Dr Scott Fitzpatrick

Research Fellow

Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Scott Fitzpatrick is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health (CRRMH) at The University of Newcastle and an Affiliate of the Centre for Values, Ethics, and the Law in Medicine (VELiM) at The University of Sydney. His research focuses on the philosophical, moral, and socio-cultural frameworks that underpin suicide and suicide prevention including research and clinical and public health policy and practice. His research explores such topics as the social determinants of suicide and mental health; methodological and ethical issues in suicide research, policy and practice; and the use of qualitative research methodologies, with a particular emphasis on narrative theory.


Qualifications

  • PhD (Public Health), University of Sydney
  • Bachelor of Arts (Honours), Queensland University of Technology

Keywords

  • Ethics
  • Mental Health
  • Narrative Theory and Methods
  • Qualitative Research
  • Sociology of Health and Illness
  • Suicide

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
220199 Applied Ethics not elsewhere classified 20
160804 Rural Sociology 30
111714 Mental Health 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Fellow University of Newcastle
Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2009 Australian Postgraduate Award
The University of Sydney
2009 University of Sydney Merit Award
The University of Sydney
2008 Honours Scholarship
Queensland University of Technology

Prize

Year Award
2008 University Medal
Queensland University of Technology
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Fitzpatrick SJ, 'Toward a narrative understanding of suicide', Confessions: Confounding Narrative and Ethics, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Newcastle upon Tyne 181-196 (2010) [B1]

Journal article (13 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Fitzpatrick SJ, Kerridge IH, Jordens CFC, Zoloth L, Tollefsen C, Tsomo KL, et al., 'Religious Perspectives on Human Suffering: Implications for Medicine and Bioethics', Journal of Religion and Health, 55 159-173 (2016) [C1]

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.The prevention and relief of suffering has long been a core medical concern. But while this is a laudable goal, some question whe... [more]

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.The prevention and relief of suffering has long been a core medical concern. But while this is a laudable goal, some question whether medicine can, or should, aim for a world without pain, sadness, anxiety, despair or uncertainty. To explore these issues, we invited experts from six of the world¿s major faith traditions to address the following question. Is there value in suffering? And is something lost in the prevention and/or relief of suffering? While each of the perspectives provided maintains that suffering should be alleviated and that medicine¿s proper role is to prevent and relieve suffering by ethical means, it is also apparent that questions regarding the meaning and value of suffering are beyond the realm of medicine. These perspectives suggest that medicine and bioethics have much to gain from respectful consideration of religious discourse surrounding suffering.

DOI 10.1007/s10943-015-0014-9
2016 Matthews LR, Fitzpatrick SJ, Quinlan MG, Ngo M, Bohle P, 'Bereaved families and the coronial response to traumatic workplace fatalities: Organizational perspectives', Death Studies, 1-10 (2016) [C1]

2016 Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC Work remains a significant source of illness, injury, and death in developed countries. In Australia, for example, over 2,000 people ... [more]

2016 Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC Work remains a significant source of illness, injury, and death in developed countries. In Australia, for example, over 2,000 people die from work-related causes each year, with heavy social, economic, and personal costs (Safe Work Australia, 2013a). Most die as a result of work-related disease. However, many die from trauma. In 2012, 223 workers were fatally injured in Australia and in the United States the figure was 4,383 (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2014; Safe Work Australia, 2013b). Apart from the immediate tragedy of each worker¿s death, these deaths affect the victim¿s immediate family, wider family, friends, and co-workers. It has been estimated that, on average, every death has an impact on at least 20 other people (Dyregrov, Nordanger, & Dyregrov, 2003), especially when the deceased had several families, which is an increasingly common phenomenon (OECD, 2014). Little is known, however, about how regulatory responses following a traumatic workplace fatality meet the needs of surviving families. With a focus on the coronial investigation, this article provides information about the regulatory responses to a traumatic workplace fatality and examines how various organizations involved in the coronial process following the death viewed its ability to accommodate the needs and wishes of surviving families.

DOI 10.1080/07481187.2015.1115787
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Quinlan M, Matthews L, Bohle P, Fitzpatrick SJ, 'Employer and Union Responses to Traumatic Death at Work: Evidence from Australia', New Zealand Journal of Employment Relations, 40 1-23 (2016)
2015 Fitzpatrick SJ, Hooker C, Kerridge I, 'Suicidology as a social practice', Social Epistemology: a journal of knowledge, culture and policy, 29 303-322 (2015)
DOI 10.1080/02691728.2014.895448
2015 Quinlan M, Fitzpatrick SJ, Matthews LR, Ngo M, Bohle P, 'Administering the cost of death: Organisational perspectives on workers' compensation and common law claims following traumatic death at work in Australia', International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, 38 8-17 (2015)

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd.Quite apart from its devastating human and psychological effects, the death of a worker can have significant, life-changing effects on their families. For man... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd.Quite apart from its devastating human and psychological effects, the death of a worker can have significant, life-changing effects on their families. For many affected families, workers' compensation entitlements represent the primary financial safeguard. Where the worker was self-employed, the family will generally be excluded from this remedy and have to take the more problematic option of claiming damages at common law. Despite the centrality of workers' compensation, little attention has been given to how effectively workers' compensation agencies address the needs of bereaved families or the views of other organisations involved, such as safety inspectors, unions, employers and victim advocates. Based on interviews with forty eight organisational representatives in five Australian states, this study examines how workers' compensation regimes deal with work-related death from the perspective of those organisations involved directly or indirectly in the process. The study highlighted a number of problems, including the exclusion of self-employed workers and dealing with 'mixed families'.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijlp.2015.01.002
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Fitzpatrick SJ, 'Scientism as a Social Response to the Problem of Suicide', Journal of Bioethical Inquiry, 1-10 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Journal of Bioethical Inquiry Pty Ltd.As one component of a broader social and normative response to the problem of suicide, scientism served to minimize sociopolitical an... [more]

© 2015 Journal of Bioethical Inquiry Pty Ltd.As one component of a broader social and normative response to the problem of suicide, scientism served to minimize sociopolitical and religious conflict around the issue. As such, it embodied, and continues to embody, a number of interests and values, as well as serving important social functions. It is thus comparable with other normative frameworks and can be appraised, from an ethical perspective, in light of these values, interests, and functions. This work examines the key values, interests, and functions of scientism in suicidology and argues that although scientism has had some social benefit, it primarily serves to maintain political and professional interests and has damaging implications for suicide research and prevention.

DOI 10.1007/s11673-015-9662-4
2014 Fitzpatrick SJ, 'Re-moralizing the suicide debate', Journal of Bioethical Inquiry, 11 223-232 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/s11673-014-9510-y
2014 Fitzpatrick SJ, 'Stories worth telling: Moral experiences of suicidal behavior', Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics, 4 147-160 (2014)
DOI 10.1353/nib.2014.0047
2014 Matthews LM, Fitzpatrick SJ, Bohle P, Quinlan M, 'Investigation and prosecution following workplace fatalities: Responding to the needs of families', The Economic and Labour Relations Review, 25 253-270 (2014)
DOI 10.1177/1035304614534350
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Fitzpatrick SJ, Jordens CFC, Kerridge IH, Keown D, Walter JJ, Nelson P, et al., 'Religious Perspectives on the Use of Psychopharmaceuticals as an Enhancement Technology', Journal of Religion and Health, 1-16 (2013)

The use of psychopharmaceuticals as an enhancement technology has been the focus of attention in the bioethics literature. However, there has been little examination of the challe... [more]

The use of psychopharmaceuticals as an enhancement technology has been the focus of attention in the bioethics literature. However, there has been little examination of the challenges that this practice creates for religious traditions that place importance on questions of being, authenticity, and identity. We asked expert commentators from six major world religions to consider the issues raised by psychopharmaceuticals as an enhancement technology. These commentaries reveal that in assessing the appropriate place of medical therapies, religious traditions, like secular perspectives, rely upon ideas about health and disease and about normal human behavior. But unlike secular perspectives, faith traditions explicitly concern themselves with ways in which medicine should or should not be used to live a "good life". © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

DOI 10.1007/s10943-013-9761-7
2013 Fitzpatrick SJ, Kerridge IH, 'Challenges to a more open discussion of suicide', Medical Journal of Australia, 198 470-471 (2013) [C2]
DOI 10.5694/mja12.11540
Citations Scopus - 3
2012 Fitzpatrick SJ, 'The Telling Moment: Narrative as a Discursive Act', AJOB Neuroscience, 3 80-81 (2012)
DOI 10.1080/21507740.2012.721452
2011 Fitzpatrick SJ, 'Looking beyond the qualitative and quantitative divide: Narrative, ethics and representation in suicidology', Suicidology Online, 2 29-37 (2011) [C2]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $3,000

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20161 grants / $3,000

Systems thinking and systems change in rural suicide prevention$3,000

Funding body: The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team

Dr Scott Fitzpatrick, Associate Professor Kerry Inder, Professor David Perkins, Professor Alan Hayes, Dr Donna Read

Scheme Strategic Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Investigating the Role of Carers of Individuals with Mental Health Issues as an Unpaid Component of the Mental Health Workforce
PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
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News

PhD Scholarship - Approaches to the prevention of suicide in rural and remote areas

August 23, 2016

The Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health at the University of Newcastle, Orange, Australia is offering a PhD scholarship in the area of approaches to the prevention of suicide in rural and remote areas. We are seeking a student with a public health, social science, nursing, psychology or similar background to study under the supervision of Prof David Perkins, Dr Scott Fitzpatrick, Prof Sally Chan and A/Prof Kerry Inder.

Dr Scott Fitzpatrick

Position

Research Fellow
Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email scott.fitzpatrick@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 6363 8464
Fax (02) 6361 2457

Office

Room R.41
Building Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health
Location Bloomfield Campus Forest Road Orange NSW 2800

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