Associate Professor Richard Fletcher

Associate Professor Richard Fletcher

Associate Professor

Family Action Centre

A helping hand for fathers

A team leader within the Faculty of Health and Medicine's Family Action Centre, Associate Professor Richard Fletcher is shining a spotlight on the role of fathers.

Dr Richard Fletcher 

Associate Professor Richard Fletcher leads the Fathers and Families Research Program (FFRP) within the Family Action Centre at the University of Newcastle.

The FFRP team focus on research and teaching around fathers, particularly fathers of young children and babies.

Richard believes that we as a society need to change our expectations and beliefs relating to the role of fathers, for the benefit of the whole family and wider society.

Actively working towards this goal, Richard and his team have several projects in the works. They are in the process of trialing a smartphone based program that will offer information, mood assessment and support for new and expectant fathers, in a bid to identify and address paternal perinatal depression.

Another project, run by Dr Jennifer St George, is assessing the importance and safe limits of rough and tumble play between fathers and children, beginning with pre-school aged children.

A third project sees Dr Chris May working with couples on parenting partnerships. Through identifying and encouraging factors that create successful co-parenting dynamics, the projects aims to enhance the well-being of all members of the family.

As a result of the team's work, both government departments and non-government organisations (NGOs) have begun to review their policies and standard practices to identify and enhance opportunities for fathers' involvement.

CHANGING PERCEPTIONS

As well as teaching courses in the Master in Family Studies program, the team provide consultancy services to organisations around Australia, and across the globe, on how to more successfully engage fathers in areas that have previously been dominated by maternal caregivers.

Richard sees the consultation work that he and the team at the Family Action Centre undertake with health professionals, and other services such as schools and welfare agencies, as a giant step towards changing understandings of the roles of fathers. But there is still a long way to go.

"There's still a very strong idea in the community and amongst professionals about parental roles. Many think that engaging mothers as the primary caregiver is sufficient, and fathers are just an optional extra," he explains.

"Fathers are invisible in many places, and that is endemic. Not because people dislike fathers, but because the system is set up to be focused on mothers."

Some services and organisations are aware of the need to engage dads, but have been unsuccessful in their attempts.

"When people are challenged about this, they generally want dads involved," Richard affirms.

"Often, however, they just don't know how to do it."

ADDRESSING ROADBLOCKS HEAD ON

Richard's research revealed possible long-term negative impacts on the children of dads with mental health issues. Fathers' depressive symptoms in the first year after the birth predicted behavior problems in their children years later.

"If dads' mental health has such a dramatic impact then we need to be screening dads for depression, not just mums," Richard explains.

"This is a relatively new idea."

"We were so focused on the mum being the main affect that we didn't factor in the dads. Now we see it matters a lot, right from birth."

New costs related to babies, decreased family income due to maternal leave, plus new and extra family related duties, often combine to make the physical attendance of men at perinatal services impractical.

This increased pressure comes at a time where changes to routines and relationships can create stress and isolation, making dads vulnerable.

"We always worked on the idea that dad's should come to the same groups as the mums, parenting classes and things like that," he recalls.

"But then we thought, what if you weren't trying to do that, what if you accepted the fact that they're not able to come in, how do you talk to them?"

BUILDING FOUNDATIONS

In response to these limitations, Richard and his team have designed a smart-phone based program that allows mobile connection for new and expectant dads.

Participants will receive texts containing information and links, and self-report their mood. If the mood tracker identifies them as needing extra support, they will be offered a phone call from a counsellor trained in this area.

Following the recent success of a six week pilot of the SMS4dads program, a twelve month trial will start later this year. Funding for the program, which includes a website and social media presence, comes from Beyond Blue and the Movember Foundation.

"When dad's miss the classes or activities, they miss the contact and the links to other people.  They may never get the chance to say to anyone, look I'm really stressed," he points out.

"This is a way of bringing dads into the system and keeping them hooked up," explains Richard.

TAILORED AND TARGETED SUPPORT

Although only in the trial phase, the SMS4dads project has already produced spin-off programs.

Richard and his team are working with the Young and Well Co-operative Research Centre, local Aboriginal communities, and the University of Newcastle's Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health to develop a website for young Aboriginal dads.

The Stayin' on Track: Young Aboriginal Fathers Project is focused on the experiences of young Aboriginal dads in Moree, Tamworth and Newcastle.

The project participants receive the same smartphone mood assessment and information as the SMS4Dads users, but also receive follow up support directly from community leaders and project facilitators, Charlie Faulkner and Craig Hammond.

A pivotal component of the project involves the participants sharing their stories. Filmed interviews with the fathers will be available on the website for other dads to access.

Another spin-off is in the works with the Queensland Department of Health.

"They were looking to run a project using SMS messages for mums. When they heard about our SMS for dads projects they approached us to partner with them," Richard explains.

"It's a much more mainstream approach so we're very excited about that." 

A SEASONED WARRIOR

Richard credits a varied career, a talented and innovative team, and much life experience for affording him the insight needed to address the challenges related to actively engaging dads.

Following a stint as a high school science teacher, Richard took up to a position in the Equity Unit at the University of Newcastle.

From there his maths and teaching qualifications gained him a position in Holistic Health within the Faculty of Health.

After completing his masters in Medical Science, studying epidemiology, Richard earned his PhD focusing on fathers and attachment.

Although not a clinician himself, Richard often works with health professionals on issues related to fathers, and has delivered many antenatal programs for expectant dads.

He credits his own family with giving him the advanced understanding of the role of fathers needed to make his work relevant.

"I have three daughters and two stepdaughters,"

"My kids would say they taught me just about everything I know and they'd be right. They've taught me a lot, and still do."

Dr Richard Fletcher

A helping hand for fathers

Associate Professor Richard Fletcher is building support systems for new fathers using text, internet and peer-designed video to deliver information to dads

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

As a natural extension of the development at the University of Newcastle of 'boyswork' a new area of gender-related practice linking social and physical health and education, Richard Fletcher, began to incorporate fathers into the program development model at the Family Action Centre which was focused on working with established services to help them include 'marginalised' groups into the normal service delivery. This approach, focusing on service providers rather than on the clients as 'the problem' had been successfully introduced into the Men's Health arena through the presentations and role of Richard Fletcher at national conferences and as advisor to state and federal government departments. In the case of fathers the Bernard van Leer Foundation agreed to fund a significant project, The Engaging Fathers Project, over five years to develop effective models of father engagement among services addressing the needs of children 0-8. This project led to research reports, resources and training for service staff in all states and territories. Change at the national level was achieved due to several initiatives: the Engaging Fathers Project was funded to conduct a review of fatherhood research in Australia (a recommendation from this review was to have a national Practitioners Forum to draw together examples of capacity building to involve fathers); Richard Fletcher had that key role incorporating fathers into the discussion at the Parenting in Australia national workshop hosted by FACSIA; Richard Fletcher and Judi Geggie presented invited seminars in Canberra to FACSIA staff; the Father Inclusive Practice Forum was subsequently funded. These activities resulted in changes to FACSIA management (funded programs are now required to report separately on the involvement of mothers and fathers - an important first step to addressing the lack of fathers involvement). State government departments and NGOs (for example Karitane) have begun to review their policies and standard practices to identify avenues for fathers involvement. 

Current research projects include:

Developing a User-guided Website for Young Aboriginal Fathers (as Project Leader with team of 8 researchers) ,  Paternal Perinatal Depression Initiative (as Project Leader with team of 90 researchers and clinicians), Video-Feedback training in Families with Cerebral Palsy (as Project Leader with 8 researchers and clinicians), Father-child Rough and Tumble Play (as Project Leader with 2 other researchers). 

Research Expertise
Designed and conducted research into fathers' role in families across diverse settings such as separated parents, new fathers, antenatal support, rough and tumble play with children, fathers using the web. Also research into practitioners' role in promoting father-infant and father-child contact for the benefit of the whole family.

Teaching Expertise
Designed and delivered courses and seminars on Health Research, Boys development, Engaging Fathers in Human Services, Separated Fathers, Fathers and Postnatal Depression, Father-infant Attachment and Working with Fathers in Vulnerable Families to undergraduate and postgraduate level and to professionals in health, education and welfare.

Administrative Expertise
Coordinator of undergraduate and postgraduate online and blended courses. Project leader for large multi-component research projects.

Collaborations
My current projects involve working with researchers and clinicians from Pediatrics, Nursing, Midwifery, Education, Epidemiology, Psychiatry, Early Childhood, Social Work, Psychology in all states of Australia and UK, Sweden, Poland, Canada, USA , Israel and The Netherlands. I also collaborate with those working in Disability and with several Aboriginal researchers.

Qualifications

  • PhD (Paediatrics), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science, University of Sydney
  • Diploma in Education, University of Sydney
  • Graduate Diploma in Health Social Science, University of Newcastle
  • Master of Medical Science, University of Newcastle
  • Graduate Diploma of Infant Mental Health, NSW Institute of Psychiatry

Keywords

  • Domestic violence
  • Father inclusive practice
  • Father-infant attachment
  • Fathers
  • Fathers mental health
  • Indigenous fatherhood
  • Parenting
  • Play and self-regulation
  • Postnatal depression fathers
  • Public health
  • Separated parents and child development
  • Strengths-based practice with families

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified 30
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 70

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
Family Action Centre
Australia
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
Family Action Centre
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2009 -  Lecturer (Level C), Project Leader, Engaging Fathers Project, Family Action Centre University of Newcastle
Family Action Centre
Australia
1/01/2008 -  Editor - Australian Fatherhood Research Network Australian Fatherhood Research Network
Australia
1/01/2002 - 1/06/2003 Consultant for FACS Department of Family and Community Services
1/01/1992 -  Education Officer, Equity Unit University of Newcastle
Equity Unit
Australia
1/01/1992 -  Lecturer Level B, Health Studies, Discipline of Paediatrics, University of Newcastle
Discipline of Paedriatics
Australia
1/01/1991 -  Tutor University of Newcastle
Faculty Of Health
Australia
1/01/1990 -  Health Educator, Health Promotion Unit Hunter Area Health Service

Invitations

Participant

Year Title / Rationale
2006 The Psychosocial Assessment of Fathers Antenatally
Organisation: World Association for Infant Mental Health Description: Richard Fletcher The Psychosocial Assessment of Fathers Antenatally (poster) World Association for Infant Mental Health, Paris July 2006.
2006 Web-based information for new fathers
Organisation: Second Biennial Parenting Conference Description: Web-based information for new fathers Second Biennial Parenting Conference Adelaide May 2006
2005 Father-Infant Attachment
Organisation: Australian Association for Infant Mental Health Description: Richard Fletcher Father-Infant Attachment Australian Association for Infant Mental Health 2005 QUT Brisbane 7 - 9 July 2005
2005 The missing father in everyday healthcare
Organisation: Best Practice for Better Health! 6th UIHPE European Conference on Effectiveness and Quality of Health Promotion Description: The missing father in everyday healthcare lessons from the Engaging Fathers Program of Australia Best Practice for Better Health! 6th UIHPE European Conference on Effectiveness and Quality of Health Promotion Stockholm, Sweden 2005
2004 Connecting The Dots: fathers, boys, families and strengths
Organisation: Working with Fathers: Achieving Positive Outcomes for Children conference Children North East Description: Connecting The Dots: fathers, boys, families and strengths 11th March 2004. Working with Fathers: Achieving Positive Outcomes for Children conference Children North East, Newcastle Upon Tyne, England
2004 Beyond 'Dear Parents' making the invisible fathers visible
Organisation: Reconceptualizing Early Childhood Education Conference on Research, Theory and Practice Description: Craig dArcy and Richard Fletcher Beyond Dear Parents& making the invisible fathers visible Reconceptualizing Early Childhood Education Conference on Research, Theory and Practice:Oslo University College, Oslo Troubling Identities Oslo University College, Oslo, Norway - May 24 28, 2004.
2003 What we know about fathers
Organisation: National Strategic Conference on Fatherhood Description: Papers presented Richard Fletcher What we know about fathers National Strategic Conference on Fatherhood Main Committee Room Parliament House, Canberra 18th & 19th August, 2003
2003 Families: Myths, Dreams and Realities
Organisation: The National Association of Childbirth Educators (NACE Description: Keynote speaker Fathers and Babies The National Association of Childbirth Educators (NACE) 8th National Conference Families: Myths, Dreams and Realities 21st 23rd February 2003 Sydney, Australia
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.

Highlighted Publications

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Fletcher R, Freeman EE, Matthey S, 'The impact of behavioural parent training on fathers' parenting: A meta-analysis of the triple-p positive parenting program', Fathering: A Journal of Theory, Research, & Practice about Men as Fathers, 9 291-312 (2011) [C1]
Co-authors Emily Freeman
2011 Fletcher R, The Dad Factor : How the Father-Baby Bond Helps a Child for Life, Finch Publishing, Warriewood, NSW, 211 (2011) [A1]
2011 Fletcher R, Freeman EE, Garfield C, Vimpani GV, 'The effects of early paternal depression on children's development', Medical Journal of Australia, 195 685-689 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Emily Freeman
2011 Fletcher R, 'Field testing of father-inclusive guidelines for web-based information and support aimed at families with perinatal depression', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 22 231-233 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4
2013 Fletcher R, StGeorge J, Freeman E, 'Rough and tumble play quality: Theoretical foundations for a new measure of father-child interaction', Early Child Development and Care, 183 746-759 (2013) [C1]

Energetic, competitive, body-contact play (rough and tumble play (RTP)) is commonly observed among young children and is reported as an important feature of father-child relations... [more]

Energetic, competitive, body-contact play (rough and tumble play (RTP)) is commonly observed among young children and is reported as an important feature of father-child relationships. Animal studies have demonstrated positive developmental effects of peer-peer play-wrestling, influencing cognitive and social outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the nature of RTP between father and child and its relationship to child development and to describe a theoretically informed measure of the quality of father-child RTP. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/03004430.2012.723439
Citations Scopus - 7
Co-authors Emily Freeman, Jennifer Stgeorge
2013 Fletcher RJ, Maharaj ON, Fletcher Watson CH, May C, Skeates N, Gruenert S, 'Fathers with mental illness: implications for clinicians and health services', The Medical journal of Australia, 199 S34-S36 (2013)

A significant proportion of fathers living with their natural, adopted, step or foster children experience mental illness. Psychiatric illness among fathers can have a devastating... [more]

A significant proportion of fathers living with their natural, adopted, step or foster children experience mental illness. Psychiatric illness among fathers can have a devastating impact on children's wellbeing, and even milder forms of paternal mental illness can have serious developmental effects on children. While several pathways linking paternal mental illness with poor child outcomes have been identified, fathers' impaired parenting is an important, potentially malleable factor. Clinicians can assist fathers with mental illness and their families by proactively inquiring about children and by exploring fathering-focused psychological support.

Citations Scopus - 2
2015 Fletcher R, Garfield CF, Matthey S, 'Fathers' Perinatal Mental Health', Identifying Perinatal Depression and Anxiety: Evidence-Based Practice in Screening, Psychosocial Assessment and Management, Wiley, Chichester, UK 165-176 (2015) [B1]
DOI 10.1002/9781118509722.ch10
2016 Fletcher R, May C, Wroe J, Hall P, Cooke D, Rawlinson C, et al., 'Development of a set of mobile phone text messages designed for new fathers', Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, 34 525-534 (2016)

© 2016 Society for Reproductive and Infant Psychology.Objective: The project aimed to test of the quality and acceptability of researcher-developed Short Message Service (SMS) ... [more]

© 2016 Society for Reproductive and Infant Psychology.Objective: The project aimed to test of the quality and acceptability of researcher-developed Short Message Service (SMS) messages designed to support fathers of infants aged 12 months or less. Background: The findings of previous studies suggest antenatal and postnatal depression among fathers¿ impacts negatively on the health of family members. Method: Draft messages were first modified based on expert review. In a second phase, parents (mothers n¿=¿56; fathers n¿=¿46; unknown n¿=¿4) were recruited through two early childhood parenting services to rate the clarity, usefulness and relevance of the 70 SMS messages using a paper-based survey. In a third phase, 15 fathers were recruited to receive texts at different times over three weeks. Results: Findings suggest that SMS items were easily understood by the majority of parents, with only 3% of responses indicating an item was ¿not easily understood¿. Feedback from parents indicated that negatively rated SMS messages were considered as either poorly phrased, lacking enough information or as not offering sufficient support. The majority (88%) of the SMS items were also rated as ¿useful¿ by the parents. Conclusion: Fathers¿ responses indicated that receiving the texts at different times was acceptable and that message content was relevant to their fathering. The study has produced a set of brief text messages suitable and acceptable to new fathers and their partners.

DOI 10.1080/02646838.2016.1214250
Co-authors Brian Kelly
2016 O'Brien AP, McNeil KA, Fletcher R, Conrad A, Wilson AJ, Jones D, Chan SW, 'New Fathers' Perinatal Depression and Anxiety-Treatment Options: An Integrative Review.', Am J Mens Health, (2016)
DOI 10.1177/1557988316669047
Co-authors Amanda Wilson, Sally Chan, Tony Obrien, Agatha Conrad

Book (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Fletcher R, The Dad Factor : How the Father-Baby Bond Helps a Child for Life, Finch Publishing, Warriewood, NSW, 211 (2011) [A1]
2008 Fletcher R, The Assessment and Support of New Fathers: Father-Infant Attachment as a Basis for Psychosocial Assessment and Support, VDM Verlag, Saarbrucken, 234 (2008) [A1]
2004 Fletcher R, Bring fathers in handbook: how to engage with men for the benefit of everyone in the family, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW (2004) [A2]

Chapter (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Fletcher R, Garfield CF, Matthey S, 'Fathers' Perinatal Mental Health', Identifying Perinatal Depression and Anxiety: Evidence-Based Practice in Screening, Psychosocial Assessment and Management, Wiley, Chichester, UK 165-176 (2015) [B1]
DOI 10.1002/9781118509722.ch10
2013 Fletcher R, 'Ruw spel van vaders bervordert sociale, emotionele en lichamelijke ontwikkeling van jongens en meisjes. (Fathers rough play promotes social, emotional and physical development of boys and girls)', Jongens & Meisjes: Zoek de verschillen?! (Boys & Girls: Spot the difference!), Van Gorcum Amsterdam, Amsterdam 57-67 (2013) [B1]
2013 Smyth BM, Baxter JA, Fletcher R, Moloney LJ, Moloney L, 'Fathers in Australia: A contemporary snapshot', The Fathers¿ Role: Cross-cultural Perspectives, Routledge, NY 361-382 (2013) [B1]
2010 Fletcher R, 'Including fathers in work with vulnerable families', Working with Vulnerable Families: A Partnership Approach, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 135-155 (2010) [B1]
2006 Fletcher R, 'Male role models', Educating Boys: The Good News: Insights from a Selection of Papers Presented at the 4th Biennial Working with Boys, Building Fine Men Conference, Family Action Centre, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 25-37 (2006) [B2]
2003 Fletcher R, 'Father's role in family services', Focus on Fathering, ACER Press, Camberwell., Victoria 125-141 (2003) [B2]
2001 Fletcher R, 'The development of men's health in Australia', Promoting men's health : a guide for practitioners, Bailli¿re Tindall, London 313 (2001) [B2]
Show 4 more chapters

Journal article (49 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 St George J, Fletcher R, Palazzi K, 'Comparing Fathers' Physical and Toy Play and Links to Child Behaviour: An Exploratory Study', Infant and Child Development, (2016)

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Increasing amounts of research show that fathers' involvement in children's lives contributes to the child's social, emotional and cognitive develop... [more]

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Increasing amounts of research show that fathers' involvement in children's lives contributes to the child's social, emotional and cognitive development; however, much of the evidence comes from fathers' caregiving and object play. This exploratory study compared the characteristics of 24 Australian fathers' play in two contexts - toy play and physical play - and examined the association of these play contexts with children's development. Correlational analyses revealed few conceptual similarities between toy play and physical play (rough-and-tumble). Rough-and-tumble quality was associated with children's emotional and behavioural functioning and self-regulation, while intrusiveness in toy play related only to self-regulation. The findings are discussed in terms of widening the conceptual and methodological reach of fathering measures in order to better capture the range of fathers' parenting behaviours and to be able to determine mechanisms of influence.

DOI 10.1002/icd.1958
2016 Fletcher R, May C, Wroe J, Hall P, Cooke D, Rawlinson C, et al., 'Development of a set of mobile phone text messages designed for new fathers', Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, 34 525-534 (2016)

© 2016 Society for Reproductive and Infant Psychology.Objective: The project aimed to test of the quality and acceptability of researcher-developed Short Message Service (SMS) ... [more]

© 2016 Society for Reproductive and Infant Psychology.Objective: The project aimed to test of the quality and acceptability of researcher-developed Short Message Service (SMS) messages designed to support fathers of infants aged 12 months or less. Background: The findings of previous studies suggest antenatal and postnatal depression among fathers¿ impacts negatively on the health of family members. Method: Draft messages were first modified based on expert review. In a second phase, parents (mothers n¿=¿56; fathers n¿=¿46; unknown n¿=¿4) were recruited through two early childhood parenting services to rate the clarity, usefulness and relevance of the 70 SMS messages using a paper-based survey. In a third phase, 15 fathers were recruited to receive texts at different times over three weeks. Results: Findings suggest that SMS items were easily understood by the majority of parents, with only 3% of responses indicating an item was ¿not easily understood¿. Feedback from parents indicated that negatively rated SMS messages were considered as either poorly phrased, lacking enough information or as not offering sufficient support. The majority (88%) of the SMS items were also rated as ¿useful¿ by the parents. Conclusion: Fathers¿ responses indicated that receiving the texts at different times was acceptable and that message content was relevant to their fathering. The study has produced a set of brief text messages suitable and acceptable to new fathers and their partners.

DOI 10.1080/02646838.2016.1214250
Co-authors Brian Kelly
2016 O'Brien AP, McNeil KA, Fletcher R, Conrad A, Wilson AJ, Jones D, Chan SW, 'New Fathers' Perinatal Depression and Anxiety-Treatment Options: An Integrative Review.', Am J Mens Health, (2016)
DOI 10.1177/1557988316669047
Co-authors Amanda Wilson, Sally Chan, Tony Obrien, Agatha Conrad
2015 Fletcher R, St George J, May C, Hartman D, King A, 'Father-Inclusive Practice in a Family Center - An Australian Perspective', Zero to Three, 35 60-67 (2015) [C2]
Co-authors Jennifer Stgeorge, Deborah Hartman
2015 StGeorge J, Fletcher R, Freeman E, Paquette D, Dumont C, 'Father¿child interactions and children's risk of injury', Early Child Development and Care, (2015) [C1]

Unintentional injury is an important cause of infant and child hospitalisation and parents play a key role in reducing children's risk-taking behaviour. Studies show that maternal... [more]

Unintentional injury is an important cause of infant and child hospitalisation and parents play a key role in reducing children's risk-taking behaviour. Studies show that maternal and paternal parenting and supervision of children differ, but there is little research showing how fathers¿ parenting may influence children's tendency to engage in risk-taking behaviour. Recent theoretical developments suggest that father's parenting may be particularly effective in encouraging safe risk taking. In this study, we examine how well parenting practices typically undertaken by fathers predict rates of children's injury risk at three years. Questionnaire data were collected from 46 fathers. Results show that both duration of rough-and-tumble play and fathers¿ encouragement of perseverance predicted lower rates of injury behaviours, while their stimulation of risk taking predicted higher rates of injury behaviours. The results are discussed in the light of developmentally appropriate risk taking and fathering.

DOI 10.1080/03004430.2014.1000888
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jennifer Stgeorge, Emily Freeman
2015 May C, Fletcher R, Dempsey I, Newman L, 'Modeling Relations among Coparenting Quality, Autism-Specific Parenting Self-Efficacy, and Parenting Stress in Mothers and Fathers of Children with ASD', Parenting, 15 119-133 (2015) [C1]

© , Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.SYNOPSIS: Objective. Coparenting quality has been linked to both parenting stress and parenting self-efficacy in families of typicall... [more]

© , Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.SYNOPSIS: Objective. Coparenting quality has been linked to both parenting stress and parenting self-efficacy in families of typically developing children, but little is known about relations between these factors in families where there is a child with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study employed structural equation modeling to explore relations among coparenting quality, autism-specific parenting self-efficacy, and parenting stress in mothers and fathers of children with an ASD. Design. A cohort of biological mothers (n = 80) and fathers (n = 72) who were caring for their young child (age < 13) with a diagnosed ASD self-completed validated surveys assessing parenting stress, coparenting quality, and autism-specific parenting self-efficacy. Results. Both mothers and fathers reported high and similar levels of parenting stress which shared predictive relations with both coparenting quality and autism-specific parenting self-efficacy. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that the relations between perceptions of autism-specific parenting self-efficacy and parenting stress were mediated by coparenting quality. Conclusion. Coparenting quality shares an important relation with parenting stress in both mothers and fathers of children with an ASD, and enhanced perceptions of autism-specific parenting self-efficacy are unlikely to influence parenting stress when parents experience poor quality coparenting.

DOI 10.1080/15295192.2015.1020145
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 StGeorge JM, Fletcher RJ, 'Men's experiences of grandfatherhood: A welcome surprise', International Journal of Aging and Human Development, 78 351-378 (2014) [C1]

The present-day involvement of men in many facets of childrearing stands in contrast to previous eras when men accepted that the major task of fathering was to provide a secure in... [more]

The present-day involvement of men in many facets of childrearing stands in contrast to previous eras when men accepted that the major task of fathering was to provide a secure income to support the family. This imperative often required long hours away from the family. However, when men whose contact with children has been limited due to work and cultural constraints retire, their newly acquired lifestyle may bring fresh opportunities for involvement with grandchildren. An important question therefore concerns the impact of caring for young children on men's perceptions of their role as grandfathers. This interview study explores the experiences of 19 Australian grandfathers. The analysis found themes that relate to relationships and change, as well as themes concerning core beliefs and existential questions. The findings demonstrate the potential for insight into family relationships and personal growth in older age when studying the topic of grandparenting and caring from the male perspective. © 2014, Baywood Publishing Co., Inc.

DOI 10.2190/AG.78.4.c
Co-authors Jennifer Stgeorge
2014 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Burrows T, Fletcher R, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community randomized controlled trial: A community-based healthy lifestyle program for fathers and their children', Preventive Medicine, 61 90-99 (2014) [C1]

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK)' program when delivered by trained facilitators in community settings. Method: A two-arm randomi... [more]

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK)' program when delivered by trained facilitators in community settings. Method: A two-arm randomized controlled trial of 93 overweight/obese fathers (mean [SD] age=40.3 [5.3] years; BMI=32.5 [3.8] kg/m2) and their primary school-aged children (n=132) from the Hunter Region, Australia. In 2010-2011, families were randomized to either: (i) HDHK intervention (n=48 fathers, n=72 children) or (ii) wait-list control group. The 7-week intervention included seven sessions and resources (booklets, pedometers). Assessments were held at baseline and 14-weeks with fathers' weight (kg) as the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes for fathers and children included waist, BMI, blood pressure, resting heart rate, physical activity (pedometry), and self-reported dietary intake and sedentary behaviors. Results: Linear mixed models (intention-to-treat) revealed significant between-group differences for fathers' weight (P < .001, d= 0.24), with HDHK fathers losing more weight (- 3.3. kg; 95%CI, - 4.3, - 2.4) than control fathers (0.1. kg; 95%CI, - 0.9,1.0). Significant treatment effects (P < .05) were also found for fathers' waist (d= 0.41), BMI (d= 0.26), resting heart rate (d= 0.59), energy intake (d= 0.49) and physical activity (d= 0.46) and for children's physical activity (d= 0.50) and adiposity (d= 0.07). Discussion: HDHK significantly improved health outcomes and behaviors in fathers and children, providing evidence for program effectiveness when delivered in a community setting. © 2014 Published by Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.12.019
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Andrew Miller, David Lubans, Robin Callister, Myles Young, Adam Lloyd, Tracy Burrows, Alyce Barnes, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2014 Fletcher R, Dowse E, Bennett E, Chan W, O¿Brien AP, 'The paternal perinatal depression initiative', Australian Nursing & Midwifery Journal, 22 40-40 (2014)
Co-authors Sally Chan
2014 Lawson G, Fletcher R, 'Delayed fatherhood', Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care, 40 283-288 (2014) [C1]

Birth data from developed countries indicates that the average paternal age is increasing. As the trend to older fatherhood has become established, concerns have been raised that ... [more]

Birth data from developed countries indicates that the average paternal age is increasing. As the trend to older fatherhood has become established, concerns have been raised that this may be linked to adverse outcomes, such as pregnancy complications, congenital anomalies, and long-term health implications for the child. Since the sperm of older fathers may be impaired due to the general effects of ageing, their offspring may be at risk due to defects in sperm quality at conception. A literature search was performed to identify pregnancy complications, fetal anomalies and health issues for the child when the father is in an older age bracket. Evidence for impairment in the sperm and genetic material of older fathers was reviewed. With an older father, there is evidence of an increase in stillbirths and a slightly increased risk of autism, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in the offspring later in life. The increased risk of achondroplasia has long been recognised. For the mother, there is an increased rate of Caesarean section. Investigations of other possible adverse outcomes have produced mixed findings. Further robust and longitudinal studies are needed to clarify these issues.

DOI 10.1136/jfprhc-2013-100866
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 May CD, Fletcher, St george, 'A father's prenatal relationship with 'their' baby and 'her' pregnancy - implications for antenatal education', International Journal of Birth and Parenting Education, 1 5-12 (2014) [C2]
Co-authors Jennifer Stgeorge
2013 May C, Fletcher R, 'Preparing fathers for the transition to parenthood: Recommendations for the content of antenatal education', MIDWIFERY, 29 474-478 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2012.03.005
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
2013 Fletcher R, StGeorge J, Freeman E, 'Rough and tumble play quality: Theoretical foundations for a new measure of father-child interaction', Early Child Development and Care, 183 746-759 (2013) [C1]

Energetic, competitive, body-contact play (rough and tumble play (RTP)) is commonly observed among young children and is reported as an important feature of father-child relations... [more]

Energetic, competitive, body-contact play (rough and tumble play (RTP)) is commonly observed among young children and is reported as an important feature of father-child relationships. Animal studies have demonstrated positive developmental effects of peer-peer play-wrestling, influencing cognitive and social outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the nature of RTP between father and child and its relationship to child development and to describe a theoretically informed measure of the quality of father-child RTP. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/03004430.2012.723439
Citations Scopus - 7
Co-authors Emily Freeman, Jennifer Stgeorge
2013 Freeman E, Ross NM, St George J, Fletcher R, 'A quantitative analysis of practitioners' knowledge of fathers and fathers' engagement in family relationship services', Australasian Dispute Resolution Journal, 24 270-277 (2013) [C1]
Co-authors Jennifer Stgeorge, Emily Freeman, Nicola Ross
2013 Fletcher RJ, Maharaj ON, Fletcher Watson CH, May C, Skeates N, Gruenert S, 'Fathers with mental illness: implications for clinicians and health services', The Medical journal of Australia, 199 S34-S36 (2013)

A significant proportion of fathers living with their natural, adopted, step or foster children experience mental illness. Psychiatric illness among fathers can have a devastating... [more]

A significant proportion of fathers living with their natural, adopted, step or foster children experience mental illness. Psychiatric illness among fathers can have a devastating impact on children's wellbeing, and even milder forms of paternal mental illness can have serious developmental effects on children. While several pathways linking paternal mental illness with poor child outcomes have been identified, fathers' impaired parenting is an important, potentially malleable factor. Clinicians can assist fathers with mental illness and their families by proactively inquiring about children and by exploring fathering-focused psychological support.

Citations Scopus - 2
2012 Fletcher R, Gallagher J, 'Engaging Fathers in Early Childhood Services', Foundations, 8 16-19 (2012)
2012 Freeman EE, Fletcher R, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Burrows TL, Callister R, 'Preventing and treating childhood obesity: Time to target fathers', International Journal of Obesity, 36 12-15 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Emily Freeman, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2012 St George JM, Fletcher R, 'Fathers' role in school readiness', Every Child, 18 22-24 (2012) [C3]
Co-authors Jennifer Stgeorge
2012 St George JM, Fletcher R, 'Time for work, commuting, and parenting? Commuting parents' involvement with their children', Community, Work and Family, 15 273-291 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Jennifer Stgeorge
2012 Fletcher R, Maharaj ON, Fletcher Watson CH, May C, Skeates N, Gruenert S, 'Fathers with mental illness: Implications for clinicians and health services', MJA Open, 1 34-36 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 1
2011 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Burrows TL, Fletcher R, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community effectiveness trial: Study protocol of a community-based healthy lifestyle program for fathers and their children', BMC Public Health, 11 876 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-11-876
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Adam Lloyd, Myles Young, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister, Andrew Miller, David Lubans
2011 Fletcher R, Freeman EE, Matthey S, 'The impact of behavioural parent training on fathers' parenting: A meta-analysis of the triple-p positive parenting program', Fathering: A Journal of Theory, Research, & Practice about Men as Fathers, 9 291-312 (2011) [C1]
Co-authors Emily Freeman
2011 Fletcher R, May C, St George JM, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Fathers' perceptions of rough-and-tumble play: Implications for early childhood services', Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, 36 131-138 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Jennifer Stgeorge
2011 Fletcher R, Freeman EE, Garfield C, Vimpani GV, 'The effects of early paternal depression on children's development', Medical Journal of Australia, 195 685-689 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Emily Freeman
2011 Garfield CF, Fletcher R, 'Sad dads: A challenge for pediatrics', Pediatrics, 127 781-782 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1542/peds.2011-0097
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2011 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Okely AD, Burrows TL, Fletcher R, Collins CE, 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' randomized controlled trial: Efficacy of a healthy lifestyle program for overweight fathers and their children', International Journal of Obesity, 35 436-447 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2010.151
Citations Scopus - 46Web of Science - 42
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, David Lubans
2011 Fletcher R, 'Field testing of father-inclusive guidelines for web-based information and support aimed at families with perinatal depression', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 22 231-233 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4
2011 Fletcher R, St George JM, 'Heading into fatherhood-nervously: Support for fathering from online dads', Qualitative Health Research, 21 1101-1114 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1049732311404903
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Jennifer Stgeorge
2011 St George JM, Fletcher R, 'Fathers online: Learning about fatherhood through the internet', Journal of Perinatal Education, 20 154-162 (2011) [C1]
Co-authors Jennifer Stgeorge
2010 Fletcher R, St George JM, 'Men's help-seeking in the context of family separation', Advances in Mental Health, 9 49-62 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.5172/jamh.9.1.49
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Jennifer Stgeorge
2010 Fletcher R, St George JM, 'Practitioners' understanding of father engagement in the context of family dispute resolution', Journal of Family Studies, 16 101-115 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.5172/jfs.16.2.101
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jennifer Stgeorge
2009 Fletcher R, 'Promoting infant well-being in the context of maternal depression by supporting the father', Infant Mental Health Journal, 30 95-102 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/imhj.20205
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 14
2009 Matthey S, Reay R, Fletcher R, 'Service strategies for engaging fathers in the perinatal period: What have we learned so far?', International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, 11 29-41 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/14623730.2009.9721785
2008 Fletcher R, Visser AL, 'Facilitating father engagement: The role of Family Relationship Centres', Journal of Family Studies, 14 53-64 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2008 Fletcher R, Vimpani GV, Russell G, Sibbritt DW, 'Psychosocial assessment of expectant fathers', Archives of Womens Mental Health, 11 27-32 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00737-008-0211-6
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 14
2008 Fletcher R, 'Mothers and fathers accessing Family Relationship Centres', Family Relationships Quarterly, 3-6 (2008) [C2]
2008 Fletcher R, 'Father-inclusive practice and associated professional competencies', AFRC Briefing, 1-10 (2008) [C2]
2008 Fletcher R, Vimpani GV, Russell G, Keatinge DR, 'The evaluation of tailored and web-based information for new fathers', Child Care Health and Development, 34 439-446 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2214.2008.00811.x
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 15
2006 Fletcher R, Matthey S, Marley CG, 'Addressing depression and anxiety among new fathers', Medical Journal of Australia, 185 461-463 (2006) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 23
2006 Fletcher R, Silberberg SH, 'Involvement of fathers in primary school activities', Australian Journal of Education, 50 29-39 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/000494410605000103
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
2005 Friedewald M, Fletcher R, Fairbairn HM, 'All-male discussion forums for expectant fathers: evaluation of a model', Journal of Perinatal Education, 14 8-18 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1624/105812405X44673
2005 Fletcher R, 'Bringing fathers to family services', Every Child, 11 17 (2005) [C2]
2004 Hammond C, Lester JH, Fletcher R, Pascoe SM, 'Young Aboriginal fathers: the findings and impact of a research project undertaken in the Hunter Valley', Aboriginal Islander and Health Worker Journal, 28 5-8 (2004) [C2]
2004 Fletcher R, Silberberg SH, Galloway D, 'New father's postbirth views of antenatal classes: satisfaction, benefits, and knowledge of family services', Journal of Perinatal Education, 13 18-26 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1624/105812404X1734
2003 Fletcher R, 'Fathers as partners in change', Threshold, 75 12-13 (2003) [C2]
2002 Fletcher R, Higginbotham HN, Dobson A, 'Men's Perceived Health Needs', Journal of Health Psychology: an interdisciplinary, international journal, 7(3) 233-241 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Nick Higginbotham
2001 Fletcher R, 'The Wellbeing of boys', NSW Public Health Bulletin, 12 324-326 (2001) [C1]
1995 Fletcher R, 'MEN'S HEALTH IN RURAL NEW SOUTH WALES', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 3 106-113 (1995)

ABSTRACT: This paper describes three developing approaches to men's health: (i) locally-based clinics and programs targeting men; (ii) large scale campaigns directed at males by ... [more]

ABSTRACT: This paper describes three developing approaches to men's health: (i) locally-based clinics and programs targeting men; (ii) large scale campaigns directed at males by special interest groups and; (iii) an epidemiological approach found in national public health policy documents. The women's health movement does not provide for an effective model for the establishment of alternative male health centres. However, two important areas that concern women are relevant to men: a social view of health, and representation in health decision making. The implications for rural health workers are to involve established male organisations, such as the New South Wales Farmers' Association to promote the health of men and boys. Copyright © 1995, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved

DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1584.1995.tb00162.x
1994 FLETCHER R, 'PROSTATE-CANCER SCREENING AND MENS HEALTH', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 18 449-451 (1994) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Show 46 more journal articles

Conference (25 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 May CD, fletcher, dempsey, newman, 'The importance of Coparenting Quality as a predictor of Parenting Stress in families where there is a child with an ASD.', Asia Pacific autism Conference 2013 (2013)
2013 May CD, Fletcher, Dempsey, Newman, 'The Importance of the Quality of the Coparenting Partnership in Predicting Parenting Stress in Parents of Children with an ASD.', IMFAR conference proceedings (2013)
2011 Miller AD, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Okely AD, et al., 'Effective strategies for the recruitment of overweight men and their children into a community trial: The Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids recruitment story', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Andrew Miller, David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Myles Young, Adam Lloyd, Tracy Burrows, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Alyce Barnes
2010 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Fletcher R, Burrows TL, Collins CE, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community program: Promoting family health through sustainable school and community partnerships', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Myles Young, Tracy Burrows, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister
2010 Fletcher R, May C, St George JM, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Fathers' perceptions of rough and tumble play', 11th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference Proceedings (2010) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Jennifer Stgeorge
2010 Douglas SL, Fletcher R, 'The co-construction of involved fatherhood on YouTube', 11th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference. Program and Abstracts (2010) [E3]
2010 St George JM, Fletcher R, 'Travelling well: Commuting parents' involvement with their children', 11th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference. Program and Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Jennifer Stgeorge
2010 Fletcher R, Toussaint J, 'The Child Development Consultation for separating parents with young children: Theoretical and practical considerations', 11th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference.Program and Abstracts (2010) [E3]
2010 Fletcher R, 'Working With fathers: Guidelines for strengths-based practice and research', 6th Australian Family & Community Strengths Conference. Strengths & Assets Summit (2010) [E2]
2010 Fletcher R, 'Father Engagement - how do you rate? Practitioners' knowledge of fathers and competence to engage fathers in Family Relationship Services', FRSA 3rd National Conference (2010) [E3]
2010 Fletcher R, Toussaint J, 'Building connection through play: Resources for separating parents with young children', FRSA 3rd National Conference "Diversity: Everyone Benefits". Abstracts (2010) [E3]
2010 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Okely AD, Burrows TL, Fletcher R, Collins CE, 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' randomized controlled trial: Efficacy of a healthy lifestyle program for overweight fathers and their children', Obesity Reviews (2010) [E3]
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2010.151
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, David Lubans, Robin Callister
2009 Fletcher R, Prichard P, 'Fathering at the heart of early childhood: Why fathers should be central to our rethinking of early childhood in Australia', National Men's Health Gathering 2009: Program and Abstracts (2009) [E3]
2009 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Burrows TL, Bray JF, Fletcher R, et al., 'Using mediation analysis to explain weight loss in the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' pilot randomised controlled trial', National Men's Health Gathering 2009: Program and Abstracts (2009) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2009 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Fletcher R, Bray JF, Okely T, et al., 'Engaging overweight men to improve their health: Lessons learnt from the 'SHED-IT' and 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' pilot randomised controlled trials', National Men's Health Gathering 2009: Program and Abstracts (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Robin Callister, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, David Lubans
2009 Fletcher R, St George JM, Douglas SL, Gray KM, 'The dad, the chat and the cam: New father's use of the web', National Men's Health Gathering 2009: Program and Abstracts (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Kim Gray, Jennifer Stgeorge
2009 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Bray JF, Burrows TL, Fletcher R, et al., 'Intervention description and preliminary findings of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' pilot randomised controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2009) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Tracy Burrows, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2008 Fletcher R, Close NM, Babakhani A, Ward P, 'Reviewing the research literature to Inform family policy: Undertaking a realist review', 10th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference: Program & Abstracts (2008) [E3]
2008 Fletcher R, Katz I, 'Defining priorities for fatherhood research in Australia', 10th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference: Program & Abstracts (2008) [E3]
2008 Fletcher R, St George JM, 'Practitioners' understanding of father engagement in the context of family dispute resolution', 10th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference: Program & Abstracts (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Jennifer Stgeorge
2008 Matthey S, Fletcher R, Reay R, 'What are the successful strategies for involving fathers?', 5th Australian Family and Community Strengths Conference: Program & Abstract Book (2008) [E3]
2008 Ball J, Fletcher R, Hodgins D, Johnson S, 'Supporting indigenous fathers' journeys', Father Involvement Research 2008 Conference: Presentation Abstracts (2008) [E3]
2008 Fletcher R, 'Linking research and policy on father involvement', Father Involvement Research 2008 Conference: Presentation Abstracts (2008) [E3]
2008 Hammond CA, Fletcher R, 'Strengths of indigenous fathers posters', Father Involvement Research 2008 Conference: Presentation Abstracts (2008) [E3]
2008 Fletcher R, 'Reaching out to vulnerable fathers: Why and how', QEC 5th Biennial International Conference Reaching Out to Vulnerable Families: Achieving Better Outcomes for Children. Conference Podcasts (2008) [E2]
Show 22 more conferences

Other (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Fletcher R, St George J, 'Refining father-Inclusive Practice Webinar', Refining father-Inclusive Practice: Australian Institute of Family Studies (2015)
Co-authors Jennifer Stgeorge
2014 O'Brien AP, Fletcher R, Chan S, Conrad A, Jones D, Wilson A, 'CBT to address new fathers¿ depression and anxiety', ( pp.1): Family Action Centre, The University of Newcastle15th August (2014) [O1]
Co-authors Tony Obrien, Sally Chan
2014 Fletcher R, may C, st george, stoker L, oshan M, 'Engaging Fathers - Evidence Review', . http://www.aracy.org.au/publications-resources/area?command=record&id=197&cid=6: ARACY (2014)
Co-authors Jennifer Stgeorge
2013 Fletcher R, 'The role of fathers in children¿s early learning. Early Childhood Australia Everyday Learning Series', : Early Childhood Australia (2013)
Show 1 more other
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.8

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Navigating the negative: Early postnatal negative thoughts and father-infant interrelations at 9 months
PhD (Family Studies), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2014 PhD The Importance of Coparenting Quality when Parenting a Child with an ASD: A Mixed Method Investigation
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
Edit

News

Dr Richard Fletcher awarded Beyond Blue research grant

Helping new fathers beat the blues

February 9, 2015

Dr Richard Fletcher, a team leader within the Faculty of Health and Medicine's Family Action Centre, has received a grant of $300,000 over two years from Beyond Blue.

Stayin' on Track

Stayin’ on Track

December 4, 2014

Young Aboriginal fathers are set to benefit from a partnership launched today between the University of Newcastle and the Young and Well Co-operative Research Centre.

PhD/Research Masters Opportunity - Fathers Perinatal Depression

November 25, 2014

Applications are invited from motivated graduates to undertake a PhD or research masters in Fathers Perinatal Depression under the supervision of Dr Richard Fletcher.

Associate Professor Richard Fletcher

Position

Associate Professor
Family Action Centre
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email richard.fletcher@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 16401
Fax 18686
Link Research and Innovation Cluster

Office

Room AOB27
Building Academic Office Block
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
Edit