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Dr Sharyn Hunter

Lecturer

School of Nursing and Midwifery (Nursing)

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Sharyn Hunter is a lecturer at the School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle, Australia. Sharyn has a passionate interest in the preparation of student nurses for nursing older people. She has received awards for teaching into the undergraduate nursing program from the University of Newcastle and nationally by Australian Learning and Teaching Council with a Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning. She has recently published an undergraduate textbook for nurses about healthy ageing. Sharyn’s research interests include, the development of health professionals regarding the care of older people and the of clinical reasoning. She has published and presented papers nationally and internationally in these areas. Research Expertise
Dr Hunter has experience in quantitative and qualitative research methods. She has conducted and supervised studies about nurse's practice development, clinical reasoning development, tertiary education and simulation. PhD Thesis: Title: The professional development of RN in Residential Aged Care The use of multiple case study approach allowed for the exploration of the real-life context of registered nurses’ (RNs) practices in residential aged care (RAC). Previously, the boundaries between the phenomenon of aged care nursing practices and the management of aged care facilities were clear. This study provided evidence of the blurring of these boundaries with respect to designations of nurses and their respective functions. The multiple sources of data provided evidence of recurring patterns of behaviours, which have contributed to the development of a model to reflect the changes of registered nurses' practice in residential aged care. A series of expressions of the model demonstrates the relationships between the study findings and other research and available information. This model addresses this need for a strategic approach to the ongoing professional development of RNs who work in RAC. A the presence of RNs in aged care is critical, there is a need to be proactive, feasible, and realistic in the approach to staff development in the contexts in which aged care is delivered. RAC now provides the opportunity for RNs to practise at an advanced level; to use and develop a range of sophisticated skills in critical thinking, problem solving and reflective practice to deliver the best possible care to residents. Major grants: Dr Hunter has been involved in a number of University of Newcastle funded projects about clinical reasoning and peer review of teaching. She was member of a team funded by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council to explore simulation and clinical reasoning in undergraduate nurses. Other projects: Dr Hunter is currently supervising research higher degree candidates studies on acute care and older people, and nursing education. She is also a member of the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) Evidence Synthesis Group and has trained to undertake systematic reviews for JBI.

Teaching Expertise
Teaching Portfolio Current Role (Lecturer) Teaching Responsibilities Course coordinator for in an undergraduate couse about the health and illness of the older person across both semesters of the academic year. This course focuses on developing competencies in undergraduate nurses about nursing older people across different health contexts. I also lecture and conduct tutorials. Teaching Goals and Philosophy In January 2007, I became involved in teaching and coordinating an undergraduate second year core course in the BN program focused on nursing older people. Prior to my academic role, as a senior clinician working in aged care, I facilitated the change of ‘old’ nursing roles in residential and community aged care services. My doctoral studies were also in this area. My research and clinical expertise have been recognised nationally and internationally. I have been recognised for my expectional role as a tertiary teacher in relation to this course. My approach transformed students’ attitudes towards nursing older people and contributed to their professional development. I was ( and continure to) positively influence nursing students’ attitudes towards caring for older people and thus contribute to students’ professionalism by ensuring their ‘work readiness’for nursing older people. I have received 2 awards for my contribution to student learning in this course: 2008 Vice Chancellors Award for Teaching: Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning: and 2010 Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC): Citations for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning. Student Feedback about my teaching The quantitative results are continually positive with scores above 4.5/5 for all items,especially the teacher was enthusiastic, motivates me to extend my learning, and helped me understand the importance of the content to my program.The qualitative comments focus on my enthusiasm for aged care; how I was inspiring; and encouraging them to want to learn more. The students’ comments link my passion and expertise to their engagement and enjoyment. I also “…broadened my (the student’s) idea about aged care” ) and “The scenario based learning in tutorials was perfect for this course…” . All comments were communicated via email. These comments demonstrate that students in this course are being transformed and also describe how this change impacts on their professionalism. I felt that I learnt a great deal about aged care from you and the way you made the tutorials interesting. Your enthusiasm and passion for the subject came across so very well and this also helped keep the subject interesting. I feel that I am able to take so much to work with me now and also educate others about the very important aspect of aged care…. Learning the registered nurses responsibilities and what I will be able to bring to me place of employment once I am registered gives me hope that in the future aged care will improve out of sight!....You really are an inspiration to me ….Your delivery of the subject always came across with such a great insight and realism that made learning so worth while. I would also like to thank-you so very much for making our tutorials so understandable and interesting. I know I’m not the only one commenting on how you helped us "get it". Having you teach aged care to me over the last 7 weeks has put the wind back in my sails as far as working with the elderly go and I must admit it is wonderful to see someone so passionate about the elderly and their "individual" care .You have been exceptional and your enthusiasm is second to none... Thankyou from myself and also in advance from the elderly I will be caring for with a brighter and renewed sense of care. On behalf of all the students in tut group X, and indeed on my personal behalf, I'd like to sincerely thank you for all your wonderful guidance and direction you have provided throughout this semester. You kept us interested and engaged, and inspired most of us

Administrative Expertise
Course co ordination within the undergraduate and post graduate program; Student Academic Conduct Officer ( held this position for 2 years). Assist with the coordination of the Research Higher Degree Skills Seminars

Collaborations
Registered Nurse Professional Development in Aged Care Clinical Reasoning in Health Care Simulation in Health Care


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science, University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), James Cook University

Keywords

  • ageing
  • clinical reasoning
  • healthy ageing
  • older people
  • primary health care
  • simulation

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
111099Nursing not elsewhere classified50
170199Psychology not elsewhere classified50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2014 - LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Australia

Academic appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2009 - Membership - Joanna Briggs Institue Evidence Synthesis GroupJoanna Briggs Institue Evidence Synthesis Group
Australia
1/01/2001 - Membership - Royal College of Nursing AustraliaRoyal College of Nursing Australia
Australia

Professional appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/03/2004 - 1/01/2007Clincial Nurse ConsultantAnglicanCare
Resdiential and Community Aged Care
Australia
1/01/2002 - 1/01/2004Nurse ManagerBaptist Community Service
Warabrook Aged Care Facility
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (1 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2012Miller CA, Hunter S, Miller's nursing for wellness in older adults, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Sydney, 604 (2012) [A4]

Chapter (3 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2013Hunter S, Dumont F, 'Caring for an older person with altered cognition', Clinical Reasoning : Learning to Think Like a Nurse, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 160-179 (2013) [B2]
2013Day JL, Taylor ACT, Hunter S, Jeong S, Armitage D, Keatinge D, Higgins I, 'Community Care', Medical-Surgical Nursing: Critical thinking in Client Care, Pearson, Sydney 35-54 (2013) [B2]
Co-authorsAnn Taylor, Jenny Day, Sarah Jeong, Isabel Higgins
2011Day JL, Armitage D, Jeong Y-S, Hunter S, Keatinge DR, Higgins IJ, 'Community-based nursing care', Medical Surgical Nursing: Critical Thinking in Client Care, Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW 37-52 (2011) [B2]
Co-authorsIsabel Higgins, Sarah Jeong, Jenny Day

Journal article (13 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2015Pitt V, Powis D, Levett-Jones T, Hunter S, 'The influence of critical thinking skills on performance and progression in a pre-registration nursing program', Nurse Education Today, 35 125-131 (2015)

Background: The importance of developing critical thinking skills in preregistration nursing students is recognized worldwide. Yet, there has been limited exploration of how students' critical thinking skill scores on entry to pre-registration nursing education influence their academic and clinical performance and progression. Aim: The aim of this study was to: i) describe entry and exit critical thinking scores of nursing students enrolled in a three year bachelor of nursing program in Australia in comparison to norm scores; ii) explore entry critical thinking scores in relation to demographic characteristics, students' performance and progression. Method: This longitudinal correlational study used the Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT) to measure critical thinking skills in a sample (. n=. 134) of students, at entry and exit (three years later). A one sample t-test was used to determine if differences existed between matched student critical thinking scores between entry and exit points. Academic performance, clinical performance and progression data were collected and correlations with entry critical thinking scores were examined. Results: There was a significant relationship between critical thinking scores, academic performance and students' risk of failing, especially in the first semester of study. Critical thinking scores were predictive of program completion within three years. The increase in critical thinking scores from entry to exit was significant for the 28 students measured. In comparison to norm scores, entry level critical thinking scores were significantly lower, but exit scores were comparable. Critical thinking scores had no significant relationship to clinical performance. Conclusion: Entry critical thinking scores significantly correlate to academic performance and predict students risk of course failure and ability to complete a nursing degree in three years. Students' critical thinking scores are an important determinant of their success and as such can inform curriculum development and selection strategies.

DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2014.08.006
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2015Pitt V, Powis D, Levett-Jones T, Hunter S, 'The influence of critical thinking skills on performance and progression in a pre-registration nursing program', Nurse Education Today, 35 125-131 (2015)
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2014.08.006
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2014Pitt V, Powis D, Levett-Jones T, Hunter S, 'Nursing students' personal qualities: a descriptive study.', Nurse Educ Today, 34 1196-1200 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2014.05.004Author URL
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2014Hunter S, Pitt V, Croce N, Roche J, 'Critical thinking skills of undergraduate nursing students: Description and demographic predictors', Nurse Education Today, 34 809-814 (2014)
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2013.08.005
2014Hunter S, Pitt V, Croce N, Roche J, 'Critical thinking skills of undergraduate nursing students: Description and demographic predictors', Nurse Education Today, 34 809-814 (2014) [C1]

Aim: This study investigated the critical thinking skills among undergraduate nursing students in Australia to obtain a profile and determine demographic predictors of critical thinking. Background: There is universal agreement that being a critical thinker is an outcome requirement for many accreditation and registering nursing bodies. Most studies provide descriptive statistical information about critical thinking skills while some have studied the changes in critical thinking after an intervention. Limited research about factors that predict critical thinking skills is available. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted using convenience sampling. Two hundred and sixty-nine students were recruited across three years of an undergraduate programme in 2009. Most students' age ranged from under 20 to 34. years (58%), 87% were female, 91% were Australian and 23% of first and second year students had nursing associated experience external to the university. Data about critical thinking skills were collected via the Health Science Reasoning Test (HSRT). Linear regression analysis investigated the predictors of nursing students' critical thinking skills. Results: The students in third year had a profile of critical thinking skills comparable with HSRT norms. Year of study predicted higher critical thinking scores for all domains (p<. 0.001) except the subscale, analysis. Nationality predicted higher scores for total CT skill scores (p<. 0.001) and subscales, inductive (p=0.001) and deductive reasoning (p=0.001). Nursing associated experience predicted higher scores for the subscale, analysis (p<. 0.001). Age and gender were not predictive. However, these demographic predictors only accounted for a small variance obtained for the domains of CT skills. Conclusion: An understanding of factors that predict nursing students' CT skills is required. Despite this study finding a number of significant predictors of nursing students' CT skills, there are others yet to be understood. Future research is recommended exploring explicit CT instructional approaches and nursing students' CT skills. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2013.08.005
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2014Pitt V, Powis D, Levett-Jones T, Hunter S, 'The influence of personal qualities on performance and progression in a pre-registration nursing programme', Nurse Education Today, 34 866-871 (2014) [C1]

Background: Research conducted primarily with psychology and medical students has highlighted that personal qualities play an important role in students' academic performance. In nursing there has been limited investigation of the relationship between personal qualities and performance. Yet, reports of student incivility and a lack of compassion have prompted appeals to integrate the assessment of personal qualities into pre-registration nursing student selection. Before this can be done research is needed to explore the influence of students' personal qualities on programme performance and progression. Aim: This study explores the relationships between students' personal qualities and their academic and clinical performance, behaviours and progression through a pre-registration nursing programme in Australia. Method: This longitudinal descriptive correlational study was undertaken with a sample of Australian pre-registration nursing students (n=138). Students' personal qualities were assessed using three personal qualities assessment (PQA) instruments. Outcome measures included grades in nursing theory and clinical courses, yearly grade point average, final clinical competency, progression (completion), class attendance and levels of life event stress. Results: Significant correlations were found between academic performance and PQA scores for self-control, resilience and traits of aloofness, confidence and involvement. Final clinical competence was predicted by confidence and self-control scores. Students with higher empathy had higher levels of life event stress in their first year and class attendance had a positive correlation with self-control. Completing the programme in three years was weakly predicted by the measure of resilience. No difference was noted between extreme or non-extreme scorers on the PQA scales with respect to performance or progression. Conclusion: This sample of students' personal qualities was found to influence their academic and clinical performance and their ability to complete a pre-registration programme in three years. However, further research is required with larger cohorts to confirm the use of personal qualities assessment during selection. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2013.10.011
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2014Rossiter RC, Day J, McDonald VM, Hunter S, Jeong S, Van Der Riet P, et al., 'Redefining old: Optimising health and wellbeing', Hong Kong Journal of Mental Health, 40 59-72 (2014) [C1]
Co-authorsPamela Vanderriet, Jane Maguire, Vanessa Mcdonald, Isabel Higgins, Rachel Rossiter, Sarah Jeong, Jenny Day
2013Pitt V, Powis D, Levett-Jones T, Hunter S, 'Can an existing personal qualities measure be used to examine nursing students' professional and personal attributes?', Focus on Health Professional Education: A Multi-disciplinary Journal, 15 41-54 (2013) [C1]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2012Pitt VL, Powis DA, Levett-Jones TL, Hunter S, 'Factors influencing nursing students' academic and clinical performance and attrition: An integrative literature review', Nurse Education Today, 32 903-913 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 22Web of Science - 14
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2011Hoffman KA, Dempsey J, Levett-Jones TL, Noble DI, Hickey N, Jeong Y-S, et al., 'The design and implementation of an Interactive Computerised Decision Support Framework (ICDSF) as a strategy to improve nursing students' clinical reasoning skills', Nurse Education Today, 31 587-594 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.nedt.2010.10.012
CitationsScopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Sarah Jeong
2011Burrows TL, Findlay NA, Killen CG, Dempsey SE, Hunter S, Chiarelli PE, Snodgrass SN, 'Using nominal group technique to develop a consensus derived model for peer review of teaching across a multi-school faculty', Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice, 8 1-9 (2011) [C1]
Co-authorsTracy Burrows, Shane Dempsey, Suzanne Snodgrass, Pauline Chiarelli
2010Hunter S, Levett-Jones TL, 'The practice of nurses working with older people in long term care: An Australian perspective', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 19 527-536 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1365-2702.2009.02967.x
CitationsScopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2007Hunter S, McMillan MA, Conway JF, 'The professional development needs of registered nurses in residential aged care', Collegian: Journal of the Royal College of Nursing Australia, 14 6-11 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.1016/S1322-7696(08)60549-1
CitationsScopus - 3
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Conference (17 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2014Pathike W, O'Brien AP, Hunter S, 'Developing an understanding of rural Thai elderly resilience: An ethnography of the primary care unit (Tambon Health Promoting Hospital) subculture', 3rd Asia-Pacific International Conference on Qualitative Research in Nursing, Midwifery and Health, Newcastle, NSW Australia (2014) [E3]
Co-authorsTony Obrien
2012Hunter S, 'Positive health promotion to encourage healthy ageing in older adults', International Conference. Interprofessional Partnership: Improvement for Global Health Outcomes, Chiang Mai, Thailand (2012) [E3]
2012Hunter S, 'Nursing students collaborating online: Making it happen', 14th National Nurse Education Conference 2012. Speaker Abstracts, Perth, WA (2012) [E3]
2011Dempsey J, Levett-Jones TL, Hoffman KA, Bourgeois S, Jeong Y-S, Hunter S, et al., 'Pandoras Box: simulation, reflection, cognitive errors and clinical reasoning', 4th International Clinical Skills Conference: Showcasing Innovation and Evidenced Based Clinical Skills Education and Practice: Abstracts, Prato, Tuscany (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsSarah Jeong, Tracy Levett-Jones
2011Hunter S, Arthur C, Pitt VL, 'Enhancing nursing students' clinical reasoning skills: An innovative teaching strategy', 4th International Clinical Skills Conference: Showcasing Innovation and Evidenced Based Clinical Skills Education and Practice: Abstracts, Prato, Tuscany (2011) [E3]
2011Hunter S, Arthur C, Roche JM, Levett-Jones TL, Kable AK, 'Prudent use of simulation dollars to achieve good learning outcomes', 4th International Clinical Skills Conference: Showcasing Innovation and Evidenced Based Clinical Skills Education and Practice: Abstracts, Prato, Tuscany (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsAshley Kable, Tracy Levett-Jones
2011Pitt VL, Powis DA, Levett-Jones TL, Hunter S, 'Moving towards tomorrow's workforce: Using personal qualities to guide selection', Innovations in Nursing Practice, Thinking Aloud, Thinking Ahead: 15th Australasian Nurse Educators Conference 2011, Hamilton, NZ (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2011Hunter S, Pitt VL, Levett-Jones TL, 'Improving nursing students' clinical reasoning', Innovations in Nursing Practice, Thinking Aloud, Thinking Ahead: 15th Australasian Nurse Educators Conference 2011, Hamilton, NZ (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2010Hunter S, 'Challenging nursing students' attitudes about older people', 2010 National Conference of Emerging Researchers in Ageing:, Newcastle, NSW (2010) [E3]
2010Levett-Jones TL, Hoffman KA, Dempsey J, Bourgeois S, Hunter S, Jeong Y-S, 'Enhancing nursing students' clinical reasoning skills through their engagement with interactive computerised case studies', 3rd International Nurse Education Conference. Programme, Sydney (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones, Sarah Jeong
2010Pitt VL, Powis DA, Levett-Jones TL, Hunter S, 'Altering selection strategies: The future of undergraduate nursing education', ANZAME 2010: Overcoming Barriers, Re(E)Forming Professional Practice, Townsville, QLD (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2010Arthur C, Roche JM, Levett-Jones TL, Hoffman KA, Kable AK, Hunter S, 'The simulation 'pot of gold': How should we spend it?', SimTech Health 2010: Education and Innovation in Healthcare. Conference Handbook with Program and Abstracts, Melbourne, Vic (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsAshley Kable, Tracy Levett-Jones
2010Hunter S, 'Is there a relationship between scores on the Health Sciences Reasoning Test, grade point average and the clinical reasoning ability of nursing students?', Symposium: Simulation and Beyond. Creative Teaching Approaches for Improving Patient Safety. Program, Pokolbin, NSW (2010) [E3]
2009Hoffman KA, Dempsey J, Levett-Jones TL, Hunter S, Hickey N, Roche JM, et al., 'Enhancing nursing students' clinical reasoning skills through their engagement with computerised decision support frameworks', Australasian Nurse Educators Conference 2009: Concurrent Sessions, Christchurch, NZ (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsSarah Jeong, Tracy Levett-Jones
2009Pitt VL, Levett-Jones TL, Hunter S, Powis DA, 'Personal qualities and nursing students clinical & academic performance', Australasian Nurse Educators Conference 2009: Concurrent Sessions, Christchurch, NZ (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2009Pitt VL, Levett-Jones TL, Hunter S, Powis DA, 'Selection or support: The best direction for improving undergraduate nursing?', RCNA Annual Conference 09: Program and Book of Abstracts, Melbourne, VIC (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
2009Dempsey J, Levett-Jones TL, Hoffman KA, Hunter S, Hickey N, Noble DI, et al., 'The 5 r's of clinical reasoning', Third International Clinical Skills Conference. Abstracts, papers, workshops and posters, Prato, Italy (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsTracy Levett-Jones
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Other (1 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2014Pathike W, O'brien AP, Hunter S, 'The challenges experienced nursing older people in the Thai rural community; Understanding the Thai Primary Care Unit (PCU) subculture. Poster presentation at the Global eHealth research and innovation cluster showcase, NSW Australia', ( pp.-). Newcastle, NSW, Australia: University of Newcastle (2014) [O1]
Co-authorsTony Obrien
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants6
Total funding$74,933

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20132 grants / $63,933

Feasibility Study: A Proposed Model of a 'Health Ageing Clinic' and team based curricular for clinical placement of healthcare students$62,333

Funding body: HETI (Health Education and Training Institute)

Funding bodyHETI (Health Education and Training Institute)
Project TeamAssociate Professor Chris Kewley, Doctor Sharyn Hunter
SchemeNSW ICTN Local Project Fund
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1300015
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - State
Category2OPS
UONY

Fifth International Clinical Skill Conference, Prato, Italy, 19 - 22 May 2013$1,600

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamDoctor Sharyn Hunter
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1300436
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20121 grants / $1,400

14th National Nurse Education Conference, Perth, 11 - 13 April 2012$1,400

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamDoctor Sharyn Hunter
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200537
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20111 grants / $1,500

Fourth International Clinical Skills Conference, Prato, Italy, 22 - 25 May 2011$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamDoctor Sharyn Hunter
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100289
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20091 grants / $1,700

Connecting the Dots: Geriatric Nursing, Education and Clinical Simulation Conference, North Carolina USA 2-3 April 09$1,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamDoctor Sharyn Hunter
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0189944
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20081 grants / $6,400

Exploring nursing students' critical thinking and clinical reasoning abilities$6,400

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Sharyn Hunter
SchemeEarly Career Researcher Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0189651
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY
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Research Supervision

Current Supervision

CommencedResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015The Evaluation of Older Person Pain Management Strategies
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2015Nursing Interventions for Newly Institutionalised Older People with Alzheimer's Disease: An Explorative Study.
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2013Health Promotion for Thai Elderly with Chronic Illness: A Mixed Methods Study
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2012An Ethnographic Study to Understand the Concept of Rural Thai Elderly Resilience: Rural Elderly and Community Nurses Perspectives
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2009Comparison of a Nurse Led Evidence Based Venous Thromboembolism Program With Usual VTE Prevention Practices and Associated Outcomes Following Hip and Knee Arthroplasty
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

YearResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2014Factors Impacting on Bachelor of Nursing Students' Clinical and Academic Performance and Progression
Nursing, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
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Dr Sharyn Hunter

Position

Lecturer
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Nursing

Contact Details

Emailsharyn.hunter@newcastle.edu.au
Phone(02) 4921 5957

Office

LocationCallaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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