Ms Sarah Costigan

Casual Research Assistant

School of Education

Career Summary

Biography

Sarah Costigan completed her undergraduate degree in Physical Education (Distinction) in 2005 before obtaining her Masters of Health Promotion in 2011, both degrees were completed through Deakin University (Melbourne). Sarah’s Master’s project examined ‘The Health Indicators Associated With Screen-based Sedentary Behaviour among Adolescent Girls’.

Sarah currently holds an Associate Lecturer position within the School of Education, and teaches a range of health and physical education courses in both the primary and secondary teacher education courses at the undergraduate level.

Sarah is an Associate Researcher within the Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, her research has focused on the promotion of physical activity and reduction of sedentary behaviour amongst youth.

Sarah currently has 10 peer-reviewed publications (since 2011), the majority published in international journals.

Research Expertise
Sarah is an Associate Researcher within the Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, her research has focused on the promotion of physical activity and reduction of sedentary behaviour amongst youth. Sarah currently has 10 peer-reviewed publications (since 2011), the majority published in international journals.

Teaching Expertise
Sarah currently holds an Associate Lecturer position within the School of Education, and teaches a range of health and physical education courses in both the primary and secondary teacher education courses at the undergraduate level.

Administrative Expertise
Course Co-ordinator for PUBH2020 (Physical Education). 

Keywords

  • Physical Activity
  • Physical Education
  • Sedentary Behaviour

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
130210 Physical Education and Development Curriculum and Pedagogy 50
110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2013 -  Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia
1/03/2010 - 1/12/2012 Research Assistant University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (16 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Costigan SA, Eather N, Plotnikoff RC, Hillman CH, Lubans DR, 'High-Intensity Interval Training on Cognitive and Mental Health in Adolescents.', Med Sci Sports Exerc, (2016)
DOI 10.1249/MSS.0000000000000993
Co-authors Narelle Eather, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
2015 Costigan SA, Eather N, Plotnikoff RC, Taaffe DR, Pollock E, Kennedy SG, Lubans DR, 'Preliminary efficacy and feasibility of embedding high intensity interval training into the school day: A pilot randomized controlled trial', Preventive Medicine Reports, 2 973-979 (2015) [C1]

© 2015.Current physical activity and fitness levels among adolescents are low, increasing the risk of chronic disease. Although the efficacy of high intensity interval training (... [more]

© 2015.Current physical activity and fitness levels among adolescents are low, increasing the risk of chronic disease. Although the efficacy of high intensity interval training (HIIT) for improving metabolic health is now well established, it is not known if this type of activity can be effective to improve adolescent health. The primary aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of embedding HIIT into the school day. A 3-arm pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted in one secondary school in Newcastle, Australia. Participants (n= 65; mean age = 15.8(0.6) years) were randomized into one of three conditions: aerobic exercise program (AEP) (n = 21), resistance and aerobic exercise program (RAP) (n = 22) and control (n = 22). The 8-week intervention consisted of three HIIT sessions per week (8-10. min/session), delivered during physical education (PE) lessons or at lunchtime. Assessments were conducted at baseline and post-intervention to detect changes in cardiorespiratory fitness (multi-stage shuttle-run), muscular fitness (push-up, standing long jump tests), body composition (Body Mass Index (BMI), BMI-z scores, waist circumference) and physical activity motivation (questionnaire), by researchers blinded to treatment allocation. Intervention effects for outcomes were examined using linear mixed models, and Cohen's d effect sizes were reported. Participants in the AEP and RAP groups had moderate intervention effects for waist circumference (p = 0.024), BMI-z (p = 0.037) and BMI (not significant) in comparison to the control group. A small intervention effect was also evident for cardiorespiratory fitness in the RAP group.

DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.11.001
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Narelle Eather, David Lubans
2015 Plotnikoff RC, Costigan SA, Short C, Grunseit A, James E, Johnson N, et al., 'Factors associated with higher sitting time in general, chronic disease, and psychologically-distressed, adult populations: Findings from the 45 & up Study', PLoS ONE, 10 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Plotnikoff et al.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and ... [more]

© 2015 Plotnikoff et al.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.This study examined factors associated with higher sitting time in general, chronic disease, and psychologically-distressed, adult populations (aged =45 years). A series of logistic regression models examined potential socio-demographic and health factors associated with higher sitting (=6hrs/day) in adults from the 45 and Up Study (n = 227,187), including four separate subsamples for analysis comprising those who had ever had heart disease (n = 26,599), cancer (n = 36,381), diabetes (n = 19,550) or psychological distress (n = 48,334). Odds of higher sitting were significantly (p<.01) associated with a number of factors across these groups, with an effect size of ORs=1.5 observed for the high-income =$70,000AUD, employed full-time and severe physical limitations demographics. Identification of key factors associated with higher sitting time in this population-based sample will assist development of broad-based, public health and targeted strategies to reduce sitting-time. In particular, those categorized as being high-income earners, full-time workers, as well as those with severe physical limitations need to be of priority, as higher sitting appears to be substantial across these groups.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0127689
Co-authors Erica James, Catherine Deste, Ron Plotnikoff, Natalie Johnson
2015 Costigan SA, Eather N, Plotnikoff RC, Taaffe DR, Lubans DR, 'High-intensity interval training for improving health-related fitness in adolescents: A systematic review and meta-analysis', British Journal of Sports Medicine, 49 1253-1261 (2015) [C1]

© Br J Sports Med 2015.Background: High-intensity interval training (HIIT) may be a feasible and efficacious strategy for improving health-related fitness in young people. The ob... [more]

© Br J Sports Med 2015.Background: High-intensity interval training (HIIT) may be a feasible and efficacious strategy for improving health-related fitness in young people. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the utility of HIIT to improve health-related fitness in adolescents and to identify potential moderators of training effects. Methods: Studies were considered eligible if they: (1) examined adolescents (13-18 years); (2) examined health-related fitness outcomes; (3) involved an intervention of =4 weeks in duration; (4) included a control or moderate intensity comparison group; and (5) prescribed high-intensity activity for the HIIT condition. Meta-analyses were conducted to determine the effect of HIIT on health-related fitness components using Comprehensive Meta-analysis software and potential moderators were explored (ie, study duration, risk of bias and type of comparison group). Results: The effects of HIIT on cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition were large, and medium, respectively. Study duration was a moderator for the effect of HIIT on body fat percentage. Intervention effects for waist circumference and muscular fitness were not statistically significant. Conclusions: HIIT is a feasible and time-efficient approach for improving cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition in adolescent populations.

DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2014-094490
Citations Scopus - 7
Co-authors David Lubans, Narelle Eather, Ron Plotnikoff
2015 Plotnikoff RC, Costigan SA, Williams RL, Hutchesson MJ, Kennedy SG, Robards SL, et al., 'Effectiveness of interventions targeting physical activity, nutrition and healthy weight for university and college students: A systematic review and meta-analysis', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 12 1-10 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Plotnikoff et al.; licensee BioMed Central.To examine the effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving physical activity, diet, and/or weight-related behaviors amongs... [more]

© 2015 Plotnikoff et al.; licensee BioMed Central.To examine the effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving physical activity, diet, and/or weight-related behaviors amongst university/college students. Five online databases were searched (January 1970 to April 2014). Experimental study designs were eligible for inclusion. Data extraction was performed by one reviewer using a standardized form developed by the researchers and checked by a second reviewer. Data were described in a narrative synthesis and meta-analyses were conducted when appropriate. Study quality was also established. Forty-one studies were included; of these, 34 reported significant improvements in one of the key outcomes. Of the studies examining physical activity 18/29 yielded significant results, with meta-analysis demonstrating significant increases in moderate physical activity in intervention groups compared to control. Of the studies examining nutrition, 12/24 reported significantly improved outcomes; only 4/12 assessing weight loss outcomes found significant weight reduction. This appears to be the first systematic review of physical activity, diet and weight loss interventions targeting university and college students. Tertiary institutions are appropriate settings for implementing and evaluating lifestyle interventions, however more research is needed to improve such strategies.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0203-7
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Clare Collins, Jennifer Allen, John Germov, Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Melinda Hutchesson
2015 Teychenne M, Costigan SA, Parker K, 'The association between sedentary behaviour and risk of anxiety: a systematic review', BMC Public Health, 15 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1843-x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
2014 Plotnikoff R, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Rhodes R, Costigan SA, 'The Intersect of Theory, Methods, and Translation in Guiding Interventions for the Promotion of Physical Activity: A Case Example of a Research Programme', AUSTRALIAN PSYCHOLOGIST, 49 110-126 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ap.12037
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2014 Lai SK, Costigan SA, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Stodden DF, Salmon J, Barnett LM, 'Do school-based interventions focusing on physical activity, fitness, or fundamental movement skill competency produce a sustained impact in these outcomes in children and adolescents? A systematic review of follow-up studies', Sports Medicine, 44 67-79 (2014) [C1]

Background: There is emerging evidence for positive associations between physical activity (PA), fitness, and fundamental movement skill (FMS) competence, for both children and ad... [more]

Background: There is emerging evidence for positive associations between physical activity (PA), fitness, and fundamental movement skill (FMS) competence, for both children and adolescents. Current reviews of interventions to improve these variables note few studies conduct follow-up assessments to assess behavior maintenance. Objective: The aim of this systematic review was to determine whether typically developing children and adolescents (aged 3-18 years) who have participated in school-based interventions have sustained outcomes in PA, fitness, and/or FMS. Methods: A systematic search of six electronic databases (CINAHL® Plus with Full Text, Ovid MEDLINE®, SPORTDiscus¿, Scopus, PsycINFO® and ERIC) was conducted from 1995 to 26 July 2012. Included studies were school-based studies (including randomized controlled trials, longitudinal cohort, quasi-experimental, and experimental) that had a positive effect at post intervention in at least one variable and had a follow-up PA, fitness, or FMS assessment at least 6 months after the post-intervention assessment. Risk of bias assessment was guided by the "Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses" statement. Results: The search identified 14 articles, and some studies addressed multiple outcomes: 13 articles assessed PA; three assessed fitness; and two assessed FMS. No study in this review met four key methodological criteria that have been shown to influence results, i.e., clarity on the randomization process, assessor blinding, analyzing participants in their original groups, and retaining sufficient participants through the entire study. Three-quarters (ten of 13) of the studies addressing PA, reported PA behavior change maintenance. The length of follow-up ranged from 6 months to 20 years, and the degree of PA difference reported was between 3 and 14 min per day. Only one of the three studies assessing fitness reported a sustained impact, whilst both studies that assessed FMS reported maintenance of effects. Conclusion: It is likely that PA is a sustainable outcome from interventions in children and adolescents, and there is reasonable evidence that interventions of longer than 1 year and interventions that utilize a theoretical model or framework are effective in producing this sustained impact. It would seem probable that FMS are a sustainable outcome in children and adolescents; however, this finding should be viewed with caution given the lack of studies and the risk of bias assessment. More research is needed to assess the sustainability of fitness interventions as this review only included a handful of studies that addressed fitness and only one of these studies found a sustained impact. © 2013 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

DOI 10.1007/s40279-013-0099-9
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 29
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2013 Plotnikoff RC, Costigan SA, Karunamuni ND, Lubans DR, 'Community-based physical activity interventions for treatment of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review with meta-analysis.', Frontiers in Endocrinology, 4 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fendo.2013.00003
Citations Scopus - 10
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
2013 Plotnikoff RC, Costigan SA, Karunamuni N, Lubans DR, 'Social cognitive theories used to explain physical activity behavior in adolescents: A systematic review and meta-analysis', PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 56 245-253 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.01.013
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 26
Co-authors David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff
2013 Dewar DL, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Costigan SA, Lubans DR, 'Testing Social-Cognitive Theory to Explain Physical Activity Change in Adolescent Girls From Low-Income Communities', RESEARCH QUARTERLY FOR EXERCISE AND SPORT, 84 483-491 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02701367.2013.842454
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
2013 Costigan SA, Barnett L, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, 'The Health Indicators Associated With Screen-Based Sedentary Behavior Among Adolescent Girls: A Systematic Review', JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENT HEALTH, 52 382-392 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2012.07.018
Citations Scopus - 49Web of Science - 41
Co-authors David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff
2013 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Costigan SA, McCargar L, 'A Test of the Theory of Planned Behavior to Predict Physical Activity in an Overweight/Obese Population Sample of Adolescents From Alberta, Canada', HEALTH EDUCATION & BEHAVIOR, 40 415-425 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1090198112455642
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
2012 Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, Dewar DL, Costigan SA, Collins CE, 'Explaining dietary intake in adolescent girls from disadvantaged secondary schools. A test of Social Cognitive Theory', Appetite, 58 517-524 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Clare Collins, David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Ron Plotnikoff
2012 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Weaver KE, Callister R, Dewar DL, Costigan SA, et al., 'Rationale and study protocol for the Supporting Children's Outcomes Using Rewards, Exercise and Skills (SCORES) group randomized controlled trial: A physical activity and fundamental movement skills intervention for primary schools in low-income communities', BMC Public Health, 12 1-11 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Robin Callister, Jordan Smith, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2011 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Costigan SA, Trinh L, Spence JC, Downs S, McCargar L, 'A test of the theory of planned behavior to explain physical activity in a large population sample of adolescents from Alberta, Canada', Journal of Adolescent Health, 49 547-549 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2011.03.006
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authors David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff
Show 13 more journal articles

Conference (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Dewar D, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Costigan SA, 'Explaining physical activity behaviour in adolescent girls from disadvantaged secondary schools: A test of social cognitive theory', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2011 Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Costigan SA, Trinh L, Spence J, Downs S, McCargar L, 'A test of the theory of planned behavior to explain physical activity in a large population sample of Canadian adolescents', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
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Ms Sarah Costigan

Position

Casual Research Assistant
Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition
School of Education
Faculty of Education and Arts

Contact Details

Email sarah.costigan@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 49854060
Fax (02) 4921 2084

Office

Room 316
Building Advanced Technology Centre (ATC)
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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