Dr Ross Wilkinson

Dr Ross Wilkinson

Associate Professor

School of Psychology

Career Summary

Biography

I completed my Honours degree in Psychology at James Cook University in 1989 and a PhD in Clinical Psychology at the Australian National University in 1997. I began working at the ANU in 1993 and remained working there in various roles including Clinical Program Director, Graduate Program Convenor, and Deputy Head of School for 20 years. In 2014 I joined the University of Newcastle School of Psychology as Associate Professor in Clinical Psychology and Head of the Health and Clinical Psychology Research Group. Throughout my academic career I have maintained a clinical practice focused mainly on treating anxiety and depression.

Research Expertise
I am the convenor of the Relationships and Psychological Health Research Laboratory (RAPH Lab) at UoN. The objective of RAPH lab is to promote and facilitate through fundamental and applied psychological research the understanding of how personal relationships and relationship processes impact on psychological health, well-being, and adjustment. Using attachment theory as a primary but not exclusive theoretical base, research conducted at RAPH lab cuts across the traditional sub-disciplines of psychology. Social, clinical, developmental, cognitive, and personality psychology perspectives are all used to enhance our understanding of relationships and their impacts. My main research interest is in the area of interpersonal functioning and psychological attachment. Another major research focus is examining how attachment is related to positive psychology constructs such as mindfulness, optimism, and gratitude.. I also have a range of other research interests including marital relationships, adjustment to new parenthood, dyadic coping strategies, and perinatal depression and anxiety.

Teaching Expertise
My main teaching responsibilities are in the area of clinical psychology. I teach general adult clinical psychology courses focusing on diagnosis and treatment. I also do sessions on mindfulness, attachment, and structural equation modeling.



Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Australian National University
  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), James Cook University

Keywords

  • Attachment
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Depression
  • Mental Health
  • Mindfulness
  • Perinatal
  • Positive Psychology
  • Psychological Health
  • Relationships

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology 70
170113 Social and Community Psychology 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2013 - 1/01/2014 Clinical Program Director Australian National University
Research School of Psychology
Australia
1/01/2007 - 1/01/2009 Deputy Head of School Australian National University
Research School of Psychology
Australia
1/01/2000 - 1/02/2014 Senior Lecturer Australian National University
Research School of Psychology
Australia
1/01/2000 -  Membership - APS Psychology of Relationship Interest Group APS Psychology of Relationship Interest Group
Australia
1/01/2000 -  Membership - International Association for Relationship Research International Association for Relationship Research
Australia
1/01/1997 - 1/12/2002 Clinical Program Director Australian National University
Research School of Psychology
Australia
1/01/1995 -  Membership - Clinical College of the Australian Psychological Society Clinical College of the Australian Psychological Society
Australia
1/01/1993 - 1/01/2000 Lecturer Australian National University
Research School of Psychology
Australia
1/01/1989 -  Membership - Australian Psychological Society Australian Psychological Society
Australia

Awards

Research Award

Year Award
2009 Research Award
Unknown
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Wilkinson RB, 'Parents and Adolescents', The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Couples and Family Relationships 66-81 (2012)
DOI 10.1002/9781444354119.ch5
2012 Wilkinson RB, 'Parents and adolescents: Challenges and misconceptions', Couples and family relationships: A guide to contemporary research, theory, practice and policy, Wiley-Blackwell, Malden, MA 66-81 (2012)
2012 Wilkinson RB, 'Adolescent best friends as attachment figures: Implications for psychological health and adjustment', Friendships: Types, cultural variations, and psychological and social aspects, Nova Publishers, New York 1-37 (2012) [B1]
2006 Wilkinson RB, 'Ability or achievement?', Case Studies in Psychology, Thomson, Sydney, Australia (2006)
Show 1 more chapter

Journal article (39 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Burchell JL, Gorelik A, Wilkinson RB, 'Hurt feelings in women: The interaction of social and individual difference factors', Journal of Relationships Research, 7 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/jrr.2015.12
2016 Christian E, Sellbom M, Wilkinson RB, 'Clarifying the Associations Between Individual Differences in General Attachment Styles and Psychopathy.', Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment, (2016)
DOI 10.1037/per0000206
2016 Rubin JM, Evans O, Wilkinson R, 'A longitudinal study of the relations between university students¿ subjective social status, social contact with university friends, and mental health and well-being.', Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 35 722-737 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1521/jscp.2016.35.9.722
Co-authors Mark Rubin
2015 Zulkefly NS, Wilkinson RB, 'Measuring Specific Attachment Relationships of Mother, Father and Peer in Malaysian Adolescents', Child Indicators Research, 8 767-788 (2015) [C1]

© 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.The Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment (IPPA) is the most widely used self-report measure of individual differences in adol... [more]

© 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.The Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment (IPPA) is the most widely used self-report measure of individual differences in adolescent attachment. However, the factor structure of this measure has not been replicated outside of the Western adolescent population. Using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), the aim of this study is to explore the factor structure of the IPPA in Malaysian adolescents. A total of 2,040 school-going adolescents across urban and rural areas of Malaysia completed the 75 items of the IPPA Mother, Father and Peer forms. Contrary to Western findings, results revealed that the three factor structure of the original IPPA sets were not replicated in the Malaysian data. A different three-factor structure for the Parental scales and a two-factor structure for the Peer scale were found to best fit the data. Multigroup CFA (MGCFA) of the IPPA-Malay scales supported invariance of the structural model across age, gender and locality of adolescents. The results indicate that assumptions underlying the cross-cultural assessment of attachment relationships need to be examined. Future research is suggested to look into culturally valid instruments to investigate the adolescent attachment relationship beyond the Western context.

DOI 10.1007/s12187-014-9271-5
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 Wilkinson RB, Goh DYL, 'Structural, Age, and Sex Differences for a Short Form of the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment: The IPPA-45', Journal of Relationships Research, 5 1-11 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/jrr.2014.5
2014 Brinker JK, Chin ZH, Wilkinson RB, 'Ruminative thinking style and the MMPI-2-RF', Personality and Individual Differences, 66 102-105 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.paid.2014.03.001
2014 Hirsch JK, Walker KL, Wilkinson RB, Lyness JM, 'Family criticism and depressive symptoms in older adult primary care patients: Optimism and pessimism as moderators', American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 22 632-635 (2014)

Objective: Depression is a significant global public health burden, and older adults may be particularly vulnerable to its effects. Among other risk factors, interpersonal conflic... [more]

Objective: Depression is a significant global public health burden, and older adults may be particularly vulnerable to its effects. Among other risk factors, interpersonal conflicts, such as perceived criticism from family members, can increase risk for depressive symptoms in this population. We examined family criticism as a predictor of depressive symptoms and the potential moderating effect of optimism and pessimism. Methods: One hundred five older adult, primary care patients completed self-report measures of family criticism, optimism and pessimism, and symptoms of depression. We hypothesized that optimism and pessimism would moderate the relationship between family criticism and depressive symptoms. Results: In support of our hypothesis, those with greater optimism and less pessimism reported fewer depressive symptoms associated with family criticism. Conclusion: Therapeutic enhancement of optimism and amelioration of pessimism may buffer against depression in patients experiencing familial criticism. © 2014 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry.

DOI 10.1016/j.jagp.2013.04.008
2012 Wilson JM, Wilkinson RB, 'The Self-Report Assessment of Adolescent Attachment: A Systematic Review and Critique', Journal of Relationships Research, 3 81-94 (2012) [D1]
DOI 10.1017/jrr.2012.7
2012 Reay RE, Mulcahy R, Wilkinson RB, Owen C, Shadbolt B, Raphael B, 'The Development and Content of an Interpersonal Psychotherapy Group for Postnatal Depression', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY, 62 221-251 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2012 Reay RE, Owen C, Shadbolt B, Raphael B, Mulcahy R, Wilkinson RB, 'Trajectories of long-term outcomes for postnatally depressed mothers treated with group interpersonal psychotherapy', Archives of Women's Mental Health, 15 217-228 (2012) [C1]

There is evidence that psychological treatments for postnatal depression are effective in the short-term; however, whether the effects are enduring over time remains an important ... [more]

There is evidence that psychological treatments for postnatal depression are effective in the short-term; however, whether the effects are enduring over time remains an important empirical question. The aim of this study was to investigate the depressive symptoms and interpersonal functioning of participants in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of group interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT-G) at 2 years posttreatment. The study also examined long-term trajectories, such as whether participants maintained their recovery status, achieved later recovery, recurrence or persistent symptoms. Approximately 2 years posttreatment, all women in the original RCT (N50) were invited to participate in a mailed follow-up. A repeated measures analysis of variance assessed differences between the treatment and control conditions on depression and interpersonal scores across five measurement occasions: baseline, mid-treatment, end of treatment and 3-month and 2-year follow-up. Chi-square tests were used to analyse the percentage of participants in the four recovery categories. Mothers who received IPT-G improved more rapidly in the short-term and were less likely to develop persistent depressive symptoms in the long-term. Fifty seven percent of IPT-G mothers maintained their recovery over the follow-up period. Overall, IPT-G participants were significantly less likely to require follow-up treatment. Limitations include the use of self-report questionnaires to classify recovery. The positive finding that fewer women in the group condition experienced a persistent course of depression highlights its possible enduring effects after treatment discontinuation. Further research is needed to improve our long-term management of postnatal depression for individuals who are vulnerable to a recurrent or chronic trajectory. © Springer-Verlag 2011.

DOI 10.1007/s00737-012-0280-4
Citations Scopus - 6
2011 Wilkinson RB, 'Measuring attachment dimensions in adolescents: Development and validation of the Experiences in Close Relationships - Revised - General Short Form', Journal of Relationships Research, 2 53-62 (2011)
2011 McKone E, Hall A, Pidcock M, Palermo R, Wilkinson RB, Rivolta D, et al., 'Face ethnicity and measurement reliability affect face recognition performance in developmental prosopagnosia: Evidence from the Cambridge face memory test-Australian', Cognitive Neuropsychology, 28 109-146 (2011) [C1]

The Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT, Duchaine & Nakayama, 2006) provides a validated format for testing novel face learning and has been a crucial instrument in the diagnosis of ... [more]

The Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT, Duchaine & Nakayama, 2006) provides a validated format for testing novel face learning and has been a crucial instrument in the diagnosis of developmental prosopagnosia. Yet, some individuals who report everyday face recognition symptoms consistent with prosopagnosia, and are impaired on famous face tasks, perform normally on the CFMT. Possible reasons include measurement error, CFMT assessment of memory only at short delays, and a face set whose ethnicity is matched to only some Caucasian groups. We develop the "CFMT-Australian" (CFMT-Aus), which complements the CFMT-original by using ethnicity better matched to a different European subpopulation. Results confirm reliability (.88) and validity (convergent, divergent using cars, inversion effects). We show that face ethnicity within a race has subtle but clear effects on face processing even in normal participants (includes cross-over interaction for face ethnicity by perceiver country of origin in distinctiveness ratings). We show that CFMT-Aus clarifies diagnosis of prosopagnosia in 6 previously ambiguous cases. In 3 cases, this appears due to the better ethnic match to prosopagnosics. We also show that face memory at short (,3-min), 20-min, and 24-hr delays taps overlapping processes in normal participants. There is some suggestion that aform of prosopagnosia may exist that is long delay only and/or reflects failure to benefit from face repetition. © 2011 Psychology Press.

Citations Scopus - 33
2011 Jerga AM, Shaver PR, Wilkinson RB, 'Attachment insecurities and identification of at-risk individuals following the death of a loved one', Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 28 891-914 (2011) [C1]

We examined variables that might identify at-risk individuals following the death of a significant other. Previous research indicates attachment anxiety is associated with more in... [more]

We examined variables that might identify at-risk individuals following the death of a significant other. Previous research indicates attachment anxiety is associated with more intense grief, while avoidant individuals seem to cope with loss as well as secure individuals. Participants in this study (368 adults aged 17-49) completed an online survey measuring general and relationship-specific attachment insecurities, relationship characteristics, loss circumstances, and typical and prolonged grief symptoms. General attachment anxiety and avoidance were related to prolonged grief symptoms but not to typical symptoms. Relationship-specific anxiety was positively related to grief symptoms, while specific avoidance was negatively related. The results support the distinction between general and specific attachment insecurities and between normative and prolonged grief reactions. © The Author(s) 2011.

DOI 10.1177/0265407510397987
Citations Scopus - 9
2010 Wilkinson RB, 'Best friend attachment versus peer attachment in the prediction of adolescent psychological adjustment', Journal of Adolescence, 33 709-717 (2010) [C1]

This study examined the utility of the newly developed Adolescent Friendship Attachment Scale (AFAS) for the prediction of adolescent psychological health and school attitude. Hig... [more]

This study examined the utility of the newly developed Adolescent Friendship Attachment Scale (AFAS) for the prediction of adolescent psychological health and school attitude. High school students (266 males, 229 females) were recruited from private and public schools in the Australian Capital Territory with ages of participants ranging from 13 to 19 years. Self-report measures of depression, self-esteem, self-competence and school attitude were administered in addition to the AFAS and a short-form of the Inventory of Parental and Peer Attachment (IPPA). Regression analyses revealed that the AFAS Anxious and Avoidant scales added to the prediction of depression, self-esteem, self-competence, and school attitude beyond the contribution of the IPPA. It is concluded that the AFAS taps aspects of adolescent attachment relationships not assessed by the IPPA and provides a useful contribution to research and practice in the area of adolescent psycho-social adjustment. © 2009 The Association for Professionals in Services for Adolescents.

DOI 10.1016/j.adolescence.2009.10.013
Citations Scopus - 28
2010 Wilkinson RB, Mulcahy R, 'Attachment and interpersonal relationships in postnatal depression', Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, 28 252-265 (2010) [C1]

Postnatal depression (PND) is a debilitating condition that has demonstrated negative impacts on the mother, her infant, and her intimate and social relationships. Using an attach... [more]

Postnatal depression (PND) is a debilitating condition that has demonstrated negative impacts on the mother, her infant, and her intimate and social relationships. Using an attachment theory perspective, this study examined the relationship of insecure working models of attachment to depression, marital quality, infant bonding, and social support in Australian samples of diagnosed depressed (n=47) and comparison (n=68) mothers. Clinically depressed mothers reported less security of attachment and more preoccupied and fearful attachment. Irrespective of diagnostic status, attachment styles characterised by a negative model of self were associated with higher depression and lower quality of relationship with baby and spouse and the perception of less social support. The role of dismissing attachment in the outcomes was less clear. The potential mutual influence of depression and attachment working models is discussed, and it is concluded that while insecure attachment working models may be associated with postnatal depression, further research using longitudinal methods and multiple attachment assessment techniques is required. © 2010 Society for Reproductive and Infant Psychology.

DOI 10.1080/02646831003587353
Citations Scopus - 14
2010 Karantzas G, Wilkinson RB, Feeney J, 'Is less more? confirmatory factor analysis of the attachment style questionnaires', Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 27 749-780 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0265407510373756
Citations Scopus - 14
2010 Mulcahy R, Reay RE, Wilkinson RB, Owen C, 'A randomised control trial for the effectiveness of group interpersonal psychotherapy for postnatal depression', Archives of Women's Mental Health, 13 125-139 (2010) [C1]

This study is a randomised controlled trial comparing outcomes from an 8-week Interpersonal Psychotherapy group (IPT-G) for postnatal depression with 'treatment as usual' (TAU), c... [more]

This study is a randomised controlled trial comparing outcomes from an 8-week Interpersonal Psychotherapy group (IPT-G) for postnatal depression with 'treatment as usual' (TAU), conducted in a routine community setting in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). Eligible women were recruited and randomly assigned to either IPT-G or TAU conditions. This study compared outcomes on such variables as depressive symptoms, marital adjustment, social support and mother-infant bond at baseline, mid-treatment, end-of-treatment and 3 months follow-up. Participants were also independently assessed using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D). 50 women completed baseline assessments and were included in the analysis. Comparisons of treatment conditions showed that by end of treatment both the TAU and IPT-G groups significantly improved in terms of mean depression scores, however, the IPT-G women improved significantly more and had continued improvements at 3 months post therapy. Furthermore, women who received IPT-G displayed significant improvement in terms of marital functioning and perceptions of the mother-infant relationship compared to TAU participants. These findings highlight the potential benefits of an interpersonally based treatment, which not only improves outcomes for the mother but also potentially for the couple and the infant when compared to usual care. © 2009 Springer-Verlag.

DOI 10.1007/s00737-009-0101-6
Citations Scopus - 45
2008 Wilkinson RB, 'Development and properties of the adolescent friendship attachment scale', Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 37 1270-1279 (2008) [C1]

Two studies are reported presenting the development of the Adolescent Friendship Attachment Scale (AFAS), a 30 item self-report measure of adolescent close friendship conceptualiz... [more]

Two studies are reported presenting the development of the Adolescent Friendship Attachment Scale (AFAS), a 30 item self-report measure of adolescent close friendship conceptualized as an attachment relationship. Study One reports the results of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses with a sample of 490 adolescents aged 13 to 19 years. A second-order factor model was supported with a single friendship attachment factor underlying three first order factors (Secure, Anxious/Ambivalent, Avoidant) similar to those reported in the broader attachment literature. The AFAS subscales were found to be appropriately reliable and demonstrated appropriate convergent and discriminant validity when compared to measures of attachment styles (the Relationship Questionnaire) and parental and peer group attachment (the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment). Study Two reports a successful replication of the factor structure with an independent sample of 787 adolescents. Further research evaluating the predictive utility of the AFAS is recommended. © 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

DOI 10.1007/s10964-006-9141-7
Citations Scopus - 11
2007 Wilkinson RB, 'Self and Relationships [Review of Self and relationships: Connecting intrapersonal and interpersonal processes]', Relationship Research News, 5 24-26 (2007) [C3]
2006 Wilkinson RB, Scherl FB, 'Psychological health, maternal attachment and attachment style in breast- and formula-feeding mothers: A preliminary study', Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, 24 5-19 (2006)

This study examined psychological health, maternal attachment, and attachment style in an Australian sample of breast- and formula-feeding mothers. Thirty-six breast-feeding and 2... [more]

This study examined psychological health, maternal attachment, and attachment style in an Australian sample of breast- and formula-feeding mothers. Thirty-six breast-feeding and 24 formula-feeding women with a child between 4 and 6 months of age were recruited through community health centres and snowball sampling. Participation involved a 30-minute interview and completion of relevant questionnaires. Contrary to expectations, no differences were found between breast- and formula-feeding mothers in terms of their psychological health and maternal attachment. Results suggest that secure attachment styles are related to greater psychological health and that they predict the likelihood of a mother changing feeding method. The results of this study challenge widely held assumptions concerning the importance of breast-feeding for maternal well-being and attachment with infants, and support the literature suggesting attachment styles play an important role in affect regulation and the adjustment to new motherhood. © 2006 Society for Reproductive and Infant Psychology.

DOI 10.1080/02646830500475153
Citations Scopus - 11
2006 Wilkinson RB, 'Age and sex differences in the influence of attachment relationships on adolescent psychological health', The Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, 23 87-104 (2006)
DOI 10.1017/S081651220002900X
2006 Clark D, Wilkinson RB, 'Intimacy and attachment in adolescent relationships', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 58 215-215 (2006)
2005 Wilkinson RB, Sarandrea AM, 'Age and sex differences in the influence of attachment relationships on adolescent psychological health', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 57 267-267 (2005)
2005 Mcmahon MJ, Wilkinson RB, 'Attachment relationships and adolescent psychological health: The influence of romantic relationships', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 57 287-287 (2005)
2004 Wilkinson RB, 'The role of parental and peer attachment in the psychological health and self-esteem of adolescents', Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 33 479-493 (2004)

This paper presents the results of 3 studies examining the relationships of parental attachment, peer attachment, and self-esteem to adolescent psychological health. A model is pr... [more]

This paper presents the results of 3 studies examining the relationships of parental attachment, peer attachment, and self-esteem to adolescent psychological health. A model is presented in which parental attachment directly influences both psychological health and self-esteem and the influence of peer attachment on psychological health is totally mediated by self-esteem. Using structural equation modeling, Study 1 evaluates the model on a sample of 1998 Norwegian high school students (aged 12-19 years). With some modifications it is found to be a satisfactory fit. Study 2 replicates Study 1 using a sample of 358 Australian high school students (aged 15-18 years). A multisample analysis revealed no significant differences between the model for Studies 1 and 2. Study 3 was a further successful replication employing alternative measures of the constructs considered with a sample of 345 Australian high school students (aged 15-19 years). The major finding from all 3 studies is that the role of peer and parental attachment on psychological health is primarily meditated by self-esteem. Implications for research elucidating the links between attachment and specific aspects of self-esteem are discussed.

DOI 10.1023/B:JOYO.0000048063.59425.20
Citations Scopus - 85
2003 Ozgul S, Heubeck B, Ward J, Wilkinson R, 'Self-discrepancies: Measurement and relation to various negative affective states', Australian Journal of Psychology, 55 56-62 (2003)

This study examined the validity of two methods for assessing self-discrepancies: an idiographic method (The Selves Questionnaire, SQ) and a nomothetic method (Adjective Rating Li... [more]

This study examined the validity of two methods for assessing self-discrepancies: an idiographic method (The Selves Questionnaire, SQ) and a nomothetic method (Adjective Rating List, ARL). It also tested several major hypotheses of self-discrepancy theory regarding the relations between self-discrepancies and emotional discomfort. SQ and ARL scores from 220 participants demonstrated moderate correlations between instruments and high intercorrelations between discrepancy scores within instruments. Self-discrepancy scores were related to negative emotional states, but the specificity of these relations was not demonstrated, nor did they make a substantial contribution to the prediction of negative emotional states after controlling for negative self-concept. Overall, these findings raise significant concerns about the relevance of self-discrepancies as measured by the SQ and ARL and fail to support the main contentions of self-discrepancy theory.

DOI 10.1080/00049530412331312884
Citations Scopus - 22
2001 Wilkinson RB, Walford WA, 'Attachment and personality in the psychological health of adolescents', Personality and Individual Differences, 31 473-484 (2001)

Attachment is argued to be a major influence on psychological health. However, research examining attachment and psychological health in adolescents frequently fails to distinguis... [more]

Attachment is argued to be a major influence on psychological health. However, research examining attachment and psychological health in adolescents frequently fails to distinguish between the different dimensions of psychological health and their differential relationship to attachment and key personality and life event variables. This cross-sectional study of 404 adolescents examined the role of attachment, neuroticism, extraversion, and positive and negative life events in psychological well-being and distress. Quality of attachment to parents, but not peers, predicted increased well-being and decreased distress independent of neuroticism, extraversion, and life event variables. It is concluded that while parental attachment is implicated in psychological health, the role and status of measures of quality of peer relationships as attachment is unclear. © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/S0191-8869(00)00151-3
Citations Scopus - 34
2000 Wilkinson RB, Walford WA, Espnes GA, 'Coping styles and psychological health in adolescents and young adults: A comparison of moderator and main effects models', Australian Journal of Psychology, 52 155-162 (2000)

A cross-sectional study of 392 late adolescents and young adults (mean age 18.2 years) was undertaken to examine the relationship between coping styles and psychological health. C... [more]

A cross-sectional study of 392 late adolescents and young adults (mean age 18.2 years) was undertaken to examine the relationship between coping styles and psychological health. Coping styles were assessed through the Coping Styles Questionnaire (Roger, Jarvis, & Najarian, 1993). Using separate regression models of psychological distress and psychological wellbeing, the direct effects and moderator models of coping were tested with regard to approach and avoidant coping. It was hypothesised that approach coping would have buffer effects on distress and wellbeing and that avoidant coping would have direct effects on distress and wellbeing. Results indicated that there were no buffer effects for either approach or avoidant coping, but there were direct effects for both. The use of approach coping was associated with increased wellbeing, while avoidant coping was related to increased distress levels. Implications for effective primary intervention techniques for adolescent wellbeing and distress are discussed.

Citations Scopus - 13
2000 Wilkinson RB, 'The integration of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments in drug/alcohol addictions [Review of The integration of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments in drug/alcohol addictions]', Australian Psychologist, (2000) [C3]
1999 Wilkinson RB, 'Mood changes in mothers and fathers through childbearing: Are the blues so blue?', Psychology and Health, 14 847-858 (1999)

Mood state and mood lability were assessed over a nine month period in a sample of primiparous (n = 42) and multiparous (n = 44) childbearing couples. Positive mood, negative mood... [more]

Mood state and mood lability were assessed over a nine month period in a sample of primiparous (n = 42) and multiparous (n = 44) childbearing couples. Positive mood, negative mood and mood lability were measured in the second and third trimester, ten days after parturition, and three months postpartum. Results indicated that the immediate postpartum was the peak period of positive affect for both primiparous and multiparous mothers and their male partners and was also the peak period of negative affect and mood lability for primiparous women. It is argued that the results do not support the 'maternity blues' hypothesis that the immediate postpartum is characterised by labile dysphoric mood. Rather, mood in this period may better be described as a mixed affective state with elevated levels of both positive and negative mood.

Citations Scopus - 6
1998 Wilkinson RB, Walford WA, 'The measurement of adolescent psychological health: One or two dimensions?', Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 27 443-455 (1998)

Psychological health in adult populations has been conceptualized as being comprised of two distinct, though related, dimensions: well-being and distress. Research into adolescent... [more]

Psychological health in adult populations has been conceptualized as being comprised of two distinct, though related, dimensions: well-being and distress. Research into adolescent psychological health, however, has been dominated by a single factor approach with well-being and distress defining opposite ends of this continuum. Measures of psychological health were administered to 345 late adolescents. A series of confirmatory factor analyses supported an oblique two-factor model of psychological health with measures of anxiety and negative affect defining a distress construct and measures of positive affect, satisfaction with life, and happiness defining a well-being construct. A measure of depression loaded on both well-being and distress. It is concluded that although these two dimensions are highly correlated, they are distinguishable in adolescent samples. It is suggested that to avoid confusion in the literature authors should take more care in labeling the aspects of psychological health that they wish to assess.

Citations Scopus - 24
1998 Heubeck BG, Wilkinson RB, Cologon J, 'A second look at Carver and White's (1994) BIS/BAS scales', Personality and Individual Differences, 25 785-800 (1998)

Previous attempts to operationalise Gray's BIS-BAS theory at the personality level have not been very successful. Recently Carver and White (1994) presented new scales focussing s... [more]

Previous attempts to operationalise Gray's BIS-BAS theory at the personality level have not been very successful. Recently Carver and White (1994) presented new scales focussing specifically on dispositional BIS and BAS sensitivities. The current study (N= 336) examined the internal validity of the newly created scales as well as their relationships with well established concepts and scales like Neuroticism, Extraversion, and Positive and Negative Emotionality. An exact replication of the principal components analysis of Carver and White (1994) is presented for comparison. Confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated that a correlated four factor model provided the relatively best, but modest fit to the data. Correlations with Neuroticism, Extraversion, Positive and Negative Affectivity were generally in the predicted direction. However, Neuroticism and Extraversion were not predicted by Gray's combinations of BIS and BAS activity, questioning the theory or its operationalisation in the new scales. A second order factor analysis supported the hypothesis that the Extraversion, Fun, Drive, and Positive Affect scales all measure a common positive personality factor, while the Neuroticism, BIS, and Negative Affect scales measure a common higher order negative factor. Reward Responsiveness, however, loaded on both factors. © 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Citations Scopus - 119
1998 Wilkinson RB, Espnes GA, 'The Karolinska Scales of Personality: Some psychometric and cross-cultural considerations', Corpus, Psyche, et, Societas, 5 25-37 (1998)
1997 Wilkinson RB, 'Interactions between self and external reinforcement in predicting depressive symptoms', Behaviour Research and Therapy, 35 281-289 (1997)

A low rate of self-reinforcement has been argued by a number of theorists to be implicated in the aetiology and maintenance of unipolar depression. This paper examines the relatio... [more]

A low rate of self-reinforcement has been argued by a number of theorists to be implicated in the aetiology and maintenance of unipolar depression. This paper examines the relationship between dispositional rates of self-reinforcement, as assessed by the Frequency of Self-Reinforcement Questionnaire, external sources of reward and punishment, extraversion, neuroticism, and depression. Using a hierarchical regression methodology (N = 366), evidence was found to support the view that self-reinforcement is a construct distinct from other major personality variables, and that it has both direct and moderational effects on depression. The results did not support the view that extraversion is associated with depression either as a main effect or in interaction with neuroticism. It is argued that despite the significant results, the main and interactional influences of self-reinforcement on depression are minor and that the important role of external sources of reinforcement and punishment should not be disregarded.

DOI 10.1016/S0005-7967(96)00110-6
Citations Scopus - 6
1997 Gordan A, Wilkinson RB, McGowan A, Jovanoska S, 'The psychometric properties of the Boredom Proneness Scale: An examination of its validity', Psychological studies, 42 85-97 (1997)
1995 Wilkinson RB, Espnes GA, 'Physical exercise in the treatment of post-myocardial infarct depression and anxiety', Corpus, Psyche, et, Societas, 2 19-39 (1995)
1995 Wilkinson RB, 'Changes in psychological health and the marital relationship through childbearing: Transition or process as stressor?', Australian Journal of Psychology, 47 86-92 (1995)
DOI 10.1080/00049539508257505
1994 Wilkinson RB, 'Understanding happiness: A theory of subjective well-being [Review of Understanding Happiness: A theory of subjective well-being].', Australian Psychologist, 29 223-224 (1994) [C3]
1993 Wilkinson RB, 'The Staats-Heiby theory of depression: The role of event frequency and affect reevaluated', Behaviour Research and Therapy, 31 97-104 (1993)

This paper reports an attempt to replicate and extend a study by Rose and Staats (Behavior Research and Therapy, 26, 489-494, 1988) and reviews their attempts to find support for ... [more]

This paper reports an attempt to replicate and extend a study by Rose and Staats (Behavior Research and Therapy, 26, 489-494, 1988) and reviews their attempts to find support for two subtypes of depression as predicted by the Staats-Heiby theory of unipolar depression. Due to methodological and analytical problems in the work by Rose and Staats (1988) it was felt that the conclusions they drew were unjustified. In this study 160 university students completed the Mood Related subscales of the Pleasant (PES-MR) and Unpleasant Event Schedules (UES-MR) and the Beck Depression Inventory. Overall, the contention that different subtypes of depression could be differentiated on the basis of the interaction between frequency of events and the affective value of events was not supported. However, there was some support for the role of pleasant event frequency, unpleasant event frequency, and event unpleasantness in depression. The results indicate that the relationship between event frequency and hedonic strength differs between the PES-MR and UES-MR. It is argued that the research methodology and analyses used could not adequately assess the hypotheses generated from the Staats-Heiby model. © 1992.

DOI 10.1016/0005-7967(93)90047-X
Citations Scopus - 5
Show 36 more journal articles

Review (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2000 Wilkinson RB, 'Self and Relationships [Review of Self and relationships: Connecting intrapersonal and interpersonal processes]. (2000)
1994 Wilkinson RB, 'Understanding happiness: A theory of subjective well-being [Review of Understanding Happiness: A theory of subjective well-being]. (1994)

Conference (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2009 Wilkinson RB, Denman MJ, 'History of sexual risk behaviour and attachment in the psychological health of young women', Proceedings of the 9th Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society¿s Psychology of Relationships Interest Group (2009)
2007 Wilkinson RB, Coupe T, 'Attachment functions and networks in older adults', .), Proceedings of The Combined 7th Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society's Psychology of Relationships Interest Group and International Association for Relationship Research Mini-Conference (2007)
2007 Gray C, Wilkinson RB, Schuurmans-Stekhoven J, 'Attachment and need for Certainty and Discovery: The development of information orientations', Proceedings of The Combined 7th Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society's Psychology of Relationships Interest Group and International Association for Relationship Research Mini-Conference (2007)
2007 Jerga A, Wilkinson RB, 'Attachment dimensions and the identification of at-risk individuals following the loss of a loved one', Proceedings of The Combined 7th Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society's Psychology of Relationships Interest Group and International Association for Relationship Research Mini-Conference (2007)
2007 Goh D, Wilkinson RB, 'Attachment transfer and the importance of romantic partners in predicting adolescent psychological health', Proceedings of The Combined 7th Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society's Psychology of Relationships Interest Group and International Association for Relationship Research Mini-Conference (2007)
2007 Wilkinson RB, Staniforth A, 'Attachment, sense of coherence, and psychological health in Adolescents and young adults: Test of a mediating model', Proceedings of the 42nd Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society (2007)
2006 Wilkinson RB, 'The relationship of attachment working models to cognitive self-schema', Proceedings of the 2006 Joint Conference of the Australian Psychological Society and the New Zealand Psychological Society (2006)
2005 McMahon M, Wilkinson RB, 'Attachment relationships and adolescent psychological health: The influence of romantic relationships', Proceedings of the¿4th Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society¿s Psychology of Relationships Interest Group (2005)
2004 Wilkinson RB, Parry MM, 'Attachment styles, quality of attachment relationships, and components of self-esteem in adolescence.', Proceedings of the 39th Australian Psychological Society Annual Conference (2004)
2004 Wilkinson RB, Kraljevic M, 'Adolescent psychological health and school attitudes: The impact of attachment relationships.', Proceedings of the 4th Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society¿s Psychology of Relationships Interest Group (2004)
Show 7 more conferences

Other (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Wilkinson RB, Goh DYL, 'Adolescent relationships: An attachment perspective', The Acparian ( issue.8 pp.34-49) (2014)
2011 Karantzas G, Wilkinson RB, 'The challenges of relationship diversity: Perspectives from the APS Psychology of Relationships Interest Group.', InPsych ( issue.1 pp.18-18): Australian Psychological Society (2011)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 7
Total funding $267,673

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $7,700

Psychological health in Chinese and Australian university students: A longitudinal study of attachment, mindfulness, social integration, and collectivism-individualism$7,700

Funding body: Keats Endowment Research Fund

Funding body Keats Endowment Research Fund
Project Team Doctor Ross Wilkinson, Miss Jichun Hao, Associate Professor Mark Rubin, Dr Raymond Chan
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700466
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20161 grants / $2,000

Faculty PVC Conference Assistance Grant 2016$2,000

Funding body: Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle
Scheme PVC Conference Assistance Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20152 grants / $155,973

50% salary contribution of Clinical Chair of Psychology$88,673

Contribution to Chair in Clinical Psychology

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Scheme Clinical Chair of Psychology, School of Psychology, University of Newcastle
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

A Longitudinal Study of the Relations between Students’ Socioeconomic Status, Social Integration at University, and Mental Health$67,300

Funding body: Department of Education and Training

Funding body Department of Education and Training
Project Team

Dr Mark Rubin

Scheme Higher Education Participation Programme National Priority Pool grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20142 grants / $72,000

50% salary contribution of Clinical Chair of Psychology$70,000

Contribution towards Chair of Clinical Psychology

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Scheme Clinical Chair of Psychology, School of Psychology, University of Newcastle
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

Faculty PVC Conference Assistance Grant 2014$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project Team Doctor Ross Wilkinson
Scheme PVC Conference Assistance Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1401241
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20111 grants / $30,000

A project to develop a research proposal to assess the effectiveness of the Circle of Security Program for improving infant and early-childhood mental health$30,000

Funding body: ACT Department of Health

Funding body ACT Department of Health
Project Team

Huber, A & Wilkinson R.B.

Scheme ACT Health and Medical Research Council Support Program Project Development Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current4

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 PhD A longitudinal study on mindfulness and psychological health in Chinese and Australian university students: the role of attachment and social integration PhD (Psychology - Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Socioeconomic Status Differences in University Students' Mental Health. PhD (Psychology - Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Attachment and psychopathy Psychology, Australian National University Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Mindfulness Interventions Psychology, Australian National University Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Attachment patterns, communication, and the MMPI 2 RF Psychology, Australian National University Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Attachment relationships and wellbeing: A comparison of SIngaporean and Australian young adults. Psychology, Australian National University Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Gratitude and attachment Psychology, Australian National University Principal Supervisor
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Research Projects

Social Class Differences in Higher Education 2012 - 2018

Around 25% of the Australian population are from working-class and low socioeconomic status backgrounds, but only 16% attend Australia's universities. In response to this inequity, the Australian Government aims to increase the percentage of these students in the higher education sector nationwide.

However, improving access to university represents only half the battle. We also need to ensure that our new intake of working-class and low SES students perform well at university and don't drop out part way through their studies. The University of Newcastle is well-placed to investigate the experiences of this group of students because it already has a relatively high percentage of low SES enrolments (27%). Dr Rubin is involved in research that investigates the performance and experiences of these students at university, including their social integration, mental health, physical health, academic performance, and persistence in their degree.

This line of research is consistent with the University’s focus on achieving parity of retention and success among students of all SES backgrounds (New Futures Strategic Plan 2016-2025), and it is part of a range of activities undertaken by the University’s Centre of Excellence for Equity in Higher Education.

Grants

Equity in elite degrees: Social difference, institutional practice and processes of change.

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Scheme Strategic Networks Grant

A longitudinal study of the relations between students’ socioeconomic status, social integration at university, and mental health.

Funding body: Department of Education and Training

Funding body Department of Education and Training
Scheme Research Grant

Equity groups and predictors of academic success in higher education.

Funding body: National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education (NCSEHE)

Funding body National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education (NCSEHE)
Project Team Doctor Jill Scevak, Associate Professor Erica Southgate, Mrs Suzanne MacQueen, Associate Professor Mark Rubin, Dr Heather Douglas
Scheme Research Grants Program

Publications

Rubin JM, 'Social class differences in social integration among students in higher education: A meta-analysis and recommendations for future research', Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, 5 22-38 (2012) [C1]

Rubin JM, 'Working-class students need more friends at university: A cautionary note for Australia's higher education equity initiative', Higher Education Research & Development, 31 431-433 (2012) [C3]

Southgate E, Douglas H, Scevak J, MacQueen S, Rubin JM, Lindell C, 'The academic outcomes of first-in-family in an Australian university: An exploratory study.', International Studies in Widening Participation, 1 31-45 (2014) [C1]

Rubin M, Denson N, Kilpatrick S, Matthews KE, Stehlik T, Zyngier D, '¿I am working-class¿: Subjective self-definition as a missing measure of social class and socioeconomic status in higher education research.', Educational Researcher, 43 196-200 (2014) [C1]

Rubin M, Wright CL, 'Age differences explain social class differences in students' friendship at university: Implications for transition and retention', Higher Education, 70 427-439 (2015) [C1]

Rubin M, Kelly BM, 'A cross-sectional investigation of parenting style and friendship as mediators of the relation between social class and mental health in a university community.', International Journal for Equity in Health, 14 1-11 (2015) [C1]

Students

Program Research Title
PhD
Faculty of Science
Socioeconomic Status Differences in University Students' Mental Health.
PhD
Faculty of Science
The Relations between Social Class, Sleep and Physical and Mental Health

Collaborators

Name Organisation
Doctor Jill Janina Scevak University of Newcastle
Doctor Ross Bernard Wilkinson University of Newcastle
Nida Denson Western Sydney University
Chrysalis Wright University of Central Florida
Mrs Suzanne Elizabeth MacQueen University of Newcastle

Positive psychology constructs, attachment, and psychological health 2014 - 2016

This project examines the links between positive psychology constructs such as mindfulness, resilience, and hope, and our expectancies of close relationships (attachment). Specifically we are interested in finding out if these constructs mediate the relationship of attachment anxiety and avoidance on symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress. Data will be collected from an online survey over two years with participants drawn from the community and University of Newcastle. Up to six graduate students will be assisting with this project.


Relationship and attitudinal factors in dyadic coping and the psychological health of emerging adults. 2016 - 2018

A growing body of research indicates that dyadic coping (i.e., coping style as a couple rather than as an individual) is an important factor in adjusting to significant health and other stressful challenges. The current application covers two studies, conducted over two years, investigating the importance of relationship factors (commitment, satisfaction, & investment) and individual difference factors (attachment, mindfulness facets) in predicting dyadic coping and the extent to which it mediates the effect of negative events on psychological adjustment.


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News

Flower stem

Improving student well-being

September 8, 2015

Psychology researchers at the University of Newcastle (UON) have undertaken a major study to understand the impact of social class on student mental health at university.

Dr Ross Wilkinson

Position

Associate Professor
School of Psychology
School of Psychology
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email ross.wilkinson@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 49216947
Fax 4921 6980
Links Facebook
Research Networks

Office

Room W211
Building Behavioural Sciences Building
Location Faculty of Science and Information Technology

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