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Associate Professor Phillip Dickson

Associate Professor

School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy (Medical Biochemistry)

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
The focus of my work has been the enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase which controls the rate of synthesis of the catecholamines dopamine, noradrenaline and adrenaline. I have examined the control of tyrosine hydroxylase activity by phosphorylation and have shown that hierarchical phosphorylation(the phosphorylation one site affecting the rate of phosphorylation of another site on the same molecule) exists in tyrosine hydroxylase and plays an important role in the control of tyrosine hydroxylase activity. More recently my work has focused on how this regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase plays a role in Parkinson's disease. We have now found that there is a selective loss of one of the human TH isoforms in Parkinson's disease. Therefore the expression of particular TH isoforms may render the cells more susceptible to death in Parkinson's disease.

Teaching Expertise
The focus of my teaching has been biochemistry and molecular biology. I have taught into the general areas of cell organelle structure, enzymology, cell communication and signal transduction, DNA replication, DNA transcription and protein synthesis and molecular biological techniques.

Administrative Expertise
I was the foundation program coordinator for the Bachelor of Biomedical Sciences Honours program. Since 2004 I have been Head of the Discipline of Medical Biochemistry and in 2006 took up the position as the Research Higher Degrees Coordinator for the School of Biomedical Sciences. I have been a member of both the School Research Executive and the School Teaching Committee. In 2009 I was appointed Deputy Head of School in charge of infrastructure.

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Melbourne
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Melbourne

Keywords

  • Parkinson's disease
  • catecholamines
  • cellular biochemistry
  • dopamine
  • hierarchical phosphorylation
  • molecular biology
  • signal transduction
  • tyrosine hydroxylase

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
060199 Biochemistry and Cell Biology not elsewhere classified 35
110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classified 25
110199 Medical Biochemistry and Metabolomics not elsewhere classified 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia

Invitations

Participant

Year Title / Rationale
2006 13th International Symposium on Chromaffin Cell Biology
Organisation: International Society for Neurochemistry (ISN) Description: Invited speaker to the conference
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Dickson PW, Briggs GD, 'Tyrosine hydroxylase. Regulation by feedback inhibition and phosphorylation.', Advances in Pharmacology: A New Era of Catecholamines in the Laboratory and Clinic, Academic Press, San Diego 13-21 (2013) [B1]
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-411512-5.00002-6
Citations Scopus - 9

Journal article (77 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Gasparotto J, Ribeiro CT, Bortolin RC, Somensi N, Fernandes HS, Teixeira AA, et al., 'Anti-RAGE antibody selectively blocks acute systemic inflammatory responses to LPS in serum, liver, CSF and striatum.', Brain Behav Immun, 62 124-136 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.bbi.2017.01.008
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2017 Rostas JAP, Hoffman A, Murtha LA, Pepperall D, McLeod DD, Dickson PW, et al., 'Ischaemia- and excitotoxicity-induced CaMKII-Mediated neuronal cell death: The relative roles of CaMKII autophosphorylation at T286 and T253.', Neurochem Int, 104 6-10 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.neuint.2017.01.002
Co-authors Neil Spratt, Lucy Murtha, Damian Mcleod, John Rostas, Kathryn Skelding
2017 Ong LK, Fuller EA, Sominsky L, Hodgson DM, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, 'Early life peripheral lipopolysaccharide challenge reprograms catecholaminergic neurons.', Sci Rep, 7 40475 (2017)
DOI 10.1038/srep40475
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Peter Dunkley, Deborah Hodgson
2017 Ong LK, Zhao Z, Kluge M, TeBay C, Zalewska K, Dickson PW, et al., 'Reconsidering the role of glial cells in chronic stress-induced dopaminergic neurons loss within the substantia nigra? Friend or foe?', BRAIN BEHAVIOR AND IMMUNITY, 60 117-125 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.bbi.2016.10.001
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Sarah Johnson, Michael Nilsson, Rohan Walker
2016 Rostas JAP, Spratt NJ, Dickson PW, Skelding KA, 'The role of Ca2+-calmodulin stimulated protein kinase II in ischaemic stroke - A potential target for neuroprotective therapies', Neurochemistry International, (2016)

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd.Studies in multiple experimental systems show that Ca2+-calmodulin stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a major mediator of ischaemia-induced cell death a... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd.Studies in multiple experimental systems show that Ca2+-calmodulin stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a major mediator of ischaemia-induced cell death and suggest that CaMKII would be a good target for neuroprotective therapies in acute treatment of stroke. However, as CaMKII regulates many cellular processes in many tissues any clinical treatment involving the inhibition of CaMKII would need to be able to specifically target the functions of ischaemia-activated CaMKII. In this review we summarise new developments in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in ischaemia-induced CaMKII-mediated cell death that have identified ways in which such specificity of CaMKII inhibition after stroke could be achieved. We also review the mechanisms and phases of tissue damage in ischaemic stroke to identify where and when CaMKII-mediated mechanisms may be involved.

DOI 10.1016/j.neuint.2017.01.012
Co-authors Kathryn Skelding, Neil Spratt, John Rostas
2016 James MH, Quinn RK, Ong LK, Levi EM, Smith DW, Dickson PW, Dayas CV, 'Rapamycin reduces motivated responding for cocaine and alters GluA1 expression in the ventral but not dorsal striatum', European Journal of Pharmacology, 784 147-154 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) regulates synaptic protein synthesis and therefore synaptic function ... [more]

© 2016 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) regulates synaptic protein synthesis and therefore synaptic function and plasticity. A role for mTORC1 has recently been demonstrated for addiction-related behaviors. For example, central or intra-accumbal injections of the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin attenuates several indices of cocaine-seeking including progressive ratio (PR) responding and reinstatement. These behavioral effects are associated with decreased mTORC1 activity and synaptic protein translation in the nucleus accumbens (NAC) and point to a possible therapeutic role for rapamycin in the treatment of addiction. Currently, it is unclear whether similar behavioral and biochemical effects can be achieved by administering rapamycin systemically, which represents a more clinically-appropriate route of administration. Here, we assessed the effects of repeated, systemic administration of rapamycin (10 mg/kg, i.p.) on PR responding for cocaine. We also assessed whether systemic rapamycin was associated with changes in measures of mTORC1 activity and GluA1 expression in the ventral and dorsal striatum. We report that systemic rapamycin treatment reduced PR breakpoints to levels comparable to intra-NAC rapamycin. Systemic rapamycin treatment also reduced phosphorylated p70S6K and GluA1 AMPARs within the NAC but not dorsal striatum. Thus, systemic administration of rapamycin is as effective at reducing drug seeking behavior and measures of mTORC1 activity compared to direct accumbal application and may therefore represent a possible therapeutic option in the treatment of addiction. Possible caveats of this treatment approach are discussed.

DOI 10.1016/j.ejphar.2016.05.013
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Douglas Smith, Christopher Dayas, Linkooi Ong
2016 Peres TV, Ong LK, Costa AP, Eyng H, Venske DKR, Colle D, et al., 'Tyrosine hydroxylase regulation in adult rat striatum following short-term neonatal exposure to manganese', Metallomics, 8 597-604 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element required for a range of physiological processes, but Mn can also be neurotoxic especially durin... [more]

© 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element required for a range of physiological processes, but Mn can also be neurotoxic especially during development. Excess levels of Mn accumulate preferentially in the striatum and can induce a syndrome called manganism, characterized by an initial stage of psychiatric disorder followed by motor impairment. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Mn exposure on the developing dopaminergic system, specifically tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) protein and phosphorylation levels in the striatum of rats. Neonatal rats were exposed to Mn intraperitoneally (ip) from post-natal day 8 up to day 12 (PND8-12). Striatal tissue was analysed on PND14 or PND70, to detect either short-term or long-term effects induced by Mn exposure. There was a dose dependent increase in TH protein levels in the striatum at PND14, reaching significance at 20 mg kg-1 Mn, and this correlated with an increase in TH phosphorylation at serines 40, 31 and 19. However, in the striatum at PND70, a time by which Mn levels were no longer elevated, there was a dose dependent decrease in TH protein levels, reaching significance at 20 mg kg-1 Mn, and this correlated with TH phosphorylation at Ser40 and Ser19. There was however a significant increase in phosphorylation of TH at serine 31 at 20 mg kg-1 Mn, which did not correlate with TH protein levels. Taken together our findings suggest that neonatal Mn exposure can have both short-term and long-term effects on the regulation of TH in the striatal dopaminergic system.

DOI 10.1039/c5mt00265f
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Peter Dunkley
2016 Ong LK, Page S, Briggs GD, Guan L, Dun MD, Verrills NM, et al., 'Peripheral Lipopolysaccharide Challenge Induces Long-Term Changes in Tyrosine Hydroxylase Regulation in the Adrenal Medulla.', J Cell Biochem, (2016)
DOI 10.1002/jcb.25839
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Peter Dunkley, Nikki Verrills, Matt Dun
2016 Kunzler A, Zeidán-Chuliá F, Gasparotto J, Girardi CS, Klafke K, Petiz LL, et al., 'Changes in Cell Cycle and Up-Regulation of Neuronal Markers During SH-SY5Y Neurodifferentiation by Retinoic Acid are Mediated by Reactive Species Production and Oxidative Stress', Molecular Neurobiology, 1-14 (2016)

© 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New YorkHuman neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells have been used as an in vitro model for neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson¿s disease ... [more]

© 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New YorkHuman neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells have been used as an in vitro model for neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson¿s disease and can be induced to a mature neuronal phenotype through retinoic acid (RA) differentiation. However, mechanisms of RA-induced differentiation remain unclear. Here, we investigate the role of reactive species (RS) on SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells under RA differentiation, using the antioxidant Trolox® as co-treatment. We found that RA treatment for 7 days reduced the cell number and proliferative capacity and induced the expression of adult catecholaminergic/neuronal markers such as tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), ß-III tubulin, and enolase-2. Evaluation of intracellular RS production by DCFH oxidation assay and quantification of cell non-enzymatic antioxidant activity by TRAP demonstrated that RA increases RS production. Furthermore, mitochondrial NADH oxidation showed to be inhibited under differentiation with RA. Cells subjected to co-treatment with antioxidant Trolox® demonstrated a remaining proliferative capacity and a decrease in the pro-oxidant state and RS production. Besides, antioxidant treatment restores the mitochondrial NADH oxidation. Importantly, Trolox® co-treatment inhibited the appearance of morphological characteristics such as neurite extension and branching, and decreased the expression of TH, ß-III tubulin, and enolase-2 after a seven-day differentiation with RA, indicating that RS production is a necessary step in this process. Trolox® also inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2, which are involved in differentiation and survival, respectively, of these cells. Altogether, these data indicate the presence of a redox-dependent mechanism in SH-SY5Y RA-differentiation process and can be a useful insight to improve understanding of neuronal differentiation signaling.

DOI 10.1007/s12035-016-0189-4
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2015 Quinn RK, Brown AL, Goldie BJ, Levi EM, Dickson PW, Smith DW, et al., 'Distinct miRNA expression in dorsal striatal subregions is associated with risk for addiction in rats', Translational Psychiatry, 5 (2015) [C1]

Recently, we published data using an animal model that allowed us to characterize animals into two groups, addiction vulnerable and addiction resilient, where we identified that a... [more]

Recently, we published data using an animal model that allowed us to characterize animals into two groups, addiction vulnerable and addiction resilient, where we identified that addiction/relapse vulnerability was associated with deficits in synaptic plasticityassociated gene expression in the dorsal striatum (DS). Notable was the strong reduction in expression for activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) considered a master regulator of synaptic plasticity. In the present study, we confirmed that Arc messenger RNA was significantly decreased in the DS, but importantly, we identified that this reduction was restricted to the dorsomedial (DMS) and not dorsolateral striatum (DLS). There is recent evidence of microRNA (miRNA)-associated posttranscriptional suppression of Arc and animal models of addiction have identified a key role for miRNA in the regulation of addiction-relevant genes. In further support of this link, we identified several differentially expressed miRNA with the potential to influence addiction-relevant plasticity genes, including Arc. A key study recently reported that miR-212 expression is protective against compulsive cocaine-seeking. Supporting this hypothesis, we found that miR-212 expression was significantly reduced in the DMS but not DLS of addiction-vulnerable animals. Together, our data provide strong evidence that miRNA promote ongoing plasticity deficits in the DS of addiction-vulnerable animals.

DOI 10.1038/tp.2014.144
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Douglas Smith, Christopher Dayas, Murray Cairns
2014 James MH, Quinn RK, Ong LK, Levi EM, Charnley JL, Smith DW, et al., 'mTORC1 inhibition in the nucleus accumbens 'protects' against the expression of drug seeking and 'relapse' and is associated with reductions in GluA1 AMPAR and CAMKIIa levels.', Neuropsychopharmacology, 39 1694-1702 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/npp.2014.16
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Christopher Dayas, Douglas Smith, Linkooi Ong
2014 Briggs GD, Bulley J, Dickson PW, 'Catalytic domain surface residues mediating catecholamine inhibition in tyrosine hydroxylase', Journal of Biochemistry, 155 183-193 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/jb/mvt110
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2014 Ong LK, Guan L, Damanhuri H, Goodchild AK, Bobrovskaya L, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, 'Neurobiological consequences of acute footshock stress: effects on tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation and activation in the rat brain and adrenal medulla', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY, 128 547-560 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jnc.12482
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Peter Dunkley
2014 Stutz B, Lima da Conceicao FS, Santos LE, Cadilhe DV, Fleming RL, Acquarone M, et al., 'Murine dopaminergic Muller cells restore motor function in a model of Parkinson's disease', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY, 128 829-840 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jnc.12475
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2014 Hoffman A, Carpenter H, Kahl R, Watt LF, Dickson PW, Rostas JAP, et al., 'Dephosphorylation of CaMKII at T253 controls the metaphase-anaphase transition', Cellular Signalling, 26 748-756 (2014) [C1]

Calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multi-functional serine/threonine protein kinase that controls a range of cellular functions, including proliferation... [more]

Calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multi-functional serine/threonine protein kinase that controls a range of cellular functions, including proliferation. The biological properties of CaMKII are regulated by multi-site phosphorylation and targeting via interactions with specific proteins. To investigate the role specific CaMKII phosphorylation sites play in controlling cell proliferation and cell cycle progression, we examined phosphorylation of CaMKII at two sites (T253 and T286) at various stages of the cell cycle, and also examined the effects of overexpression of wild-type (WT), T286D phosphomimic, T253D phosphomimic and T253V phosphonull forms of CaMKIIa in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer and SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells on cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression. We demonstrate herein that whilst there is no change in total CaMKII expression or T286 phosphorylation throughout the cell cycle, a marked dephosphorylation of CaMKII at T253 occurs during the G2 and/or M phases. Additionally, we show by molecular inhibition, as well as pharmacological activation, that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is the phosphatase responsible for this dephosphorylation. Furthermore, we show that inducible overexpression of WT, T286D and T253V forms of CaMKIIa in MDA-MB-231 and SHSY5Y cells increases cellular proliferation, with no alteration in cell cycle profiles. By contrast, overexpression of a T253D phosphomimic form of CaMKIIa significantly decreases proliferation, and cells accumulate in mitosis, specifically in metaphase. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the dephosphorylation of CaMKII at T253 is involved in controlling the cell cycle, specifically the metaphase-anaphase transition. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.cellsig.2013.12.015
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Nikki Verrills, John Rostas, Kathryn Skelding
2014 Abdul Majeed ABB, Pearsall E, Carpenter H, Brzozowski J, Dickson PW, Rostas JAP, Skelding KA, 'CaMKII Kinase Activity, Targeting and Control of Cellular Functions: Effect of Single and Double Phosphorylation of CaMKIIa', Calcium Signaling, 1 36-51 (2014) [C1]
Co-authors John Rostas, Kathryn Skelding
2013 Briggs G, Bulley J, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, 'Structural Basis for Regulation of Tyrosine Hydroxlyase by the Catecholamines 8-9 (2013) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-800044-1.00006-4
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2013 Skelding KA, Majeed ABA, Carpenter H, Dickson PW, Rostas JA, 'Can functional outcomes of CaMKII double phosphorylation be predicted from outcomes following single phosphorylation of CaMKII?', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY, 125 162-162 (2013) [E3]
Co-authors John Rostas, Kathryn Skelding
2013 Briggs GD, Nagy GM, Dickson PW, 'Mechanism of action of salsolinol on tyrosine hydroxylase', Neurochemistry International, 63 726-731 (2013) [C1]

Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. Dopamine regulates TH as an end-product inhibitor through its binding to a high and low affi... [more]

Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. Dopamine regulates TH as an end-product inhibitor through its binding to a high and low affinity site, the former being abolished by Ser40 phosphorylation only, and the latter able to bind and dissociate according to intracellular dopamine levels. Here, we have investigated TH inhibition by a dopamine metabolite found in dopaminergic brain regions, salsolinol (SAL). SAL is known to decrease dopamine in the nigrostriatal pathway and mediobasal hypothalamus, and to also decrease plasma catecholamines in rat stress models, however a target and mechanism for the effects of SAL have not been found. We found that SAL inhibits TH activity in the nanomolar range in vitro, by binding to both the high and low affinity dopamine binding sites. SAL produces the same level of inhibition as dopamine when TH is non-phosphorylated. However, it produces 3.7-fold greater inhibition of Ser40-phosphorylated TH compared to dopamine by competing more strongly with tetrahydrobiopterin, the cofactor of this enzymatic reaction. SAL's potent inhibition of phosphorylated TH would prevent TH from being fully activated to synthesise dopamine. Crown Copyright © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.neuint.2013.09.016
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
2013 Sominsky L, Fuller EA, Bondarenko E, Ong LK, Averell L, Nalivaiko E, et al., 'Functional Programming of the Autonomic Nervous System by Early Life Immune Exposure: Implications for Anxiety', PLOS ONE, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0057700
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Peter Dunkley, Deborah Hodgson, Linkooi Ong, Eugene Nalivaiko
2012 Skelding KA, Dickson PW, Verrills NM, Rostas JA, 'Progression through mitosis can be controlled by dephosphorylation of CaMKII at T253', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY, 123 31-31 (2012) [E3]
Co-authors John Rostas, Nikki Verrills, Kathryn Skelding
2012 Rostas JA, Skelding KA, Fluechter L, Dickson PW, Spratt NJ, 'CaMKII is Differentially Regulated in Striatum and Cortex', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY, 123 63-63 (2012) [E3]
Co-authors John Rostas, Kathryn Skelding, Neil Spratt
2012 Majeed ABA, Rostas JAP, Carpenter H, Dickson PW, Skelding KA, 'Multi-site phosphorylation of CaMKII regulates CaMKII function co-operatively', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY, 123 116-116 (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Kathryn Skelding, John Rostas
2012 Skelding KA, Spratt NJ, Fluechter L, Dickson PW, Rostas JA, 'alpha CaMKII is differentially regulated in brain regions that exhibit differing sensitivities to ischemia and excitotoxicity', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 32 2181-2192 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors John Rostas, Neil Spratt, Kathryn Skelding
2012 Ong LK, Sominsky L, Dickson PW, Hodgson DM, Dunkley PR, 'The sustained phase of Tyrosine hydroxylase activation in vivo', Neurochemical Research, 37 1938-1943 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Peter Dunkley, Deborah Hodgson, Linkooi Ong
2012 Damanhuri HA, Burke PGR, Ong LK, Bobrovskaya L, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, Goodchild AK, 'Tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation in catecholaminergic brain regions: A marker of activation following acute hypotension and glucoprivation', Plos One, 7 1-19 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Peter Dunkley, Linkooi Ong
2011 Briggs GD, Gordon SL, Dickson PW, 'Mutational analysis of catecholamine binding in tyrosine hydroxylase', Biochemistry, 50 1545-1555 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/bi101455b
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2011 Aumann TD, Egan K, Lim J, Boon WC, Bye CR, Chua HK, et al., 'Neuronal activity regulates expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in adult mouse substantia nigra pars compacta neurons', Journal of Neurochemistry, 116 646-658 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2010.07151.x
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 18
2011 Ong LK, Guan L, Stutz B, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, Bobrovskaya L, 'The effects of footshock and immobilization stress on tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation in the rat locus coeruleus and adrenal gland', Neuroscience, 192 20-27 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2011.06.087
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Peter Dunkley
2011 Ong LK, Bobrovskaya L, Walker FR, Day TA, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, 'The effect of social defeat on tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation in the rat brain and adrenal gland', Neurochemical Research, 36 27-33 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11064-010-0255-7
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Peter Dunkley, Rohan Walker
2010 Bobrovskaya L, Damanhuri HA, Ong LK, Schneider JJ, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, Goodchild AK, 'Signal transduction pathways and tyrosine hydroxylase regulation in the adrenal medulla following glucoprivation: An in vivo analysis', Neurochemistry International, 57 162-167 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.neuint.2010.05.009
Citations Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Jennifer Schneider, Peter Dunkley
2010 Double KL, Halliday GM, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, Gerlach M, Riederer P, 'Pigmentation in the human brain and risk of Parkinson's Disease', Annals of Neurology, 67 553-554 (2010) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2010 Posser T, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, Franco JL, 'Human neuroblastoma cells transfected with tyrosine hydroxylase gain increased resistance to methylmercury-induced cell death', Toxicology in Vitro, 24 1498-1503 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.tiv.2010.07.015
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2010 Skelding KA, Suzuki T, Gordon SL, Xue J, Verrills NM, Dickson PW, Rostas JA, 'Regulation of CaMKII by phospho-Thr253 or phospho-Thr286 sensitive targeting alters cellular function', Cellular Signalling, 22 759-769 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.cellsig.2009.12.011
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors John Rostas, Nikki Verrills, Kathryn Skelding
2010 Franco JL, Posser T, Gordon SL, Bobrovskaya L, Schneider JJ, Farina M, et al., 'Expression of tyrosine hydroxylase increases the resistance of human neuroblastoma cells to oxidative insults', Toxicological Sciences, 113 150-157 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/toxsci/kfp245
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Jennifer Schneider, Peter Dunkley
2009 Skelding KA, Liao X, Verrills NM, Fluechter L, Dickson PW, Rostas JA, 'CaMKII phosphorylation at T253 alters neuronal growth rates and morphology', Journal of Neurochemistry, 110, Suppl. 2 42 (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2009.06238.x
Co-authors Nikki Verrills, John Rostas, Kathryn Skelding
2009 Posser T, Franco JL, Bobrovskaya L, Leal RB, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, 'Manganese induces sustained Ser40 phosphorylation and activation of tyrosine hydroxylase in PC12 cells', Journal of Neurochemistry, 110 848-856 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2009.06185.x
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2009 Gordon SL, Bobrovskaya L, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, 'Differential regulation of human tyrosine hydroxylase isoforms 1 and 2 in situ: Isoform 2 is not phosphorylated at Ser35', Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Cell Research, 1793 1860-1867 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.bbamcr.2009.10.001
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2009 Gordon SL, Webb JK, Shehadeh J, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, 'The low affinity dopamine binding site on tyrosine hydroxylase: The role of the N-Terminus and in situ regulation of enzyme activity', Neurochemical Research, 34 1830-1837 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11064-009-9989-5
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2009 Franco JL, Posser T, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, Mattos JJ, Martins R, et al., 'Methylmercury neurotoxicity is associated with inhibition of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase', Free Radical Biology and Medicine, 47 449-457 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2009.05.013
Citations Scopus - 103Web of Science - 91
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2008 Gordon SL, Quinsey NS, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, 'Tyrosine hydroxylase activity is regulated by two distinct dopamine-binding sites', Journal of Neurochemistry, 106 1614-1623 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2008.05509.x
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2008 Skelding KA, Verrills NM, Fluechter L, Sim AT, Dickson PW, Rostas JA, 'Development of a novel method for the identification of CaMKII binding proteins', Journal of Neurochemistry, 106 51 (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Nikki Verrills, Kathryn Skelding, Alistair Sim, John Rostas
2007 Bobrovskaya L, Gelain DP, Gilligan C, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, 'PACAP stimulates the sustained phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase at serine 40', Cellular Signalling, 19 1141-1149 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.cellsig.2006.12.006
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 36
Co-authors Conor Gilligan, Peter Dunkley
2007 Bobrovskaya L, Gilligan C, Bolster EK, Flaherty JJ, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, 'Sustained phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase at serine 40: a novel mechanism for maintenance of catecholamine synthesis', Journal of Neurochemistry, 100 479-489 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2006.04213.x
Citations Scopus - 55Web of Science - 54
Co-authors Conor Gilligan, Peter Dunkley
2007 Gelain DP, Moreira JCF, Bevilaqua LRM, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, 'Retinol activates tyrosine hydroxylase acutely by increasing the phosphorylation of serine40 and then serine31 in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells', Journal of Neurochemistry, 103 2369-2379 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2007.04935.x
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2006 Migues PV, Lehmann IT, Fluechter L, Cammarota MP, Gurd JW, Sim AT, et al., 'Phosphorylation of CaMKII at Thr253 occurs in vivo and enhances binding to isolated postsynaptic densities', Journal of Neurochemistry, 98 289-299 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2006.03876.x
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Alistair Sim, John Rostas
2006 Lehmann IT, Bobrovskaya L, Gordon SL, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, 'Differential regulation of the human tyrosine hydroxylase isoforms via hierarchical phosphorylation', Journal of Biological Chemistry, 281 17644-17651 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1074/jbc.M512194200
Citations Scopus - 50Web of Science - 50
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2005 Graham ME, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, Von Nagy-Felsobuki EI, 'Characterisation of tryptic peptides of phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase by high-pressure liquid chromatography electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry', Journal of Electron Spectroscopy and Related Phenomena, 142 271-276 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.elspec.2004.09.008
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ellak, Peter Dunkley
2004 Dunkley PR, Bobrovskaya L, Graham ME, Von Nagy-Felsobuki EI, Dickson PW, 'Tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation: regulation and consequences', Journal of Neurochemistry, 91 1025-1043 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2004.02797.x
Citations Scopus - 270Web of Science - 265
Co-authors Peter Dunkley, Ellak
2003 Bevilaqua L, Cammarota MP, Dickson PW, Sim AT, Dunkley PR, 'Role of protein phosphatase 2C from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells in the dephosphorylation of phospho-serine 40 tyrosine hydroxylase', Journal of Neurochemistry, 85 1368-1373 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1046/j.1471-4159.2003.01792.x
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Peter Dunkley, Alistair Sim
2001 Bevilaqua L, Graham ME, Dunkley PR, Von Nagy-Felsobuki EI, Dickson PW, 'Phosphorylation of Ser19 Alters the Conformation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase to Increase the Rate of Phosphorylation of Ser40*', The Journal of Biological Chemistry, 276 No. 44 40411-40416 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 64Web of Science - 63
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2001 Bevilaqua L, Graham ME, Von Nagy-Felsobuki EI, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, 'Effect of phosphorylation on tyrosine hydroxylase shape', Journal of Neurochemistry, 78 Supt. 1 143 (2001) [C3]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2001 Graham ME, Bevilaqua L, Dunkley PR, Von Nagy-Felsobuki EI, Dickson PW, 'The Kinetics of CAMKII Phosphorylation of Dopamine Bound-Tyrosine Hydroxylase Determined by Electrospray Mass Spectrometry', ComBio 2001, 0 (2001) [C3]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2000 Graham ME, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, Von Nagy-Felsobuki EI, 'Determination of Phosphorylation Levels of Tyrosine Hydroxylase by Electrospray Mass Spectrometry', Analytical Biochemistry, 280 1-7 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Peter Dunkley, Ellak
1999 Dickson PW, Wong Z, Harrap S, Abramson M, Walters E, 'Mutational analysis of the high affinity immunoglobulin E receptor Beta subunit gene in asthma', Thorax (The Journal of the British Thoracic Society), 54 409-412 (1999) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 17
1998 Quinsey NS, Luong AQ, Dickson PW, 'Mutational analysis of substrate inhibition in tyrosine hydroxylase', Journal of Neurochemistry, 71 2132-2138 (1998) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
1998 Graham ME, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, Von Nagy-Felsobuki EI, 'Characterisation of the phosphorylation of rat tyrosine hydroxylase using electrospray mass spectrometry', Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 12 746-748 (1998) [C1]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
1998 Graham ME, Dickson P, Dunkley P, Von Nagy-Felsobuki EI, 'Characterization of the Phosphorylation of Rat Tyrosine Hydroxylase using Electrospray Mass Spectrometry', Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 12 746-748 (1998) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Ellak, Peter Dunkley
1997 Kamitani A, Wong ZYH, Dickson P, Van Herwerden L, Raven J, Forbes AB, et al., 'Absence of genetic linkage of chromosome 5q31 with asthma and atopy in the general population', Thorax, 52 816-817 (1997)

Background - Clinical asthma is associated with increased serum total immunoglobulin E (IgE), atopy (skin prick test positivity to common aeroallergens), and bronchial hyperreacti... [more]

Background - Clinical asthma is associated with increased serum total immunoglobulin E (IgE), atopy (skin prick test positivity to common aeroallergens), and bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR) to non-specific stimuli (positive methacholine challenge test). A region on chromosome 5q31-33 has been linked with increased total serum IgE and BHR. A study of the genetic linkage of this region with clinical asthma and atopy was therefore undertaken. Methods - A polymorphic microsatellite marker in chromosome 5q31 (D5S399) was studied in 119 sibling pairs recruited from the general population who shared asthma, atopy, and/or BHR. Based on our population distribution of 13 different alleles, it was expected that by chance alone sibling pairs would share on average 1.24 alleles and that a significant excess would indicate genetic linkage. Results - No evidence of linkage was found in 45 siblings concordant for asthma (shared alleles = 1.09, p = 0.95), in 103 sibling pairs with atopy (shared alleles = 1.18, p = 0.82), in 51 sibling pairs with BHR (shared alleles = 1.22, p = 0.62), or in 68 sibling pairs who shared atopy in the absence of BHR (shared alleles = 1.22, p = 0.61). A slight non-significant excess of shared alleles (1.44, p = 0.11) was observed in siblings who shared BHR without atopy. Conclusions - No evidence of genetic linkage of chromosome 5q31 with either clinical asthma or atopy was therefore detected in the population studied. Linkage between chromosome 5q and BHR needs further investigation.

Citations Scopus - 22
1996 Quinsey NS, Lenaghan CM, Dickson PW, 'Identification of Gln313 and Pro327 as residues critical for substrate inhibition in tyrosine hydroxylase', Journal of Neurochemistry, 66 908-914 (1996)

Rat tyrosine hydroxylase was expressed in Escherichia coli. High-level expression was obtained after incubation at 27°C for 18 h. The smallest fragment of tyrosine hydroxylase th... [more]

Rat tyrosine hydroxylase was expressed in Escherichia coli. High-level expression was obtained after incubation at 27°C for 18 h. The smallest fragment of tyrosine hydroxylase that gave a soluble active molecule was from Leu188 to Phe456. This fragment corresponds directly to the section of phenylalanine hydroxylase that had previously been shown to be this enzyme's catalytic core region. It has been shown that Glu286 plays a critical role in pterin function in phenylalanine hydroxylase. The corresponding residue in tyrosine hydroxylase (Glu332) has no significant role in pterin function. Substitution of a leucine for a proline at position 327 in tyrosine hydroxylase produces a molecule with a Km for tetrahydrobiopterin 20-fold higher than that of the wild-type molecule, whereas the same substitution at the corresponding residue in phenylalanine hydroxylase (Pro281) has no effect on the kinetic constant for the cofactor. This suggests that corresponding residues in phenylalanine hydroxylase and tyrosine hydroxylase can have different roles in pterin function. Substitution of a leucine for a proline at position 281 in phenylalanine hydroxylase increases the Km for phenylalanine >20-fold over that of the wild-type. Substitution of leucine or alanine for Pro327 or a glutamic acid for Gln313 in tyrosine hydroxylase eliminates the substrate inhibition shown by wild-type tyrosine hydroxylase.

Citations Scopus - 24
1996 Dickson PW, Quinsey NS, 'Analysis of substrate inhibition in tyrosine hydroxylase', FASEB Journal, 10 (1996)

Tyrosine hydroxylase (TYRH) belongs to a family of aromatic amino acid hydroxylases which also includes phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) and tryptophan hydroxylase. The three enzym... [more]

Tyrosine hydroxylase (TYRH) belongs to a family of aromatic amino acid hydroxylases which also includes phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) and tryptophan hydroxylase. The three enzymes are functionally related and have a high similarity in amino acid sequence of their catalytic domains. TYRH and PAH have common boundaries in their catalytic domains (1,2). We have identified residues involved in co-factor and substrate function in PAH (1,2). We have also delineated residues that are involved in substrate inhibition in TYRH (2). Analysis of deletion mutants of TYRH has identified mutants which show no substrate inhibition but retain high specific activity. This suggests that the tyrosine inhibition site in TYRH maybe functionally distinct from the tyrosine catalytic site. (1) Dickson, P.W., Jennings, I.G., and Cotton, R.G.H. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269 ,20369-20375. (2) Quinsey, N.S., Lenaghan, C.M.. and Dickson, P.W. (1996) J. Neurochem. 66 ,908-914.

1994 Dickson PW, Jennings IG, Cotton RGH, 'Delineation of the catalytic core of phenylalanine hydroxylase and identification of glutamate 286 as a critical residue for pterin function', Journal of Biological Chemistry, 269 20369-20375 (1994)

Rat phenylalanine hydroxylase was expressed in Escherichia coli. High level expression was achieved when the transformed E. coli were incubated at 27 °C for 24 h. A series of tru... [more]

Rat phenylalanine hydroxylase was expressed in Escherichia coli. High level expression was achieved when the transformed E. coli were incubated at 27 °C for 24 h. A series of truncated fragments were expressed. The smallest fragment that gave an active soluble protein was from Leu142 to Phe410. This fragment corresponds closely to the region where there is highest homology between the three aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. The circular dichroism spectra of the phenylalanine hydroxylase catalytic core suggested that it contains around 50% a-helix. The core fragment is monomeric in dilute solutions but self-associates at higher concentrations. The E. coli expression system was used to generate a number of mutations in phenylalanine hydroxylase from position 264 to 290. This region had been previously shown to be important for pterin binding. Characterization of the mutant phenylalanine hydroxylase molecules identified Glu286 as an amino acid critical for pterin function in phenylalanine hydroxylase.

Citations Scopus - 57
1989 COLE T, DICKSON PW, ESNARD F, AVERILL S, RISBRIDGER GP, GAUTHIER F, SCHREIBER G, 'The cDNA structure and expression analysis of the genes for the cysteine proteinase inhibitor cystatin C and for ß2-microglobulin in rat brain', European Journal of Biochemistry, 186 35-42 (1989)

Tissue patterns of gene expression were analyzed by measuring mRNA levels and incorporation of radioactive amino acids for cystatin C and ß2-microglobulin, the two extracellular ... [more]

Tissue patterns of gene expression were analyzed by measuring mRNA levels and incorporation of radioactive amino acids for cystatin C and ß2-microglobulin, the two extracellular proteins in the brain with the highest ratio of concentration in cerebrospinal fluid over that in blood plasma. The primary structure of rat cystatin C mRNA from choroid plexus was determined by nucleotide sequencing of cloned cDNA and the tissue patterns of gene expression were analysed by RNA blot analysis and in situ hybridization. Cystatin C was found to be composed of 120 amino acids and to contain a potential site for N-linked glycosylation. The tissue with the highest cystatin C mRNA level was the choroid plexus of the brain. Cystatin C mRNA was also detected in lower levels in other areas of the brain, testis, epididymis, seminal vesicles, prostate, ovary, submandibular gland, and, in trace amounts, in liver. Choroid plexus pieces in culture secreted radioactive cystatin C when incubated with radioactive leucine. Rat ß2-microglobulin cDNA was cloned and identified by nucleotide sequencing and comparison of the obtained sequence with that of mouse and human ß2-microglobulin cDNA. Tissue levels of ß2-microglobulin mRNA in the rat were measured by hybridization to rat ß2-microglobulin cDNA. The highest levels of ß2-microglobulin mRNA were observed in liver and choroid plexus. Other parts of the brain and testis contained lower levels of ß2-microglobulin mRNA. Copyright © 1989, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved

DOI 10.1111/j.1432-1033.1989.tb15174.x
Citations Scopus - 86
1989 SCHREIBER G, TSYKIN A, ALDRED AR, THOMAS T, FUNG W, DICKSON PW, et al., 'The Acute Phase Response in the Rodent', Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 557 61-86 (1989)
DOI 10.1111/j.1749-6632.1989.tb24000.x
Citations Scopus - 105
1988 Wai-Ping F, Thomas T, Dickson PW, Aldred AR, Milland J, Dziadek M, et al., 'Structure and expression of the rat transthyretin (prealbumin) gene', Journal of Biological Chemistry, 263 480-488 (1988)

The rat transthyretin gene, 7.3 kilobase pairs (kb) long, with 14.5 kb of 5' flanking and 12.2 kb of 3' flanking region was cloned and characterized. The gene contained four exons... [more]

The rat transthyretin gene, 7.3 kilobase pairs (kb) long, with 14.5 kb of 5' flanking and 12.2 kb of 3' flanking region was cloned and characterized. The gene contained four exons. A 'TATA box' sequence (5'-TATATAA-3') and a 'CAAT box' sequence (5'-GTCAAT-3') were located 23 and 95 nucleotides upstream, respectively, from the major transcription start site. Nucleotides -51 to -189 were highly conserved (93% homology between rats and humans, 97% homology between rats and mice). Tandem repeats of sequences of 5'-AC-3' and 5'-ACACATGC-3' in the 5' flanking region, of 5'-GAAA-3' in the first intron, and of 5'-GT-3' in the third intron of the gene were observed. Using specific cDNA probes, tissue specificity and regulation of transthyretin mRNA biosynthesis durig embyrogenesis were analyzed. Transthyretin expression occurred first in the yolk sac, then decreased when expression increased in fetal liver. Presumptive choroid plexus cells in the inner lining of the neural tube expressed transthyretin early in gestation (11 days before birth) with a maximum immediately preceding the spurt of brain growth around birth. Partial hepatectomy of adult rats induced both an acute phase response and regenerative growth in liver. The decrease in transcription of the transthyretin gene in liver, which is characteristic for the acute phase response, was overridden by stimulating of gene expression after partial hepatectomy. This stimulation also affected transthyretin expression in choroid plexus.

Citations Scopus - 74
1987 Aldred AR, Dickson PW, Marley PD, Schreiber G, 'Distribution of transferrin synthesis in brain and other tissues in the rat.', Journal of Biological Chemistry, 262 5293-5297 (1987)

Levels of transferrin mRNA were measured by hybridization to transferrin cDNA in extracts from various areas of rat brain and other tissues. The highest concentrations of transfer... [more]

Levels of transferrin mRNA were measured by hybridization to transferrin cDNA in extracts from various areas of rat brain and other tissues. The highest concentrations of transferrin mRNA were found in the liver and the choroid plexus of the lateral and third ventricles. Lower concentrations were observed in the medulla and thalamus, choroid plexus of the fourth ventricle, cortex, hypothalamus, cerebellum, pituitary, testis, placenta, stomach, spleen, kidney, muscle, and heart. Yolk sac, small intestine, and adrenal glands did not contain detectable transferrin mRNA levels. The size of transferrin mRNA was the same in liver, brain, and testis. Upon incubation of choroid plexus pieces with [14C]leucine in vitro, about 4% of the radioactive protein secreted into the medium was found to be transferrin. Together with previous data (Dickson, P.W., Howlett, G.J., and Schreiber, G. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 8214-8219; Dickson, P.W., Aldred, A.R., Marley, P.D., Bannister, D., and Schreiber (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 3475-3478) the obtained data suggest that the choroid plexus plays a role in maintenance of homeostasis in the microenvironment of the central nervous system by synthesizing and secreting plasma proteins.

Citations Scopus - 111
1987 Dickson PW, Aldred AR, Menting JG, Marley PD, Sawyer WH, Schreiber G, 'Thyroxine transport in choroid plexus.', Journal of Biological Chemistry, 262 13907-13915 (1987)

The role of the choroid plexus in thyroid hormone transport between body and brain, suggested by strong synthesis and secretion of transthyretin in this tissue, was investigated i... [more]

The role of the choroid plexus in thyroid hormone transport between body and brain, suggested by strong synthesis and secretion of transthyretin in this tissue, was investigated in in vitro and in vivo systems. Rat choroid plexus pieces incubated in vitro were found to accumulate thyroid hormones from surrounding medium in a non-saturable process. At equilibrium, the ratio of thyroid hormone concentration in choroid plexus pieces to that in medium decreased upon increasing the concentration of transthyretin in the medium. Fluorescence quenching of fluorophores located at different depths in liposome membranes showed maximal hormone accumulation in the middle of the phospholipid bilayer. Partition coefficients of thyroxine and triiodothyronine between lipid and aqueous phase were about 20,000. After intravenous injection of 125I-labeled thyroid hormones, choroid plexus and parts of the brain steadily accumulated 125I-thyroxine, but not [125I]triiodothyronine, for many hours. The accumulation of 125I-thyroxine in choroid plexus preceded that in brain. The amount of 125I-thyroxine in non-brain tissues and the [125I]triiodothyronine content of all tissues decreased steadily beginning immediately after injection. A model is proposed for thyroxine transport from the bloodstream into cerebrospinal fluid based on partitioning of thyroxine between choroid plexus and surrounding fluids and binding of thyroxine to transthyretin newly synthesized and secreted by choroid plexus.

Citations Scopus - 135
1987 Dickson PW, Bannister D, Schreiber G, 'Minor burns lead to major changes in synthesis rates of plasma proteins in the liver', Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, 27 283-286 (1987)

The effect of minor burns on the rates of synthesis of plasma proteins in the liver was studied in white Buffalo rats. Burns of second to third degree, covering 0.8% of total body... [more]

The effect of minor burns on the rates of synthesis of plasma proteins in the liver was studied in white Buffalo rats. Burns of second to third degree, covering 0.8% of total body surface, were produced by short application of a hot piece of metal to the skin under ether anesthesia. Levels of mRNA in extracts from liver removed after 24 hr were measured by hybridization to radioactively labeled specific cDNA probes. The level of mRNA for major acute phase ar-protein (also called cysteine proteinase inhibitor or Tl-kininogen) increased 20-fold, that of fibrinogen mRNA 8-fold, and that of a,-acid glycoprotein mRNA about 9-fold. The levels of albumin mRNA and transthyretin mRNA (also called prealbumin) decreased to about 80% of normal and the level of transferrin mRNA did not change significantly. Thus, although the percentage of burnt skin was only very small, a typical acute phase response of plasma protein synthesis in liver was observed. © 1987 by The Williams & Wilkins Co.

Citations Scopus - 36
1986 Dickson PW, Aldred AR, Marley PD, Bannister D, Schreiber G, 'Rat choroid plexus specializes in the synthesis and the secretion of transthyretin (Prealbumin). Regulation of transthyretin synthesis in choroid plexus is independent from that in liver', Journal of Biological Chemistry, 261 3475-3478 (1986)

Synthesis of total protein and of transthyretin in rat choroid plexus was studied by measuring the incorporation of radioactive leucine into proteins in choroid plexus tissue incu... [more]

Synthesis of total protein and of transthyretin in rat choroid plexus was studied by measuring the incorporation of radioactive leucine into proteins in choroid plexus tissue incubated in vitro. About 20% of the protein newly synthesized in choroid plexus and about 50% of the newly synthesized protein secreted into the medium was transthyretin. Evidently, the choroid plexus is very active in the biosynthesis of this carrier protein for thyroid hormones and could be an important link in the chemical communication between the body and the central nervous system. Acute inflammation, which leads to a profound rearrangement of the pattern of plasma protein synthesis rates in the liver, produced distinct changes in the levels for plasma protein mRNAs in the liver. The levels of the mRNAs for a1-acid glycoprotein and major acute phase a1-protein increased more than 30-fold, those for transthyretin and albumin decreased to 27 and 57% of normal, respectively. The pattern of the observed changes in the levels of mRNAs for plasma proteins in the liver was independent of whether the acute inflammation was produced by subcutaneous injection of turpentine or intraperitoneal injection of a suspension of talcum. However, levels of transthyretin mRNAs in choroid plexus were affected only very slightly, or not al all. Apparently, transthyretin synthesis in liver and choroid plexus is regulated independently during the acute phase response. No mRNA was detected in choroid plexus for albumin, a1-acid glycoprotein, and major acute phase a1-protein under any conditions.

Citations Scopus - 120
1986 Stauder AJ, Dickson PW, Aldred AR, Schreiber G, Mendelsohn FA, Hudson P, 'Synthesis of transthyretin (pre-albumin) mRNA in choroid plexus epithelial cells, localized by in situ hybridization in rat brain', Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry, 34 949-952 (1986)
Citations Scopus - 54
1986 Dickson PW, Schreiber G, 'High levels of messenger RNA for transthyretin (prealbumin) in human choroid plexus', Neuroscience Letters, 66 311-315 (1986)

We have investigated the expression of the gene for transthyretin (prealbumin) in the human choroid plexus. RNA was isolated from the human choroid plexus, fractionated by electro... [more]

We have investigated the expression of the gene for transthyretin (prealbumin) in the human choroid plexus. RNA was isolated from the human choroid plexus, fractionated by electrophoresis in agarose gel and transferred onto a nitrocellulose filter membrane. Transthyretin messenger RNA (mRNA) was identified by hybridization to radioactive complementary DNA for rat transthyretin. The level of transthyretin mRNA in the human choroid plexus was found to be at least 40 times higher than in human liver, suggesting very active synthesis of transthyretin in the choroid plexus. © 1986.

DOI 10.1016/0304-3940(86)90037-6
Citations Scopus - 53
1986 Schreiber G, Aldred AR, Thomas T, Birch HE, Dickson PW, Guo-Fen T, et al., 'Levels of messenger ribonucleic acids for plasma proteins in rat liver during acute experimental inflammation', Inflammation, 10 59-66 (1986)

The levels of mRNA for plasma proteins and for metallothionein in rat liver during the acute-phase response were studied by hybridization to specific cDNA probes. The mRNA for a2-... [more]

The levels of mRNA for plasma proteins and for metallothionein in rat liver during the acute-phase response were studied by hybridization to specific cDNA probes. The mRNA for a2-macroglobulin, the ß-chain of fibrinogen, a1,-acid glycoprotein (so-called acute-phase reactants) reached a maximum level between 18 and 36 h after inducing an acute inflammation. The level of mRNA for metallothionein-I peaked earlier, after 12 h. The mRNA for transferrin showed a delayed increase with a broad maximum for its relative level after 36-60 h. The mRNA levels for albumin and a2u-globulin (so-called negative acute-phase reactants) decreased, reaching a minimum of 25 % of the normal level after 36 h (albumin) and after 72 h (a2u-globulin). The ratios of the rates of incorporation of leucine into the proteins over the levels of their mRNA in liver changed only a little, indicating that the rates of synthesis of plasma proteins in the liver are regulated at the mRNA level during the acute-phase response to inflammation. © 1986 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

DOI 10.1007/BF00916041
Citations Scopus - 44
1985 Dickson PW, Aldred AR, Marley PD, Guo-Fen T, Howlett GJ, Schreiber G, 'High prealbumin and transferrin mRNA levels in the choroid plexus of rat brain', Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 127 890-895 (1985)

Expression of plasma protein genes in various parts of the rat brain was studied by hybridizing radioactive cDNA to RNA in cytoplasmic extracts. No mRNA could be detected in brain... [more]

Expression of plasma protein genes in various parts of the rat brain was studied by hybridizing radioactive cDNA to RNA in cytoplasmic extracts. No mRNA could be detected in brain for the ß subunit of fibrinogen, major acute phase a1-protein, a1-acid glycoprotein and albumin. However, per g tissue, the choroid plexus contained at least 100 times larger amounts of prealbumin mRNA than the liver and about the same amount of transferrin mRNA as liver. No prealbumin mRNA was found in other areas of the brain. The results obtained suggest very active synthesis of prealbumin in choroid plexus, which would be an important link in the transport of thyroid hormones from the blood to the brain via the cerebrospinal fluid. © 1985 Academic Press, Inc.

DOI 10.1016/S0006-291X(85)80027-9
Citations Scopus - 116
1985 Dickson PW, Howlett GJ, Schreiber G, 'Rat transthyretin (prealbumin). Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and gene expression in liver and brain', Journal of Biological Chemistry, 260 8214-8219 (1985)
Citations Scopus - 123
1982 Howlett GJ, Dickson PW, Birch H, Schreiber G, 'Studies on 125I-labeled proteins in rat plasma using an air-driven ultracentrifuge: Protein-protein interactions and nonideality', Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, 215 309-318 (1982)

The molecular weights of a number of 125I-labeled plasma proteins have been determined from an analysis of their sedimentation equilibrium behavior in an air-driven ultracentrifug... [more]

The molecular weights of a number of 125I-labeled plasma proteins have been determined from an analysis of their sedimentation equilibrium behavior in an air-driven ultracentrifuge. The values obtained agree well with results obtained by other methods. Molecular weights obtained for 125I-labeled bovine serum albumin and the rat serum proteins albumin, a1-acid glycoprotein, and major acute-phase a1-protein were unaffected by the addition of 7% rat plasma. Direct evidence for protein-protein interactions was obtained for mixtures of 125I-labeled rat a1-acid glycoprotein and the plant lectin concanavalin A and for mixtures of 125I-labeled protein A from Staphylococcus aureus and 7% rat plasma. Interactions of a different type were observed when the sedimentation equilibrium profiles of 125I-labeled proteins were determined in concentrated solutions of other proteins. Under these conditions the effects of molecular exclusion or nonideality became significant and low estimates were obtained for the molecular weights of the labeled proteins. Analysis of the data obtained for 125I-labeled bovine serum albumin in concentrated solutions of bovine serum albumin (20-80 mg/ ml) yielded nonideality coefficients in good agreement with literature values. Analysis of the behavior of 125I-labeled rat serum albumin, transferrin, and a1-acid glycoprotein yielded nonideality coefficients and hence activities of these proteins in undiluted rat plasma. © 1982.

DOI 10.1016/0003-9861(82)90309-5
Citations Scopus - 9
1982 Howlett GJ, Birch H, Dickson PW, Schreiber G, 'Determination of the molecular weight of detergent-solubilized enzymes by sedimentation equilibrium in an air-driven ultracentrifuge', Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 105 895-901 (1982)

Detergent solubilization of ¿-glutamyl transpeptidase was deduced from measuring sedimentation equilibrium behaviour in an air-driven ultra-centrifuge. Sequential fractionation o... [more]

Detergent solubilization of ¿-glutamyl transpeptidase was deduced from measuring sedimentation equilibrium behaviour in an air-driven ultra-centrifuge. Sequential fractionation of the tube contents and analysis of the radial concentration dependence permits direct determination of molecular weight. Studies using D2O and H2O indicate that the Triton X-100 solubilized enzyme has a molecular weight of approximately 175,000 and contains 55% bound detergent. The glycoprotein nature of the enzyme is demonstrated by its interaction with concanavalin A. © 1982.

DOI 10.1016/0006-291X(82)91054-3
Citations Scopus - 3
1982 DICKSON PW, HOWLETT GJ, SCHREIBER G, 'Metabolism of Prealbumin in Rats and Changes Induced by Acute Inflammation', European Journal of Biochemistry, 129 289-293 (1982)

Prealbumin was purified from rat plasma by chromatography on Blue Sepharose CL-6B, followed by chromatography on concanavalin-A¿Sepharose and preparative electrophoresis in polya... [more]

Prealbumin was purified from rat plasma by chromatography on Blue Sepharose CL-6B, followed by chromatography on concanavalin-A¿Sepharose and preparative electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel. The overall recovery was 20%. The purified prealbumin was homogeneous upon electrophoresis in detergent containing polyacrylamide gel and was used to raise a monospecific anti-serum in rabbits. During perfusion of rat liver, [14C]-leucine was incorporated into prealbumin secreted into the perfusion medium, suggesting that the liver was synthesizing prealbumin. The ratio of the rate of incorporation of leucine into prealbumin to that into total protein was 1.5%. 125I-prealbumin had a half-life of 29 h in the bloodstream of healthy Buffalo rats on a diet containing 20% protein. Whole body homogenates from healthy rats contained 6.2 mg prealbumin/100 g body weight. The rate of synthesis of prealbumin, calculated from half-life and total body pool, was 3.6 mg prealbumin × (100 g body weight)¿1× day¿1. Two days after induction of inflammation by a subcutaneous injection of turpentine, both the concentration of prealbumin in the plasma and the amount of prealbumin in the whole body homogenates decreased to a minimum of about one third of normal. The relative rate of degradation of 125I-prealbumin did not change during inflammation. The rate of synthesis of prealbumin decreased considerably, or even ceased, during acute inflammation. Copyright © 1982, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved

DOI 10.1111/j.1432-1033.1982.tb07051.x
Citations Scopus - 63
Show 74 more journal articles

Conference (48 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Ong LK, Briggs G, Guan L, Dunkley P, Dickson P, 'Inflammation and dopamine synthesis in neurodegeneration', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley, Linkooi Ong
2015 Rostas J, Hoffman A, Murtha L, Pepperall D, McLeod D, Dickson P, et al., 'Ischaemia-induced neuronal cell death is mediated by molecular targeting of CaMKII phosphorylated at T253', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Kathryn Skelding, Lucy Murtha, John Rostas, Neil Spratt, Damian Mcleod
2014 Ong LK, Briggs GD, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, 'The role of inflammation and dopamine synthesis in Parkinson's disease', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Peter Dunkley
2013 Guan L, Werno M, Gordon SL, Dunkley P, Dickson PW, 'The effect of tyrosine hydroxylase on alpha-synuclein aggregation', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2013 Dickson P, Shehadeh J, Double K, Bobrovskaya L, Reyes S, Dunkley P, Halliday G, 'Analysis of Tyrosine Hydroxylase Isoforms and Phosphorylation in Parkinson's Disease' (2013) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-800044-1.00011-8
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2012 Skelding KA, Abdul Majeed ABB, Dickson PW, Spratt NJ, Rostas JA, 'CAMKII is regulated differently in brains regions with differing sensitivities to ischaemia/excitotoxicity', Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society 32nd Annual Meeting (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Neil Spratt, Kathryn Skelding, John Rostas
2012 Briggs GD, Smith T, Hickey S, Dickson PW, 'A channel extending from the catalytic cleft of tyrosine hydroxylase is involved in high affinity catecholamine inhibition', Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society 32nd Annual Meeting (2012) [E3]
2012 Skelding KA, Dickson PW, Verrills NM, Rostas JA, 'Dephosphorylation of CAMKII at T253 controls progression through metaphase', Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society 32nd Annual Meeting (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Kathryn Skelding, Nikki Verrills, John Rostas
2012 Abdul Majeed ABB, Skelding KA, Dickson PW, Rostas JA, 'Does phosphorylation of CaMKII at multiple sites regulate CaMKII targeting co-operatively or independently?', Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society 32nd Annual Meeting (2012) [E3]
Co-authors John Rostas, Kathryn Skelding
2012 Guan L, Werno M, Gordon SL, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, 'Effect of tyrosine hydroxylase on alphasynuclein aggregation', Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society 32nd Annual Meeting (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2012 James MH, Charnley JL, Levi EM, Dunkley PR, Smith DW, Dickson PW, Dayas CV, 'A role for the mTOR pathway in the development of addiction', Abstracts. Australian Neuroscience Society 32nd Annual Meeting (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Christopher Dayas, Douglas Smith, Peter Dunkley
2012 Ong LK, Guan L, Bobrovskaya L, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, 'Neurobiological consequences of acute footshock stress', Journal of Neurochemistry (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley, Linkooi Ong
2012 Rostas JA, Skelding KA, Fluechter L, Dickson PW, Spratt NJ, 'CaMKII is differentially regulated in striatum and cortex', Journal of Molecular Neuroscience: Abstracts The 21st Annual Meeting of the Israel Society for Neuroscience & The First Binational Australian-Israeli Meeting in Neuroscience (2012) [E3]
Co-authors John Rostas, Kathryn Skelding, Neil Spratt
2010 Ong LK, Guan L, Stutz B, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, Bobrovskaya L, 'Tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation in response to footshock and restraint stress', Journal of Neurochemistry (2010) [E3]
DOI 10.1093/jac/dkq221
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Peter Dunkley
2010 Skelding KA, Verrills NM, Dickson PW, Rostas JA, 'Regulation of proliferation of neuroblastoma cells by CaMKII', Proceding of the Australian Neuroscience Society (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Nikki Verrills, Kathryn Skelding, John Rostas
2010 Skelding KA, Xue J, Suzuki T, Verrills NM, Dickson PW, Rostas JA, 'Mechanisms of phosphorylation-sensitive CaMKII targeting', Proceding of the Australian Neuroscience Society (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Kathryn Skelding, Nikki Verrills, John Rostas
2009 Bobrovskaya L, Damanhuri H, Ong LK, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, Goodchild AK, 'The effect of glucoprivation on tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation in adrenals of Sprague-Dawley rats', Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.autneu.2009.05.191
Co-authors Peter Dunkley, Linkooi Ong
2009 Bobrovskaya L, Ong LK, Walker RA, Day TA, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, 'The effect of social stress on tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation', ANS 2009 Abstracts: Posters (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley, Linkooi Ong
2009 Gordon SL, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, 'The low affinity dopamine binding site regulates tyrosine hydroxylase activity in situ: Implications for the regulation of cytosolic catecholamine levels', ANS 2009 Abstracts: Posters (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2009 Briggs GD, Gordon SL, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, 'Localisation of the low affinity catecholamine binding site in tyrosine hydroxylase', ANS 2009 Abstracts: Posters (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2009 Skelding KA, Liao X, Verrills NM, Fluechter L, Sim AT, Dickson PW, Rostas JA, 'Functional consequences of CaMKII phosphorylation at THR253 in neurons', ANS 2009 Abstracts: Posters (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Nikki Verrills, Kathryn Skelding, Alistair Sim, John Rostas
2009 Rostas JA, Skelding KA, Liao X, Verrills NM, Dickson PW, 'Regulation of CaMKII by targeting', Proceedings of the 2nd Australia-China Biomedical Research Conference (2009) [E3]
Co-authors John Rostas, Kathryn Skelding, Nikki Verrills
2009 Gordon SL, Bobrovskaya L, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, 'Differential regulation of the two major isoforms of human tyrosine hydroxylase in situ', Journal of Neurochemistry (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2009.06242.x
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2009 Ong LK, Bobrovskaya L, Walker FR, Day TA, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, 'The effect of social conflict on tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation in catecholamine-producing cells from sprague-dawley rats', Journal of Neurochemistry (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2009.06242.x
Co-authors Rohan Walker, Peter Dunkley, Linkooi Ong
2009 Dickson PW, Shehadeh J, Double KL, Bobrovskaya L, Reyes S, Dunkley PR, Halliday GM, 'Distribution of tyrosine hydroxylase isoforms in the human brain', Journal of Neurochemistry (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2009.06239.x
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2009 Shehadeh J, Double K, Murphy K, Bobrovskaya L, Reyes S, Dunkley PR, et al., 'Differential distribution of tyrosine hydroxylase isoforms in the human brain', Parkinsonism & Related Disorders (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2008 Gelain DP, Mareira JC, Bevilaqua LRM, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, 'Retinol stimulates tyrosine hydroxylase activity by increasing ser40 phosphorylation in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells', Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2008 Lonergan T, Bobrovskaya L, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, Pilowsky PM, Goodchild A, 'Intracellular signaling pathways in catecholaminergic cells activitated by glucoprivation', Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2008 Posser T, Franco JL, Bobrovskaya L, Leal RB, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, 'Sustained tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation in pc12 cells exposed to manganese', Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2008 Skelding KA, Verrills NM, Fluechter L, Sim AT, Dickson PW, Rostas JA, 'Identification of CaMKII binding proteins in brain sensitive to CaMKII phosphorylation state', Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society (2008) [E3]
Co-authors John Rostas, Alistair Sim, Kathryn Skelding, Nikki Verrills
2008 Gelain DP, Moreira JC, Bevilaqua LRM, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, 'Retinol stimulates tyrosine hydroxylase activity by increasing ser40 and then ser 31 phosphorylation in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells', Journal of Neurochemistry (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2007 Bobrovskaya L, Gelain D, Gilligan C, Flaherty J, Bolster EK, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, 'Nicotine and Pacap stimulate the sustained phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase at serine 40 (Poster)', 7th IBRO 2007 World Congress of Neuroscience Program (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Conor Gilligan, Peter Dunkley
2007 Gordon SL, Quinsey NS, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, 'Tyrosine hydroxylase activity is regulated by two distinct dopamine binding sites (Poster)', 7th IBRO 2007 World Congress of Neuroscience Program (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2007 Gelain DP, Moreira JC, Bevilaqua LR, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, 'Retinol stimulates tyrosine hydroxylase activity by increasing Ser40 phosphorylation in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2007)
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2006 Rostas JAP, Migues P, Lehmann IT, Fluechter L, Cammarota M, Gurd JW, et al., 'Phosphorylation of CAMKII at Thr253 occurs in vivo and enhances binding to isolated post synaptic densities', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2006)
Co-authors John Rostas, Alistair Sim
2006 Dunkley PR, Bobrovskaya L, Gilligan C, Bolster EK, Flaherty J, Dickson PW, 'Sustained phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase at serine 40 is inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine', Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Conor Gilligan, Peter Dunkley
2006 Lehmann IT, Bobrovskaya L, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, 'Differential regulation of the human tyrosine hydroxylase isoforms via hierarchical phosphorylation', Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2006 Rostas JA, Migues PV, Fluechter L, Dickson PW, Sim AT, Rawoff S, et al., 'Phosphorylation of CAMKII at T253 induced by transient global ischaemia', Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society (2006) [E3]
Co-authors John Rostas, Alistair Sim
2005 Dunkley PR, Bobrovskaya L, Gilligan C, Soster E, Dickson PW, 'Sustained phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase at Ser40', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2005) [E1]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley, Conor Gilligan
2005 Lehmann IT, Bobrovskaya L, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, 'Phosphorylation of Ser31 increases the activation of tyrosine hydroxylase via hierarchical phosphorylation', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2005) [E1]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2005 Migues PV, Lehmann IT, Fluechter L, Cammarota M, Sim AT, Gurd JW, et al., 'Phosphorylation of CaMKII on T253 enhances its association with postsynaptic densities', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2005)
Co-authors John Rostas
2004 Bobrovskaya L, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, 'Phosphorylation of Ser19 increases both Ser40 phosphorylation and enzyme activity of tyrosine hydroxylase in intact cells', Journal of Neurochemistry (2004) [E1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2004.02550.x
Citations Scopus - 45Web of Science - 45
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2004 Bobrovskaya L, Bolster EK, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, 'Angiotensin II-Stimulated phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells: The role of PKC isozymes', Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society (2004) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2004 Dunkley PR, Bobrovskaya L, Dickson PW, Rose J, Lehmann IT, 'Hierarchical phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells', Journal of Neurochemistry (2004) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2003 Bobrovskaya L, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, 'Hierarchical Phosphorylation of SER19 and SER40 on Tyrosine Hydroxylase in Bovine Adrenal Chromaffin Cells', Proccedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society (2003) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2003 Bobrovskaya L, Dunkley PR, Dickson PW, 'Phosphorylation of Ser19 increases both Ser40 phosphorylation and enzyme activity of tyrosine hydroxylase in intact cells', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2003) [E1]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley
2001 Graham ME, Dickson PW, Dunkley PR, Von Nagy-Felsobuki EI, 'Quantification of phosphorylation levels of tyrosine hydroxylase utilkizing protein cleavage and electrospray mass spectrometry', Advances in Mass Spectrometry (2001) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Dunkley, Ellak
2001 Bevilaqua LRM, Graham ME, Von Nagy-Felsobuki EI, Dunkley RR, Dickson PW, 'Effect of phosphorylation on tyrosine hydroxylase shape', JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY (2001) [E1]
Co-authors Ellak, Peter Dunkley
Show 45 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 41
Total funding $4,489,592

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20151 grants / $1,000

1st Neurodegeneration and dementia conference, Melbourne Brian Centre Australia, 20 - 21 August 2015$1,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Dickson
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501073
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20144 grants / $597,500

Role of infection in the development of Parkinson's Disease $247,679

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Emeritus Professor Peter Dunkley
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1301295
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Expanding the Genomic Frontier - from Species to Strains and Individuals to Populations$150,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Marc Wilkins, Professor Rick Cavicchioli, Professor Brett Neilan, Laureate Professor Rodney Scott, Laureate Professor Paul Foster, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Professor Ian Charles, Associate Professor Elizabeth Harry, Associate Professor Steven Djordjevic, Associate Professor Cynthia Whitchurch, Professor Ian Paulsen, Professor Nicolle Packer, Professor Michael Gillings
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1300426
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Expanding the Genomic Frontier - from Species to Strains and Individuals to Populations$128,147

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Marc Wilkins, Professor Rick Cavicchioli, Professor Brett Neilan, Laureate Professor Rodney Scott, Laureate Professor Paul Foster, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Professor Ian Paulsen, Professor Nicolle Packer, Professor Michael Gillings, Professor Ian Charles, Associate Professor Elizabeth Harry, Associate Professor Steven Djordjevic, Associate Professor Cynthia Whitchurch
Scheme Linkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301339
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

JuLI Stage $71,674

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

20133 grants / $61,596

42nd Annual Meeting of the Brazilian Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Brazil 18-21 May 13.$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Dickson
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300791
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20124 grants / $396,463

Human tyrosine hydroxylase isoforms and susceptibility of dopaminergic neurons to degeneration in Parkinson's disease$354,601

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Emeritus Professor Peter Dunkley, Associate Professor Kay Double
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1100113
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Role of CaMKII targeting in neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxic cell death$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Emeritus Professor John Rostas, Professor Neil Spratt, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Doctor Nikki Verrills
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200673
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Regulation of the cell cycle by phosphorylation dependent targeting of CaMKII$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Nikki Verrills, Doctor Kathryn Skelding, Emeritus Professor John Rostas, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200679
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

10th International catecholamine symposium, pacific Grove, California, 9 - 13 September 2012$1,862

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Dickson
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200814
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20111 grants / $10,000

IMPLEN NanoPhotometer pearl$10,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Murray Cairns, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Professor Alan Brichta, Emeritus Professor John Rostas, Emeritus Professor Patricia Michie, Conjoint Professor Keith Jones, Professor Ulli Schall, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Associate Professor Rohan Walker, Doctor Rick Thorne, Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Doctor Nikki Verrills, Doctor Janet Bristow, Doctor Severine Roselli, Doctor Kathryn Skelding, Doctor Jude Weidenhofer, Associate Professor Liz Milward, Doctor Charles De Bock, Doctor Julie Merriman-Jones, Doctor Jing Qin Wu, Doctor Bing Liu, Dr DAN Johnstone, Ms Belinda Goldie, Doctor Natalie Beveridge
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100030
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20102 grants / $94,000

Repair of the nigrostriatal pathway by phenotype shift of dopamine neurones$60,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Professor Malcolm Horne
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1000068
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

ABI 7500 Real Time PCR System $34,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

20092 grants / $545,000

20072 grants / $839,250

Functional Characterisation of a New Regulatory Mechanism for CaMKII at Synapses in Vivo$526,500

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Emeritus Professor John Rostas, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Professor Alistair Sim
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0186415
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Differential regulation of human tyrosine hydroxylase isoforms and the development of Parkinson's disease$312,750

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Emeritus Professor Peter Dunkley, Associate Professor Kay Double
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0186394
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20064 grants / $652,138

Functional Characterisation of CaMKII Phosphorylate at a New Site in vivo$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Emeritus Professor John Rostas, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Professor Alistair Sim
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186059
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Differential regulation of human tyrosine hydroxyase isoforms and susceptibility of dopaminergic neurons to degeneration$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Emeritus Professor Peter Dunkley, Associate Professor Kay Double
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186079
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

BioRad Mini-PROTEAN3 Electrophoresis system$995

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Emeritus Professor Leonie Ashman, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Emeritus Professor Peter Dunkley, Emeritus Professor John Rostas, Professor Judith Scott, Professor Alistair Sim, Doctor Nikki Verrills
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0187280
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON Y

20055 grants / $578,349

A novel mechanism for the maintenance of catecholamine synthesis$351,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Emeritus Professor Peter Dunkley, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0184211
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Control of Dopamine synthesis and Parkinsons' disease$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Emeritus Professor Peter Dunkley
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0185977
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Regulation of Human Tyrosine Hydroxylase Isoforms by Hierarchical Phosphorylation$8,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Emeritus Professor Peter Dunkley
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0184779
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

ISN 20th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for Neurochemistry, 21-26 August 2005$2,160

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Dickson
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0185672
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20042 grants / $191,481

Biacore3000-Expansion of Proteomics Facility$187,341

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Alistair Sim, Laureate Professor John Aitken, Emeritus Professor Peter Dunkley, Emeritus Professor John Rostas, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Emeritus Professor Leonie Ashman, Laureate Professor Roger Smith, Professor Gordon Burns, Professor Adam McCluskey, Associate Professor Paul Tooney, Dr Fraser Ross, Emeritus Professor Ray Rose
Scheme Linkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0183030
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

Wide Gel Format Western Blot Apparatus for the Medical Biochemistry Group$4,140

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Dickson
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0184540
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20032 grants / $146,000

Hierarchical Phosphorylation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase is Dependent on the Activation Sequence of Signaling Pathways.$135,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Emeritus Professor Peter Dunkley
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0182096
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Dephosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase$11,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Dickson
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo G0182434
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20024 grants / $314,315

Control of catecholamine synthesis and secretion by angiotensin II$270,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Emeritus Professor Peter Dunkley, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0180883
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Peltier Thermal Cycler and associated equipment essential for establishing cDNA Retroviral Libraries$21,315

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Emeritus Professor Leonie Ashman, Dr Petranel Ferrao, Professor Gordon Burns, Professor Alistair Sim, Emeritus Professor Peter Dunkley, Emeritus Professor John Rostas, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Professor Dirk Van Helden, Dr Perry Hartfield
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2002
GNo G0181919
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Elucidation of the mechanism of tyrosine hydroxylase regulation by the use on mass spectrometry$12,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Dickson
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2002
GNo G0181403
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Dephosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase in vitro and in vivo$11,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Dr Martin Cammarota
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2002
GNo G0181404
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20011 grants / $13,000

Control of Catecholamine Synthesis by Tyrosine Hydroxylase.$13,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Emeritus Professor Peter Dunkley, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Emeritus Professor Ellak Von Nagy-Felsobuki, Professor Alistair Sim
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2001
GNo G0180125
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20002 grants / $24,500

Control of Catecholamine Synthesis by Tyrosine Hydroxylase.$14,500

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Emeritus Professor Peter Dunkley, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Emeritus Professor Ellak Von Nagy-Felsobuki
Scheme Small Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2000
Funding Finish 2000
GNo G0178980
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

Loss of control of dopamine synthesis and induction of neurodegeneration in Parkinson' Disease.$10,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Conjoint Professor David Powis
Scheme Small Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2000
Funding Finish 2000
GNo G0178912
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

19992 grants / $25,000

FPLC Protein Purification System$16,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Alistair Sim, Emeritus Professor John Rostas, Emeritus Professor Peter Dunkley, Associate Professor Phillip Dickson
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 1999
Funding Finish 1999
GNo G0180790
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Development of a cellular model to study regulation of neurotransmitter synthesis$9,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Phillip Dickson, Emeritus Professor Peter Dunkley
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1999
Funding Finish 1999
GNo G0178050
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed6
Current3

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD1.45

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Understanding the Molecular Basis of Chronic Respiratory Diseases PhD (Immunology & Microbiol), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Role of Inflammation in Parkinson's Disease PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Role of Inflammation in Parkinson's Disease PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Regulation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase in Stress and Parkinson's Disease PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Investigation of Catecholamine Inhibition in Tyrosine Hydroxylase PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2013 Masters Effects of Multi-site Phosphorylation on CaMKII Function M Philosophy (Medical Biochem), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Neurobiological Consequences of Stress: Tyrosine Hydroxylase Phosphorylation in Response to Stress PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2010 PhD Differential Distribution of Tyrosine Hydroxylase Isoforms and Phosphorylation in Parkinson Disease PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2009 PhD Acute Regulation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
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Associate Professor Phillip Dickson

Position

Associate Professor
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Medical Biochemistry

Contact Details

Email phil.dickson@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 7031
Fax (02) 4921 6903

Office

Room LS3-47
Building Life Sciences Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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