Profile Image

Professor Rob Atkin

ARC Future Fellow

School of Environmental and Life Sciences (Chemistry)

Finding the right chemistry

Associate Professor Rob Atkin is making an important contribution to the development of better and potentially greener industrial liquids.

Rob Atkin with a beaker of liquid 

As a former basketball player, Associate Professor Rob Atkin knows that executing an 'assist' can sometimes be as valuable to a team as scoring a basket. It is an important lesson for a researcher in a vast and rapidly expanding scientific field where every new discovery is a step towards a more energy-efficient and environmentally friendly future.

Atkin, a physical chemist, conducts research that contributes to the development of novel room-temperature ionic liquids, or molten salts. These are vastly under-exploited substances that can be used more effectively than existing liquids in a range of industrial applications, including lubrication, catalysis, heat transfer and electrodeposition.

"Table salt melts at about 800 degrees Celsius, so if you heat it up enough it turns into a liquid," Atkin outlines. "What we do is take similar salts, change the molecular structure and manipulate them so they have melting points below room temperature. Once you have something that is pure salt but is a liquid, it can do all sorts of interesting things."

As well as offering greater efficiency, these so-called 'designer salts' hold the promise of being cheaper and greener alternatives to conventional solvents – and as pure electrolytes have useful conductive properties. Atkin's focus is on gaining a better understanding of the basic science of this growing field, and identifying the fundamental relationships between properties and the molecular structure of ionic liquids.

"The Holy Grail is being able to match the properties of an ionic liquid to a particular application," Atkin says. "That might sound simple, but the catch is that there are theoretically billions of different ionic liquids – only about 3,000 of which have been described in literature.

"Because there are so many, our challenge is to work out what part of a molecule is important for a particular application then apply that information to designing the liquid to fit the purpose."

Atkin has completed several pioneering studies in his field, and is highly regarded for his work in atomic force microscopy (the measurement of matter in nanoscale) and neutron scattering, for which he has access to the ANSTO research reactor at Lucas Heights and the ISIS facility in the UK.

Atkin this year received a prestigious Future Fellowship from the Australian Research Council (ARC) and also leads a three-year $380,000 ARC Discovery Project investigating molecular scale engineering of solid/liquid interfaces. He heads the University's Ionic Liquids Research Group and is a principal researcher in the Centres for Organic Electronics and Advanced Particle Processing and Transport. His work is also aligned with the NIER (the Newcastle Institute for Energy Resources), a key partnership between the University, government and industry for developing sustainable energy technologies.

Atkin, who was awarded his PhD at the University of Newcastle in 2003, has received consistent ARC support since 2005 and was appointed to the University of Newcastle in 2007 on a research fellowship as part of a recruitment strategy to foster a new generation of outstanding young researchers.

"Gaining the fellowship was a huge boost for me because it allowed me to establish myself in the field and build a research team," he says.

"We are well equipped here and I think the main reason our research group has been successful and has continued to attract government support is that our projects are done well and produce good outcomes and quality papers."

Visit the Centre for Organic Electronics

Visit the Centre for Advanced Particle Processing and Transport website

Visit the NIER website

Rob Atkin with a beaker of liquid

Finding the right chemistry

Associate Professor Rob Atkin is making an important contribution to the development of better and potentially greener industrial liquids.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Rob Atkin is a physical chemist, and has completed several pioneering studies in a range of areas broadly classified as surface science in ionic liquid systems. These scientific breakthroughs have allowed Atkin to make contributions to the development of nanolubricants, as well as in related ionic liquid based ‘working fluid’ applications such as the use of ionic liquids for heat transfer, as solvents for electrodeposition, as electrolytes in batteries and capacitors, and even as solvents for proteins in bioreactors.  In all these processes, it is the arrangement of the ionic liquid ions near the active surface, and the way they are adsorbed to or are repelled by it, which controls performance.  The designer properties of ionic liquids can be exploited to improve function in these systems in ways that are simply not possible using conventional liquids like water or oils.

Atkin’s research into ionic liquids began in 2005.  His investigations at that time were purely fundamental: the goal was to understand how the ions arrange in the bulk of the ionic liquid, and how this structure changed near a solid surface.  It soon became clear that the liquid structure was much stronger than had previously been suspected which, combined with their remarkable physical properties, opened up the new applied research avenues for the use of ionic liquids as working fluids.

Atkin’s career research pathway demonstrates the importance of fundamental research for Australian industries into the future; the detailed understanding derived from fundamental research allows quantum leaps in process performance which are not usually possible if trial and error approaches are employed.  Nowadays, Atkin divides his research effort equally between fundamental and applied topics.  

PhD Qualification: 2003

Book Chapters: 4
Journal Articles: 85
H-Index: 31
M-Index: 2.5
Citations/article:35

http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=AAqasEQAAAAJ&amp;hl=en">http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=AAqasEQAAAAJ&amp;hl=en</a></p><strong>Research Expertise
A/Prof Atkin’s PhD work made significant contributions in the area of interfacial adsorption, particularly concerning the kinetics and mechanism of ionic surfactant adsorption at the solid-aqueous solution interface. The primary instrument used for determining adsorption rates was optical reflectometry. A/Prof Atkin spent optimised this technique, greatly increasing the quality of the data obtained. As optical reflectometry yields no structural information, soft-contact atomic force microscopy was used to determine the topography of the adsorbed surfactant layer, as well as the layer thickness. A/Prof Atkin’s PhD culminated with the writing of a major review article for Advances in Colloid and Interface Science in 2003. A/Prof Atkin’s postdoctoral studies at Bristol University dealt with the preparation of polymer microcapsules for controlled release applications. A/Prof Atkin contributed to the development of a novel method that allows the thickness of the polymer shell to be accurately controlled, which allows manipulation of the release profile of the encapsulated material. Two Langmuir papers and one Macromolecules paper resulted from this work. Another method for coating particles with a polymer layer that swells and de-swells with pH variation was published in Soft Matter. As an APD at the University of Sydney A/Prof Atkin completed a comprehensive study of microemulsion phase behaviour and nanostructure of ethylammonium nitrate microemulsions. A follow up investigation examined surfactant micelle, liquid crystal and microemulsion phase behaviour and structure in propylammonium nitrate, and A/Prof Atkin initiated a study using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to show the presence of self assembled surfactant aggregates at the graphite – ionic liquid interface resulting in a publication in JACS. However, the two studies most critical for subsequent work dealt with pure ionic liquids. Firstly, A/Prof Atkin used AFM to study the interfacial structure of a variety of ionic liquids on several different solid substrates. Secondly, A/Prof Atkin used small angle neutron scattering to show that protic ionic liquids have a bulk sponge-like nanostructure; although these ionic liquids had been studied for over 100 years, bulk structure was never suspected. In a subsequent book chapter A/Prof Atkin rationalised the relationship between bulk and interfacial ionic liquid structure. These two key results set the course for future research, and formed the foundation of a Australian Research Council Discovery project “Adsorption and Structure at Ionic Liquid Interfaces”. A/Prof Atkin has developed upon these results since moving to the University of Newcastle in June 2007. His group has examined the influence of temperature and molecular structure on protic and aprotic ionic liquid interfacial structure. We have found that this interfacial structure is sufficiently strong to prevent particle aggregation in ionic liquids despite the extremely high ionic strength, and found that in some cases particles settled many times faster than predicted by the Stokes equation. The properties of poly(ethylene oxide) dissolved in protic ILs has been well characterised, as has its properties adsorbed at solid-protic ionic liquid interfaces. A/Prof Atkin developed a collaboration with Professor Frank Endres (Clausthal University, Germany) dealing with the influence of ionic liquid molecular structure on electrochemical behaviour. A/Prof Atkin completed a study of the self assembly of Pluronic polymers in bulk ionic liquids and at the silica ionic liquid interface; adsorbed self assembled aggregates were identified at the interface between an ionic liquid and a charged surface for the first time. In collaboration with Professor Mark Rutland (KTH, Sweden) A/Prof Atkin has examined the structure of the protic ionic liquid-air interface and of surfactants adsorbed at this interface, and the effect of ionic liquid interfacial structure on lubricity.

Teaching Expertise
My goal as an undergraduate teacher is to produce graduates who are innovative and creative problem solvers, with a well rounded skill set in chemistry suitable for the modern world, rather than students who are simply good at examinations and completing laboratory projects where the goal is to complete a series of steps to arrive at a predetermined ‘answer’. The cornerstone of all of my teaching is the scientific process: making careful observations, asking questions, determining methods by which these questions may be answered, making predictions about the likely outcomes, and testing the methods. Essentially, the scientific process involves thinking logically, and is accessible to all people regardless of whether or not they are ‘scientifically inclined’. Once this type of thinking has been mastered, students will that they are able to make better and more informed decisions, and predictions, about many subjects outside of science. Lectures (University of Newcastle) 1. Environmental Chemistry (CHEM 3610), 2007. 2. Environmental Chemistry (CHEM 2610), 2008 -2012. 3. Polymers and Colloids (CHEM3580) 2008 - 2012. 4. Introductory Chemistry II (CHEM1020), 2008 - 2012. 5. Physical Chemistry II (CHEM2410), 2010 – present. 6. Physical Chemistry III (CHEM3410), 2010 – present. PhD Students Deborah Wakeham 2008 – 2012. “Surfactant Adsorption and Structure at Ionic Liquid Interfaces”. Jacob Smith 2010-13. “Interfacial Forces in Ionic Liquids”. Robert Hayes 2010-13. “Nanostructure in Ionic Liquids”. James Sweeny 2011 - 2014. “Fluid Dynamics and Lubrication in Ionic Liquids”. Thomas Murphy 2012 – 2015. “Nanoparticles Suspensions in Ionic Liquids”. Aaron Elbourne 2013 -2016. “High resolution AFM imaging of solid – ionic liquid interfaces”. Honours Students Robert Hayes 2009. “Structure of Ethylammonium Nitrate in Bulk and at an Electrode Interface”. Philip Marquet 2009. “Interfacial Structure in Dye Solar Cells”. Jacob Smith 2009. “Particle Stability in Protic Ionic Liquids”. Thomas Murphy 2011. “Self Replicating Micelles in Ionic liquids”. Aaron Elbourne 2012. “AFM imaging of ionic liquids adsorbed at solid surfaces” Liam Buxton, 2012. “Electrical Double Layer Structure in Ionic Liquids: effect of added electrolyte” Ross Wood, 2013 “Nanotribology of at the Graphite Ionic Liquid Interface” Samila McDonald, 2013 “project to be confirmed” Lisa McCauley, 2013 “Ionic Liquid microemulsions” 4Th Year Project Students Paul Davies 2004. “Water Core – Polymer Shell Microcapsules”. Jason Mann 2008. “Thermal Stability of Lysozyme in Alkylammonium Formate Ionic Liquids”. Jason’s thesis received the highest grade in his year. James Sweeny 2010. “Fluid Dynamics in Ionic Liquids” Brendan Corr, 2011, “Electrical Double Layer Structure in Ionic Liquids” Daniel Eschebach, 2011, “Surface Tension of Mixtures of Protic Ionic liquids” Peter Cooper, 2013, “QCM studies of solid ionic liquid interfaces” Ryan Stefanovic, 2013, “Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Ionic Liquid Interfaces” Summer Research Scholarship Students Connie Lui 2005. “Polymer Solubility in Ionic liquids”. Lisa-Maree De Fina 2006, “Phase Behaviour of P65 in Ethylammonium Nitrate”. Robert Hayes 2007 & 2008. “Interfacial Structure in Alkylammonium Formate Ionic Liquids”. Samuel Turner 2007. “Effect of Impurity on the Surface Tension of SDBS”. Jason Mann 2007. “Thermal Stability of Lysozyme in Alkylammonium Formate Ionic Liquids”. Oliver Coleman 2008. “Ion Adsorption at the Calcite – Water Interface”. Timothy Murdoch 2010. “Interface Characterisation in Dye Solar Cells” Emma Saville 2010. “Effect of Ionic Liquids on the Stability of Glucose Oxidase” Peter Cooper, 2011, “Thermal conductivity of Nanofluids”. Ryan Stefanovic, 2011, “Nanotribology of Mica – EAN interfaces”. Joshua Cummings, 2012, “Particle Stabilised Ionic Liquid Foams”. Samila McDonald, 2012, “Polarising Microscopy Study of Lqiuid Crystals in Ionic Liquids”. Ross Wood, 2012, “Self Replicating Micelles in Ionic liquids”.

Administrative Expertise
Co-Chair and Organiser for the 28th Australian Colloid and Surface Science Student Conference, Riverwood Downs, February 2012: With Dr Grant Webber (University of Newcastle, Chemical Engineering), I organised this biennual event which attracted over 110 delegates. This conference represents important opportunity for students to network with other students, and academics, and present their work in a semi-formal setting. A significant percentage of student attendees at previous installments of this conference have gone on to successful academic careers domestically and internationally. Guest Editor of Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics Special Edition: I was invited, along with Prof Jairton Dupont, to be guest editor of a special edition of Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (2011, Issue 30) on the theme of nanostructures in ionic liquids. In consultation with the journal editor Philip Earis and Prof Dupont, this involved screening papers for suitability on submission, assigning reviewers, collating reviews, assessing responses to reviews from authors, and making a final judgement whether or not to accept the paper for publication. School Officer for SEC. I am assisting SELS HOS A/Prof Hugh Dunstan in analysing SEC feedback for SELS, and addressing issues in courses that receive poor results. For any course that has an overall grade of 3.6 or less I examine all of the feedback data collected and read all of the students comments, and consult with the HOS to discus appropriate courses of action. This approach is making a difference, with average scores across in all SELS courses increasing from 3.9 in 2009 to 4.05 in 2011.

Collaborations
A/Prof Atkin has a longstanding collaboration with Prof Gregory Warr (University of Sydney), dating back to 2005 when A/Prof Atkin was an Australian Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow at Sydney. Our primary area of collaboration is protic ILs, and focuses on molecular self assembly. A/Prof Atkin and Prof Warr have published 26 joint publications in the last 6 years, and over $1M ARC project funding. A/Prof Atkin has a strong collaboration with Prof Mark Rutland (KTH, Stockholm, Sweden) in two project areas. Since 2008 Atkin and Rutland have collaborated on the structure of pure ionic liquid – air interfaces, and the properties of surfactants adsorbed at these interfaces, supported by an ARC Linkage International project (LX0776612). This project was a key aspect of the PhD projects of Deborah Wakeham (University of Newcastle) and Petru Niga (KTH). In 2010 A/Prof Atkin initiated a new project with Prof Rutland concerning ionic liquid nanotribology. Together, we have attracted 3 joint grants and published 8 joint papers. A/Prof Atkin’s collaboration with Prof Frank Endres (Clausthal University, Germany) concerning ionic liquid interfacial structure and surfaces as they relate to electrochemistry has produced nine joint publications in the last four years and 2 joint grants. Prof Endres' group performs electrodeposition, scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and cyclic voltammetry experiments that complement AFM studies performed at Newcastle. A/Prof Atkin has a productive collaboration with Dr Silvia Imberti, a neutron diffraction instrument scientist at ISIS, UK. To date this work (also in collaboration with Prof Warr) has focussed on protic ionic liquid nanostructure, and has produced four joint publications with another four articles in preparation. Since 2008, this group has been awarded neutron diffraction beam time at ISIS with a commercial value in excess of $500 K. A/Prof Atkin has collaborated with Dr Kislon Voitchovsky (EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland) since 2012 on high resolution AFM images of solid ionic liquid interfaces. Together they have published 1 joint article. A/Prof Atkin, together with Dr Grant Webber (University of Newcastle) have established AFM nanotribology in IL systems as a capability with the University of Newcastle, and are jointly supervising a 2 PhD students. A/Prof Atkin and A/Prof Webber have 2 joint grants and several joint publications. A/Prof Atkin has collaborated with Dr Alister Page (University of Newcastle) on the structure of solid ionic liquid interfaces since 2013. Dr Page is performing MD simulations of the iterations of ionic liquids with surfaces that are correlated with AFM images and force curves. They are currently joint supervising 1 student.


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Atomic Force Microscope
  • Ionic Liquids
  • Microencapsulation
  • Neutron Scattering
  • Physical Chemistry
  • Polymer Adsorption
  • Surfactant Adsorption
  • X-ray Scattering

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
020499Condensed Matter Physics not elsewhere classified5
030399Macromolecular and Materials Chemistry not elsewhere classified50
030699Physical Chemistry not elsewhere classified45

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2015 - ProfessorUniversity of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/12/2012 - Fellow - ARCUniversity of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia
1/07/2012 - Associate ProfessorUniversity of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia
1/01/2010 - 1/06/2012Senior LecturerUniversity of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia
1/01/2005 - 1/05/2007Australian Research Council Postdoctoral FellowThe University of Sydney
Australia
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (5 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2013Hayes R, Wakeham D, Atkin R, 'Interfaces of Ionic Liquids', Ionic Liquids Uncoiled: Critical Expert Overviews, Wiley, Belfast 51-85 (2013) [B1]
DOI10.1002/9781118434987.ch3
CitationsScopus - 2
2012Hayes R, Wakeham D, Atkin R, 'Ionic Liquids UnCOILed', Ionic Liquids UnCOILed, John Wiley & Sons, New Jersey 51-86 (2012) [B1]
2009Atkin R, Warr GG, 'Bulk and interfacial nanostructure in protic room temperature ionic liquids', Ionic Liquids: From Knowledge to Application, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC 317-333 (2009) [B1]
DOI10.1021/bk-2009-1030.ch022
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 3
2005Atkin R, Eastoe J, Wanless EJ, Colin D, 'Dynamics of Adsorption of Cationic Surfactant Adsorption at Air-Water and Solid-Liquid Interfaces', Dynamics of Surfactant Assemblies: Micelles, Vesicles, and Microemulsions, CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida, United States of America 379-418 (2005) [B1]
2005Atkin R, Blom A, Warr GG, 'Giant Micelles at and Near Interfaces', Giant Micelles: Properties and Applications, CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida, United States of America 351-374 (2005) [B1]
Show 2 more chapters

Journal article (88 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2015Chen Z, Fitzgerald PA, Kobayashi Y, Ueno K, Watanabe M, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Micelle structure of novel diblock polyethers in water and two protic ionic liquids (EAN and PAN)', Macromolecules, 48 1843-1851 (2015)

Small angle neutron scattering has been used to probe the self-assembled structures formed by novel block copolymers in water and two protic ionic liquids (ILs), ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) and propylammonium nitrate (PAN). The block copolymers consist of solvophilic poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) tethered to either poly(ethyl glycidyl ether) (PEGE) or poly(glycidyl propyl ether) (PGPrE) solvophobic blocks. Four block copolymers (EGE109EO54, EGE113EO115, EGE104EO178, and GPrE98EO260) have been investigated between 10 and 100 °C, showing how aggregate structure changes with increasing the EO block length, by changing the insoluble block from EGE to the more bulky, hydrophobic GPrE block, and with temperature. EO solubility mainly depends on the hydrogen bond network density, and decreases in the order H2O, EAN, and then PAN. The solubility of the EGE and GPrE blocks decreases in the order PAN, EAN then water because the large apolar domain of PAN increase the solubility of the solvophobic blocks more effectively than the smaller apolar domains in EAN, and water, which is entirely hydrophilic; GPrE is less soluble than EGE because its larger size hinders solubilization in the IL apolar domains. Large disk-shaped structures were present for EGE109EO54 in all three solvents because short EO chains favor flat structures, while GPrE98EO260 formed spherical structures because long EO chains lead to curved aggregates. The aggregate structures of EGE113EO115 and EGE104EO178, which have intermediate EO chain lengths, varied depending on the solvent and the temperature. Solubilities also explain trends in critical micelle concentrations (cmc) and temperatures (cmt).

DOI10.1021/acs.macromol.5b00082
CitationsScopus - 1
2015Cummings J, Shah K, Atkin R, Moghtaderi B, 'Physicochemical interactions of ionic liquids with coal; The viability of ionic liquids for pre-treatments in coal liquefaction', Fuel, 143 244-252 (2015)

Three Australian sub-bituminous coals were treated with three different ionic liquids (ILs) at a temperature of 100 °C. The thermal behaviour of these treated coals were compared against raw coals via pyrolysis experiments in a Thermogravimetric Analyser. Morphological comparisons were also made via Scanning Electron Microscopy. Among the studied ILs, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride [Bmim][Cl] was found to perform the most consistently in being able to alter the thermal and morphological properties of most of the coals used. It is posited that this may be due to the large difference in charge density between the delocalised charge of the large bmim cation and the chloride anion which allows this IL to disrupt the cross linked network of coal. It was also found that the interactions of the ionic liquids are coal specific, for instance none of the ionic liquids were able to change the thermal properties of coal A. Moreover, the results indicated that among the studied coals, coal R showed the highest mass loss during pyrolysis in TGA and coal C showed the highest amount of swelling and fragmentation in SEM images. The results displayed in this study indicate that the potential for ionic liquids to be used as pre-treatments in coal liquefaction is promising. Crown

DOI10.1016/j.fuel.2014.11.042
Co-authorsBehdad Moghtaderi, Kalpit Shah
2015McLean B, Li H, Stefanovic R, Wood RJ, Webber GB, Ueno K, et al., 'Nanostructure of [Li(G4)] TFSI and [Li(G4)] NO3 solvate ionic liquids at HOPG and Au(111) electrode interfaces as a function of potential', PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY CHEMICAL PHYSICS, 17 325-333 (2015)
DOI10.1039/c4cp04522jAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsGrant Webber
2015Elbourne A, Voïtchovsky K, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Ion structure controls ionic liquid near-surface and interfacial nanostructure', Chemical Science, 6 527-536 (2015)

A unique, but unifying, feature of ionic liquids (ILs) is that they are nanostructured on the length scale of the ions; in many ILs well-defined polar and apolar domains exist and may percolate through the liquid. Near a surface the isotropic symmetry of the bulk structure is broken, resulting in different nanostructures which, until now, have only been studied indirectly. In this paper, in situ amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) has been used to resolve the 3-dimensional nanostructure of five protic ILs at and near the surface of mica. The surface and near surface structures are distinct and remarkably well-defined, but are very different from previously accepted descriptions. Interfacial nanostructure is strongly influenced by the registry between cations and the mica surface charge sites, whereas near surface nanostructure is sensitive to both cation and anion structure. Together these ILs reveal how interfacial nanostructure can be tuned through ion structure, informing "bottom-up" design and optimisation of ILs for diverse technologies including heterogeneous catalysis, lubrication, electrochemical processes, and nanofluids. This journal is

DOI10.1039/c4sc02727b
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2015Wydro MJ, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy reveals the near surface nanostructure of surfactant sponge (L3) and lamellar (La) phases.', Langmuir : the ACS journal of surfaces and colloids, (2015)
DOI10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b01008
2015Li H, Atkin R, Page AJ, 'Combined friction force microscopy and quantum chemical investigation of the tribotronic response at the propylammonium nitrate-graphite interface.', Physical chemistry chemical physics : PCCP, (2015)
Co-authorsAlister Page
2015Chen Z, FitzGerald PA, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Conformation of poly(ethylene oxide) dissolved in the solvate ionic liquid [Li(G4)]TFSI.', Phys Chem Chem Phys, 17 14872-14878 (2015)
DOI10.1039/c5cp02033fAuthor URL
2015Hayes R, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Structure and Nanostructure in Ionic Liquids.', Chem Rev, (2015)
DOI10.1021/cr500411qAuthor URL
2015Wydro MJ, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Amplitude-modulated atomic force microscopy reveals the near surface nanostructure of surfactant sponge (l3) and lamellar (la) phases.', Langmuir, 31 5513-5520 (2015)
DOI10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b01008Author URL
2015McDonald S, Wood JA, FitzGerald PA, Craig VS, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Interfacial and bulk nanostructure of liquid polymer nanocomposites.', Langmuir, 31 3763-3770 (2015)
DOI10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b00255Author URL
2015Elbourne A, McDonald S, Voïchovsky K, Endres F, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Nanostructure of the Ionic Liquid-Graphite Stern Layer.', ACS Nano, (2015)
DOI10.1021/acsnano.5b02921Author URL
2015Chen Z, Kobayashi Y, Webber GB, Ueno K, Watanabe M, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Adsorption of Polyether Block Copolymers at Silica-Water and Silica-Ethylammonium Nitrate Interfaces.', Langmuir, 31 7025-7031 (2015)
DOI10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b01500Author URL
Co-authorsGrant Webber
2014Jiang HJ, FitzGerald PA, Dolan A, Atkin R, Warr GG, 'Amphiphilic self-assembly of alkanols in protic ionic liquids.', J Phys Chem B, 118 9983-9990 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1021/jp504998tAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 5
2014Li H, Cooper PK, Somers AE, Rutland MW, Howlett PC, Forsyth M, Atkin R, 'Ionic liquid adsorption and nanotribology at the silica-oil interface: Hundred-fold dilution in oil lubricates as effectively as the pure ionic liquid', Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, 5 4095-4099 (2014) [C1]

The remarkable physical properties of ionic liquids (ILs) make them potentially excellent lubricants. One of the challenges for using ILs as lubricants is their high cost. In this article, atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanotribology measurements reveal that a 1 mol % solution of IL dissolved in an oil lubricates the silica surface as effectively as the pure IL. The adsorption isotherm shows that the IL surface excess need only be approximately half of the saturation value to prevent surface contact and effectively lubricate the sliding surfaces. Using ILs in this way makes them viable for large-scale applications.

DOI10.1021/jz5021422
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014Page AJ, Elbourne A, Stefanovic R, Addicoat MA, Warr GG, Voïtchovsky K, Atkin R, '3-Dimensional atomic scale structure of the ionic liquid-graphite interface elucidated by AM-AFM and quantum chemical simulations.', Nanoscale, 6 8100-8106 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1039/c4nr01219dAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authorsAlister Page
2014Sweeney J, Webber GB, Rutland MW, Atkin R, 'Effect of ion structure on nanoscale friction in protic ionic liquids.', Phys Chem Chem Phys, 16 16651-16658 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1039/c4cp02320jAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authorsGrant Webber
2014Li H, Wood RJ, Endres F, Atkin R, 'Influence of alkyl chain length and anion species on ionic liquid structure at the graphite interface as a function of applied potential', Journal of physics. Condensed matter : an Institute of Physics journal, 26 284115-284115 (2014) [C1]

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements elucidate the effect of cation alkyl chain length and the anion species on ionic liquid (IL) interfacial structure at highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces as a function of potential. Three ILs are examined: 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate ([HMIM] FAP), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate ([EMIM] FAP), and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([EMIM] TFSA). The step-wise force-distance profiles indicate the ILs adopt a multilayered morphology near the surface. When the surface is biased positively or negatively versus Pt quasireference electrode, both the number of steps, and the force required to rupture each step increase, indicating stronger interfacial structure. At all potentials, push-through forces for [HMIM] FAP are the highest, because the long alkyl chain results in strong cohesive interactions between cations, leading to well-formed layers that resist the AFM tip. The most layers are observed for [EMIM] FAP, because the C2 chains are relatively rigid and the dimensions of the cation and anion are similar, facilitating neat packing. [EMIM] TFSA has the smallest push-through forces and fewest layers, and thus the weakest interfacial structure. Surface-tip attractive forces are measured for all ILs. At the same potential, the attractions are the strongest for [EMIM] TFSA and the weakest for [HMIM] FAP because the interfacial layers are better formed for the longer alkyl chain cation. This means interfacial forces are stronger, which masks the weak attractive forces.

DOI10.1088/0953-8984/26/28/284115
2014Shah K, Atkin R, Stanger R, Wall T, Moghtaderi B, 'Interactions between vitrinite and inertinite-rich coals and the ionic liquid - [bmim][Cl]', Fuel, 119 214-218 (2014) [C1]

The interactions between vitrinite and inertinite-rich coals and the ionic liquid butylimidazolium chloride ([bmim][Cl]) heated to 100 C have been characterised. Differences in the interactions of coal macerals and ionic liquids have been identified. [bmim][Cl] is able to dissolve 22 wt% of a high-vitrinite coal fraction compared to 14 wt% of a high-inertinite coal fraction. The vitrinite-rich coal fraction tends to swell to a greater extent compared to the inertinite-rich coal fraction, which was fractured and fragmented rather than swelled. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI10.1016/j.fuel.2013.11.038
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsKalpit Shah, Behdad Moghtaderi, Terry Wall
2014Smith JA, Webber GB, Warr GG, Zimmer A, Atkin R, Werzer O, 'Shear dependent viscosity of poly(ethylene oxide) in two protic ionic liquids', Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 430 56-60 (2014) [C1]

Steady shear viscosity measurements have been performed on 100. kDa poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) dissolved in the protic ionic liquids ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) and propylammonium nitrate (PAN) and in water. The zero shear viscosity in all three solvents increases with polymer concentration, falling into three concentration regimes corresponding to dilute, semi-dilute and network solutions. Huggins plots reveal three distinct solvent conditions: good (water), good-theta (EAN) and theta (PAN). However, differences in the transition concentrations, power law behaviour of the viscosities, and relaxation times arising from shear thinning in the two ILs can be directly related to the effects of solvent nanostructure. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

DOI10.1016/j.jcis.2014.05.006
CitationsScopus - 2
Co-authorsGrant Webber
2014Atkin R, Borisenko N, Drüschler M, Endres F, Hayes R, Huber B, Roling B, 'Structure and dynamics of the interfacial layer between ionic liquids and electrode materials', Journal of Molecular Liquids, 192 44-54 (2014)
DOI10.1016/j.molliq.2013.08.006
CitationsScopus - 10
2014Borisenko N, Atkin R, Lahiri A, El Abedin SZ, Endres F, 'Effect of dissolved LiCl on the ionic liquid-Au(111) interface: an in situ STM study', JOURNAL OF PHYSICS-CONDENSED MATTER, 26 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1088/0953-8984/26/28/284111Author URL
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 4
2014Li H, Wood RJ, Endres F, Atkin R, 'Influence of alkyl chain length and anion species on ionic liquid structure at the graphite interface as a function of applied potential', Journal of Physics Condensed Matter, 26 (2014) [C1]

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements elucidate the effect of cation alkyl chain length and the anion species on ionic liquid (IL) interfacial structure at highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces as a function of potential. Three ILs are examined: 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate ([HMIM] FAP), 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate ([EMIM] FAP), and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([EMIM] TFSA). The step-wise force-distance profiles indicate the ILs adopt a multilayered morphology near the surface. When the surface is biased positively or negatively versus Pt quasireference electrode, both the number of steps, and the force required to rupture each step increase, indicating stronger interfacial structure. At all potentials, push-through forces for [HMIM] FAP are the highest, because the long alkyl chain results in strong cohesive interactions between cations, leading to well-formed layers that resist the AFM tip. The most layers are observed for [EMIM] FAP, because the C2 chains are relatively rigid and the dimensions of the cation and anion are similar, facilitating neat packing. [EMIM] TFSA has the smallest push-through forces and fewest layers, and thus the weakest interfacial structure. Surface-tip attractive forces are measured for all ILs. At the same potential, the attractions are the strongest for [EMIM] TFSA and the weakest for [HMIM] FAP because the interfacial layers are better formed for the longer alkyl chain cation. This means interfacial forces are stronger, which masks the weak attractive forces. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd.

DOI10.1088/0953-8984/26/28/284115
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2014Borisenko N, Atkin R, Endres F, 'Influence of molecular organization of ionic liquids on electrochemical properties', Electrochemical Society Interface, 23 59-63 (2014) [C2]

Ionic liquids (IL) exhibit a remarkably diverse interfacial chemistry, with multiple interfacial layers present at the IL/solid interface. Ionic liquids (ILs) are pure salts with melting points typically less than 100°C. It has remarkable physical properties, which include wide electrochemical stability windows, high ionic conductivity and negligible vapor pressure. The adsorption strength of ILs onto solid surfaces is much higher than for typical organic solvents or water. The structure and composition of the interfacial layer can be tuned by varying the surface potential and the ionic structure, and by addition of solutes. This allows us to envision that IL interfacial properties can be readily matched to a particular application once the required fundamental understanding is elucidated. STM and AFM results show that the IL cation has a strong influence on the structure and composition of the interface.

2014Murphy T, Hayes R, Imberti S, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Nanostructure of an ionic liquid-glycerol mixture', Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 16 13182-13190 (2014) [C1]

The nanostructure of a 50:50 vol% mixture of glycerol and ethylammonium formate (EAF), a protic ionic liquid (IL), has been investigated using neutron diffraction and empirical potential structure refinement (EPSR) fits. EPSR fits reveal that the mixture is nanostructured. Electrostatic interactions between IL charge groups leads to the formation of ionic regions. These solvophobically repel cation alkyl groups which cluster together to form apolar domains. The polar glycerol molecules are preferentially incorporated into the charged domains, and form hydrogen bonds with EAF groups rather than with other glycerol molecules. However, radial distribution functions reveal that glycerol molecules pack around each other in a fashion similar to that found in pure glycerol. This suggests that a glycerol channel runs through the ionic domain of EAF. The absence of significant glycerol-glycerol hydrogen bonding indicates that glycerol molecules are able to span the polar domain, bridging EAF charge groups. Glycerol can adopt six distinct conformations. The distribution of conformers in the EAF mixture is very different to that found in the pure liquid because hydrogen bonds form with EAF rather than with other glycerol molecules, which imparts different packing constraints. © 2014 The Owner Societies.

DOI10.1039/c4cp01570c
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2014Murphy T, Varela LM, Webber GB, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Nanostructure-thermal conductivity relationships in protic ionic liquids', Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 118 12017-12024 (2014) [C1]

The thermal conductivities of nine protic ionic liquids (ILs) have been investigated between 293 and 340 K. Within this range, the thermal conductivities are between 0.18 and 0.30 W·m-1·K-1. These values are higher than those typically associated with oils and aprotic ILs, but lower than those of strongly hydrogen bonding solvents like water. Weak linear decreases in thermal conductivity with temperature are noted, with the exception of ethanolammonium nitrate (EtAN) where the thermal conductivity increases with temperature. The dependence of thermal conductivity on IL type is analyzed with use of the Bahe-Varela pseudolattice theory. This theory treats the bulk IL as an array of ordered domains with intervening domains of uncorrelated structure which enable and provide barriers to heat propagation (respectively) via allowed vibrational modes. For the protic ILs investigated, thermal conductivity depends strongly on the IL cation alkyl chain length. This is because the cation alkyl chain controls the dimensions of the IL bulk nanostructure, which consists of charged (ordered domains) and uncharged regions (disordered domains). As the cation alkyl chain controls the dimensions of the disordered domains, it thus limits the thermal conductivity. To test the generality of this interpretation, the thermal conductivities of propylammonium nitrate (PAN) and PAN-octanol mixtures were examined; water selectively swells the PAN charged domain, while octanol swells the uncharged regions. Up to a certain concentration, adding water increases thermal conduction and octanol decreases it, as expected. However, at high solute concentrations the IL nanostructure is broken. When additional solvent is added above this concentration the rate of change in thermal conductivity is greatly reduced. This is because, in the absence of nanostructure, the added solvent only serves to dilute the salt solution.

DOI10.1021/jp507408r
Co-authorsGrant Webber
2014Addicoat MA, Stefanovic R, Webber GB, Atkin R, Page AJ, 'Assessment of the density functional tight binding method for protic ionic liquids', Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation, 10 4633-4643 (2014) [C1]

Density functional tight binding (DFTB), which is ~100-1000 times faster than full density functional theory (DFT), has been used to simulate the structure and properties of protic ionic liquid (IL) ions, clusters of ions and the bulk liquid. Proton affinities for a wide range of IL cations and anions determined using DFTB generally reproduce G3B3 values to within 5-10 kcal/mol. The structures and thermodynamic stabilities of n-alkyl ammonium nitrate clusters (up to 450 quantum chemical atoms) predicted with DFTB are in excellent agreement with those determined using DFT. The IL bulk structure simulated using DFTB with periodic boundary conditions is in excellent agreement with published neutron diffraction data.

DOI10.1021/ct500394t
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsGrant Webber, Alister Page
2014Hayes R, Imberti S, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Effect of Cation Alkyl Chain Length and Anion Type on Protic Ionic Liquid Nanostructure', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY C, 118 13998-14008 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1021/jp503429kAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 9Web of Science - 9
2014Hayes R, Bernard SA, Imberti S, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Solvation of Inorganic Nitrate Salts in Protic Ionic Liquids', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY C, 118 21215-21225 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1021/jp506192dAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 3
2014Carstens T, Gustus R, Höfft O, Borisenko N, Endres F, Li H, et al., 'Combined STM, AFM, and DFT study of the highly ordered pyrolytic graphite/1-octyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide interface', Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 118 10833-10843 (2014) [C1]

The highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)/1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([OMIm]Tf2N) interface is examined by ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM), atomic force microscopy (UHV-AFM) (and as a function of potential by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM)), in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In situ STM and AFM results reveal that multiple ionic liquid (IL) layers are present at the HOPG/electrode interface at all potentials. At open-circuit potential (OCP), attractions between the cation alkyl chain and the HOPG surface result in the ion layer bound to the surface being cation rich. As the potential is varied, the relative concentrations of cations and anions in the surface layer change: as the potential is made more positive, anions are preferentially adsorbed at the surface, while at negative potentials the surface layer is cation rich. At -2 V an unusual overstructure forms. STM images and AFM friction force microscopy measurements both confirm that the roughness of this overstructure increases with time. DFT calculations reveal that [OMIm]+ is attracted to the graphite surface at OCP; however, adsorption is enhanced at negative potentials due to favorable electrostatic interactions, and at -2 V the surface layer is cation rich and strongly bound. The energetically most favorable orientation within this layer is with the [OMIm]+ octyl chains aligned "epitaxially" along the graphitic lattice. This induces quasi-crystallization of cations on the graphite surface and formation of the overstructure. An alternative explanation may be that, because of the bulkiness of the cation sitting along the surface, a single layer of cations is unable to quench the surface potential, so a second layer forms. The most energetically favorable way to do this might be in a quasi-crystalline/multilayered fashion. It could also be a combination of strong surface binding/orientations and the need for multilayers to quench the charge. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

DOI10.1021/jp501260t
CitationsScopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authorsAlister Page
2014Atkin R, Borisenko N, Drüschler M, Endres F, Hayes R, Huber B, Roling B, 'Structure and dynamics of the interfacial layer between ionic liquids and electrode materials', Journal of Molecular Liquids, 192 44-54 (2014) [C1]

In this overview paper we present a combined in situ STM, AFM and EIS study on the structure and dynamics of the interfacial layers between Au(111) and two extremely pure ionic liquids, namely [Py1,4]FAP and [EMIM]FAP. The combination of these methods provides valuable information for both neutral and electrified interfaces. In situ STM and AFM results reveal that a multilayered ion morphology is present at the IL-Au(111) interface, with stronger near surface layering detected at higher electrode potentials. The in situ STM measurements show that the structure of the interfacial layers is dependent on the applied electrode potential, the number of subsequent STM scans and the scan rate. Furthermore, in the case of [Py1,4]FAP, the Au(111) surface undergoes herringbone reconstruction, Au(111)(22×3), in the cathodic potential regime, and the ultra-slow formation of vacancies in the herringbone structure is probed with in situ STM. EIS measurements reveal the presence of two distinct capacitive processes at the interface taking place on different time scales. The time scale of the fast process is typically in the millisecond range and is governed by the bulk ion transport in the IL, which exhibits a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-type temperature dependence. The slow process takes place on a time scale of seconds and is Arrhenius activated. The contribution of this process to the overall interfacial capacitance is particularly large in the potential regime where the herringbone structure is probed. Furthermore, we analyze the temperature dependence of the interfacial capacitance. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

DOI10.1016/j.molliq.2013.08.006
CitationsScopus - 12Web of Science - 11
2014Smith J, Webber GB, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Silica particle stability and settling in protic ionic liquids', Langmuir, 30 1506-1513 (2014) [C1]

Silica particle suspensions of 10 wt % have been investigated in the protic ionic liquids (ILs) ethylammonium nitrate (EAN), ethanolammonium nitrate (EtAN), propylammonium nitrate (PAN), and dimethylethylammonium formate (DMEAF). Static and dynamic light scattering reveal that single particles coexist in dynamic equilibrium with flocculated networks at room temperature. These types of systems are classified as weakly flocculated and are quite rare. As weakly flocculated systems generally exist only within a narrow range of conditions, the effect of temperature was probed. When temperature is increased, the thermal motion of suspended particles increases, favoring dispersion, but in ILs suspensions, heating reduces the stabilizing effect of the interfacial structure of the IL. When subjected to a small increase in temperature, particle suspensions in ILs become unstable, indicated by the absence of a peak corresponding to single particles in the light scattering data. For EAN and DMEAF, further increasing temperatures above 40 C returns the systems to a weakly flocculated state in which thermal energy is sufficient to break particles away from aggregates. Weakly flocculated suspensions in EAN and EtAN settle more rapidly than predicted by the Stokes equation, as the particles spend a significant portion of time in large, rapidly settling flocs. Surprisingly, suspensions in PAN and DMEAF settle slower than predicted. Oscillatory rheology indicates that these suspensions are viscoelastic, due to a persistent, long-range structure in the suspension that slows settling. In aggregated systems, settling is very rapid. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

DOI10.1021/la403978b
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsGrant Webber
2014Topolnicki IL, Fitzgerald PA, Atkin R, Warr GG, 'Effect of protic ionic liquid and surfactant structure on partitioning of polyoxyethylene non-ionic surfactants', ChemPhysChem, 15 2485-2489 (2014) [C1]

The partitioning constants and Gibbs free energies of transfer of poly(oxyethylene) n-alkyl ethers between dodecane and the protic ionic liquids (ILs) ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) and propylammonium nitrate (PAN) are determined. EAN and PAN have a sponge-like nanostructure that consists of interpenetrating charged and apolar domains. This study reveals that the ILs solvate the hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts of the amphiphiles differently. The ethoxy groups are dissolved in the polar region of both ILs by means of hydrogen bonds. The environment is remarkably water-like and, as in water, the solubility of the ethoxy groups in EAN decreases on warming, which underscores the critical role of the IL hydrogen-bond network for solubility. In contrast, amphiphile alkyl chains are not preferentially solvated by the charged or uncharged regions of the ILs. Rather, they experience an average IL composition and, as a result, partitioning from dodecane into the IL increases as the cation alkyl chain is lengthened from ethyl to propyl, because the IL apolar volume fraction increases. Together, these results show that surfactant dissolution in ILs is related to structural compatibility between the head or tail group and the IL nanostructure. Thus, these partitioning studies reveal parameters for the effective molecular design of surfactants in ILs. Surfactants in ionic liquids: The dissolution and solvation of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic components of non-ionic surfactants in ionic liquids are affected by solvent nanostructure and hydrogen bonding. The polar domains of protic ionic liquids ethyl- and propylammonium nitrate are, thermodynamically speaking, remarkably water-like. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

DOI10.1002/cphc.201402087
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2014Li H, Wood RJ, Rutland MW, Atkin R, 'An ionic liquid lubricant enables superlubricity to be "switched on" in situ using an electrical potential.', Chem Commun (Camb), 50 4368-4370 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1039/c4cc00979gAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 13Web of Science - 13
2013Elbourne A, Sweeney J, Webber GB, Wanless EJ, Warr GG, Rutland MW, Atkin R, 'Adsorbed and near-surface structure of ionic liquids determines nanoscale friction', CHEMICAL COMMUNICATIONS, 49 6797-6799 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1039/c3cc42844cAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 15Web of Science - 17
Co-authorsErica Wanless, Grant Webber
2013Hayes R, Imberti S, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'The Nature of Hydrogen Bonding in Protic Ionic Liquids', ANGEWANDTE CHEMIE-INTERNATIONAL EDITION, 52 4623-4627 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1002/anie.201209273Author URL
CitationsScopus - 39Web of Science - 43
2013Li H, Rutland MW, Atkin R, 'Ionic liquid lubrication: Influence of ion structure, surface potential and sliding velocity', Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 15 14616-14623 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1039/c3cp52638k
CitationsScopus - 27Web of Science - 26
2013Segura JJ, Voïtchovsky K, Elbourne A, Wanless EJ, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Adsorbed and near surface structure of ionic liquids at a solid interface', Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 15 3320-3328 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1039/c3cp44163f
CitationsScopus - 26Web of Science - 22
Co-authorsErica Wanless
2013Li H, Endres F, Atkin R, 'Effect of alkyl chain length and anion species on the interfacial nanostructure of ionic liquids at the Au(111)-ionic liquid interface as a function of potential', Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 15 14624-14633 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1039/c3cp52421c
CitationsScopus - 26Web of Science - 25
2013Smith JA, Webber GB, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Rheology of Protic Ionic Liquids and Their Mixtures', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY B, 117 13930-13935 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1021/jp407715eAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authorsGrant Webber
2013Sharma SC, Atkin R, Warr GG, 'The Effect of Ionic Liquid Hydrophobicity and Solvent Miscibility on Pluronic Amphiphile Self-Assembly', The Journal of Physical Chemistry Part B: Condensed Matter, Materials, Surfaces, Interfaces and Biophysical, 117 14568-14575 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1021/jp4086443Author URL
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2013Hayes R, Imberti S, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'The Nature of Hydrogen Bonding in Protic Ionic Liquids', Angewandte Chemie, 125 4721-4725 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1002/ange.201209273Author URL
2012Wakeham D, Eschebach DS, Webber GB, Atkin R, Warr GG, 'Surface composition of mixtures of ethylammonium nitrate, ethanolammonium nitrate, and water', Australian Journal of Chemistry, 65 1554-1556 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authorsGrant Webber
2012Carstens T, Hayes RL, Abedin SZE, Corr BJ, Webber GB, Borisenko N, et al., 'In situ STM, AFM and DTS study of the interface 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate/Au(1 1 1)', Electrochimica Acta, 82 48-59 (2012) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.electacta.2012.01.111
CitationsScopus - 17Web of Science - 16
Co-authorsGrant Webber
2012Sweeney JT, Hausen F, Hayes RL, Webber GB, Endres F, Rutland MW, et al., 'Control of nanoscale friction on gold in an ionic liquid by a potential-dependent ionic lubricant layer', Physical Review Letters, 109 155502 (2012) [C1]
DOI10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.155502
CitationsScopus - 46Web of Science - 42
Co-authorsGrant Webber
2012Asencio RA, Cranston ED, Atkin R, Rutland MW, 'Ionic liquid nanotribology: Stiction suppression and surface induced shear thinning', Langmuir, 28 9967-9976 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 23Web of Science - 20
2012Wakeham D, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Surfactant adsorption at the surface of mixed ionic liquids and ionic liquid water mixtures', Langmuir, 28 13224-13231 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2012Endres F, Borisenko N, El Abedin SZ, Hayes RL, Atkin R, 'The interface ionic liquid(s)/electrode(s): In situ STM and AFM measurements', Faraday Discussions, 154 221-233 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 53Web of Science - 55
2012Hayes RL, Borisenko N, Corr BJ, Webber GB, Endres F, Atkin R, 'Effect of dissolved LiCl on the ionic liquid-Au(111) electrical double layer structure', Chemical Communications, 48 10246-10248 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 22Web of Science - 21
Co-authorsGrant Webber
2012Hayes RL, Imberti S, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'How water dissolves in protic ionic liquids', Angewandte Chemie - International Edition, 51 7468-7471 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 34Web of Science - 36
2012Wakeham D, Niga P, Ridings C, Andersson G, Nelson A, Warr GG, et al., 'Surface structure of a 'non-amphiphilic' protic ionic liquid', Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 14 5106-5114 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 10Web of Science - 8
2012Werzer O, Cranston ED, Warr GG, Atkin R, Rutland MW, 'Ionic liquid nanotribology: mica-silica interactions in ethylammonium nitrate', Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 14 5147-5152 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 26Web of Science - 23
2011Werzer O, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Conformation of poly(ethylene oxide) dissolved in ethylammonium nitrate', Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 115 648-652 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1021/jp110216k
CitationsScopus - 14Web of Science - 14
2011Hayes RL, Borisenko N, Tam MK, Howlett PC, Endres F, Atkin R, 'Double layer structure of ionic liquids at the Au(111) electrode interface: An atomic force microscopy investigation', Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 115 6855-6863 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1021/jp200544b
CitationsScopus - 91Web of Science - 93
2011Werzer O, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Compact poly(ethylene oxide) structures adsorbed at the ethylammonium nitrate-silica interface', Langmuir, 27 3541-3549 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1021/la104577a
CitationsScopus - 14Web of Science - 12
2011Werzer O, Atkin R, 'Interactions of adsorbed poly(ethylene oxide) mushrooms with a bare silica-ionic liquid interface', Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 13 13479-13485 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1039/c1cp20174c
CitationsScopus - 7Web of Science - 8
2011Hayes RL, Imberti S, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Amphiphilicity determines nanostructure in protic ionic liquids', Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 13 3237-3247 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1039/c0cp01137a
CitationsScopus - 89Web of Science - 88
2011Hayes RL, Imberti S, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Pronounced sponge-like nanostructure in propylammonium nitrate', Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 13 13544-13551 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1039/c1cp21080g
CitationsScopus - 65Web of Science - 65
2011Atkin R, Borisenko N, Druschler M, El Abedin SZ, Endres F, Hayes RL, et al., 'An in situ STM/AFM and impedance spectroscopy study of the extremely pure 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate/Au(111) interface: Potential dependent solvation layers and the herringbone reconstruction', Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 13 6849-6857 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1039/c0cp02846k
CitationsScopus - 92Web of Science - 91
2011Wakeham D, Nelson A, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Probing the protic ionic liquid surface using X-ray reflectivity', Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 13 20828-20835 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1039/c1cp22351h
CitationsScopus - 12Web of Science - 10
2010Atkin R, Bobillier SMC, Warr GG, 'Propylammonium nitrate as a solvent for amphiphile self-assembly into micelles, lyotropic liquid crystals, and microemulsions', Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 114 1350-1360 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1021/jp910649a
CitationsScopus - 46Web of Science - 42
2010Smith JA, Werzer O, Webber GB, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Surprising particle stability and rapid sedimentation rates in an ionic liquid', Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, 1 64-68 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1021/jz9000642
CitationsScopus - 37Web of Science - 34
Co-authorsGrant Webber
2010Marquet PR, Andersson G, Snedden A, Kloo L, Atkin R, 'Molecular scale characterization of the titania-dye-solvent interface in dye-sensitized solar cells', Langmuir, 26 9612-9616 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1021/la100193w
CitationsScopus - 9Web of Science - 9
2010Niga P, Wakeham D, Nelson A, Warr GG, Rutland M, Atkin R, 'Structure of the ethylammonium nitrate surface: An X-ray reflectivity and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy study', Langmuir, 26 8282-8288 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1021/la904697g
CitationsScopus - 34Web of Science - 32
2010Wakeham D, Niga P, Warr GG, Rutland MW, Atkin R, 'Nonionic surfactant adsorption at the ethylammonium nitrate surface: A neutron reflectivity and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy study', Langmuir, 26 8313-8318 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1021/la9047243
CitationsScopus - 16Web of Science - 14
2010Endres F, Hofft O, Borisenko N, Gasparotto LH, Prowald A, Al-Salman R, et al., 'Do solvation layers of ionic liquids influence electrochemical reactions?', Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 12 1724-1732 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1039/b923527m
CitationsScopus - 105Web of Science - 96
2010Hayes RL, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'At the interface: Solvation and designing ionic liquids', Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 12 1709-1723 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1039/b920393a
CitationsScopus - 154Web of Science - 154
2009Wakeham D, Hayes RL, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Influence of temperature and molecular structure on ionic liquid solvation layers', Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 113 5961-5966 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1021/jp900815q
CitationsScopus - 64Web of Science - 59
2009Hayes RL, El Abedin SZ, Atkin R, 'Pronounced structure in confined aprotic room-temperature ionic liquids', Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 113 7049-7052 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1021/jp902837s
CitationsScopus - 95Web of Science - 92
2009Atkin R, De Fina L-M, Kiederling U, Warr GG, 'Structure and self assembly of pluronic amphiphiles in ethylammonium nitrate and at the silica surface', Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 113 12201-12213 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1021/jp9063627
CitationsScopus - 41Web of Science - 41
2009Atkin R, El Abedin SZ, Hayes RL, Gasparotto LHS, Borisenko N, Endres F, 'AFM and STM studies on the surface interaction of (BMP)TFSA and (EMIm)TFSA ionic liquids with Au(111)', Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 113 13266-13272 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1021/jp9026755
CitationsScopus - 123Web of Science - 116
2009Howard SC, Atkin R, Craig VSJ, 'Effect of electrolyte species on the adsorption of a cationic surfactant to silica: The common intersection point', Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, 347 109-113 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.colsurfa.2009.01.014
CitationsScopus - 12Web of Science - 12
2009Mann JP, McCluskey A, Atkin R, 'Activity and thermal stability of lysozyme in alkylammonium formate ionic liquids: Influence of cation modification', Green Chemistry, 11 785-792 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1039/b900021f
CitationsScopus - 59Web of Science - 55
Co-authorsAdam Mccluskey
2008Atkin R, Warr GG, 'The smallest amphiphiles: Nanostructure in protic room-temperature ionic liquids with short alkyl groups', The Journal of Physical Chemistry. B, 112 4164-4166 (2008) [C1]
DOI10.1021/jp801190u
CitationsScopus - 162Web of Science - 161
2007Atkin R, Warr GG, 'Structure in confined room-temperature ionic liquids', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY C, 111 5162-5168 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.1021/jp067420gAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 188Web of Science - 186
2007Atkin R, Warr GG, 'Phase behavior and microstructure of microemulsions with a room-temperature ionic liquid as the polar phase', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY B, 111 9309-9316 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.1021/jp065020nAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 88Web of Science - 82
2006Thordarson P, Atkin R, Kalle WHJ, Warr GG, Braet F, 'Developments in using scanning probe microscopy to study molecules on surfaces - From thin films and single-molecule conductivity to drug-living cell interactions', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF CHEMISTRY, 59 359-375 (2006) [C1]
DOI10.1071/CH06043Author URL
CitationsScopus - 5Web of Science - 9
2005Atkin R, Warr GG, 'Self-assembly of a nonionic surfactant at the graphite/ionic liquid interface', JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, 127 11940-11941 (2005) [C1]
DOI10.1021/ja053904zAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 80Web of Science - 81
2005Dowding PJ, Atkin R, Vincent B, Bouillot P, 'Oil core/polymer shell microcapsules by internal phase separation from emulsion droplets. II: Controlling the release profile of active molecules', LANGMUIR, 21 5278-5284 (2005) [C1]
DOI10.1021/la0470838Author URL
CitationsScopus - 50Web of Science - 51
2005Atkin R, Bradley M, Vincent B, 'Core-shell particles having silica cores and pH-responsive poly(vinylpyridine) shells', SOFT MATTER, 1 160-165 (2005) [C1]
DOI10.1039/b502628hAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 26Web of Science - 23
2004Atkin R, Davies P, Hardy J, Vincent B, 'Preparation of aqueous core/polymer shell microcapsules by internal phase separation', MACROMOLECULES, 37 7979-7985 (2004) [C1]
DOI10.1021/ma048902yAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 56Web of Science - 50
2004Burnett GR, Atkin R, Hicks S, Eastoe J, 'Surfactant-free "Emulsions" generated by freeze-thaw', LANGMUIR, 20 5673-5678 (2004) [C1]
DOI10.1021/la049923oAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 26Web of Science - 25
2004Dowding PJ, Atkin R, Vincent B, Bouillot P, 'Oil core-polymer shell microcapsules prepared by internal phase separation from emulsion droplets. I. Characterization and release rates for microcapsules with polystyrene shells', LANGMUIR, 20 11374-11379 (2004) [C1]
DOI10.1021/la048561hAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 78Web of Science - 74
2003Atkin R, Craig VSJ, Wanless EJ, Biggs SR, 'Adsorption of 12-s-12 Gemini Surfactants at the Silica - Aqueous Solution Interface', Journal of Physical Chemistry Part B, 2978-2985 (2003) [C1]
DOI10.1021/jp026626o
CitationsScopus - 63Web of Science - 62
Co-authorsErica Wanless
2003Atkin R, Craig VSJ, Wanless EJ, Biggs SR, 'Mechanism of cationic surfactant adsorption at the solid-aqueous interface', Advances in Colloid and Interface Science, 219-304 (2003) [C1]
DOI10.1016/S0001-8686(03)00002-2
CitationsScopus - 345Web of Science - 320
Co-authorsErica Wanless
2003Atkin R, Craig VSJ, Wanless EJ, Biggs SR, 'The influence of chain length and electrolyte on the adsorption kinetics of cationic surfactants at the silica-aqueous solution interface', Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 236-244 (2003) [C1]
DOI10.1016/S0021-9797(03)00631-3
CitationsScopus - 93Web of Science - 93
Co-authorsErica Wanless
2003Atkin R, Craig VSJ, Hartley PG, Wanless EJ, Biggs SR, 'Adsorption of Ionic Surfactants to a Plasma Polymer Substrate', Langmuir, 4222-4227 (2003) [C1]
DOI10.1021/la026852p
CitationsScopus - 14Web of Science - 14
Co-authorsErica Wanless
2001Atkin R, Craig VSJ, Biggs SR, 'Adsorption kinetics and structural arrangements of cetylpyridinium bromide at the silica-aqueous interface', Langmuir, 17 6155-6163 (2001) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 85Web of Science - 84
2000Atkin R, Craig VSJ, Biggs SR, 'Adsorption kinetics and structural arrangements of cationic surfactants on silica surfaces', Langmuir, 16 9374-9380 (2000) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 102Web of Science - 97
Show 85 more journal articles

Conference (14 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2014Atkin R, Li H, Sweeney J, Elbourne A, Webber G, Rutland M, Warr GG, 'Effect of surface nanostructure and ion structure on the nanotribology of the graphite: Ionic liquid interface', ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, San Francisco, CA (2014) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsGrant Webber
2014Atkin R, Murphy T, Hayes R, Imberti S, Warr GG, 'Solvation and structure in protic ionic liquids', ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, San Francisco, CA (2014) [E3]
Author URL
2013Asencio RA, Cranston ED, Wakeham D, Niga P, Werzer O, Sweeney J, et al., 'Nanotribology: Tribotronics, ionic liquids and control of surface interactions', 5th World Tribology Congress, WTC 2013 (2013)

The interfacial ordering of Ionic liquids leads to interesting nanotribological properties as revealed by colloid probe studies. The first of these is the clear correlation between the number of ion pairs trapped in the tribological contact and the friction coefficient displayed. The second is the fact that the surface electrical potential can be used to control the composition of the boundary layer and thus tune the friction. Thirdly, the interfacial ordering appears to significantly affect the fluid dynamics over large distances.

Co-authorsGrant Webber
2013Atkin R, 'Influence of ion structure and surface potential on ionic liquid lubrication', 5th World Tribology Congress, WTC 2013 (2013)

The lubricating properties of ionic liquids can be controlled by varying the molecular structure of the ions1'2 and by applying an electric potential to the sliding contact.3 Results for two systems will be presented. Firstly, the lubricating properties of protic ionic liquids confined between silica and mica surfaces will be examined. Atomic force microscope (AFM) images combined with normal and lateral force curves allows variation in lubricity as a function of normal load to be correlated with differences in the lateral structure of the ions confined between the surfaces. Secondly, results for aprotic ionic liquids confined between silica and gold surfaces will be presented. Friction forces vary with the potential applied to the gold surface because the composition of the ion layer confined between the two surfaces changes from cation-enriched (at negative potentials) to anion-enriched (at positive potentials); whether lubricity is increased or decreased as the composition changes depends on the ion species (c.f. Figure below). This offers a new approach to tuning factional forces reversibly at the molecular level without changing the substrates by employing a self-replenishing boundary lubricant of low vapour pressure.

2013Hjalmarsson N, Asencio RÁ, Sweeney J, Shah FU, Schaufelberger F, Ramström O, et al., 'Biodegradable ionic liquids as lubricants', 5th World Tribology Congress, WTC 2013 (2013)
2011Cranston ED, Werzer O, Alvarez R, Atkin R, Rutland MW, 'Nanotribology of protic ionic liquids: Green lubricants for micro-/nano-electromechanical devices', Abstracts Of Papers Of The American Chemical Society, Anaheim, CA (2011) [E3]
CitationsWeb of Science - 2
2011Borisenko N, Hayes RL, Atkin R, Endres F, 'An in situ STM / DTS study of the ionic liquid / Au(111) interface in extremely pure [Py1,4]FAP and [EMIm]FAP: potential dependent solvation layers', Abstracts. 4th International Congress on Ionic Liquids (COIL-4), Washington DC, USA (2011) [E3]
2011Werzer O, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Structure of PEO in ethylammonium nitrate and adsorbed at the silica interface', UK Colloids 2011: an International Colloid and Surface Science Symposium, London (2011) [E3]
2010Atkin R, Hayes RL, Imberti S, Warr GG, 'Nanostructure in protic ionic liquids', Abstracts of Papers, 239th ACS National Meeting, San Francisco, CA (2010) [E3]
2009Atkin R, Wakeham D, Hayes RL, Imberti S, Warr GG, 'Bulk and interfacial nanostructure in ionic liquids', 3rd Congress on Ionic Liquids (COIL-3): Conference Program, Cairns, QLD (2009) [E3]
2009Atkin R, Zein El Abedin S, Hayes RL, Gasparotto LHS, Borisenko N, Endres F, 'AFM and STM studies on the surface interaction of [BMP]TFSA and [EMIm]TFSA ionic liquids with Au(111)', ACIS 2009: Conference Programme, Adelaide, SA (2009) [E3]
DOI10.1021/jp9026755
2008Atkin R, Warr GG, 'Influence of solvophobicity and bulk nanostructure on solvation layers of room temperature ionic liquids confined between surfaces', 236th ACS National Meeting and Exposition. Abstracts, Philadelphia, Pa. (2008) [E3]
2008Atkin R, Warr GG, 'I&EC 42-Influence of solvophobicity and bulk nanostructure on solvation layers of room temperature ionic liquids confined between surfaces', ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia, PA (2008) [E3]
Author URL
1999Craig VSJ, Atkin R, Biggs SR, 'A Reflectometry Study of the adsorption Kinetics of Cetyltrimethylammonium Bromide to the Silica-Water Interface', Chemeca99, Newcastle City Hall Convention Centre (1999) [E1]
Show 11 more conferences
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants36
Total funding$3,624,602

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20151 grants / $4,545

The 7th Australian Symposium on Ionic Liquids $4,545

Funding body: NSW Trade & Investment

Funding bodyNSW Trade & Investment
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin
SchemeNSW Research Attraction and Acceleration Program (RAAP) Conference Sponsorship Program
RoleLead
Funding Start2015
Funding Finish2015
GNoG1500516
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - State
Category2OPS
UONY

20146 grants / $149,334

Surface and Colloid Characterisation Facility$60,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamProfessor Vincent Craig, Dr Shannon Notley, Doctor Grant Webber, Professor Peter Kingshott, Professor Erica Wanless, Professor Sally McArthur, Professor Rob Atkin, Associate Professor Paul Stoddart, Associate Professor Andrew Clayton
SchemeEquipment Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1300566
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Surface and Colloid Characterisation Facility$41,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamProfessor Vincent Craig, Dr Shannon Notley, Doctor Grant Webber, Professor Peter Kingshott, Professor Erica Wanless, Professor Sally McArthur, Professor Rob Atkin, Associate Professor Paul Stoddart, Associate Professor Andrew Clayton
SchemeLinkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF)
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1400581
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Surface and Colloid Characterisation Facility$41,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamProfessor Vincent Craig, Dr Shannon Notley, Doctor Grant Webber, Professor Peter Kingshott, Professor Erica Wanless, Professor Sally McArthur, Professor Rob Atkin, Associate Professor Paul Stoddart, Associate Professor Andrew Clayton
SchemeLinkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF)
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1400581
Type Of FundingScheme excluded from IGS
CategoryEXCL
UONY

Ionic Liquid SANS Scattering$2,667

Funding body: ANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation)

Funding bodyANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation)
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin
SchemeAccess to Major Research Facilities Program
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1400775
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category1NS
UONY

Ionic Liquid SANS Scattering$2,667

Funding body: ANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation)

Funding bodyANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation)
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin
SchemeAccess to Major Research Facilities Program
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1400776
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category1NS
UONY

Faculty PVC Conference Assistance Grant 2014$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin
SchemePVC Conference Assistance Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1401182
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20133 grants / $390,000

Functional mesostructured materials in ionic liquids$180,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamProfessor Gregory Warr, Professor Rob Atkin, Doctor Grant Webber
SchemeDiscovery Projects
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1300041
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Access for Australian Researchers to Advanced Neutron Beam Techniques$150,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDr Brendan Kennedy, Gentle, Ian, Daniels, John, Campbell, Stewart, Professor Erich Kisi, Professor Rob Atkin, White, John, Goossens, Darren, Dr Raymond Dagastine, He, Lizhong, Tehei, Moeava, Li, Huijun, Low, It-Meng (Jim), Professor Evan Gray, Mulhern, Terrence, Tabor, Rico, Ling, Chris, Turner, David, Gardiner, Michael
SchemeEquipment Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1200267
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

DVC(R) Research Support for Future Fellow (FT12)$60,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin
SchemeSpecial Project Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1201106
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20124 grants / $1,111,319

Green working liquids for an energy efficient future$713,652

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin
SchemeFuture Fellowships
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1101096
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Molecular Scale Engineering of Solid / Ionic Liquid Interfaces $380,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin, Professor Mark Rutland, Associate Professor Frank Endres
SchemeDiscovery Projects
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1100252
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

2011 Emerging Research Leaders Program$15,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin
SchemeEmerging Research Leaders Program
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200481
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Morphological transitions of polyethylene oxide dissolved in Ethylammonium Nitrate under shear$2,667

Funding body: AINSE (Australian Institute of Nuclear Science & Engineering)

Funding bodyAINSE (Australian Institute of Nuclear Science & Engineering)
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin
SchemeAINSE Award
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1201120
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category1NS
UONY

20116 grants / $368,875

Interfacial Mapping Facility$180,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamProfessor Paul Dastoor, Laureate Professor Graeme Jameson, Professor Erica Wanless, Doctor Grant Webber, Professor Rob Atkin, Professor Ewa Goldys, Professor Deborah Kane, Dr James Downes, Dr Gregory Wilson, Doctor Chris Fell
SchemeLinkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF)
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1000635
Type Of FundingScheme excluded from IGS
CategoryEXCL
UONY

Gold Recovery from Ore Using Ionic Liquids$75,000

Funding body: Barrick Gold Corporation

Funding bodyBarrick Gold Corporation
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin, Emeritus Professor Geoffrey Lawrance
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1001064
Type Of FundingInternational - Non Competitive
Category3IFB
UONY

Interfacial Mapping Facility$40,000

Funding body: CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

Funding bodyCSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Project TeamProfessor Paul Dastoor, Laureate Professor Graeme Jameson, Professor Erica Wanless, Doctor Grant Webber, Professor Rob Atkin, Professor Ewa Goldys, Professor Deborah Kane, Dr James Downes, Dr Gregory Wilson, Doctor Chris Fell
SchemeLinkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF) Partner funding
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100411
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

Investigations of bulk nanostructure in protic ionic liquids$33,875

Funding body: AINSE (Australian Institute of Nuclear Science & Engineering)

Funding bodyAINSE (Australian Institute of Nuclear Science & Engineering)
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin, Professor Gregory Warr
SchemePostgraduate Research Award (PGRA)
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100573
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Interfacial Mapping Facility$30,000

Funding body: Macquarie University

Funding bodyMacquarie University
Project TeamProfessor Paul Dastoor, Laureate Professor Graeme Jameson, Professor Erica Wanless, Doctor Grant Webber, Professor Rob Atkin, Professor Ewa Goldys, Professor Deborah Kane, Dr James Downes, Dr Gregory Wilson, Doctor Chris Fell
SchemeLinkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF) Partner funding
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100872
Type Of FundingScheme excluded from IGS
CategoryEXCL
UONY

Structure of Adsorbed Surfactant Layers at the Ethanoalammonium Nitrate/Air Interface$10,000

Funding body: AINSE (Australian Institute of Nuclear Science & Engineering)

Funding bodyAINSE (Australian Institute of Nuclear Science & Engineering)
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin
SchemeAINSE Award
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100868
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category1NS
UONY

20105 grants / $947,980

An Integrated LC-MS-NMR facility for Applications in Proteomics and Organic Chemistry$500,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamProfessor Adam McCluskey, Laureate Professor John Aitken, Professor Paul Dastoor, Professor Phillip Robinson, Professor Eileen McLaughlin, Emeritus Professor Geoffrey Lawrance, Professor Marcel Maeder, Professor Hugh Dunstan, Doctor Shaun Roman, Professor Rob Atkin, Doctor Clovia Holdsworth, Doctor Mark Baker, Doctor Nikki Verrills, Professor Gottfried Otting, Associate Professor Brett Nixon, Doctor Xiaojing Zhou, Ms Megan Chircop, Doctor Warwick Belcher
SchemeLinkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF)
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG0190402
Type Of FundingScheme excluded from IGS
CategoryEXCL
UONY

An Integrated LC-MS-NMR facility for Applications in Proteomics and Organic Chemistry$280,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamProfessor Adam McCluskey, Laureate Professor John Aitken, Professor Paul Dastoor, Professor Phillip Robinson, Professor Eileen McLaughlin, Emeritus Professor Geoffrey Lawrance, Professor Marcel Maeder, Professor Hugh Dunstan, Doctor Shaun Roman, Professor Rob Atkin, Doctor Clovia Holdsworth, Doctor Mark Baker, Doctor Nikki Verrills, Professor Gottfried Otting, Associate Professor Brett Nixon, Doctor Xiaojing Zhou, Ms Megan Chircop, Doctor Warwick Belcher
SchemeEquipment Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000873
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Soft matter and responsive materials characterisation facility$135,535

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamDr Raymond Dagastine, Laureate Professor Graeme Jameson, Doctor Grant Webber, Professor Rob Atkin, Professor Erica Wanless
SchemeLinkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF)
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000397
Type Of FundingScheme excluded from IGS
CategoryEXCL
UONY

Surfactant Adsorption and Structure at Ionic Liquid Interfaces$20,445

Funding body: AINSE (Australian Institute of Nuclear Science & Engineering)

Funding bodyAINSE (Australian Institute of Nuclear Science & Engineering)
Project TeamMrs Deborah Wakeham, Professor Rob Atkin
SchemePostgraduate Research Award (PGRA)
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000527
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Effect of variation in the anion on the bulk nanostructure of protic ionic liquids$12,000

Funding body: ANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation)

Funding bodyANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation)
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin
SchemeAccess to Major Research Facilities Program
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000382
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

20092 grants / $240,815

Adsorption and Structure at Ionic Liquid Interfaces$237,985

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin
SchemeDiscovery Projects
RoleLead
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0189865
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Structure of protic ionic liquids at the air interface$2,830

Funding body: AINSE (Australian Institute of Nuclear Science & Engineering)

Funding bodyAINSE (Australian Institute of Nuclear Science & Engineering)
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin
SchemeAINSE Award
RoleLead
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0900088
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category1NS
UONY

20085 grants / $46,350

Adsorption and Structure at Ionic Liquid Interfaces$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin
SchemeNear Miss Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0188394
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Investigations of the Bulk Nanostructure of Some Simple Protic Ionic Liquids$12,000

Funding body: ANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation)

Funding bodyANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation)
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin, Professor Gregory Warr
SchemeAccess to Major Research Facilities Program
RoleLead
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0189625
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

Structure of absorbed surfactant layers at ionic liquid-air interfaces$11,250

Funding body: ANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation)

Funding bodyANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation)
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin, Professor Gregory Warr
SchemeAccess to Major Research Facilities Program
RoleLead
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0188523
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

236th ACS National Meeting and Exposition$1,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0188961
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Structure of adsorbed surfactant layers at ionic liquid-air interfaces$1,400

Funding body: AINSE (Australian Institute of Nuclear Science & Engineering)

Funding bodyAINSE (Australian Institute of Nuclear Science & Engineering)
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin
SchemeUse of Facilities Only
RoleLead
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0188423
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category1NS
UONY

20074 grants / $365,384

2007 Research Fellowship - PRCOE$272,654

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin
SchemeResearch Fellowship
RoleLead
Funding Start2007
Funding Finish2007
GNoG0187046
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Surfactant self-assembly in ionic liquids$46,130

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin, Professor Gregory Warr
SchemeDiscovery Projects
RoleLead
Funding Start2007
Funding Finish2007
GNoG0187822
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Structure of adsorbed surfactant layers at ionic liquid-air interfaces$31,600

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin, Professor Gregory Warr, Professor Mark Rutland
SchemeLinkage International
RoleLead
Funding Start2007
Funding Finish2007
GNoG0187800
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

2007 Research Fellowship Project Grant$15,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamProfessor Rob Atkin
SchemeFellowship Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2007
Funding Finish2007
GNoG0188116
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY
Edit

Research Supervision

Current Supervision

CommencedResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015Development of Accelerated Molecular Simulations for Nanocarbon Self-Assembly
Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Co-Supervisor
2015Bulk and Interfacial Structure in Solvate Ionic Liquids
Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment
Co-Supervisor
2015Polymeric Materials as Additives to Low Melting Point Salt Lubricants
Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment
Co-Supervisor
2014Tuning the Properties of Liquid-Like Nanoscale Organic Hybrid Materials (NOHMs)
Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Principal Supervisor
2013Effect of Variation in Inter-Ion Forces on the Adsorbed and Near Surface Structure of Ionic Liquids at Solid Interfaces
Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Principal Supervisor
2012IoNanofluids for Heat Transfer
Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Principal Supervisor
2012The Impact of Surface-Induced Molecular Ordering on the Friction and Fluid Dynamics in Ionic Liquid Systems
Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

YearResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2014Structure in Ionic Liquids
Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Principal Supervisor
2014Molecular Structure, Flow Properties and Particle Stability in Protic Ionic Liquids
Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Principal Supervisor
2013Surfactant Adsorption and Structure at Ionic Liquid Interfaces
Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Principal Supervisor
Edit

Professor Rob Atkin

Position

ARC Future Fellow
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science and Information Technology

Focus area

Chemistry

Contact Details

Emailrob.atkin@newcastle.edu.au
Phone(02) 40339356
Fax(02) 4921 5472

Office

Room115
BuildingNIER Building C
LocationCallaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
Edit