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Dr Tara Clinton-Mcharg

Postdoctoral Researcher

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography



Teaching Expertise

Qualifications

  • PhD (Behavioural Science), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts (Honours), University of Newcastle

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Postdoctoral Researcher University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/10/2010 - 1/03/2013 Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (27 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Wolfenden L, Milat AJ, Lecathelinais C, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Bryant J, et al., 'What is generated and what is used: a description of public health research output and citation.', Eur J Public Health, 26 523-525 (2016)
DOI 10.1093/eurpub/ckw047
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Luke Wolfenden, Amy Waller, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Mariko Carey
2016 Yoong SL, Dodds P, Hure A, Clinton-Mcharg T, Skelton E, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'Healthier options do not reduce total energy of parent intended fast food purchases for their young children: A randomised controlled trial', Nutrition and Dietetics, 73 146-152 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Dietitians Association of Australia.Aim: This study aimed to assess the impact of including healthier options on fast food restaurant menus on total energy of parent-repor... [more]

© 2015 Dietitians Association of Australia.Aim: This study aimed to assess the impact of including healthier options on fast food restaurant menus on total energy of parent-reported intended purchases and frequency to eat at fast food outlets for young children. Methods: Parents from an existing health survey cohort were approached to participate. They were eligible to participate if they resided in the Hunter region in NSW, could understand English and had a child aged between 3 and 12 years. Parents were randomised using a random number function embedded in the computer assisted telephone interview software, to receive one of two hypothetical fast food menus: one with healthier options and the other without healthier options (standard menu). After receiving these menus, participants completed a second telephone survey. Parents reported intended food purchases for their nominated child and intended number of visits to the fast food outlet with the hypothetical menu. Results: There was no significant difference in total energy of parent-reported intended purchases for their child, between the standard menu with (n = 101) and without (n = 113) healthier options (P = 0.60). There was also no difference in the frequency of intending to eat at the fast food restaurant between the two groups (P = 0.80). Conclusions: The provision of healthier options in itself may not reduce the total energy of intended purchases of parents for young children at fast food restaurants.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12204
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, John Wiggers, Alexis Hure, Serene Yoong
2016 Wolfenden L, Finch M, Wyse R, Clinton-McHarg T, Yoong SL, 'Time to focus on implementation: the need to re-orient research on physical activity in childcare services.', Aust N Z J Public Health, 40 209-210 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12518
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2016 Tindall J, Groombridge D, Wiggers J, Gillham K, Palmer D, Clinton-Mcharg T, et al., 'Alcohol-related crime in city entertainment precincts: Public perception and experience of alcohol-related crime and support for strategies to reduce such crime', Drug and Alcohol Review, 35 263-272 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.Introduction and Aims: Bars, pubs and taverns in cities are often concentrated in entertainment precincts that... [more]

© 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.Introduction and Aims: Bars, pubs and taverns in cities are often concentrated in entertainment precincts that are associated with higher rates of alcohol-related crime. This study assessed public perception and experiences of such crime in two city entertainment precincts, and support for alcohol-related crime reduction strategies. Design and Methods: A cross-sectional household telephone survey in two Australian regions assessed: perception and experiences of crime; support for crime reduction strategies; and differences in such perceptions and support. Results: Six hundred ninety-four people completed the survey (32%). Most agreed that alcohol was a problem in their entertainment precinct (90%) with violence the most common alcohol-related problem reported (97%). Almost all crime reduction strategies were supported by more than 50% of participants, including visitors to the entertainment precincts, with the latter being slightly less likely to support earlier closing and restrictions on premises density. Participants in one region were more likely to support earlier closing and lock-out times. Those at-risk of acute alcohol harm were less likely to support more restrictive policies. Discussion and Conclusions: High levels of community concern and support for alcohol harm-reduction strategies, including restrictive strategies, provide policy makers with a basis for implementing evidence-based strategies to reduce such harms in city entertainment precincts.

DOI 10.1111/dar.12314
Co-authors John Wiggers, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2015 Jones J, Wyse R, Finch M, Lecathelinais C, Wiggers J, Marshall J, et al., 'Effectiveness of an intervention to facilitate the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in childcare services: a randomised controlled trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 10 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-015-0340-z
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Jenna Hollis
2015 Boyes AW, Clinton-Mcharg T, Waller AE, Steele A, D'Este CA, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'Prevalence and correlates of the unmet supportive care needs of individuals diagnosed with a haematological malignancy', Acta Oncologica, 54 507-514 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Informa Healthcare.Background. Information about the unmet supportive care needs of haematological cancer patients is needed for service planning and to inform clinical pr... [more]

© 2014 Informa Healthcare.Background. Information about the unmet supportive care needs of haematological cancer patients is needed for service planning and to inform clinical practice. This study described the prevalence of, and factors associated with, unmet supportive care needs among haematological cancer patients. Material and methods. A total of 380 adults diagnosed with haematological cancer were recruited from the outpatient department at three comprehensive cancer treatment centres in Australia. Of these, 311 completed a self-report questionnaire. Unmet needs were assessed using the 34-item Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-SF34). The data were examined using descriptive statistics and logistic regression. Results. Overall, 51% (95% CI 45-57%) of participants reported having at least one 'moderate to high' level unmet need, while 25% (95% CI 20-30%) reported 'no need' for help with any items. Unmet needs were most commonly reported in the psychological (35%; 95% CI 30-41%) and physical aspects of daily living (35%; 95% CI 30-41%) domains. The three most frequently endorsed items of 'moderate to high' unmet need were: lack of energy/tiredness (24%; 95% CI 20-30%), not being able to do the things you used to do (21%; 95% CI 17-26%), and uncertainty about the future (21%; 95% CI 16-25%). Patients' sociodemographic characteristics influenced unmet needs more than disease characteristics. Patients who were female, aged less than 55 years or not in the labour force had higher odds of reporting 'moderate to high' level unmet supportive care needs. Conclusion. Unmet supportive care needs are prevalent among haematological cancer patients, particularly in the psychological and physical aspects of daily living domains. These findings provide valuable insight about the range of resources, multidisciplinary linkages and referral pathways needed to address haematological cancer patients' unmet needs.

DOI 10.3109/0284186X.2014.958527
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Amy Waller, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Allison Boyes
2015 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-Mcharg T, 'Development and psychometric evaluation of the Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care measure with hematological cancer survivors', Cancer, 121 2383-2392 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Cancer Society.BACKGROUND The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended 6 objectives for achieving patient-centered care. However, most patient-reported outcome mea... [more]

© 2015 American Cancer Society.BACKGROUND The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended 6 objectives for achieving patient-centered care. However, most patient-reported outcome measures developed with cancer populations fail to address all 6 patient-centeredness dimensions. The Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care (QPCCC) measure was developed on the basis of IOM recommendations, and the measure's validity, reliability, and floor and ceiling effects were examined. METHODS The development of the QPCCC measure included interviews with hematological cancer survivors and feedback from hematologists and cancer patients. To evaluate the measure's psychometric properties, hematological cancer survivors were identified via 2 cancer registries and were mailed the QPCCC measure. To examine test-retest reliability, a second QPCCC measure was mailed to survivors 7 to 14 days after they had returned the first measure. RESULTS Overall, 545 hematological cancer survivors completed the 48-item QPCCC measure. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a 10-factor structure with factor loadings>0.40. The subscales were labeled Treatment Delivery, Treatment Decision Making, Coordinated and Integrated Care, Emotional Support, Timely Care, Follow-Up Care, Respectful Communication, Patient Preferences and Values, Cancer Information, and Equitable Care. The QPCCC measure demonstrated acceptable internal consistency for all subscales (Cronbach's a=.73-.94). When test-retest reliability was assessed, 4 items demonstrated substantial agreement (¿>0.60), whereas 40 items showed moderate agreement (¿=0.41-0.60). Ceiling effects were present for 8 subscales. CONCLUSIONS The QPCCC measure has acceptable face and content validity, construct validity, and internal consistency. However, the measure's discriminant validity and test-retest reliability could be improved. The QPCCC measure could be used to improve patient-centered cancer care. Cancer 2015;121:2383-2392.

DOI 10.1002/cncr.29384
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alix Hall, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Mariko Carey, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul
2015 Yoong SL, Clinton-Mcharg T, Wolfenden L, 'Systematic reviews examining implementation of research into practice and impact on population health are needed', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 68 788-791 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.Objectives To examine the research translation phase focus (T1-T4) of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and D... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.Objectives To examine the research translation phase focus (T1-T4) of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE). Briefly, T1 includes reviews of basic science experiments; T2 includes reviews of human trials leading to guideline development; T3 includes reviews examining how to move guidelines into policy and practice; and T4 includes reviews describing the impact of changing health practices on population outcomes. Study Design and Setting A cross-sectional audit of randomly selected reviews from CDSR (n = 500) and DARE (n = 500) was undertaken. The research translation phase of reviews, overall and by communicable disease, noncommunicable disease, and injury subgroups, were coded by two researchers. Results A total of 898 reviews examined a communicable, noncommunicable, or injury-related condition. Of those, 98% of reviews within CDSR focused on T2, and the remaining 2% focused on T3. In DARE, 88% focused on T2, 8.7% focused on T1, 2.5% focused on T3, and 1.3% focused on T4. Almost all reviews examining communicable (CDSR 100%, DARE 93%), noncommunicable (CDSR 98%, DARE 87%), and injury (CDSR 95%, DARE 88%) were also T2 focused. Conclusion Few reviews exist to guide practitioners and policy makers with implementing evidence-based treatments or programs.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2014.12.008
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2015 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-Mcharg T, 'The quality of patient-centred care: Haematological cancer survivors' perceptions', Psycho-Oncology, 24 796-803 (2015) [C1]

Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Objective Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that assess the quality of patient-centred c... [more]

Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Objective Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that assess the quality of patient-centred cancer care have failed to measure all six patient-centredness dimensions endorsed by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). This study is the first to use the Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care (QPCCC) measure that covers all six IOM patient-centredness dimensions to examine haematological cancer survivors' perceptions of care and characteristics associated with perceived quality of care. Methods Haematological cancer survivors diagnosed in the last 6 years and aged 18-80 years were recruited from two Australian state population-based cancer registries. Survivors were mailed the 48-item QPCCC measure. Results Overall, 545 haematological cancer survivors completed the measure. Areas of care most commonly identified as delivered were hospital staff showing respect to survivors (93%) and making sure the correct treatment was received (93%). Aspects of care most frequently nominated as not delivered were hospital staff helping family and friends (34%) or the survivor (32%) to find other people with similar experiences to talk to. Characteristics associated with survivors perceiving higher quality care was delivered included being employed, having private health insurance, being younger, a Non-Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis and more recent diagnosis. Being depressed or stressed was associated with perceived lower quality of care. Conclusions Provision of peer support programs that allow haematological cancer survivors and families and friends to talk to others in similar situations could be improved. Using PROMs to identify areas where cancer survivors perceive improvements are needed is essential to quality improvement efforts.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3728
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Alix Hall, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Flora Tzelepis
2015 Lynagh MC, Clinton-McHarg T, Hall A, Sanson-Fisher R, Stevenson W, Tiley C, Bisquera A, 'Are Australian clinicians monitoring medication adherence in hematological cancer survivors? Two cross-sectional studies.', Experimental Hematology & Oncology, 4 1-8 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s40164-015-0011-4
Co-authors Alix Hall, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Marita Lynagh, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2014 Yoong SLI, Wolfenden L, Clinton-McHarg T, Waters E, Pettman TL, Steele E, Wiggers J, 'Exploring the pragmatic and explanatory study design on outcomes of systematic reviews of public health interventions: a case study on obesity prevention trials', Journal of public health (Oxford, England), 36 170-176 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1093/pubmed/fdu006
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2014 Clinton-McHarg T, Paul C, Boyes A, Rose S, Vallentine P, O'Brien L, 'Do cancer helplines deliver benefits to people affected by cancer? A systematic review', Patient Education and Counseling, 97 302-309 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.Objectives: To determine the: (1) proportion of studies that describe characteristics of helpline service delivery, compared to the proportion that re... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.Objectives: To determine the: (1) proportion of studies that describe characteristics of helpline service delivery, compared to the proportion that report trials testing efficacy or effectiveness of helplines in changing user outcomes; (2) proportion of efficacy or effectiveness studies that meet EPOC criteria for methodological rigor; and (3) potential benefits of cancer helplines for people affected by cancer based on findings from rigorous efficacy or effectiveness trials. Methods: Electronic databases (Medline, PsycINFO, EMBASE and CINAHL) were searched to identify English-language studies describing original research published from 1991 to 2011. Results: Twenty-eight publications met the review inclusion criteria. From these studies, data on: the characteristics of cancer helpline users; call content; and user satisfaction, were extracted. The potential for helplines to improve the psychosocial outcomes of callers was examined for the three intervention trials. Conclusion: There is a lack of robust evidence regarding the level and types of benefits that cancer helplines may deliver to callers affected by cancer. Given increased emphasis on delivering best-practise supportive care, building the evidence base in this field may assist cancer helplines to increase their service uptake, reach, and benefit to callers. Practise implications: There is a need for more rigorous intervention-focussed studies in this field across a broader range of cancer populations. Future studies should focus on relevant patient-centred outcomes, such as improved knowledge and greater involvement in decision-making, while incorporating process measures to account for intervention fidelity and clinical performance.

DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2014.09.004
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Chris Paul, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2014 Clinton-Mcharg T, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Tzelepis F, Bryant J, Williamson A, 'Anxiety and depression among haematological cancer patients attending treatment centres: Prevalence and predictors', Journal of Affective Disorders, 165 176-181 (2014) [C1]

Background This study aimed to: (1) estimate the prevalence of anxiety and/or depression among haematological cancer patients attending treatment centres; and (2) explore the demo... [more]

Background This study aimed to: (1) estimate the prevalence of anxiety and/or depression among haematological cancer patients attending treatment centres; and (2) explore the demographic, disease and treatment characteristics associated with anxiety and/or depression. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with outpatients from three haematology clinics in Australia. Patients with a confirmed diagnosis of haematological cancer were approached by a research assistant while waiting for their appointment and invited to participate in the survey. Participants completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and self-reported demographic, disease and treatment characteristics. Results Questionnaires from 304 participants were returned. Twenty-seven percent of patients reported anxiety and 17% reported depression. Specifically, 15% reported anxiety without depression, 5% reported depression without anxiety, and 12% reported comorbid anxiety and depression. Participants who had to relocate to receive treatment had almost three times the odds of reporting anxiety and/or depression compared to those who did not have to move. Former smokers also had significantly higher odds of reporting anxiety and/or depression. Limitations The HADS is likely to have produced some false positives and false negatives when compared with gold standard structured clinical interviews for assessing psychological morbidity. Conclusions Approximately 20% of haematological cancer patients attending outpatient clinics may experience clinically significant levels of anxiety and/or depression. Providing additional tailored support to patients who have had to relocate for treatment, and to former smokers, may help to reduce anxiety and depression among these subgroups. © 2014 Published by Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2014.04.072
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Flora Tzelepis, Mariko Carey, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2014 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-McHarg T, 'DEVELOPMENT AND PSYCHOMETRIC EVALUATION OF THE QUALITY OF PATIENT-CENTERED CANCER CARE MEASURE WITH HAEMATOLOGICAL CANCER SURVIVORS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 10 254-255 (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alix Hall
2014 Tzelepis F, Rose SK, Sanson-Fisher RW, Clinton-McHarg T, Carey ML, Paul CL, 'Are we missing the Institute of Medicine's mark? A systematic review of patient-reported outcome measures assessing quality of patient-centred cancer care', BMC Cancer, 14 (2014) [C1]

Background: The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has endorsed six dimensions of patient-centredness as crucial to providing quality healthcare. These dimensions outline that care must ... [more]

Background: The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has endorsed six dimensions of patient-centredness as crucial to providing quality healthcare. These dimensions outline that care must be: 1) respectful to patients' values, preferences, and expressed needs; 2) coordinated and integrated; 3) provide information, communication, and education; 4) ensure physical comfort; 5) provide emotional support-relieving fear and anxiety; and 6) involve family and friends. However, whether patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) comprehensively cover these dimensions remains unexplored. This systematic review examined whether PROMs designed to assess the quality of patient-centred cancer care addressed all six IOM dimensions of patient-centred care and the psychometric properties of these measures.Methods: Medline, PsycINFO, Current Contents, Embase, CINAHL and Scopus were searched to retrieve published studies describing the development and psychometric properties of PROMs assessing the quality of patient-centred cancer care. Two authors determined if eligible PROMs included the six IOM dimensions of patient-centred care and evaluated the adequacy of psychometric properties based on recommended criteria for internal consistency, test-retest reliability, face/content validity, construct validity and cross-cultural adaptation.Results: Across all 21 PROMs, the most commonly included IOM dimension of patient-centred care was " information, communication and education" (19 measures). In contrast, only five measures assessed the " involvement of family and friends." Two measures included one IOM-endorsed patient-centred care dimension, two measures had two dimensions, seven measures had three dimensions, five measures had four dimensions, and four measures had five dimensions. One measure, the Indicators (Non-small Cell Lung Cancer), covered all six IOM dimensions of patient-centred care, but had adequate face/content validity only. Eighteen measures met the recommended adequacy criteria for construct validity, 15 for face/content validity, seven for internal consistency, three for cross-cultural adaptation and no measure for test-retest reliability.Conclusions: There are no psychometrically rigorous PROMs developed with cancer patients that capture all six IOM dimensions of patient-centred care. Using more than one measure or expanding existing measures to cover all six patient-centred care dimensions could improve assessment and delivery of patient-centred care. Construction of new comprehensive measures with acceptable psychometric properties that can be used with the general cancer population may also be warranted. © 2014 Tzelepis et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2407-14-41
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Paul CL, Hall AE, Carey ML, Cameron EC, Clinton-McHarg T, 'Access to Care and Impacts of Cancer on Daily Life: Do They Differ for Metropolitan Versus Regional Hematological Cancer Survivors?', Journal of Rural Health, 29 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jrh.12020
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Alix Hall, Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2012 Carey ML, Clinton-Mcharg TL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Shakeshaft A, 'Development of cancer needs questionnaire for parents and carers of adolescents and young adults with cancer', Supportive Care in Cancer, 20 991-1010 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2012 Carey ML, Lambert SD, Smits RE, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Clinton-Mcharg TL, 'The unfulfilled promise: A systematic review of interventions to reduce the unmet supportive care needs of cancer patients', Supportive Care in Cancer, 20 207-219 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2012 Paul CL, Clinton-Mcharg TL, Lynagh MC, Sanson-Fisher RW, Tzelepis F, 'On-line information and support for supporters and carers of haematological cancer patients: Is access an issue?', Supportive Care in Cancer, 20 2687-2695 (2012) [C1]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Marita Lynagh
2012 Paul CL, Carey ML, Anderson AE, Mackenzie LJ, Sanson-Fisher RW, Courtney RJ, Clinton-Mcharg TL, 'Cancer patients' concerns regarding access to cancer care: Perceived impact of waiting times along the diagnosis and treatment journey', European Journal of Cancer Care, 21 321-329 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Lisa Mackenzie, Chris Paul, Amy Anderson, Mariko Carey
2012 Clinton-Mcharg TL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Shakeshaft A, 'Preliminary development and psychometric evaluation of an unmet needs measure for adolescents and young adults with cancer: The Cancer Needs Questionnaire - Young People (CNQ-YP)', Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 10 1-11 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2011 Clinton-Mcharg TL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Tracey E, 'Recruitment of representative samples for low incidence cancer populations: Do registries deliver?', BMC Medical Research Methodology, 11 1-9 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2288-11-5
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2011 Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Douglas HE, Clinton-Mcharg TL, Williamson A, Barker DJ, 'Cutting the research pie: A value-weighting approach to explore perceptions about psychosocial research priorities for adults with haematological cancers', European Journal of Cancer Care, 20 345-353 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2354.2010.01188.x
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2011 Carey ML, Clinton-Mcharg TL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Campbell S, Douglas HE, 'Patient or treatment centre? Where are efforts invested to improve cancer patients' psychosocial outcomes?', European Journal of Cancer Care, 20 152-162 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2354.2010.01211.x
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2010 Clinton-Mcharg TL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Shakeshaft A, Rainbird KJ, 'Measuring the psychosocial health of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors: A critical review', Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 8 1-13 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1477-7525-8-25
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2010 Clinton-Mcharg TL, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Williamson A, 'Determining research priorities for young people with haematological cancer: A value-weighting approach', European Journal of Cancer, 46 3263-3270 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ejca.2010.06.013
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2009 Paul CL, Clinton-Mcharg TL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Douglas HE, Webb G, 'Are we there yet? The state of the evidence base for guidelines on breaking bad news to cancer patients', European Journal of Cancer, 45 2960-2966 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ejca.2009.08.013
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Chris Paul
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Conference (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Clinton-Mcharg TL, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Tzelepis F, Kingsland M, Fielding A, Skelton E, 'Reliable and valid measures for evaluating public health research implementation', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Flora Tzelepis
2014 Turon H, Waller A, Clinton-McHarg T, Fleming J, Marlton P, Sanson-Fisher R, 'HAEMATOLOGICAL CANCER PATIENTS' VIEWS ON TISSUE BANKING', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Amy Waller
2013 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher R, Hall A, Carey M, Paul C, Clinton-McHarg T, 'Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Quality of Patient-Centred Cancer Care Measure', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alix Hall
2013 Tzelepis F, Rose S, Sanson-Fisher R, Clinton-McHarg T, Carey M, Paul C, 'A Systematic Review of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures Assessing Quality of Patient-Centred Cancer Care', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Mariko Carey, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2007 Clinton-Mcharg T, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Shakeshaft A, Girgis A, 'The unmet needs of parents and carers of adolescent cancer survivors', Psycho-Oncology (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2007 Clinton-Mcharg T, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Shakeshaft A, Girgis A, 'The prevalence of unmet needs of adolescent survivors of cancer', Psycho-Oncology (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2006 Girgis A, Boyes AW, Clinton-Mcharg T, Ackland S, Pr H, 'Proactive, routine monitoring and intervention to reduce the psychosocial impact of cancer and its treatment in outpatient oncology services', Psycho-Oncology:Journal of the psychological, social and behavioral dimension of cancer (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Stephen Ackland
Show 4 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 9
Total funding $1,385,568

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20163 grants / $439,141

A randomised trial to implement systematic distress screening and structured care for callers using Cancer Councils' telephone services$289,279

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Christine Paul, Doctor Allison Boyes, Professor Paul Jacobsen, Ms Lorna O'Brien, Doctor Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Dr Anna Boltong, Doctor Patrick McElduff
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1500769
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

A randomised trial to implement systematic distress screening and structured care for callers using Cancer Councils' telephone services$74,931

Funding body: Cancer Council Victoria

Funding body Cancer Council Victoria
Project Team Associate Professor Christine Paul, Doctor Allison Boyes, Professor Paul Jacobsen, Ms Lorna O'Brien, Doctor Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Dr Anna Boltong, Doctor Patrick McElduff
Scheme Partnership Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1501098
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

A randomised trial to implement systematic distress screening and structured care for callers using Cancer Councils' telephone services$74,931

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team Associate Professor Christine Paul, Doctor Allison Boyes, Professor Paul Jacobsen, Ms Lorna O'Brien, Doctor Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Dr Anna Boltong, Doctor Patrick McElduff
Scheme Partnership Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1501099
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20132 grants / $504,660

A randomised controlled trial of online versus telephone-based information and support: Can electronic platforms deliver effective care for lung cancer patients?$329,660

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Christine Paul, Doctor Allison Boyes, Ms Paula Vallentine, Professor Amanda Baker, Associate Professor Frans Henskens, Dr Ian Roos, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Doctor Tara Clinton-Mcharg
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1200758
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

A randomised controlled trial of online versus telephone-based information and support: Can electronic platforms deliver effective care for lung cancer patients?$175,000

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team Associate Professor Christine Paul, Doctor Allison Boyes, Ms Paula Vallentine, Professor Amanda Baker, Associate Professor Frans Henskens, Dr Ian Roos, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Doctor Tara Clinton-Mcharg
Scheme Partnership Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1200784
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20123 grants / $269,889

Increasing rates of organ donor registration: An RCT to determine the differential effectiveness of electronic and interpersonal information interventions.$237,682

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Conor Gilligan, Doctor Heidi Turon, Doctor Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Doctor Flora Tzelepis
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1100421
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Evaluating the acceptability of a web-based approach to improve knowledge transfer to general practice regarding care for sleep disorders $18,000

Funding body: Sleep Health Foundation

Funding body Sleep Health Foundation
Project Team Associate Professor Christine Paul, Emeritus Professor Michael Hensley, Doctor Jeffrey Pretto, Doctor Mariko Carey, Associate Professor Frans Henskens, Doctor Tara Clinton-Mcharg
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100881
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Improving cancer care for lymphoma: patients' perceptions of optimal care$14,207

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Flora Tzelepis, Doctor Mariko Carey, Associate Professor Christine Paul, Doctor Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Ms Alison Zucca
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200212
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20101 grants / $171,878

Psychosocial outcomes in blood cancer: role of treatment centre structures/processes$171,878

Funding body: Leukaemia Foundation

Funding body Leukaemia Foundation
Project Team Doctor Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher
Scheme National Research Program (Postdoctoral Fellowship)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G0190539
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y
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News

Associate Professor Chris Paul

Study to enhance counselling for cancer callers

March 7, 2016

University of Newcastle behavioural scientist Associate Professor Christine Paul will work with Cancer Council NSW, Cancer Council Victoria and HMRI to help ensure that distressed cancer patients and their families receive the best possible health counselling when they phone for support.

Dr Tara Clinton-Mcharg

Position

Postdoctoral Researcher
HNEPH
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email tara.clinton-mcharg@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 02 4924 6064
Fax n/a

Office

Room 0059
Building Booth Building
Location Wallsend Campus

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