Dr Renate Thienel

Conjoint Fellow

School of Psychology

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Renate Thienel graduated in Germany (B.A. [Hons.] M.Psych. [Research], Ph.D. [Dr. rer. nat.]). She is affiliated with the Hunter Medical Research Institute, Member of the Australasian Cognitive Neurosciences Society, the Human Brain Mapping Society, the Australasian Society for Psychiatric Research and affiliated member with the Schizophrenia Research Institute.

Renate currently holds a University of Newcastle Postdoctoral Research Position and is based at the Priority Centre for Translational Neuroscience & Mental Health Research, School of Psychology, Faculty of Science & IT. Her research focuses on the aetiologies of neuro-cognitive disorders by studying event related potentials, functional magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and diffusion tensor imaging. Renate collaborates with national and international colleagues on various neuroimaging research projects into healthy brain development, schizophrenia, the prediction of transition to psychosis, the shared biological basis of schizophrenia and a genetically high risk population (22q11DS), and a novel neuro-feedback procedure to modify brain perfusion using functional magnetic resonance imaging with applications for cerebral stroke and neurocognitive rehabilitation in schizophrenia and dementia. Her strong translational approach also includes the creation of a normative database of electroencephalographically recorded sensory auditory memory function in children and adolescents with great potential as a diagnostic tool for the detection of “at-risk mental state”.

She currently supervises several Research Higher Degree Students, including a PhD candidate and international students from the University of Bremen in Germany and the Karolinska Institute in Sweden. Renate is frequently invited to peer-review manuscript submissions and project grant applications to the NHMRC and the Hunter Medical Research Institute. Dr Renate Thienel’s expertise in cognitive neuroscience and her collaborative spirit is highly regarded by her colleagues in Newcastle as well as nationally and internationally due to her successful participation in several multi-site/multi-disciplinary research projects. With a track record in advanced brain imaging and neuropsychology, Renate more recently developed translational applications of her research, aiming to intervene into cerebral reorganisation and thereby remediating impaired brain functions as they occur in neurodevelopmental disorders, cerebral stroke and dementias.

Research Expertise
Dr Renate Thienel graduated in Germany (B.A. [Hons.] M.Psych. [Research], Ph.D. [Dr. rer. nat.]). She is affiliated with the Hunter Medical Research Institute and the Schizophrenia Research Institute. She is an active member of the Australasian Society of Psychiatric Research. Renate currently holds a University of Newcastle Postdoctoral Research Fellowship (2009-2013) and is based at the Priority Centre for Translational Neuroscience & Mental Health Research. Her research focuses on the aetiologies of neuro-cognitive disorders by studying event related potentials, functional magnetic resonance imaging (including realtime fMRI and pharmacological fMRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and diffusion tensor imaging.

Teaching Expertise
Research only Academic


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Bochum - Germany
  • Diploma in Psychology, University of Dusseldorf - Germany

Keywords

  • EEG
  • Neuroimaging
  • Neuropsychology
  • Schizophrenia
  • fMRI

Languages

  • German (Fluent)

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
170205Neurocognitive Patterns and Neural Networks50
110999Neurosciences not elsewhere classified30
110399Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2015 - 10/04/2015Post Doctoral Research fellowUniversity of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia
1/03/2014 - 13/03/2014MRSI Data CollectionUniversity of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/03/2009 - 1/03/2013Fellow - UONUniversity of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2013Seiferth N, Thienel R, 'Exekutive Funktionen', Funktionelle MRT in Psychiatrie und Neurologie, Springer, Berlin 359-374 (2013) [B1]
DOI10.1007/978-3-642-29800-4_22

Journal article (29 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2015Cooper PS, Wong ASW, Fulham WR, Thienel R, Mansfield E, Michie PT, Karayanidis F, 'Theta frontoparietal connectivity associated with proactive and reactive cognitive control processes', NeuroImage, 108 354-363 (2015)

Cognitive control involves both proactive and reactive processes. Paradigms that rely on reactive control have shown that frontoparietal oscillatory synchronization in the theta frequency band is associated with interference control. This study examines whether proactive control is also associated with connectivity in the same frontoparietal theta network or involves a distinct neural signature. A task-switching paradigm was used to differentiate between proactive and reactive control processes, involved in preparing to switch or repeat a task and resolving post-target interference, respectively. We confirm that reactive control is associated with frontoparietal theta connectivity. Importantly, we show that proactive control is also associated with theta band oscillatory synchronization but in a different frontoparietal network. These findings support the existence of distinct proactive and reactive cognitive control processes that activate different theta frontoparietal oscillatory networks.

DOI10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.12.028
Co-authorsFrini Karayanidis, Pat Michie
2015Cooper PS, Wong ASW, Fulham WR, Thienel R, Mansfield E, Michie PT, Karayanidis F, 'Theta frontoparietal connectivity associated with proactive and reactive cognitive control processes', NeuroImage, (2015)

Cognitive control involves both proactive and reactive processes. Paradigms that rely on reactive control have shown that frontoparietal oscillatory synchronization in the theta frequency band is associated with interference control. This study examines whether proactive control is also associated with connectivity in the same frontoparietal theta network or involves a distinct neural signature. A task-switching paradigm was used to differentiate between proactive and reactive control processes, involved in preparing to switch or repeat a task and resolving post-target interference, respectively. We confirm that reactive control is associated with frontoparietal theta connectivity. Importantly, we show that proactive control is also associated with theta band oscillatory synchronization but in a different frontoparietal network. These findings support the existence of distinct proactive and reactive cognitive control processes that activate different theta frontoparietal oscillatory networks.

DOI10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.12.028
Co-authorsPat Michie, Frini Karayanidis
2015Weismüller B, Thienel R, Youlden AM, Fulham R, Koch M, Schall U, 'Psychophysiological Correlates of Developmental Changes in Healthy and Autistic Boys.', J Autism Dev Disord, 45 2168-2175 (2015)
DOI10.1007/s10803-015-2385-xAuthor URL
Co-authorsUlrich Schall
2014Knechtel L, Schall U, Cooper G, Ramadan S, Stanwell P, Jolly T, Thienel R, 'Transcranial direct current stimulation of prefrontal cortex: An auditory event-related potential and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study', Neurology Psychiatry and Brain Research, (2014) [C1]

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive intervention altering neural plasticity by modulating neuronal excitability of pre- and postsynaptic neuron populations, which has been shown to improve depression symptoms and cognition. We investigated the effects of a single session of 20 min of 2 mA left-prefrontal anodal versus sham stimulation on auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) in 11 male and 5 female healthy subjects (mean age of 28.6 [SD 6.2] years) by employing a randomized single-blind crossover design. Stimulation effects on cortical glutamate (Glu) and glutamine (Glx) levels were subsequently measured in 12 of the 16 healthy subjects in a 3 T proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy scan. tDCS was associated with a significant increase of N1 amplitudes while smaller P3b amplitudes correlated with higher cortical Glu and Glx levels in the stimulated brain area when performing an auditory go/no-go discrimination task. tDCS did not change mismatch negativity, nor task performance or cortical Glu/Glx levels which, together with N1 amplitudes, depended on stimulation order ("sham" versus "active"). Increased N1 amplitudes are consistent with higher levels of cortical excitability following prefrontal anodal tDCS. The failure to replicate Glu/Glx changes with tDCS may have been masked by between-session carry-over effects while ceiling effects may have masked tDCS effects on task performance. © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

DOI10.1016/j.npbr.2014.06.001
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsSaadallah Ramadan, Ulrich Schall
2014Cohen M, Johnston P, Ehlkes T, Fulham R, Ward P, Thienel R, et al., 'Functional magnetic resonance brain imaging of executive cognitive performance in young first-episode schizophrenia patients and age-matched long-term cannabis users', Neurology Psychiatry and Brain Research, (2014)

Converging evidence from epidemiological, clinical and neuropsychological research suggests a link between cannabis use and increased risk of psychosis. Long-term cannabis use has also been related to deficit-like ¿negative¿ symptoms and cognitive impairment that resemble some of the clinical and cognitive features of schizophrenia. The current functional brain imaging study investigated the impact of a history of heavy cannabis use on impaired executive function in first-episode schizophrenia patients. Whilst performing the Tower of London task in a magnetic resonance imaging scanner, event-related blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) brain activation was compared between four age and gender-matched groups: 12 first-episode schizophrenia patients; 17 long-term cannabis users; seven cannabis using first-episode schizophrenia patients; and 17 healthy control subjects. BOLD activation was assessed as a function of increasing task difficulty within and between groups as well as the main effects of cannabis use and the diagnosis of schizophrenia. Cannabis users and non-drug using first-episode schizophrenia patients exhibited equivalently reduced dorsolateral prefrontal activation in response to task difficulty. A trend towards additional prefrontal and left superior parietal cortical activation deficits was observed in cannabis-using first-episode schizophrenia patients while a history of cannabis use accounted for increased activation in the visual cortex. Cannabis users and schizophrenia patients fail to adequately activate the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, thus pointing to a common working memory impairment which is particularly evident in cannabis-using first-episode schizophrenia patients. A history of heavy cannabis use, on the other hand, accounted for increased primary visual processing, suggesting compensatory imagery processing of the task.

DOI10.1016/j.npbr.2014.09.002
Co-authorsAmanda Baker, Ulrich Schall
2014McCabe KL, Atkinson RJ, Cooper G, Melville JL, Harris J, Schall U, et al., 'Pre-pulse inhibition and antisaccade performance indicate impaired attention modulation of cognitive inhibition in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS)', Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, 6 (2014) [C1]

Background: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is associated with a number of physical anomalies and neuropsychological deficits including impairments in executive and sensorimotor function. It is estimated that 25% of children with 22q11DS will develop schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders later in life. Evidence of genetic transmission of information processing deficits in schizophrenia suggests performance in 22q11DS individuals will enhance understanding of the neurobiological and genetic substrates associated with information processing. In this report, we examine information processing in 22q11DS using measures of startle eyeblink modification and antisaccade inhibition to explore similarities with schizophrenia and associations with neurocognitive performance. Methods: Startle modification (passive and active tasks; 120- and 480-ms pre-pulse intervals) and antisaccade inhibition were measured in 25 individuals with genetically confirmed 22q11DS and 30 healthy control subjects. Results: Individuals with 22q1 1DS exhibited increased antisaccade error as well as some evidence (trend-level effect) of impaired sensorimotor gating during the active condition, suggesting a dysfunction in controlled attentional processing, rather than a pre-attentive dysfunction using this paradigm. Conclusions: The findings from the present study show similarities with previous studies in clinical populations associated with 22q11DS such as schizophrenia that may indicate shared dysfunction of inhibition pathways in these groups.

DOI10.1186/1866-1955-6-38
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsLinda E Campbell, Carmel Loughland, Ulrich Schall
2014Knechtel L, Thienel R, Cooper G, Case V, Schall U, 'Transcranial direct current stimulation of prefrontal cortex: An auditory event-related potential study in schizophrenia', Neurology Psychiatry and Brain Research, 20 102-106 (2014) [C1]

Cognitive impairment is one of the most significant factors determining the long-term rehabilitation prospects of schizophrenia patients. Cognitive training has been shown to be beneficial; however, effect sizes of cognitive remediation remain relatively low. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) increases cortical excitability along with larger N1 auditory event-related potentials (ERPs), thus providing a non-invasive physiological mechanism that is potentially capable of facilitating cognitive training of schizophrenia patients. The current study investigated the effects of left-prefrontal anodal tDCS on auditory discrimination performance and N1, Mismatch Negativity (MMN), and P3b ERPs, which have been linked to cognitive and global function deficits in schizophrenia. We compared 20 min of 2 mA tDCS versus sham stimulation in 14 schizophrenia patients by employing a randomised crossover design. Patients performed equally well in a go/no-go auditory discrimination task when compared to healthy subjects but presented with significantly smaller N1, MMN and P3b amplitudes, which did not change with tDCS. Auditory discrimination performance and reaction times also remained unaffected by tDCS. Our findings suggest that a single application of tDCS has no acute effects on ERPs and associated auditory information processing in schizophrenia patients.

DOI10.1016/j.npbr.2014.10.002
Co-authorsUlrich Schall
2014Knechtel L, Schall U, Cooper G, Ramadan S, Stanwell P, Jolly T, Thienel R, 'Transcranial direct current stimulation of prefrontal cortex: An auditory event-related potential and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study', Neurology Psychiatry and Brain Research, 20 96-101 (2014) [C1]

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive intervention altering neural plasticity by modulating neuronal excitability of pre- and postsynaptic neuron populations, which has been shown to improve depression symptoms and cognition. We investigated the effects of a single session of 20 min of 2 mA left-prefrontal anodal versus sham stimulation on auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) in 11 male and 5 female healthy subjects (mean age of 28.6 [SD 6.2] years) by employing a randomized single-blind crossover design. Stimulation effects on cortical glutamate (Glu) and glutamine (Glx) levels were subsequently measured in 12 of the 16 healthy subjects in a 3 T proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy scan. tDCS was associated with a significant increase of N1 amplitudes while smaller P3b amplitudes correlated with higher cortical Glu and Glx levels in the stimulated brain area when performing an auditory go/no-go discrimination task. tDCS did not change mismatch negativity, nor task performance or cortical Glu/Glx levels which, together with N1 amplitudes, depended on stimulation order ("sham" versus "active"). Increased N1 amplitudes are consistent with higher levels of cortical excitability following prefrontal anodal tDCS. The failure to replicate Glu/Glx changes with tDCS may have been masked by between-session carry-over effects while ceiling effects may have masked tDCS effects on task performance.

DOI10.1016/j.npbr.2014.06.001
CitationsScopus - 1
Co-authorsUlrich Schall, Saadallah Ramadan
2013Cabanis M, Pyka M, Mehl S, Müller BW, Loos-Jankowiak S, Winterer G, et al., 'The precuneus and the insula in self-attributional processes', Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience, 13 330-345 (2013) [C1]

Attributions are constantly assigned in everyday life. A well-known phenomenon is the self-serving bias: that is, people's tendency to attribute positive events to internal causes (themselves) and negative events to external causes (other persons/circumstances). Here, we investigated the neural correlates of the cognitive processes implicated in self-serving attributions using social situations that differed in their emotional saliences. We administered an attributional bias task during fMRI scanning in a large sample of healthy subjects (n = 71). Eighty sentences describing positive or negative social situations were presented, and subjects decided via buttonpress whether the situation had been caused by themselves or by the other person involved. Comparing positive with negative sentences revealed activations of the bilateral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). Self-attribution correlated with activation of the posterior portion of the precuneus. However, self-attributed positive versus negative sentences showed activation of the anterior portion of the precuneus, and self-attributed negative versus positive sentences demonstrated activation of the bilateral insular cortex. All significant activations were reported with a statistical threshold of p =.001, uncorrected. In addition, a comparison of our fMRI task with data from the Internal, Personal and Situational Attributions Questionnaire, Revised German Version, demonstrated convergent validity. Our findings suggest that the precuneus and the PCC are involved in the evaluation of social events with particular regional specificities: The PCC is activated during emotional evaluation, the posterior precuneus during attributional evaluation, and the anterior precuneus during self-serving processes. Furthermore, we assume that insula activation is a correlate of awareness of personal agency in negative situations. © 2013 Psychonomic Society, Inc.

DOI10.3758/s13415-012-0143-5
CitationsScopus - 12Web of Science - 11
2013Knechtel L, Thienel R, Schall U, 'Transcranial direct current stimulation: neurophysiology and clinical applications', NEUROPSYCHIATRY, 3 89-96 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.2217/NPY.12.78Author URL
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsUlrich Schall
2012Voss B, Thienel RA, Reske M, Kellermann T, Sheldrick AJ, Halfter S, et al., 'Cholinergic blockade under working memory demands encountered by increased rehearsal strategies: evidence from fMRI in healthy subjects', European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, 262 329-339 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2012Thienel R, Kircher T, Habel U, Kellermann T, Reske M, Woelwer W, et al., 'Differential effect of risperidone versus haloperidol on brain activation in firstepisode schizophrenia patients: A multicentre fMRI study', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY, 15 218-219 (2012)
Author URL
2011Stain HJ, Payne KT, Thienel RA, Michie PT, Carr V, Kelly BJ, 'The feasibility of videoconferencing for neuropsychological assessments of rural youth experiencing early psychosis', Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, 17 328-331 (2011) [C1]
DOI10.1258/jtt.2011.101015
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsBrian Kelly, Pat Michie, Helen Stain
2010Voss B, Thienel RA, Reske M, Habel U, Kircher T, 'Cognitive performance and cholinergic transmission: influence of muscarinic and nicotinic receptor blockade', European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, 260 S106-S110 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1007/s00406-010-0160-8
CitationsScopus - 9Web of Science - 6
2009Kircher T, Thienel RA, Wagner M, Reske M, Habel U, Kellermann T, et al., 'Neuregulin 1 ICE-single nucleotide polymorphism in first episode schizophrenia correlates with cerebral activation in fronto-temporal areas', European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, 259 72-79 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1007/s00406-008-0837-4
CitationsScopus - 26Web of Science - 21
2009Thienel RA, Kellermann T, Schall UA, Voss B, Reske M, Halfter S, et al., 'Muscarinic antagonist effects on executive control of attention', International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 12 1307-1317 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1017/s146114570999068x
CitationsScopus - 16Web of Science - 15
Co-authorsUlrich Schall
2009Thienel RA, Voss B, Kellermann T, Reske M, Halfter S, Sheldrick AJ, et al., 'Nicotinic antagonist effects on functional attention networks', International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 12 1295-1305 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1017/s1461145709990551
CitationsScopus - 15Web of Science - 18
Co-authorsUlrich Schall
2008Vob B, Thienel R, Leucht S, Kircher T, 'Therapy of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. A systematic overview', Der Nervenarzt: Monatsschrift fuer alle Gebiete nervenaerztlicher Forschung und Praxis, 79 47-59 (2008) [C1]
DOI10.1007/s00115-007-2358-1
CitationsScopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2007Schneider F, Habel U, Reske M, Kellermann T, Stoecker T, Shah NJ, et al., 'Neural correlates of working memory dysfunction in first-episode schizophrenia patients: An fMRI multi-center study', SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH, 89 198-210 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.schres.2006.07.021Author URL
CitationsScopus - 82Web of Science - 78
2007Rogge G, Thienel R, Kellermann T, Kircher T, 'Modulation of cortical activation in the fMRT under cognitive requirements after one time administration of selective serotonin and noradrenalin-reuptake inhibitor for healthy test person', NERVENARZT, 78 258-258 (2007)
Author URL
2007Voss B, Thienel R, Reske M, Kellermann T, Halfter S, Sheldrick A, et al., 'Connection between cognition and the cholinergic system: The significance of muscarinergic and nicotinergic transmission for concentration process of healthy test persons in the fMRI', NERVENARZT, 78 272-272 (2007)
Author URL
2007Thienel R, Voss B, Reske M, Kellermann T, Halfter S, Sheldrick A, et al., 'Pharmacological modulation in fMRI: muscarinergic and nicotinergic parts of the concentration network according to Posner', NERVENARZT, 78 272-272 (2007)
Author URL
2005Rasser PE, Johnston PJ, Lagopoulos J, Ward PB, Schall UA, Thienel R, et al., 'Functional MRI BOLD response to Tower of London performance of first-episode schizophrenia patients using cortical pattern matching', Neuroimage, 26 941-951 (2005) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.neuroimage.2004.11.054
CitationsScopus - 66Web of Science - 60
Co-authorsUlrich Schall
2005Kircher TTJ, Thienel R, 'Functional brain imaging of symptoms and cognition in schizophrenia', BOUNDARIES OF CONSCIOUSNESS: NEUROBIOLOGY AND NEUROPATHOLOGY, 150 299-308 (2005) [C1]
DOI10.1016/S0079-6123(05)50022-0Author URL
CitationsScopus - 23Web of Science - 19
2004Bender S, Dittmann-Balcar A, Prehn G, Thienel R, Peters S, Gastpar M, 'How do patients with schizophrenia experience computer-based cognitive training?', NERVENARZT, 75 44-+ (2004)
DOI10.1007/s00115-003-1545-yAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 7
2003Schall UA, Johnston PJ, Lagopoulos J, Juptner M, Jentzen W, Thienel R, et al., 'Functional brain maps of Tower of London performance: a positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging study', NeuroImage, 1154-1161 (2003) [C1]
DOI10.1016/S1053-8119(03)00338-0
CitationsScopus - 62Web of Science - 57
Co-authorsUlrich Schall
2001Thienel R, Bender S, Oades RD, Dittmann-Balcar A, Rao M, Schall UA, 'Auditory gating, neuropsychology and D2-receptor occupancy in an one-year follow-up treatment study on schizophrenia', SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH, 49 210-210 (2001)
Author URL
Co-authorsUlrich Schall
2000Thienel R, Butorac M, Schall U, Bender S, Wolstein J, Dittmann-Balcar A, Oades RD, 'Tower of London performance in first to third episode patients with schizophrenia: A follow up study on executive function', SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH, 41 284-284 (2000)
DOI10.1016/S0920-9964(00)91019-3Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
Co-authorsUlrich Schall
1999Dittmann-Balcar A, Thienel R, Schall U, 'Attention-dependent allocation of auditory processing resources as measured by mismatch negativity', NEUROREPORT, 10 3749-3753 (1999)
DOI10.1097/00001756-199912160-00005Author URL
CitationsScopus - 34Web of Science - 28
Co-authorsUlrich Schall
Show 26 more journal articles

Conference (22 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2012Stain HJ, Paulik G, Atkinson RJ, Carr VJ, Curtis J, Ehlkes T, et al., 'Clinical, social and neurocognitive functioning in youth at ultra high risk for psychosis: Baseline findings from the Minds in Transition (MINT) longitudinal cohort', Early Intervention in Psychiatry, San Francisco, CA (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsUlrich Schall, Juanita Todd, Helen Stain, Pat Michie
2010Thienel R, Pauly K, Kellermann T, Kircher T, 'FUNCTIONAL CORRELATES OF THE NON SELF-SERVING ATTRIBUTIONAL BIAS: A PILOT STUDY', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY (2010) [E3]
Author URL
2010Paulik G, Atkinson RJ, Carr V, Clark S, Curtis J, Langdon R, et al., 'Minds in transition (MINT): A prospective study examining neurocognitive correlates of transition from ultra-high risk mental state to schizophrenia', Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsHelen Stain, Pat Michie, Juanita Todd, Ulrich Schall, Carmel Loughland, Paul Tooney
2010Baharnoori M, Bartholomeusz C, Boucher AA, Buchy L, Chaddock C, Chiliza B, et al., 'The 2nd Schizophrenia International Research Society Conference, 10-14 April 2010, Florence, Italy: Summaries of oral sessions', Schizophrenia Research (2010) [E3]

The 2nd Schizophrenia International Research Society Conference, was held in Florence, Italy, April 10-15, 2010. Student travel awardees served as rapporteurs of each oral session and focused their summaries on the most significant findings that emerged from each session and the discussions that followed. The following report is a composite of these reviews. It is hoped that it will provide an overview for those who were present, but could not participate in all sessions, and those who did not have the opportunity to attend, but who would be interested in an update on current investigations ongoing in the field of schizophrenia research. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

DOI10.1016/j.schres.2010.09.008
CitationsScopus - 3
2010Thienel RA, Pauly K, Kellermann T, Voss B, Kircher T, 'Functional correlates of the non self-serving attributional bias - A pilot study', Schizophrenia Research, Florence, Italy (2010) [E3]
2009Thienel RA, Voss B, Kellermann T, Reske M, Halfter S, Sheldrick AJ, et al., 'Nicotinic antagonist effects on functional attention networks', Schizophrenia Bulletin, San Diego, CA (2009) [E3]
DOI10.1093/schbul/sbn173
Co-authorsUlrich Schall
2009Pauly K, Lengsfeld I, Loos S, Rotarska-Jagiela A, Musso F, Ciaramidaro A, et al., 'Probabilistic reasoning in psychosis: First results of a German multi-center project on the neural correlates of a cognitive behavioral therapy', Schizophrenia Bulletin, San Diego, CA (2009) [E3]
DOI10.1093/schbul/sbn173
2008Thienel RA, Voss B, Reske M, Kellermann T, Halfter S, Sheldrick AJ, et al., 'Pharmacological modulation during FMRI: muscaring and nicotinic proportions of the attention network according to Posner', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Newcastle, NSW (2008) [E3]
2008Mueller BW, Timmers R, Thienel RA, Scherbaum N, Wiltfang J, Bender S, 'Effects of age, gender and education on cognitive performance in schizophrenia patients', Schizophrenia Research, Venice, Italy (2008) [E3]
2008Voss B, Thienel RA, Reske M, Kellermann T, Halfter S, Sheldrick A, et al., 'The connection between cognition and cholinergic transmission: Influence of muscarinic and nicotinic transmission on cognitive processes in fMRI', Schizophrenia Research, Venice, Italy (2008) [E3]
2007Kircher TT, Thienel R, Wagner M, Reske M, Habel U, Kellermann T, et al., 'Neuregulin 1 ICE-SNP in first episode schizophrenia correlates with cerebral activation in fronto-temporal areas', SCHIZOPHRENIA BULLETIN, Savannah, GA (2007)
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
2007Cohen M, Johnston PJ, Ehlkes T, Carr VJ, Ward PB, Thienel R, Schall UA, 'FMRI in first-episode schizophrenia and heavy cannabis users', Schizophrenia Bulletin (Abstracts of the 11th International Congress on Schizophrenia Research), Colorado Springs, Colorado (2007) [E3]
Co-authorsUlrich Schall
2006Kircher T, Thienel R, Habel U, Klein M, Kellermann T, Braus DF, et al., 'Variation in NRG 1 affects cerebral activation during a working memory task in first episode schizophrenia', SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH, Davos, SWITZERLAND (2006)
Author URL
2006Cohen M, Ehlkes T, Carr VJ, Ward PB, Johnston PJ, Thienel R, et al., 'Hits from the bong: An update on a functional imaging study of cannabis use and schizophrenia', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Fremantle, Western Australia (2006) [E3]
Co-authorsUlrich Schall
2005Klein M, Habel U, Kellermann I, Wagner M, Ruhrmann S, Mueller B, et al., 'Cerebral dysfunctions during cognitive and emotional performance in first-episode schizophrenia patients: A multicenter longitudinal fMRI study', SCHIZOPHRENIA BULLETIN, Savannah, GA (2005)
Author URL
2003Bender S, Thienel R, Dittmann-Balcar A, Tackenberg A, Gastpar M, 'Training effects of computer-based cognitive training in patients with schizophrenia', SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH, COLORADO SPINGS, COLORADO (2003)
DOI10.1016/S0920-9964(03)80893-9Author URL
2003Klein A, Habel U, Kellermann T, Koch K, Braus D, Frodl T, et al., 'Functional cerebral deficits during cognitive performance in first-episode schizophrenia patients: A multi-center fMRI study', SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH, COLORADO SPINGS, COLORADO (2003)
Author URL
2003Rasser PE, Johnston P, Lagopoulos J, Ward PB, Schall U, Thienel R, et al., 'Analysis of fMRI bold activation during the Tower of London task using cortical pattern matching', SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH, COLORADO SPINGS, COLORADO (2003)
DOI10.1016/S0920-9964(03)81221-5Author URL
Co-authorsUlrich Schall
2003Thienel R, Bender S, Muller BW, Gizewski E, Schall U, 'Cognitive sub-components in solving the Tower of London test - An fMRI study in healthy volunteers and patients with schizophrenia', SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH, COLORADO SPINGS, COLORADO (2003)
DOI10.1016/S0920-9964(03)81230-6Author URL
Co-authorsUlrich Schall
1999Schall UA, Butorac M, Zerbin D, Dittmann-Balcar A, Bender S, Wolstein J, et al., 'Serotonin metabolism increases with improved ERP indices of selective information processing: a treatment follow-up study on first and second episode patients with schizophrenia', Current Opinion in Psychiatry (1999) [E1]
CitationsWeb of Science - 1
Co-authorsUlrich Schall
1999Dittmann-Balcar A, Thienel R, Schall UA, 'Attention modulation of mismatch negativity?', Current Opinion in Psychiatry (1999) [E1]
Co-authorsUlrich Schall
1999Bender S, Wolstein S, Schall UA, Thienel R, Thienel RD, 'Monoamine response to treatment with typical neuroleptics', Schizophrenia Research (1999) [E1]
Co-authorsUlrich Schall
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants15
Total funding$520,853

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20142 grants / $27,000

Mapping whole-brain metabolic networks$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Renate Thienel, Associate Professor Frini Karayanidis, Doctor Juanita Todd, Associate Professor Peter Stanwell, Professor Mark Parsons, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi
SchemeProject Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1301285
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Faculty PVC Conference Assistance Grant 2014$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project TeamDoctor Renate Thienel
SchemePVC Conference Assistance Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1401236
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20122 grants / $14,000

Exploring the neurobiological basis of visual processing deficits in velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS; 22q11DS) - a genetically defined risk population for schizophrenia$12,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project TeamDoctor Linda Campbell, Doctor Renate Thienel, Doctor Kathryn McCabe
SchemeStrategic Small Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1401096
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

CINP - World Congress of Neuropsychopharmacology, Stockholm, Sweden, 3-7 June 2012$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamDoctor Renate Thienel
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200545
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20116 grants / $42,120

Self-regulation of regional brain activation and its underlying metabolic correlates - translational neuroimaging research evaluating real-time fMRI neurofeedback as a potential therapeutic tool$9,820

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Renate Thienel
SchemeEarly Career Researcher Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1101157
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Salience and the pharmacology of the mismatch negativity (MMN) system$9,300

Funding body: Monash University

Funding bodyMonash University
Project TeamDoctor Juanita Todd, Doctor Renate Thienel, Professor Ulli Schall, Professor Pradeep Nathan
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100270
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

Psychophysiological correlates of cognition and emotion$9,000

Funding body: Schizophrenia Research Institute

Funding bodySchizophrenia Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Renate Thienel, Professor Ulli Schall
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100666
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Salience and the pharmacology of the mismatch negativity (MMN) system$7,500

Funding body: Schizophrenia Research Institute

Funding bodySchizophrenia Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Juanita Todd, Doctor Renate Thienel, Professor Ulli Schall, Professor Pradeep Nathan
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1000865
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

A pilot-study of the microstructural integrity of the magnocellular and parvocellular pathways and the association with PRODH and COMT genotype in schizophrenia and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.$5,000

Funding body: Schizophrenia Research Institute

Funding bodySchizophrenia Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Renate Thienel, Doctor Natalie Beveridge, Doctor Linda Campbell, Doctor Kathryn McCabe
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1101139
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

10th World Congress of Biological Psychiatry, Prague, 29 May 2011 - 23 June 2011$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamDoctor Renate Thienel
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100481
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20102 grants / $15,368

Maturation of pre-attentive deviance detection measured by Mismatch Negativity - Implications for ultra high risk schizophrenia research$13,868

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Renate Thienel
SchemeFellowship (Equipment) Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000881
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

2010 Schizophrenia International Research Society Congress, Florence, 10 - 14 April 2010$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamDoctor Renate Thienel
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000125
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20093 grants / $422,365

2008 Research Fellowship - PRCBMHR$419,533

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Renate Thienel
SchemeResearch Fellowship
RoleLead
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0189496
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

International conference on schizophrenia research, San Diego California, 28/4 - 1/4 2009$1,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamDoctor Renate Thienel
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0190112
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

Maturation of pre-attentive deviance detection measured by Mismatch Negativity - Implications for ultra high risk schizophrenia research$1,132

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamDoctor Renate Thienel
SchemeFellowship Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0190424
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY
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Research Supervision

Past Supervision

YearResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Effects on Auditory Event-Related Potentials in Schizophrenia
Psychiatry, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
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Dr Renate Thienel

Position

Conjoint Fellow
Centre for Translational Neuroscience & Mental Health
School of Psychology
Faculty of Science and Information Technology

Contact Details

Emailrenate.thienel@newcastle.edu.au
Phone(02) 49217161
Fax0240335692

Office

RoomW-251
BuildingW-Building, School of Psychology, Callaghan Campus
LocationOther

,
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