Newton's Temple of Solomon and his Reconstruction of Sacred Architecture, Springer, Basel, 186 (2011) [A1]

Isaac Newton’s unpublished manuscripts reveal that for over fifty years he had an interest in the Temple of Solomon. He wrote on the Temple’s meaning, the rituals associated with it, and even recreated the architectural plan. In an unpublished manuscript entitled Introduction to the Lexicon of the Prophets, Part two: About the appearance of the Jewish Temple, or more commonly known by its call name Babson MS 0424, he described the plan and the architecture of the Temple. His main source for this reconstruction was the Book of Ezekiel, but he also used and compared this source with a wide selection of Jewish, Classical and contemporary sources in his search for the truth. The aim of this book is three-fold. Firstly, it contains the first translation of the Babson MS 0434 manuscript into English. Secondly, it provides a commentary to accompany the translation which puts Babson MS 0434 into context with Newton’s other works on science, chronology, prophecy and theology. Thirdly, there is a full reproduction of Newton’s plan of the Temple, accompanied by six drawings. While the visualization of Newton’s recreation of the Temple was not contained in the manuscript, his verbal description is clear enough to be able to reconstruct the design using ArchiCad, bringing Newton’s plan of the Temple alive. This work will appeal not only to scholars of architectural history but also to all those interested in the history of ideas in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

2011Morrison T, 'Isaac Newton, architect', Seventeenth Century, 26 130-148 (2011) [C1]

It is well known that Isaac Newton had an interest in the Temple of Solomon. Most biographies of Newton mention this interest, but little attention, if any, is given to his architectural work on the Temple. Although there is no surviving book of Vitruvius’ De Architectura or even one of his commentators in Newton’s library, he had a good knowledge of Vitruvius. He mentioned and/or referenced Vitruvius in some of his unpublished papers. For Newton the Temple was built to the ‘proportions of the architecture’ and these proportions paralleled Vitruvius’ norms of architecture. From his early days in Cambridge up until his death Newton remained interested in the Temple, its meaning and its architecture. This paper explores Isaac Newton's architectural knowledge and understanding.

2010Morrison T, 'The body, the temple and the Newtonian man conundrum', Nexus Network Journal, 12 343-352 (2010) [C1]

From his early days at the University of Cambridge until his death, Isaac Newton had a long running interest in the Temple of Solomon, a topic which appeared in his works on prophecy, chronology and metrology. At the same time that Newton was working on the Principia, he reconstructed the Temple and commented on the reconstructions of others. An important part of his investigations concerned the measurements of the Temple, which were harmonic and were built “exactly as the proportion of architecture demands.” Newton considered these proportions to be in accordance with Book III and IV of De Architectura. However, while insisting on exact architectural proportions, Newton moved away from the traditional proportions of the Vitruvian man; he derived a Newtonian man. This poses an interesting conundrum: Newton accepted the Temple’s architectural proportions as outlined in Vitruvius’s Book III, yet he rejected the human model Vitruvius used as the foundation of these proportions. At the same time Newton accepted the human frame as the basis of all ancient measurements and attempted to estimate the length of the sacred cubit based on the lengths of the parts for the body and the measurements set out by the ancient writers such a Vitruvius.

2009Villalpando JB, Morrison T, Juan Bautista Villalpando's Ezechielem Explanationes: A Sixteenth-Century Architectural Text, Edwin Mellen Press, Lewiston, NY, 612 (2009) [A2]

This is the first translation into English of Juan Bautista Villalpando's "Book Five of In Ezechielem Explanationes et Apparatus Vrbis Templi Hierosolymitani". After its publication in 1604 the work stimulated a debate - over not only the architecture of Solomon's Temple but on the very nature of the origins of architecture - that endured for more than one hundred and fifty years, in the form of commentaries and other reconstructions.

2010Morrison T, 'Juan Bautista Villalpando and the nature and science of architectural drawing', Nexus Network Journal, 12 63-73 (2010) [C1]

In 1604, Jesuit priest and architect Juan Bautista Villalpando published In Ezechielem Explanationes. It was a massive three volume scriptural exegesis on the Book of Ezekiel. Volume Two was dedicated to the reconstruction of Ezekiel’s vision of the Temple of Solomon. This volume consists of five books: on the prophecy on the Temple; its plan and reconstruction; the justification of the reconstruction; its bronzes and ornamentation, and an entire book on the nature and science of architectural drawing. Initially the latter appears out of place in a Scriptural exegesis but he explained that the purpose of this book was in order to guide the theologians so that they can form a mental idea or image of Temple, for their understanding and enlightenment of the entire Temple. However, throughout the text he points to the utility of the book to architects. For Villalpando the laws of optics were essential to the norms of perspective. Moreover, the sense and structure of seeing was a crucial element to the norms of mathematic and architecture, it is also a central theme in his theology. This paper examines his theory and his propose of perspective for architecture drawing.

2012Morrison T, 'Solomon's temple, Stonehenge, and divine architecture in the English enlightenment', Parergon, 29 135-163 (2012) [C1]

Isaac Newton had a long running interest in Solomon’s Temple. For Newton the plan of the Temple was a successor of the ancient Prytanæum, a temple where a sacred fire was kept burning. The plan of the Prytanæum was ‘the frame of the world as the true Temple of the great God’ and it was the successor to all other temples. Newton mentioned in an unpublished manuscript that it would appear that Stonehenge was an ancient Prytanæum and as such the architectural style of Stonehenge was an antecedent of Solomon’s Temple. He only mentioned it once but the connection between Solomon’s Temple and Stonehenge was made by other significant figures of the English Enlightenment including Inigo Jones, William Stukeley and John Wood the Elder. This connection was turned into something particularly English.

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.

Click on a category title below to expand the list of citations for that specific category.

Book (3 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2011Morrison T, Isaac Newton's Temple of Solomon and his Reconstruction of Sacred Architecture, Springer, Basel, 186 (2011) [A1]

Isaac Newton’s unpublished manuscripts reveal that for over fifty years he had an interest in the Temple of Solomon. He wrote on the Temple’s meaning, the rituals associated with it, and even recreated the architectural plan. In an unpublished manuscript entitled Introduction to the Lexicon of the Prophets, Part two: About the appearance of the Jewish Temple, or more commonly known by its call name Babson MS 0424, he described the plan and the architecture of the Temple. His main source for this reconstruction was the Book of Ezekiel, but he also used and compared this source with a wide selection of Jewish, Classical and contemporary sources in his search for the truth. The aim of this book is three-fold. Firstly, it contains the first translation of the Babson MS 0434 manuscript into English. Secondly, it provides a commentary to accompany the translation which puts Babson MS 0434 into context with Newton’s other works on science, chronology, prophecy and theology. Thirdly, there is a full reproduction of Newton’s plan of the Temple, accompanied by six drawings. While the visualization of Newton’s recreation of the Temple was not contained in the manuscript, his verbal description is clear enough to be able to reconstruct the design using ArchiCad, bringing Newton’s plan of the Temple alive. This work will appeal not only to scholars of architectural history but also to all those interested in the history of ideas in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

2009Morrison T, Labyrinthine Symbols in Western Culture: An Exploration of Their History, Philosophy and Iconography, VDM Verlag, Saarbrucken, 311 (2009) [A1]

Labyrinthine symbols are one of the most enduring symbols through history. There is a sense of ?universality? about these symbols that crosses religious and cultural boundaries. One labyrinthine symbol commonly called the Cretan labyrinth has endured for over 3300 years. It has a unicursal pattern - one path to the centre and no dead ends. Through time the Cretan labyrinth became part of other cultural symbols. The purpose of this book is two-fold: first, to develop a paradigm for the classification of unicursal patterns. With this classification, the variations and the transformation from one structure to another can be examined. The second and major purpose is to use this classification system to track the unicursal pattern from the Bronze Age to the early Renaissance in order to examine its developments. Through this method it will be possible to understand the origins, cultural connections and transference of designs and ideas through the structure of this symbol. In turn, this book will cast significant light upon the effectiveness of this form of visual communication as an extension of language and as a conveyer of the history of ideas.

2009Villalpando JB, Morrison T, Juan Bautista Villalpando's Ezechielem Explanationes: A Sixteenth-Century Architectural Text, Edwin Mellen Press, Lewiston, NY, 612 (2009) [A2]

This is the first translation into English of Juan Bautista Villalpando's "Book Five of In Ezechielem Explanationes et Apparatus Vrbis Templi Hierosolymitani". After its publication in 1604 the work stimulated a debate - over not only the architecture of Solomon's Temple but on the very nature of the origins of architecture - that endured for more than one hundred and fifty years, in the form of commentaries and other reconstructions.

Chapter (6 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2013Morrison T, ''The Canny Scot' Rev. John Dunmore Lang and the Largs Controversy', Celts and Their cultures at Home and Abroad: A Festschrift for Malcolm Broun, University of Sydney, Sydney 213-227 (2013) [B1]
2009Morrison T, ''Seeing' the Apocalyptic City in the fourteenth century', End of Days: Essays on the Apocalypse from Antiquity to Modernity, McFarland & Company, Inc, Jefferson, North Carolina 67-86 (2009) [B1]
2008Morrison T, 'Villalpando's sacred architecture in the light of Isaac Newton's commentary', Nexus VII: Architecture and Mathematics, Kim Williams Books, Turin, Italy 79-91 (2008) [B1]

The second volume of Ezechielem Explanationes by Juan Battista Villalpando, published in 1604, contains a re-creation of the Temple of Solomon illustrated by a portfolio of exceptionally detailed architectural drawings. His designs were built on the principles of Platonic musical harmonies and his interpretation of ancient measurements. Villalpando envisaged the temple as a building encapsulating the entire formal grammar of classical architecture. Villalpando’s architecture, harmonic proportions and measurements appear to be a flawless system and his design exerted an extraordinary influence on the architects and historians of architecture in Europe for at least the next two centuries. His reconstruction inspired not only other commentaries and other reconstructions of Solomon’s Temple, but it also stimulated discussion on the very origins of architecture. However, his reconstruction was not without its critics. In the seventeenth and eighteen centuries critics included Louis Cappel, Samuel Lee, Louis Compiègne de Veil, Nicolaus Goldmann and others who produced alternative reconstructions of Solomon’s Temple. In the twentieth century criticism from what appears to be an unusual source was uncovered. In Sir Isaac Newton’s unpublished manuscripts he claimed that although Villalpando had created the best of the reconstructions of the Temple of Solomon, the reconstruction had many problems. This paper examines Villalpando’s reconstruction of the Temple in the light of Newton’s unpublished commentary.

2008Ostwald M, Morrison T, 'Architecture as concept: The case of the artist's model', Homo Faber: Modelling Ideas, Spatial Information Architecture Laboratory, Melbourne, Victoria 176-185 (2008) [B1]

Co-authors: Michael Ostwald

2007Morrison T, Ostwald M, 'Shifting dimensions: The architectural model in history', Homo Faber: Modelling Architecture, Spatial Information Architecture Laboratory, Melbourne, Victoria 142-157 (2007) [B1]

Co-authors: Michael Ostwald

2004Morrison T, 'The Dance of the Angels, the Mysteries of Pseudo-Dionysius and the Architecture of Gothic Cathedrals', Analecta Husserliana - The Yearbook of Phenomenological Research - Metamorphosis, Kluwer Academic Publishers, USA 299-320 (2004) [B1]

The bliss of heaven has been characterised by the dance of the angels and the illumination of light. The dance of the angels was commonly depicted on church ceilings and in Medieval and Renaissance paintings. An example of this is the dance of the angels and the blessed from Angleo da Fiesle's 'Last Judgement' painted in 1425 in the collection of the Academia della Belle Arte in Florence. Clement of Alexandria claimed that with the revelation of the Christian mysteries the initiated shall dance with the angels.' In Medieval hymns there are numerous references to the ring dance of angels or the virgins.2 The spheres of Dante's Paradise are full of light, music and dance, with the exception of the sphere of Saturn, which was the sphere of contemplation. In the sphere of the sun, the souls of the wise and learned performed a ring dance that encircled Dante and Beatrice. The ethereal light, harmony and the bliss of heaven radiated from this dance of the souls.' In Pseudo-Dionysius's 'Celestial Hierarchy' the nine spheres of angels dance a celestial choral dance. The angels' task was to receive and to pass on the divine light, and through this illumination comes the understanding that brings perfection.' Cosmic dance became linked with the Christian mysteries of baptism and the Eucharist. Pseudo-Dionysius's Ecclesiastical Hierarchy was patterned on the Celestial Hierarchy. The direct connection of the corporeal world to the incorporeal world was the mysteries. However, the mysteries were much more than just a connection with the invisible world they gave the incorporeal world their shape or pattern in the corporeal world. This paper examines these patterns. First, through an examination of the connection of dance and the mysteries, from Philo Judaeus to Pseudo-Dionysius, circa fifth century; second through the influences of Pseudo-Dionysius in the designs of the Gothic cathedrals and the patterns and designs they contain within.

Show 3 more

Journal article (51 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2014Morrison T, 'Imaginary cities of the 16th and 17th century: an exploration on the utopian cities of Albrecht Dürer, Johann Valentin Andreae and Tommaso Campanella', The International Journal of Civic, Political, and Community Studies, 12 1-19 (2014) [C1]
2014Morrison T, 'Albrecht Dürer and the Ideal City', Parergon: Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 31 137-160 (2014) [C1]
2014Morrison T, 'The Vitruvian Stonehenge: Inigo Jones, William Stukeley and John Wood the Elder', The International Journal of Critical Cultural Studies, 11 1-13 (2014) [C1]
2014Morrison T, 'The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century', Parergon: Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 13 177-179 (2014) [C3]
2014Rubin JM, Morrison T, 'Individual differences in individualism and collectivism predict ratings of virtual cities¿ liveability and environmental quality', The Journal of General Psychology, 141 348-372 (2014)
2013Morrison T, 'Isaac Newton and the Architectural Models of Solomon's Temple', Avello Publishing Journal: Principia Mathematica, 3 1-20 (2013) [C1]
2013Morrison T, 'Isaac Newton and Solomon's Temple: A Fifty Year Study', Avello Publishing Journal: Principia Mathematica, 3 1-28 (2013) [C1]
2013Morrison T, 'The built narrative as architectural history', International Journal of Literary Humanities, 10 1-18 (2013) [C1]
2013Morrison T, morrison T, Morrison, 'Bitter honey: recapitulating the medical and scientific context of Bernard Mandeville by Philip Hilton', Parergon: Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 30 245-246 (2013) [C3]
2012Morrison T, 'Solomon's temple, Stonehenge, and divine architecture in the English enlightenment', Parergon, 29 135-163 (2012) [C1]

Isaac Newton had a long running interest in Solomon’s Temple. For Newton the plan of the Temple was a successor of the ancient Prytanæum, a temple where a sacred fire was kept burning. The plan of the Prytanæum was ‘the frame of the world as the true Temple of the great God’ and it was the successor to all other temples. Newton mentioned in an unpublished manuscript that it would appear that Stonehenge was an ancient Prytanæum and as such the architectural style of Stonehenge was an antecedent of Solomon’s Temple. He only mentioned it once but the connection between Solomon’s Temple and Stonehenge was made by other significant figures of the English Enlightenment including Inigo Jones, William Stukeley and John Wood the Elder. This connection was turned into something particularly English.

2012Morrison T, 'Structuring spaces: Oral poetics and architecture in early medieval England [Book review]', Parergon, 29 208-210 (2012) [C3]
2012Morrison T, 'Persecution, Plague, and Fire: Fugitive Histories of the Stage in Early Modern England by Ellen MacKay [Book Review]', Parergon, 29 276-277 (2012) [C3]
2012Morrison T, 'Edward II [Book review]', Journal of the Australian Early Medieval Association, 8 126-127 (2012) [C3]
2011Morrison T, 'Reinventing the past: John Wood the Elder', International Journal of the Humanities, 9 43-58 (2011) [C1]
2011Morrison T, 'Isaac Newton, architect', Seventeenth Century, 26 130-148 (2011) [C1]

It is well known that Isaac Newton had an interest in the Temple of Solomon. Most biographies of Newton mention this interest, but little attention, if any, is given to his architectural work on the Temple. Although there is no surviving book of Vitruvius’ De Architectura or even one of his commentators in Newton’s library, he had a good knowledge of Vitruvius. He mentioned and/or referenced Vitruvius in some of his unpublished papers. For Newton the Temple was built to the ‘proportions of the architecture’ and these proportions paralleled Vitruvius’ norms of architecture. From his early days in Cambridge up until his death Newton remained interested in the Temple, its meaning and its architecture. This paper explores Isaac Newton's architectural knowledge and understanding.

2011Morrison T, 'Book review: Turner, Ralph V. Eleanor of Aquitane', Journal of the Australian Earls Medieval Association, 7 166-168 (2011) [C3]
2011Morrison T, 'Book Review: Paracelsus's Theory of Embodiment', Parergon, 28 251-252 (2011) [C3]
2011Morrison T, 'Book review: Pietarinen, Juhani, and Vilijanen, Valtteri (eds), The World as Active Power: Studies in the History of European Reason', Journal of the Australian Earls Medieval Association, 7 157-158 (2011) [C3]
2011Morrison T, 'Book review: Benham, Jenny, Peacemaking in the Middle Ages: Principles and Practice', Journal of the Australian Earls Medieval Association, 7 123 (2011) [C3]
2011Morrison T, 'Book review: Salisbury, Joyce E.The Beast Within: Animals in the Middle Ages', Journal of the Australian Earls Medieval Association, 7 160-162 (2011) [C3]
2011Morrison T, '[Book Review] Cameron, Euan, Enchanted Europe: Superstition, Reason, & Religion, 1250-1750', Parergon, 28 208-209 (2011) [C3]
2010Morrison T, 'The body, the temple and the Newtonian man conundrum', Nexus Network Journal, 12 343-352 (2010) [C1]

From his early days at the University of Cambridge until his death, Isaac Newton had a long running interest in the Temple of Solomon, a topic which appeared in his works on prophecy, chronology and metrology. At the same time that Newton was working on the Principia, he reconstructed the Temple and commented on the reconstructions of others. An important part of his investigations concerned the measurements of the Temple, which were harmonic and were built “exactly as the proportion of architecture demands.” Newton considered these proportions to be in accordance with Book III and IV of De Architectura. However, while insisting on exact architectural proportions, Newton moved away from the traditional proportions of the Vitruvian man; he derived a Newtonian man. This poses an interesting conundrum: Newton accepted the Temple’s architectural proportions as outlined in Vitruvius’s Book III, yet he rejected the human model Vitruvius used as the foundation of these proportions. At the same time Newton accepted the human frame as the basis of all ancient measurements and attempted to estimate the length of the sacred cubit based on the lengths of the parts for the body and the measurements set out by the ancient writers such a Vitruvius.

2010Morrison T, 'A Medieval Gesture Riddle - 'To take VII from VIII and have VI left'', Journal of the Australian Early Medieval Association, 6 25-40 (2010) [C1]
2010Morrison T, 'Juan Bautista Villalpando and the nature and science of architectural drawing', Nexus Network Journal, 12 63-73 (2010) [C1]

In 1604, Jesuit priest and architect Juan Bautista Villalpando published In Ezechielem Explanationes. It was a massive three volume scriptural exegesis on the Book of Ezekiel. Volume Two was dedicated to the reconstruction of Ezekiel’s vision of the Temple of Solomon. This volume consists of five books: on the prophecy on the Temple; its plan and reconstruction; the justification of the reconstruction; its bronzes and ornamentation, and an entire book on the nature and science of architectural drawing. Initially the latter appears out of place in a Scriptural exegesis but he explained that the purpose of this book was in order to guide the theologians so that they can form a mental idea or image of Temple, for their understanding and enlightenment of the entire Temple. However, throughout the text he points to the utility of the book to architects. For Villalpando the laws of optics were essential to the norms of perspective. Moreover, the sense and structure of seeing was a crucial element to the norms of mathematic and architecture, it is also a central theme in his theology. This paper examines his theory and his propose of perspective for architecture drawing.

2010Morrison T, 'The Paradox of the Divine Architecture in Dante's La Divine Commedia', The International Journal of the Humanities, 8 295-309 (2010) [C1]
2010Morrison T, 'Langermann, Y. Tvisi, ed., 'Avicenna and his Legacy: A Golden Age of Science and Philosophy'', Parergon, 27 244-246 (2010) [C3]
2010Morrison T, 'Gambetti, Sandra, 'The Alexandrian Riots of 38 C.E. and the Persecution of the Jews: A Historical Reconstruction'', Journal of the Australian Early Medieval Association, 6 124-125 (2010) [C3]
2010Morrison T, 'Maclean, Simon, 'History and Politics in Late Carolingian and Ottonian Europe: The Chronicles of Regino of Prum and Adalbert of Magdeburg'', Journal of the Australian Early Medieval Association, 6 128-129 (2010) [C3]
2010Morrison T, 'Colish, Maria L., 'The Fathers and Beyond: Church Fathers Between Ancient and Medieval Thought'', Journal of the Australian Early Medieval Association, 6 104-106 (2010) [C3]
2010Morrison T, 'Wood, Susan, 'The Proprietary Church in the Medieval West'', Journal of the Australian Early Medieval Association, 6 140-141 (2010) [C3]
2009Morrison T, 'Architectural planning in the early medieval era', Journal of the Australian Early Medieval Association, 5 147-163 (2009) [C1]
2009Morrison T, 'Late antique and medieval art of the Mediterranean world', Journal of the Australian Early Medieval Association, 5 204-205 (2009) [C3]
2009Morrison T, 'Macrina the Younger, philosopher of God', Journal of the Australian Early Medieval Association, 5 213-214 (2009) [C3]
2008Morrison T, 'Juan Battista Villalpando: Solomon's Temple and the architectural metaphor', The International Journal of the Humanities, 6 203-212 (2008) [C1]
2008Morrison T, 'The songs of Peire Vidal', Journal of the Australian Early Medieval Association, 4 233-235 (2008) [C3]
2007Morrison T, 'The enigma of Isaac Newton: Scientist, theologian, alchemist and prophet', International Journal of the Humanities, 5 137-144 (2007) [C1]
2007Morrison T, 'Bede's De Tabernaculo and De Templo', Journal of the Australian Early Medieval Association, 3 243-257 (2007) [C1]
2007Morrison T, 'Lifshitz, Felice, The Name of the Saint: The Martyrology of Jerome and Access to the Sacred in Francia, 627-827', Journal of the Australian Early Medieval Association, 3 358-360 (2007) [C3]
2006Morrison T, 'The Symbol of the City', International Journal of the Humanities, 3 93-104 (2006) [C1]
2006Morrison T, 'The Art of Early Medieval Number Symbolism', Journal of The Australian Early Medieval Association, 2 169-181 (2006) [C1]

Christian number symbolism built upon the strong tradition of Platonic philosophy, Pythagorean lore and Babylonian astronomy. Numbers such as 1, 7, 8, 12 and 40 had magical and talismanic properties and were strongly represented in the Hebrew Scriptures and apocrypha. God was praised: 'you have ordered all things in measure, number and weight' (Wisdom 11:21). In the Christian Scriptures, when John the Divine was perplexed with the events happening around him, he was given a golden reed to measure the temple of God, the altar and those who worshipped within the temple (Revelation 11:1). Understanding would come from the process of measuring. Saint Augustine claimed that 'to ascend the path towards wisdom, we discover that numbers transcend our mind and remain unchangeable in their own'. Numbers had an ethereal existence. Augustine, Ambrose, Macrobius, Marcianus Capella, Isidore, Boethius, Thierry of Chartres, Abelard and many others praised the divine quality of particular numbers at length. Numbers were a model for theology and an analogy of creation. This paper examines the manifestation of this number symbolism in early medieval art, literature and architecture.

2006Morrison T, 'The Architectures of Paradise', International Journal of the Humanities, 4 117-126 (2006) [C1]
2006Morrison T, 'Baber, Richard, The Reign of Chilvary', Journal of The Australian Early Medieval Association, 2 241-242 (2006) [C3]
2006Morrison T, 'Russell, Jeffrey Barton and Douglas W Lumsden, A History of Medieval Christianity', Journal of The Australian Early Medieval Association, 2 259-261 (2006) [C3]
2005Morrison T, 'The Labyrinthine Path of Pilgrimage', Peregrinations: International Society for the Study of Pilgrimage Art, 1 online (2005) [C1]
2005Morrison T, 'Computus Digitorum For the Calculation of Easter', Journal of the Australian Early Medieval Association, 1 85-98 (2005) [C1]
2005Morrison T, 'Behind the Patterns and Designs That Cross Cultural Boundaries: Towards a Holistic Approach', International Journal of the Humanities, 2 119-127 (2005) [C1]
2005Morrison T, 'Pride and Prodigies: Studies in the Monsters of the Beowulf-Manuscript', Journal of the Australian Early Medieval Association, 1 159-160 (2005) [C3]
2005Morrison T, 'A Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases', Journal of the Australian Early Medieval Association, 1 146-147 (2005) [C3]
2002Morrison T, 'The Mnemonics of the Cretan Labyrinth', Symmetry: Culture and Science, 2 203-218 (2002) [C1]
2002Morrison T, 'Roman Identity and the Labyrinth Symbol', Inter-Cultural Studies, 2 98-108 (2002) [C1]
2001Morrison T, 'The Geometry of History; 032147658', Visual Mathematics Art and Science Electronic Journal, Vol. 3 No. 4 http://www.mi.sanu.a (2001) [C1]
Show 48 more

Conference (35 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2014Morrison T, Rubin M, 'Using Visualisation to Test Historical Utopian Cities on a Modern Audience', EVA London 2014: Electronic Visualisation and the Arts, Covent Garden, London (2014) [E1]

Co-authors: Mark Rubin

2014Morrison T, Giggins H, Goddard K, 'Preserving the Cultural Heritage of iconic Newcastle hotels', Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Heritage and Sustainable Development, Guimaraes, Portugal (2014) [E1]
2013Morrison T, Giggins H, Foulcher N, 'Timeline Newcastle: Reconstructing Industrial Newcastle - Implementation and Exhibition', Electronic Visualisation and the Arts (EVA London 2013), London (2013) [E1]

Co-authors: Helen Giggins

2013Morrison T, 'The Architecture of Andreae's Christianopolis and Campanella's City of the Sun', Proceedings of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand: 30, Open, Gold Coast (2013) [E1]
2013Morrison T, 'Utopian Cities from 15th to 19th Century Literature: A Philosophical Investigation through 3-D Visualisation', Electronic Visualisation and the Arts (EVA 2013), London (2013) [E1]
2013Giggins H, Morrison T, Foulcher N, 'Bringing Together the Present with the Industrial past: the Newcastle Digitalised Heritage Project', Tourism and the Shifting Values of Cultural Heritage: Visiting Pasts, Developing Futures, Taipei city (2013) [E2]

Co-authors: Helen Giggins

2013Morrison T, 'An Examination of the Philosophy and Architecture of Andreae's and Campanella's Utopian Cities', Proceedings of ANZAMEMS 9th Biennial Conference, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
2012Morrison T, Gu N, Foulcher NC, 'Applying augmented reality to preserving industrial heritage', Proceedings. EVA London 2012: Electronic Visualisation and the Arts, London, UK (2012) [E1]

Co-authors: Ning Gu

2012Morrison T, Giggins HP, Foulcher NC, 'Evolving architectural history and digital intangible heritage', NODEM 2012: Archiving and Visualization of Intangible Heritage, Hong Kong (2012) [E3]

Co-authors: Helen Giggins

2011Morrison T, Gu N, 'What architectural historians can learn from augmented reality technologies?', Proceedings of Electronic Visualisation and the Arts (EVA) London 2011, London, UK (2011) [E1]

Co-authors: Ning Gu

2010Morrison T, 'Imperial Roman elements in the architecture of the city in Saltair na Rann', Celts in Legends and Reality: Papers from the Sixth Australian Conference of Celtic Studies, Sydney (2010) [E1]
2010Morrison T, 'William Stukeley and the origins of architecture', Imagining ... Proceedings of the 27th Annual SAHANZ Conference, Newcastle, NSW (2010) [E1]
2010Morrison T, 'Isaac Newton and Architecture', The Cultural Role of Architecture Conference, Lincoln, UK (2010) [E3]
2009Morrison T, 'The evolution of planning in the Middle Ages', International Medieval Congress 2009: Congress Programme, Leeds, UK (2009) [E3]
2009Morrison T, 'Isaac Newton: The exoteric and esoteric knowledge of the Principia', XXIII International Congress of History of Science and Technology: Ideas and Instruments in Social Context: Book of Abstracts & List of Participants, Budapest, Hungary (2009) [E3]
2008Morrison T, 'Isaac Newton: The Principia and the Temple of Solomon', Seventh Biennial International Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies: Abstracts, Hobart, TAS (2008) [E3]
2008Morrison T, 'Planning to welcome the pilgrims of the Middle Ages', Fifth Annual Conference of the Australian Early Medieval Association: Abstracts, Brisbane, QLD (2008) [E3]
2008Morrison T, 'A medieval gesture riddle: Take VII from VIII and have VI left', 2nd International Conference on the Science of Computus: Abstracts, Galway, Ireland (2008) [E3]
2007Morrison T, 'An examination of the blessing hand in Insular art', Making and Meaning in Insular Art: Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Insular Art, Trinity College, Dublin (2007) [E1]
2007Morrison T, 'The evolving image of the new Jerusalem in early medieval art and architecture', 4th Annual Conference Conversion and Cultural Transformation. Abstracts, Sydney (2007) [E3]
2006Morrison T, 'Bede and the Temple of Solomon', Australian Early Medieval Association : Conquest and Continuity - 3rd Annual Conference, Melbourne, Australia (2006) [E3]
2006Morrison T, 'Celestrial Differences and Similarities', Us and Them: Perceptions, Depictions and Descriptions of Celts Abstracts, Melbourne, Australia (2006) [E3]
2005Morrison T, 'Spiral Patterns in Irish Decoration From Newgrange to the Tenth Century', Exile and homecoming : papers from the fifth Australian Conference of Celtic Studies, Sydney (2005) [E1]
2005Morrison T, 'The Symbol and the City: Utopian Symmetry', Humanities Conference 2005, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom (2005) [E3]
2005Morrison T, 'An Examination Of Hand and Body Gestures in Insular Art', The Fifth International Conference on Insular Art, Dublin, Ireland (2005) [E3]
2005Morrison T, 'The Art of Early Medieval Number Symbolism', Text and Transmission: Australian Early Medieval Association Second Annual Conference, Canberra, Australia (2005) [E3]
2005Morrison T, 'Into The Fourth Dimension And Impossibility with Dante and Beatrice', ANZAMEMS:, Auckland, New Zealand (2005) [E3]
2004Morrison T, 'The hidden reflections of the interlaced borders of the Book of Kells', Remembered Nations, Imagined Republics: Proceedings of the Twelfth Irish-Australian Conference, Galway, Ireland (2004) [E1]
2003Morrison T, Burgess R, 'Museum as a Resource for Doctoral Studies in Fine Art', Defining the Doctorate: Doctoral Studies in Education and the Creative and Performing Arts AARE Mini-Conference. Program and Abstract Book, Newcastle, NSW (2003) [E3]
2003Morrison T, 'The Influence of Pseudo-Dionysius on Gothic Baslicas and Mnemonic Patterns of the Ancient Mysteries', ANZAMEMS Memory & Commemoration (2003) [E3]
2001Morrison T, 'The Evolving and Revolving Problem of an Ancient Mystery', Theory and Practice: Evolving or Revolving, University of Otago, New Zealand (2001) [E2]
2001Morrison T, 'The Typology of the Meandering Symbol and an application of this Typology to the Cretan Labyrinth', Symmetry: Art and Science Intersections of Art and Science, University of New South Wales (2001) [E4]
2000Morrison T, 'Would Arthur Evans's concept of Minos Priest-King of Knossos recognise pre-Hellenic Crete?', School of Fine Art, Post Graduate Symposium, The University of Newcastle (2000) [E3]
2000Morrison T, 'The Women of the pre-Hellenic 'book with no text'', 7th Inter Disciplinary Gender Studies Conference 2000, The University of Newcastle (2000) [E3]
2000Morrison T, 'The Evolving and Revolving Problem of an Ancient Mystery', Theory and Practice- Evolving or Revolving?, University of Otago, NZ (2000) [E3]
Show 32 more

Creative Work (41 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2013Morrison T, Isaac Newton and the Temple of Solomon, The Bathurst regional Gallery (2013) [J2]
2012Morrison T, Foulcher NC, Giggins HP, Reconstructing Victorian Newcastle, Newcastle Museum (2012) [J1]

Co-authors: Helen Giggins

2011Morrison T, Isaac Newton and the Temple of Solomon, The University Gallery (2011) [J1]
2010Morrison T, Ex libris John Burgess, Miejska Biblioteka Publiczna w Gliwicach, Gliwice, Poland (2010) [J2]
2008Morrison T, Lighthouse, Second International Biennial Ex Libris 2008Lighthouse, Pancevo, Serbia (2008) [J2]
2007Morrison T, Untitled 1 - 4, Municipal Public Library, Gliwice (2007) [J2]
2006Morrison T, Ostwald M, Homo Faber: Shifting Dimensions - The Architectural Model in History, Melbourne Museum (2006) [J1]

Co-authors: Michael Ostwald

2003Morrison T, 23e Mini Print Internacional de Cadaques, -, Spain, (2003) [J2]
2003Morrison T, Medunarodna Izlozba - Covjek I Riba (Man and Fish), -, Susak, (2003) [J2]
2003Morrison T, Collection of Brunico''s Civil Museum, -, Alto Adige, Unknown (2003) [J2]
2003Morrison T, Biennale van de Kleingrafiek, -, Sint-Niklaas, Unknown (2003) [J2]
2003Morrison T, Festivalul International al Aetelor Grafice, -, Cluj-Napoca, Unknown (2003) [J2]
2003Morrison T, V Miedzynarodowy Konkurs Graficzny na Ekslibris, -, w Gliwicach, Unknown (2003) [J2]
2002Morrison T, European Cities, Cluj-Napoca, (2002) [J2]
2002Morrison T, Mini Graphic & Painting World Wide Show (2002) [J2]
2002Morrison T, Centre Culturel Francais De Belgrade, Belgrage, (2002) [J2]
2002Morrison T, Biennale Internation d''art Miniature, Quebec, Canada (2002) [J2]
2001Morrison T, Printmakers Perception of the Past one Hundred years of Federation, Maitland City Art Gallery, Maitland (2001) [J2]
2001Morrison T, International Exlibriswedstrijd - Ballonvaart, Sint-Niklaas, Belgium (2001) [J2]
2001Morrison T, Culture and Spirit of Kazakhatan, Department of Culture, Aktobe, Kazakhstan (2001) [J2]
2001Morrison T, Ex-Libris, The Lovett Gallery Newcastle Regional Library (2001) [J2]
2001Morrison T, Festivalul International al Artelor Grafice, Cluj-Napoca, Romania (2001) [J2]
2001Morrison T, Spring and Celtic Festival, Mosman Art Gallery & Community Centre (2001) [J2]
2000Morrison T, And So..., Maitland City Art Gallery, Maitland, NSW (2000) [J2]
2000Morrison T, Concorso Internazionale Exlibristico "Giubileo 2000", Comume Di Pescara, Pescara, Italy (2000) [J2]
2000Morrison T, Qingdao International Biennial Print Exhibition 2000, Ministry of Culture of the People's Republic of China, Qingdao, China (2000) [J2]
2000Morrison T, International exhibition of Ex-libris and small graphic. "Culture and spirit of Kazakhstan", Department of culture Aqtobe city, Aqtobe, Kazakhstan (2000) [J2]
2000Morrison T, International Mini Print: Mikalojus KonstantinasCiurlioniui-125, Lietuvos Nacionaline Martyno Mazvydo Biblioteka, Lithuania, Vilius, Lithuania (2000) [J2]
2000Morrison T, International Ex Libris: Homage to the Poet, Ovidiu Petca, Romania, Cluj-Napoca, Romania (2000) [J2]
2000Morrison T, Biennale International d'art miniature, Salle Augustin-Chenier, Quebec, Canada (2000) [J2]
1999Morrison T, Miedzynarodowy Konkurs Graficzny Na Ekslibris Gliwice '99 'Jane Fisher', 'Julie Lee', 'Sharon Tompkins', Miejska Biblioteka Publiczna, Gliwice Poland (1999) [J2]
1999Morrison T, Digital Decade 'Spirals of Life' 'Ribbons of Time' 'The Royal Game of Ur' 'Cretan Drafts' 'The Temporal and the Infinite' 'Deconstucting a Dodecahedron' 'Unity and Fragmentation' 'Delusion' 'Vienna' 'Eye and Me', Lake Maquarie City Regional Gallery, Lake Macquarie (1999) [J2]
1999Morrison T, Save the Children Exhibition 'Strategy' and 'Cretan Drafts', Krshna Luchoomun Save the Children Fund, Vacoas, Mauritius, Mauritius (1999) [J2]
1999Morrison T, Kudaibergan Zhubannov, Universitet im Zhaksygarina, Aktobe, Kazakhhstan, Aktobe, Kazakhstan (1999) [J2]
1999Morrison T, III Miedzynarodowy Konkurs Graficzny, Miejska Biblioteka Publiczna, Gliwice, Poland, Gliwice, Poland (1999) [J2]
1999Morrison T, A Star in a Stone Boat 'The cat and the sphere', 'Afternoon Coffee in Trendo', 'Trojaborg', 'Ariadne's Paradox', 'Four Kings', 'Futures Past', 'Deceptive Strategy', 'Delusion', John Painter Gallery, Newcastle (1999) [J2]
1999Morrison T, Artist in Residence for the Digital Decade, Lake Macquarie City Art Gallery, Lake Macquarie (1999) [J2]
1999Morrison T, Ex-Libris, Vassills Zergorlis, Athen, Greece, Athens, Greece (1999) [J2]
1999Morrison T, Do You Remember? 'Next Stop, Victoria Street' and 'Tickets Please', Maitland City Art Gallery, Maitland, Maitland (1999) [J2]
1999Morrison T, Book Prints, Stadt Museum fur Grafik, Brunico, Italy (1999) [J2]
1999Morrison T, 'Infinite Tunnel of turtles' and 'The third Man', Het Stedelijk Museum, Sint-Niklaas, Belgium, Sint-Niklaas, Belgium (1999) [J2]
Show 38 more
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants10
Total funding$304,175

- Indicates that the researcher may be seeking students for this project.

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.

2014 (1 grants)

The 15th International Conference of Utopian Studies Society Europe, Charles University, Prague, 2-5 July 2014$1,500
Funding Body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Engineering & Built Environment

Project Team
Doctor Tessa Morrison
SchemeRole
Travel GrantChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$1,50020142014
GNo:G1400404

2013 (2 grants)

Kupa-impari or ‘talking to’ communities: Improved design and maintenance protocols to support resilient Indigenous housing$9,624
Funding Body: University of Newcastle

Project Team
Professor Dennis Foley, Doctor Jamie MacKee, Doctor Tessa Morrison, Mr Trevor Hilaire
SchemeRole
Linkage Pilot Research GrantInvestigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$9,62420132013
GNo:G1300988

EVA - Electronic Visualisation and the Arts, The British computer Soceity, 28 -31 July 2013$1,500
Funding Body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Engineering & Built Environment

Project Team
Doctor Tessa Morrison
SchemeRole
Travel GrantChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$1,50020132013
GNo:G1300181

2012 (1 grants)

Reconstructing Victorian Newcastle through Augmented Reality and Mobile Technology$15,000
Funding Body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Engineering & Built Environment

Project Team
Doctor Tessa Morrison, Doctor Ning Gu
SchemeRole
Pilot GrantChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$15,00020122012
GNo:G1200314

2011 (1 grants)

Emerging Research Leaders Program 2011$15,000
Funding Body: University of Newcastle

Project Team
Doctor Tessa Morrison
SchemeRole
Emerging Research Leaders ProgramChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$15,00020112011
GNo:G1101055

2009 (1 grants)

International Medieval Congress, Leeds, England, 13-16 July 2009$1,500
Funding Body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Engineering & Built Environment

Project Team
Doctor Tessa Morrison
SchemeRole
Travel GrantChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$1,50020092009
GNo:G0190261

2008 (3 grants)

Isaac Newton s Temple of Solomon and his analysis of sacred architecture: An interpretation and discussion of Babson Manuscript 0434 $242,576
Funding Body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Project Team
Doctor Tessa Morrison
SchemeRole
Discovery ProjectsChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$242,57620082010
GNo:G0187505

Commentary and translation of Villalpando's 'De Templi Gloria' in De Postrema Ezechielis Prophetae Visione$5,000
Funding Body: University of Newcastle

Project Team
Doctor Tessa Morrison
SchemeRole
New Staff GrantChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$5,00020082008
GNo:G0188488

Nexus 2008: Relationships Between Architecture and Mathematics, Point Loma Nazarene University, San Diego, California USA, 23/6/2008 - 26/6/2008$2,500
Funding Body: University of Newcastle

Project Team
Doctor Tessa Morrison
SchemeRole
Travel GrantChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$2,50020082008
GNo:G0188640

2007 (1 grants)

Villalpando's Sacred Architecture in the light of Isaac Newton's Commentary$9,975
Funding Body: University of Newcastle

Project Team
Doctor Tessa Morrison
SchemeRole
Early Career Researcher GrantChief Investigator
Total AmountFunding StartFunding Finish
$9,97520072007
GNo:G0187740
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Research Supervision

Number of current supervisions4
Total current UoN Masters EFTSL1.39
Total current UoN PhD EFTSL0.1

For supervisions undertaken at an institution other that the University of Newcastle, the institution name is listed below the program name.

Current Supervision

CommencedProposed
Completion
ProgramSupervisor TypeResearch Title
20142016M Philosophy (Building)Co-SupervisorKey Elements of Sustainability in Iran Architecture
20132015M Philosophy (Architecture)Principal SupervisorAn Assessment of Christ Church Cathedral, Newcastle, Australia in Terms of its Geometry & Proportion, Symbolism and Gothic Characteristics
20122015M Philosophy (Architecture)Principal SupervisorAssessment of Tiki Elements in the Architecture and Changing Cultural Landscape of Pacific Oceania Between 1776 and 1976
20102017PhD (Architecture)Co-SupervisorMeasuring Fallingwater
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Dr Tessa Morrison

Work Phone(02) 492 15773
Fax(02) 492 16913
Email
PositionSenior Lecturer
School of Architecture and Built Environment
Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment
The University of Newcastle, Australia
Focus AreaArchitecture
Office
AG.30,
Architecture,
Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan NSW 2308
Australia
URL:www.newcastle.edu.au/profile/tessa-morrison