Dr Peter Osmotherly

Senior Lecturer

School of Health Sciences (Physiotherapy)

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
Clinical anatomy of the upper cervical spine. Craniocervical stability testing Diagnostics and diagnostic statistics

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science, University of New South Wales
  • Graduate Diploma in Physiotherapy, Cumberland College of Health Sciences
  • Master of Medical Science (Clinical Epidemiology), University of Newcastle
  • Graduate Certificate Practice of Tertiary Teaching, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy
  • Research Methods
  • cervical spine
  • diagnosis
  • pre-manipulative screening

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110317 Physiotherapy 60
111706 Epidemiology 20
119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Osmotherly PG, 'Cautions in musculoskeletal practice. Pre-Manipulative Screening for Craniocervical Ligament Integrity', Grieve's Modern Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy, Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh .-. (2015)
2011 Barnett C, Henderson J, Haskins R, Dyson C, Osmotherly PG, 'Unravelling low back pain in an outpatient physiotherapy service', Clinical Data Mining in an Allied Health Organisation: A Real World Experience, Sydney University Press, Sydney 193-218 (2011) [B1]

Journal article (59 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Haskins R, Osmotherly PG, Southgate E, Rivetta DA, 'Australian physiotherapists' priorities for the development of clinical prediction rules for low back pain: A qualitative study', PHYSIOTHERAPY, 101 44-49 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.physio.2014.04.005
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Erica Southgate, Darren Rivett
2015 Dougherty J, Walmsley S, Osmotherly PG, 'PASSIVE RANGE OF MOVEMENT OF THE SHOULDER: A STANDARDIZED METHOD FOR MEASUREMENT AND ASSESSMENT OF INTRARATER RELIABILITY', JOURNAL OF MANIPULATIVE AND PHYSIOLOGICAL THERAPEUTICS, 38 218-224 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.jmpt.2014.11.006
2015 Dougherty J, Walmsley S, Osmotherly PG, 'Passive range of movement of the shoulder: A standardized method for measurement and assessment of intrarater reliability', Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 38 218-224 (2015)

Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the intrarater reliability and reproducibility of a standardized procedure for measuring passive shoulder movement in asymptom... [more]

Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the intrarater reliability and reproducibility of a standardized procedure for measuring passive shoulder movement in asymptomatic individuals. Methods A single assessor used a digital inclinometer and standardized protocol to measure the passive range of motion of 7 shoulder movements in 168 asymptomatic shoulders. Following a warm-up maneuver, 3 measurements were taken for each movement on 2 occasions. Both shoulders were measured using a standardized order of movement. Selection of measurement beginning with left or right shoulder was randomly determined. The entire process was repeated 7 days later to assess reproducibility. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) with 95% confidence intervals and standard errors of measurement (SEMs) were calculated to assess the intrarater reliability of the methods. Results The intrarater reliability of our methods was substantial for total shoulder flexion (ICC = 0.82, SEM = 12.3°), whereas all other movements demonstrated moderate reliability (ICC range = 0.64-0.75) except external rotation in neutral abduction, for which reliability was classed as slight (ICC = 0.28, SEM = 31°). Moderate reliability was evident for all movements on follow-up at 7 days (ICC range = 0.60-0.77). Conclusions These methods of measurement have moderate to substantial reliability for the majority of tested passive shoulder movements, with moderate reliability sustained after 1 week, in a large sample of asymptomatic individuals.

DOI 10.1016/j.jmpt.2014.11.006
2015 Farrell SF, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Cornwall J, 'Can E12 sheet plastination be used to examine the presence and incidence of intra-articular spinal meniscoids?', Anatomy, 9 13-18 (2015)
DOI 10.2399/ana.14.046
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2015 Haskins R, Osmotherly PG, Southgate E, Rivett DA, 'Australian physiotherapists' priorities for the development of clinical prediction rules for low back pain: A qualitative study', Physiotherapy (United Kingdom), 101 44-49 (2015)

Objective: To identify the types of clinical prediction rules (CPRs) for low back pain (LBP) that Australian physiotherapists wish to see developed and the characteristics of LBP ... [more]

Objective: To identify the types of clinical prediction rules (CPRs) for low back pain (LBP) that Australian physiotherapists wish to see developed and the characteristics of LBP CPRs that physiotherapists believe are important. Design: Qualitative study using semi-structured focus groups. Setting: Metropolitan and regional areas of New South Wales, Australia. Participants: Twenty-six physiotherapists who manage patients with LBP (77% male, 81% private practice). Results: Participants welcomed the development of prognostic forms of LBP CPRs. Tools that assist in identifying serious spinal pathology, likely responders to interventions, patients who are likely to experience an adverse outcome, and patients not requiring physiotherapy management were also considered useful. Participants thought that LBP CPRs should be uncomplicated, easy to remember, easy to apply, accurate and precise, and well-supported by research evidence. They should not contain an excessive number of variables, use complicated statistics, or contain variables that have no clear logical relationship to the dependent outcome. It was considered by participants that LBP CPRs need to be compatible with traditional clinical reasoning and decision-making processes, and sufficiently inclusive of a broad range of management approaches and common clinical assessment techniques. Conclusion: There were several identified areas of perceived need for LBP CPR development and a range of characteristics such tools need to encompass to be considered clinically meaningful and useful by physiotherapists in this study. Targeting and incorporating the needs and preferences of physiotherapists is likely to result in the development of tools for LBP with the greatest potential to positively impact clinical practice.

DOI 10.1016/j.physio.2014.04.005
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Darren Rivett, Erica Southgate
2015 Haskins R, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, 'Diagnostic clinical prediction rules for specific subtypes of low back pain: a systematic review.', The Journal of orthopaedic and sports physical therapy, 45 61-A4 (2015)
DOI 10.2519/jospt.2015.5723
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2015 Farrell SF, Osmotherly PG, Cornwall J, Rivett DA, 'Morphology and morphometry of lateral atlantoaxial joint meniscoids.', Anatomical science international, (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s12565-015-0276-z
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2015 Haskins R, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, 'Validation and impact analysis of prognostic clinical prediction rules for low back pain is needed: A systematic review', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, (2015)

Objectives: To identify prognostic forms of clinical prediction rules (CPRs) related to the nonsurgical management of adults with low back pain (LBP) and to evaluate their current... [more]

Objectives: To identify prognostic forms of clinical prediction rules (CPRs) related to the nonsurgical management of adults with low back pain (LBP) and to evaluate their current stage of development. Study Design and Setting: Systematic review using a sensitive search strategy across seven databases with hand searching and citation tracking. Results: A total of 10,005 records were screened for eligibility with 35 studies included in the review. The included studies report on the development of 30 prognostic LBP CPRs. Most of the identified CPRs are in their initial phase of development. Three CPRs were found to have undergone validation-the Cassandra rule for predicting long-term significant functional limitations and the five-item and two-item Flynn manipulation CPRs for predicting a favorable functional prognosis in patients being treated with lumbopelvic manipulation. No studies were identified that investigated whether the implementation of a CPR resulted in beneficial patient outcomes or improved resource efficiencies. Conclusion: Most of the identified prognostic CPRs for LBP are in the initial phase of development and are consequently not recommended for direct application in clinical practice at this time. The body of evidence provides emergent confidence in the limited predictive performance of the Cassandra rule and the five-item Flynn manipulation CPR in comparable clinical settings and patient populations.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2015.02.003
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2015 McGarvey AC, Hoffman GR, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Maximizing shoulder function after accessory nerve injury and neck dissection surgery: A multicenter randomized controlled trial', Head and Neck, 37 1022-1031 (2015)

Background Shoulder pain and dysfunction after neck dissection may result from injury to the accessory nerve. The effect of early physical therapy in the form of intensive scapula... [more]

Background Shoulder pain and dysfunction after neck dissection may result from injury to the accessory nerve. The effect of early physical therapy in the form of intensive scapular strengthening exercises is unknown. Methods A total of 59 neck dissection participants were prospectively recruited for this study. Participants were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (n = 32), consisting of progressive scapular strengthening exercises for 12 weeks, or the control group (n = 29). Blinded assessment occurred at baseline, and at 3, 6, and 12 months. Results Three-month data were collected on 52 participants/53 shoulders. Per-protocol analysis demonstrated that the intervention group had statistically significantly higher active shoulder abduction at 3 months compared to the control group (+26.6°; 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.28-45.95; p =.007). Conclusion The intervention is a favorable treatment for maximizing shoulder abduction in the short term. The effect of the intervention compared to usual care is uncertain in the longer term.

DOI 10.1002/hed.23712
2015 Thomas L, Rivett DA, Osmotherly PG, McLeod L, 'The effect of end-range cervical rotation on vertebral and internal carotid arterial blood flow and cerebral inflow: A sub analysis of an MRI study.', Manual Therapy (in press), - (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.math.2014.11.012
Co-authors Lucy Thomas, Darren Rivett
2015 Haskins R, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, 'Validation and impact analysis of prognostic clinical prediction rules for low back pain is needed: a systematic review', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL EPIDEMIOLOGY, 68 821-832 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2015.02.003
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2015 Haskins R, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, 'Validation and impact analysis of prognostic clinical prediction rules for low back pain is needed: A systematic review', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 68 821-832 (2015)

Objectives To identify prognostic forms of clinical prediction rules (CPRs) related to the nonsurgical management of adults with low back pain (LBP) and to evaluate their current ... [more]

Objectives To identify prognostic forms of clinical prediction rules (CPRs) related to the nonsurgical management of adults with low back pain (LBP) and to evaluate their current stage of development. Study Design and Setting Systematic review using a sensitive search strategy across seven databases with hand searching and citation tracking. Results A total of 10,005 records were screened for eligibility with 35 studies included in the review. The included studies report on the development of 30 prognostic LBP CPRs. Most of the identified CPRs are in their initial phase of development. Three CPRs were found to have undergone validation - the Cassandra rule for predicting long-term significant functional limitations and the five-item and two-item Flynn manipulation CPRs for predicting a favorable functional prognosis in patients being treated with lumbopelvic manipulation. No studies were identified that investigated whether the implementation of a CPR resulted in beneficial patient outcomes or improved resource efficiencies. Conclusion Most of the identified prognostic CPRs for LBP are in the initial phase of development and are consequently not recommended for direct application in clinical practice at this time. The body of evidence provides emergent confidence in the limited predictive performance of the Cassandra rule and the five-item Flynn manipulation CPR in comparable clinical settings and patient populations.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2015.02.003
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2015 Thomas LC, McLeod LR, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, 'The effect of end-range cervical rotation on vertebral and internal carotid arterial blood flow and cerebral inflow: A sub analysis of an MRI study', Manual Therapy, 20 475-480 (2015)

Introduction: Cervical spine manual therapy has been associated with a small risk of serious adverse neurovascular events, particularly to the vertebral arteries. Sustained end-ra... [more]

Introduction: Cervical spine manual therapy has been associated with a small risk of serious adverse neurovascular events, particularly to the vertebral arteries. Sustained end-range rotation is recommended clinically as a pre-manipulative screening tool; however ultrasound studies have yielded conflicting results about the effect of rotation on blood flow in the vertebral arteries. There has been little research on internal carotid arterial flow or utilising the reference standard of angiography. Objectives: To evaluate the mean effect of cervical rotation on blood flow in the craniocervical arteries and blood supply to the brain, as well as individual variation. Design: This was an observational study. Method: Magnetic resonance angiography was used to measure average blood flow volume in the vertebral arteries, internal carotid arteries, and total cerebral inflow, in three neck positions: neutral, end-range left rotation and end-range right rotation in healthy adults. Results: Twenty participants were evaluated. There was a decrease in average blood flow volume in the vertebral and internal carotid arteries on contralateral rotation, compared to neutral. This was statistically significant on left rotation only. Ipsilateral rotation had no effect on average blood flow volume in any artery. Total cerebral inflow was not significantly affected by rotation in either direction. Conclusions: It appears that in healthy adults the cerebral vasculature can compensate for decreased flow in one or more arteries by increasing flow in other arteries, to maintain cerebral perfusion. Sustained end-range rotation may therefore reflect the compensatory capacity of the system as a whole rather than isolated vertebrobasilar function.

DOI 10.1016/j.math.2014.11.012
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2014 McGarvey AC, Hoffman GR, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Intra-operative monitoring of the spinal accessory nerve: A systematic review', Journal of Laryngology and Otology, 128 746-751 (2014)
DOI 10.1017/S0022215113002934
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2014 McGarvey AC, Hoffman GR, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Intra-operative monitoring of the spinal accessory nerve: A systematic review', Journal of Laryngology and Otology, 128 746-751 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S0022215113002934
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2014 Walmsley S, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, 'Clinical identifiers for early-stage primary/idiopathic adhesive capsulitis: Are we seeing the real picture?', Physical Therapy, 94 968-976 (2014) [C1]

Background. Adhesive capsulitis is often difficult to diagnose in its early stage and to differentiate from other common shoulder disorders. Objective. The aim of this study was t... [more]

Background. Adhesive capsulitis is often difficult to diagnose in its early stage and to differentiate from other common shoulder disorders. Objective. The aim of this study was to validate any or all of the 8 clinical identifiers of early-stage primary/idiopathic adhesive capsulitis established in an earlier Delphi study. Design. This was a cross-sectional study. Methods. Sixty-four patients diagnosed with early-stage adhesive capsulitis by a physical therapist or medical practitioner were included in the study. Eight active and 8 passive shoulder movements and visual analog scale pain scores for each movement were recorded prior to and immediately following an intra-articular injection of corticosteroid and local anesthetic. Using the local anesthetic as the reference standard, pain relief of >70% for passive external rotation was deemed a positive anesthetic response (PAR). Results. Sixteen participants (25%) demonstrated a PAR. Univariate logistic regression identified that of the proposed identifiers, global loss of passive range of movement (odds ratio [OR] =0.26, P=.03), pain at the end of range of all measured active movements (OR=0.06, P=.02), and global loss of passive glenohumeral movements (OR=0.23, P=.02) were associated with a PAR. Following stepwise removal of the variables, pain at the end of range of all measured active movements remained the only identifier but was associated with reduced odds of a PAR. Limitations. The lack of a recognized reference standard for diagnosing early-stage adhesive capsulitis remains problematic in all related research. Conclusions. None of the clinical identifiers for early-stage adhesive capsulitis previously proposed by expert consensus have been validated in this study. Clinicians should be aware that commonly used clinical identifiers may not be applicable to this stage. © 2014 American Physical Therapy Association.

DOI 10.2522/ptj.20130398
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2014 Walmsley S, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, 'Movement and pain patterns in early stage primary/idiopathic adhesive capsulitis: A factor analysis', Physiotherapy (United Kingdom), 100 336-343 (2014) [C1]

Objectives: To evaluate patients clinically diagnosed with early stage primary/idiopathic adhesive capsulitis to determine the existence of any pattern of movement loss and associ... [more]

Objectives: To evaluate patients clinically diagnosed with early stage primary/idiopathic adhesive capsulitis to determine the existence of any pattern of movement loss and associated pain that may facilitate early recognition. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Private upper limb specialty clinic, Newcastle, Australia. Participants: Fifty-two patients clinically diagnosed with early stage adhesive capsulitis by a medical practitioner or physiotherapist. Main outcome measures: Percentage loss of active and passive ranges of eight shoulder movements and the pain level at the end of each movement. The reason for limitation of movement was also recorded. Results: Factor analysis clearly identified two groups for percentage loss of active range of movement. Notably external rotation movements grouped separately from other movements. A single group emerged for percentage loss of passive range of movement suggesting a non-specific global loss. For both pain at the end of active range of movement and passive range of movement two groups emerged, however the delineation between the groups was less clear than for percentage loss of active range of movement suggesting a pattern of end range pain may be less useful in identifying patients in this stage. Conclusions: External rotation movements in neutral and abduction generally group together and behave differently to other shoulder movements in patients clinically diagnosed with early stage primary/idiopathic adhesive capsulitis. In particular external rotation in abduction has emerged as the most painfully limited movement in this sample. This study provides preliminary evidence of patterns of range of movement and end range pain that require testing in a population of mixed shoulder diagnoses to determine their diagnostic utility for early stage adhesive capsulitis.

DOI 10.1016/j.physio.2014.02.001
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2014 Farrell SF, Osmotherly PG, Cornwall J, Rivett DA, 'The anatomy and morphometry of cervical zygapophyseal joint meniscoids', Surgical and Radiologic Anatomy, (2014)
DOI 10.1007/s00276-014-1406-3
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2014 Mcgarvey AC, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman GR, Chiarelli PE, 'Lymphoedema following treatment for head and neck cancer: Impact on patients, and beliefs of health professionals', European Journal of Cancer Care, 23 317-327 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/ecc.12134
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2014 Mcgarvey AC, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman GR, Chiarelli PE, 'Lymphoedema following treatment for head and neck cancer: Impact on patients, and beliefs of health professionals', European Journal of Cancer Care, 23 317-327 (2014) [C1]

Cervicofacial lymphoedema is a recognised side-effect that may result following treatment for head and neck cancer. This study aimed to investigate the perspectives of affected pa... [more]

Cervicofacial lymphoedema is a recognised side-effect that may result following treatment for head and neck cancer. This study aimed to investigate the perspectives of affected patients and the beliefs that treating health professionals hold about head and neck lymphoedema. Ten patients with head and neck lymphoedema and 10 health professionals experienced in the treatment of head and neck cancer patients agreed to participate in semi-structured face to face interviews. Interviews were recorded, audio files were transcribed and coded and then analysed for themes. Themes of experiences of patients with head and neck lymphoedema and the beliefs of health professionals largely overlapped. Given its visible deformity, the main effect of lymphoedema in head and neck cancer patients was on appearance. In some cases this lead to negative psychosocial sequelae such as reduced self-esteem, and poor socialisation. Clinicians need to be aware of those patients more likely to experience lymphoedema following treatment for head and neck cancer, and how they are affected. Understanding how patients with facial lymphoedema are affected psychologically and physically, and the importance of prompt referral for lymphoedema treatment, might ultimately improve outcomes and ensure optimal management. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/ecc.12134
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2014 Mcgarvey AC, Hoffman GR, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Maximizing shoulder function after accessory nerve injury and neck dissection surgery: A multicenter randomized controlled trial', Head and Neck, (2014)

Background: Shoulder pain and dysfunction after neck dissection may result from injury to the accessory nerve. The effect of early physical therapy in the form of intensive scapul... [more]

Background: Shoulder pain and dysfunction after neck dissection may result from injury to the accessory nerve. The effect of early physical therapy in the form of intensive scapular strengthening exercises is unknown. Methods: A total of 59 neck dissection participants were prospectively recruited for this study. Participants were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (n = 32), consisting of progressive scapular strengthening exercises for 12 weeks, or the control group (n = 29). Blinded assessment occurred at baseline, and at 3, 6, and 12 months. Results: Three-month data were collected on 52 participants/53 shoulders. Per-protocol analysis demonstrated that the intervention group had statistically significantly higher active shoulder abduction at 3 months compared to the control group (+26.6°; 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.28-45.95; p = .007). Conclusion: The intervention is a favorable treatment for maximizing shoulder abduction in the short term. The effect of the intervention compared to usual care is uncertain in the longer term. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

DOI 10.1002/hed.23712
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2014 Gallagher R, Osmotherly P, Chiarelli P, 'Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, what is the physiotherapist¿s role in assessment for surgery?', Physical Therapy Reviews, 19 245-251 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1179/1743288X13Y.0000000130
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2014 Chiarelli PE, Johnston C, Osmotherly PG, 'Introducing palliative care into entry-level physical therapy education', Journal of Palliative Medicine, 17 152-158 (2014) [C1]

Background and Objective: There is a paucity of information related to teaching palliative care to entry-level physical therapy students. The aim of this study was to evaluate the... [more]

Background and Objective: There is a paucity of information related to teaching palliative care to entry-level physical therapy students. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of an undergraduate course in palliative care on the preparedness of entry-level physical therapy students to practice within the palliative care setting. Methods: Participants were all entry-level undergraduate students enrolled in the third year of a 4-year undergraduate degree. All students enrolled in the course, "Physiotherapy Through Lifestages" took part in the learning modules relating to the care of patients undergoing palliative care. A survey instrument was used in the study, a modified version of an existing unpublished written questionnaire previously used to evaluate palliative care education in other allied health professions. Results and Conclusions: Participation in the course resulted in an increase in self-rated knowledge and confidence for working in the palliative care setting for entry-level physical therapy students and is considered to provide a useful ongoing resource for the presentation of this topic material. Although the impact of the delivery of this education module may be considered successful in this regard, it would appear that some of the underlying attitudes and emotional responses to this area of physiotherapy practice were less easily influenced. Further research is required to understand the influences on emotional preparedness of students to undertake this area of study and practice and to determine the optimal stage of study for delivery of this content. © Copyright 2014, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

DOI 10.1089/jpm.2013.0158
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Cath Johnston
2014 Haskins R, Osmotherly PG, Southgate E, Rivett DA, 'Physiotherapists' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding clinical prediction rules for low back pain', Manual Therapy, 19 142-151 (2014) [C1]

Clinical Prediction Rules (CPRs) have been developed to assist in the physiotherapy management of low back pain (LBP) although little is known about the factors that may influence... [more]

Clinical Prediction Rules (CPRs) have been developed to assist in the physiotherapy management of low back pain (LBP) although little is known about the factors that may influence their implementation in clinical practice. This study used qualitative research methodology to explore the knowledge, attitudes and practices/behaviours of physiotherapists in relation to these tools. Four semi-structured focus groups involving 26 musculoskeletal physiotherapists were conducted across three Australian geographic regions. A fictitious LBP case scenario was developed and used to facilitate group discussion. Participant knowledge of CPRs was found to be mixed, with some clinicians never having previously encountered the term or concept. LBP CPRs were often conceptualised as a formalisation of pattern recognition. Attitudes towards CPRs expressed by study participants were wide-ranging with several facilitating and inhibiting views identified. It was felt that more experienced clinicians had limited need of such tools. Only a small number of participants expressed that they had ever used LBP CPRs in clinical practice. To optimise the successful adoption of an LBP CPR, researchers should consider avoiding the use of the term 'rule' and ensure that the tool and its interface are uncomplicated and easy to use. Understanding potential barriers, the needs of clinicians and the context in which CPRs will be implemented will help facilitate the development of tools with the highest potential to positively influence physiotherapy practice. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.math.2013.09.005
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Darren Rivett, Erica Southgate
2014 Farrell SF, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Cornwall J, 'Formic acid demineralization does not affect the morphometry of cervical zygapophyseal joint meniscoids', Anatomical Science International, (2014)

Demineralization can facilitate the dissection of soft tissue structures in inaccessible locations by softening surrounding bone so that it can be easily removed without risking d... [more]

Demineralization can facilitate the dissection of soft tissue structures in inaccessible locations by softening surrounding bone so that it can be easily removed without risking damage to the structure of interest. However, it is unclear whether demineralization alters the morphometry of soft tissues if used for this purpose. We have therefore examined the effect of extended-immersion formic acid demineralization on the size and shape of cervical zygapophyseal joint meniscoids to evaluate its usefulness as a means of facilitating dissection and examination of soft tissue structures from bony regions. Four cadaveric cervical spines were dissected, and three randomly selected zygapophyseal joints from each spine (12 in total) were removed, disarticulated and immersed in 5 % formic acid for 32 days. Each joint was examined using a surgical microscope and photographed, and meniscoid length and surface area measured at days 0, 4, 18, and 32. Measurements were made on magnified digital photographs, and each measurement was repeated three times to determine intra-rater reliability. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance. Significance was set at p < 0.05. There were no significant differences between any of the measures over time for all of the variables assessed (F = 0.302-1.576, p = 0.226-0.759, partial ¿2 = 0.029-0.136). For all measurements, intra-rater reliability was high (intra-class correlation > 0.9). These results support the use of formic acid demineralization to facilitate the study of cervical spine meniscoids by dissection, as even after a period of extended immersion in the solution, the morphometry of the structures was not significantly altered. Findings may have implications for dissection studies of other meniscoid-like soft tissue structures that use formic acid demineralization. © 2014 Japanese Association of Anatomists.

DOI 10.1007/s12565-014-0248-8
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2014 Drew MK, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Imaging and clinical tests for the diagnosis of long-standing groin pain in athletes. A systematic review', Physical Therapy in Sport, 15 124-129 (2014) [C1]

Objectives: To examine the validity of clinical tests available for the diagnosis of longstanding groin pain in athletes. Design: Systematic review. Method: A published search str... [more]

Objectives: To examine the validity of clinical tests available for the diagnosis of longstanding groin pain in athletes. Design: Systematic review. Method: A published search strategy of MeSH terms in MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and SportDiscuss. Inclusion criteria: diagnostic studies relating to athletic groin pain, professional or semi-professional athletes, symptoms lasting for more than six weeks, and not limited by age or gender. A priori exclusion criteria were utilised. Outcome measures: QUADAS tool, sensitivity and specificity, likelihood ratios and predictive values of the reported tests and investigations. Results: 577 Journal articles were identified. Five studies metall requirements. Sensitivity and specificity of clinical tests ranged between 30 and 100% and 88 and 95% respectively with negative likelihood ratio of 0.15-0.78 and positive likelihood ratios of 1.0-11.0. Sensitivity and specificity of investigations (MRI, herniography, and dynamic ultrasound) ranged between 68% and 100% as well as 33% and 100% respectively with negative likelihood ratios between 0 and 0.32 and positive likelihood ratios between 1.5 and 8.1. Conclusion: There is a lack of validated diagnostic clinical tests available for clinicians and a lack of symptomology being evaluated. It is recommended that a reference standard should be applied and data should be reported in sufficient detail to calculate diagnostic statistics that is useful to the clinician. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.ptsp.2013.11.002
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2014 Hayes MJ, Osmotherly PG, Taylor JA, Smith DR, Ho A, 'The effect of wearing loupes on upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders among dental hygienists', International Journal of Dental Hygiene, 12 174-179 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/idh.12048
Co-authors Jane Taylor, Derek Smith, Melanie Hayes
2014 Hayes MJ, Osmotherly PG, Taylor JA, Smith DR, Ho A, 'The effect of wearing loupes on upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders among dental hygienists', International Journal of Dental Hygiene, 12 174-179 (2014) [C1]

Objectives: It is well established that musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are a significant occupational health issue for dentists and hygienists. Despite this, there has been littl... [more]

Objectives: It is well established that musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are a significant occupational health issue for dentists and hygienists. Despite this, there has been little advancement in the application of ergonomic principles in the dental profession. While the use of loupes is often promoted as an ergonomic solution, there is little published research to robustly support this claim. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the use of loupes on upper extremity MSD among dental hygienists. Methods: The study was conducted using an exploratory pretest and post-test design, comparing musculoskeletal measures in practising dental hygienists wearing loupes with final-year dental hygiene students who did not wear loupes. Pre- and post-test measures included valid self-reported and objective outcome measures and were measured at baseline and 6 months following the intervention. Statistical analysis was conducted as a series of mixed anovas with time and treatment as the independent variables. Results: The analysis revealed a significant interaction between time and treatment for the Disabilities of the Shoulder, Arm and Hand (DASH) scores (P < 0.04), indicating an improvement in symptoms for the treatment group but a reversed trend for the controls. There was also a significant mean increase in scapular position measures; however, this finding was evident in both groups, indicating that these were not a result of the intervention. Conclusions: Overall, this study suggests that wearing loupes appears to have both positive and negative effects on upper extremity MSD among dental hygienists. Ongoing research is required to determine the long-term effects of loupes wear, over an extended period of time. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/idh.12048
Co-authors Derek Smith, Jane Taylor, Melanie Hayes
2014 Haskins R, Osmotherly PG, Tuyl F, Rivett DA, 'Uncertainty in clinical prediction rules: The value of credible intervals', Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, 44 85-91 (2014) [C1]

SYNOPSIS: Decision making in physical therapy is increasingly informed by evidence in the form of probabilities. Prior beliefs concerning diagnoses, prognoses, and treatment effec... [more]

SYNOPSIS: Decision making in physical therapy is increasingly informed by evidence in the form of probabilities. Prior beliefs concerning diagnoses, prognoses, and treatment effects are quantitatively revised by the integration of new information derived from the history, physical examination, and other investigations in a well-recognized application of Bayes' theorem. Clinical prediction rule development studies commonly employ such methodology to produce quantified estimates of the likelihood of patients having certain diagnoses or achieving given outcomes. To date, the physical therapy literature has been limited to the discussion and calculation of the point estimate of such probabilities. The degree of precision associated with the construction of posterior probabilities, which requires consideration of both uncertainty associated with pretest probability and uncertainty associated with test accuracy, remains largely unrecognized and unreported. This paper provides an introduction to the calculation of the uncertainty interval, known as a credible interval, around posterior probability estimates. The method for calculating the credible interval is detailed and illustrated with example data from 2 clinical prediction rule development studies. Two relatively quick and simple methods for approximating the credible interval are also outlined. It is anticipated that knowledge of the credible interval will have practical implications for the incorporation of probabilistic evidence in clinical practice. Consistent with reporting standards for interventional and diagnostic studies, it is equally appropriate that studies reporting posterior probabilities calculate and report the level of precision associated with these point estimates. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy®.

DOI 10.2519/jospt.2014.4877
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Darren Rivett, Frank Tuyl
2014 Cornwall J, Osmotherly PG, 'Genomic medicine and the future of physiotherapy', Australasian Medical Journal, 7 361-362 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.4066/AMJ.2014.2218
2013 McGarvey AC, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman GR, Chiarelli PE, 'Impact of Neck Dissection on Scapular Muscle Function: A Case-Controlled Electromyographic Study', ARCHIVES OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION, 94 113-119 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2012.07.017
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2013 Osmotherly PG, Rivett D, Rowe LJ, 'Toward Understanding Normal Craniocervical Rotation Occurring During the Rotation Stress Test for the Alar Ligaments', PHYSICAL THERAPY, 93 986-992 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.2522/ptj.20120266
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2013 McGarvey AC, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman GR, Chiarelli PE, 'Scapular muscle exercises following neck dissection surgery for head and neck cancer: A comparative electromyographic study', Physical Therapy, 93 786-797 (2013) [C1]

Background Shoulder pain and dysfunction can occur following neck dissection surgery for cancer. These conditions often are due to accessory nerve injury. Such an injury leads to ... [more]

Background Shoulder pain and dysfunction can occur following neck dissection surgery for cancer. These conditions often are due to accessory nerve injury. Such an injury leads to trapezius muscle weakness, which, in turn, alters scapular biomechanics. Objective The aim of this study was to assess which strengthening exercises incur the highest dynamic activity of affected trapezius and accessory scapular muscles in patients with accessory nerve dysfunction compared with their unaffected side. Design A comparative design was utilized for this study. Methods The study was conducted in a physical therapy department. Ten participants who had undergone neck dissection surgery for cancer and whose operated side demonstrated clinical signs of accessory nerve injury were recruited. Surface electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius, middle trapezius, rhomboid major, and serratus anterior muscles on the affected side was compared dynamically with that of the unaffected side during 7 scapular strengthening exercises. Results Electromyographic activity of the upper and middle trapezius muscles of the affected side was lower than that of the unaffected side. The neck dissection side affected by surgery demonstrated higher levels of upper and middle trapezius muscle activity during exercises involving overhead movement. The rhomboid and serratus anterior muscles of the affected side demonstrated higher levels of activity compared with the unaffected side. Limitations Exercises were repeated 3 times on one occasion. Muscle activation under conditions of increased exercise dosage should be inferred with caution. Conclusions Overhead exercises are associated with higher levels of trapezius muscle activity in patients with accessory nerve injury following neck dissection surgery. However, pain and correct scapular form must be carefully monitored in this patient group during exercises. Rhomboid and serratus anterior accessory muscles may have a compensatory role, and this role should be considered during rehabilitation. © 2013 American Physical Therapy Association.

DOI 10.2522/ptj.2012038
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2013 Osmotherly PG, Farrell SF, Digby SD, Rowe LJ, Buxton AJ, 'THE INFLUENCE OF AGE, SEX, AND POSTURE ON THE MEASUREMENT OF ATLANTODENTAL INTERVAL IN A NORMAL POPULATION', JOURNAL OF MANIPULATIVE AND PHYSIOLOGICAL THERAPEUTICS, 36 226-231 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jmpt.2013.04.004
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Tony Buxton
2013 Walmsley S, Osmotherly PG, Walker CJ, Rivett DA, 'Power Doppler ultrasonography in the early diagnosis of primary/idiopathic adhesive capsulitis: An exploratory study', Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 36 428-435 (2013) [C1]

Objective The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine if increased vascularity in the rotator interval area of the glenohumeral joint capsule could be visualized with p... [more]

Objective The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine if increased vascularity in the rotator interval area of the glenohumeral joint capsule could be visualized with power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS) in patients with a clinical diagnosis of early-stage adhesive capsulitis. Methods Demographic and clinical characteristics from a consecutive series of 41 patients diagnosed with early-stage adhesive capsulitis were recorded and examination with PDUS was undertaken. Images were reviewed by 3 musculoskeletal radiologists, and consensus was determined on the presence of increased signal in the rotator interval area. Results Consensus was achieved on the presence of increased signal in 12 (29%) of the 41 cases. Participants with an increased PDUS signal did not demonstrate a characteristic set of identifying features, suggesting that those with increased vascularity may not constitute a distinct subgroup. Conclusion This study found that some patients diagnosed with early-stage adhesive capsulitis demonstrated increased vascularity in the rotator interval area when examined with PDUS. These findings suggest that PDUS may have the potential to assist in the identification of increased vascularization in early stages of this disorder. Further research in the use of PDUS in diagnosing early-stage adhesive capsulitis is warranted. © 2013 National University of Health Sciences.

DOI 10.1016/j.jmpt.2013.05.024
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2013 Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Mercer SR, 'Revisiting the clinical anatomy of the alar ligaments', EUROPEAN SPINE JOURNAL, 22 60-64 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00586-012-2496-4
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2013 Scott OM, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Assessment of pelvic floor muscle contraction ability in healthy males following brief verbal instruction', The Australian and New Zealand Continence Journal, 19 12-17 (2013) [C1]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2012 Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Rowe LJ, 'Construct validity of clinical tests for alar ligament Iintegrity: An evaluation using magnetic resonance imaging', Physical Therapy, 92 718-725 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2012 Haskins R, Rivett DA, Osmotherly PG, 'Clinical prediction rules in the physiotherapy management of low back pain: A systematic review', Manual Therapy, 17 9-21 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2012 Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Rowe LJ, 'The anterior shear and distraction tests for craniocervical instability. An evaluation using magnetic resonance imaging', Manual Therapy, 17 416-421 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.math.2012.03.010
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2012 Walmsley S, Rivett DA, Osmotherly PG, McKiernan ST, 'Early diagnosis of primary/idiopathic adhesive capsulitis: Can imaging contribute?', International Musculoskeletal Medicine, 34 166-174 (2012) [C1]
Co-authors Darren Rivett, Sharmaine Mckiernan
2011 Osmotherly PG, Rawson OA, Rowe LJ, 'The relationship between dens height and alar ligament orientation: A radiologic study', Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 34 181-187 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jmpt.2011.02.006
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2011 Osmotherly PG, McElduff P, Attia JR, 'Factor Structure of the Neck Disability Index RESPONSE', SPINE, 36 1816-1816 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1097/BRS.0b013e31822b4321
Co-authors John Attia
2011 Pickering PM, Osmotherly PG, Attia JR, McElduff P, 'An examination of outcome measures for pain and dysfunction in the cervical spine: A factor analysis', Spine, 36 581-588 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/brs.0b013e3181d762da
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors John Attia
2011 Osmotherly PG, McElduff P, Attia JR, 'In response: Factor structure of the Neck Disability Index', Spine, 36 1816 (2011) [C3]
Co-authors John Attia
2011 McGarvey A, Chiarelli PE, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman GR, 'Physiotherapy for accessory nerve shoulder dysfunction following neck dissection surgery: A literature review', Head and Neck-Journal for the Sciences and Specialties of the Head and Neck, 33 274-280 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/hed.21366
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2011 Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, 'Knowledge and use of craniovertebral instability testing by Australian physiotherapists', Manual Therapy, 16 357-363 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.math.2010.12.009
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2010 Rawson OA, Rowe LJ, Osmotherly PG, 'Multiplanar alar ligament testing: Putting the anatomical assumptions to the test', Journal of Manual and Manipulative Therapy, 18 PO-44 (2010) [C3]
2009 Walmsley S, Rivett DA, Osmotherly PG, 'Adhesive capsulitis: Establishing consensus on clinical identifiers for stage 1 using the DELPHI technique', Physical Therapy, 89 906-917 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.2522/ptj.20080341
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2009 Chiarelli PE, Mackenzie LA, Osmotherly PG, 'Urinary incontinence is associated with an increase in falls: A systematic review', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 55 89-95 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0004-9514(09)70038-8
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2009 Miller PA, Osmotherly PG, 'Does scapula taping facilitate recovery for shoulder impingement symptoms? A pilot randomized controlled trial', The Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy, 17 E6-E13 (2009) [C1]
2008 Osmotherly PG, Attia JR, Thakkinstian A, 'Can clinical measures of upper quarter postural muscle performance predict neck pain in visual display terminal operators?', Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, 21 113-120 (2008) [C1]
Co-authors John Attia
2008 Osmotherly PG, 'A practical guide to ultrasound imaging', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 54 287 (2008) [C3]
2008 Osmotherly PG, Attia JR, 'The interplay of static and dynamic postural factors in neck pain', Hong Kong Physiotherapy Journal, 26 9-17 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S1013-7025(09)70003-X
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors John Attia
2007 Windred AJ, Osmotherly PG, McGowan CM, 'Pre-race warm-up practices in Greyhound: A pilot study', Equine and Comparative Exercise Physiology, 4 119-122 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1478061507851012
2007 Nicholson HL, Osmotherly PG, Smith BA, McGowan CM, 'Determinants of passive hip range of motion in adult Greyhounds', Australian Veterinary Journal, 85 217-221 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1751-0813.2007.00145.x
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 12
2006 Osmotherly PG, Attia JR, 'The healthy worker survivor effect in a study of neck muscle performance measures in call-centre operators', Work, 26 399-406 (2006) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors John Attia
2005 Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, 'Screening for craniovertebral instability: a new look at the evidence', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 51 S17 (2005) [C3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2004 Osmotherly PG, Higginbotham HN, 'Assessing patient intention to perform a home based exercise program for back and shoulder pain', Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, 20 57-71 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09593980490425111
Co-authors Nick Higginbotham
Show 56 more journal articles

Conference (69 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Snodgrass SNJ, Thompson ER, Osmotherly PG, 'Injuries, Practices and Perceptions of Wheelchair Sports Participants', Physiotherapy: World Confederation for Physical Therapy Congress 2015 Abstracts, Singapore (2015)
Co-authors Suzanne Snodgrass
2015 Osmotherly PG, Symonds J, Folbigg S, 'Does neck dimension influence the range of cervical spine movement?', Physiotherapy 101 ( supplement 1), Singapore (2015)
2015 Thompson E, Snodgrass SJ, Osmotherly PG, 'Injuries, practices and perceptions of wheelchair sports participants.', Physiotherapy 101 (Supplement 1), Singapore (2015)
2015 Selvakumaran L, White R, Rostas M, Osmotherly PG, 'Sedentary behaviour and persistent pain: Building a profile of behaviours and clinical associations.', Physiotherapy 101 (Supplement 1), Singapore (2015)
2015 Haskins R, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, 'A systematic review of diagnostic clinical prediction rules for low back pain', Physiotherapy 101 (Supplement 1), Singapore (2015)
2015 Haskins R, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, 'Prognostic and prescriptive clinical prediction rules for low back pain: a systematic review.', Physiotherapy, 101(Supplement 1), Singapore (2015)
2015 Barry R, Newstead C, Osmotherly PG, Johnston C, 'Performance in physiotherapy clinical exit examinations: the relationship to academic and clinical placement assessment.', Physiotherapy, 101(Supplement 1), Singapore (2015)
Co-authors Cath Johnston
2015 Barry R, Johnston C, Newstead C, Osmotherly PG, 'Performance In Clinical Exit Examinations: Is It Related To Academic Or Clinical Placement Assessment In Physiotherapy Students?', ANZAHPE/AMEA 2015 Conference, Newcastle (2015)
Co-authors Cath Johnston
2014 Farrell SF, Osmotherly PG, Cornwall J, Rivett DA, 'The anatomy and morphometry of the meniscoids of the lateral atlantoaxial joints.', Annals of Anatomy, 196(e-Suppl. 1), Beijing, China (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.aanat.2014.05.035
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2014 Farrell SF, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Cornwall J, 'Can sheet plastination be used to visualise intra-articular spinal meniscoids?', 11th Meeting of Australia New Zealand Association of Clinical Anatomists, Queenstown, NZ (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2014 Farrell SF, Osmotherly PG, Cornwall J, Rivett DA, 'The anatomy and morphometry of the meniscoids of the lateral atlantoaxial joints.', Annals of Anatomy, 196(e-Suppl. 1), Beijing, China (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.aanat.2014.05.035
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2014 Farrell SF, Osmotherly PG, Cornwall J, Rivett DA, 'The anatomy and morphometry of the mensicoids of the lateral atlantoaxial joints', Annals of Anatomy, 196S1, Beijing, China (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2014 Johnston C, Osmotherly PG, Newstead C, Baldwin Z, 'The relationship between academic and clinical performance in physiotherapy students', Anzahpe 2014 Conference Handbook, Gold Coast, Queensland (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Cath Johnston
2014 Drew M, Palsson TS, Hirata RP, Izumi M, Lovell G, Chiarelli P, et al., 'An experimental pain model to evaluate the diagnostic tests for adductor-related pain', Aspetar, Doha, Qatar (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2014 Drew M, Palsson TS, Hirata RP, Izumi M, Lovell G, Chiarelli P, et al., 'Pain distribution, quality and intensity in experimentally-induced adductor longus pain: Considerations for athletes with long-standing groin pain', Aspetar, Doha, Qatar (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2014 Farrell SF, Osmtherly PG, Rivett DA, Cornwall J, 'Does formic acid immersion affect the morphometry of cervical zygapophyseal joint meniscoids?', Clinical Anatomy, Brisbane, Australia (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2014 Farrell SF, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Cornwall J, 'Does formic acid immersion affect the morphometry of cervical zygoapophyseal joint meniscoids?', Clinical Anatomy, Brisbane (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1002/ca.22459
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2013 Farrell SF, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Cornwall J, 'Does formic acid immersion affect the morphometry of cervical zygapophyseal joint meniscoids?', ANZACA CONFERENCE 2013 Handbook, University of Queensland, Brisbane (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2013 Walmsley S, Rivett DA, Osmotherly PG, 'Movement loss patterns in patients diagnosed with early stage primary/idiopathic adhesive capsulitis: preliminary results.', ICSES/ICSET 2013, Nagoya, Japan (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2013 Walmsley S, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, 'Validation of a set of clinical identifiers for the early stage of primary/idiopathic adhesive capsulitis', Journal of Physiotherapy, eSupplement 2013 APA Conference Abstracts, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2013 Harrison JL, Osmotherly PG, Snodgrass SJ, Rivett DA, Reid S, 'The relationship between cervical spine anthropometrics, range of movement and strength in elite rugby players', Proceeding of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett, Suzanne Snodgrass
2013 Haskins R, Osmotherly PG, Southgate E, Rivett DA, 'Physiotherapists' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding clinical prediction rules for low back pain', Proceedings of the Australian Physiotherapy Association 2013, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett, Erica Southgate
2013 McGarvey AC, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman GR, Chiarelli PE, 'Physiotherapy for accessory nerve shoulder dysfunction following neck dissection |surgery: a multicentre randomised controlled study', Proceedings of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne (2013)
2013 Walmsley S, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, 'Movement and pain patterns in early stage primary/idiopathic adhesive capsulitis', Proceedings of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2013 Gallagher R, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus. Is there a role for physiotherapists in management?', Proceedings of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2013 Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Rowe LJ, 'Interpreting a normal response to rotation stress testing for the alar ligaments', Proceedings of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2013 Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Rowe LJ, 'The construct validity of the anterior shear and distraction tests for craniocervical instability', Proceedings of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2013 Hayes MJ, Osmotherly PG, Taylor JA, Smith DR, Ho A, 'The effect of surgical magnification (loupes) on neck pain and disability among dental hygienists.', Proceedings of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Melanie Hayes, Jane Taylor, Derek Smith
2013 McGarvey AC, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman GR, Chiarelli PE, 'Impact of neck dissection on scapular muscle function: a case controlled EMG study', Proceedings of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne (2013)
2013 Hayes MJ, Osmotherly PG, Taylor JA, Smith DR, Ho A, 'Does the use of surgical magnification (loupes) effect upper extremity pain, and disability among dental hygienists.', Proceedings of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Melanie Hayes, Derek Smith, Jane Taylor
2013 Drew M, Palsson TS, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, Lovell G, Hirata R, Gavin-Neilsen T, 'Anatomical and histological considerations of athletic groin pain', Proceedings of the Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport, Phuket, Thailand (2013)
2012 McGarvey A, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman G, Chiarelli PE, 'Facial lymphoedema following treatment for head and neck cancer: Impact on patients and beliefs of health professionals', Final Program. Australian and New Zealand Head and Neck Cancer Society Annual Scientific Meeting, Brisbane, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2012 McGarvey A, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman G, Chiarelli PE, 'Impact of neck dissection on scapular muscle function: A case-controlled electromyographic study', Final Program. Australian and New Zealand Head and Neck Cancer Society Annual Scientific Meeting, Brisbane, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2012 Walmsley S, Rivett DA, Osmotherly PG, 'Validation of a set of clinical identifiers for the early stage of primary/idiopathic adhesive capsulitis: Preliminary results', Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, Quebec City, Canada (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2012 Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Rowe LJ, 'The anterior shear and distraction tests for craniocervical ligament instability: An assessment of construct validity', Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, Quebec City, Canada (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2012 Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Rowe LJ, 'Interpreting the rotation stress test for the alar ligaments: What should be considered normal range?', Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, Quebec City, Canada (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2011 Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Rowe LJ, 'Are the alar ligaments effected by stress testing in the upper cervical spine? An examination using magnetic resonance imaging', APA Physiotherapy Conference 2011 Abstract Presentations, Brisbane (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2011 Walmsley S, Rivett DA, Osmotherly PG, 'Power Doppler ultrasound in the early diagnosis of primary / idiopathic adhesive capsulitis', APA Physiotherapy Conference 2011 Abstract Presentations, Brisbane (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2011 Haskins R, Rivett DA, Osmotherly PG, 'Clinical prediction rules in the physiotherapy management of low back pain: A systematic review', APA Physiotherapy Conference 2011 Abstract Presentations, Brisbane (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.math.2011.05.001
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2011 Farrell SF, Rowe LJ, Osmotherly PG, 'Do age and gender influence the atlanto-dental interval in the normal population? A quantitative anatomical study', APA Physiotherapy Conference 2011 Abstract Presentations, Brisbane (2011) [E3]
2011 Drew MK, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'The diagnosis of persistent pain arising from the attachments of the pubic arc in athletes', APA Physiotherapy Conference 2011 Abstract Presentations, Brisbane (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2011 McGarvey A, Chiarelli PE, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman G, 'Physiotherapy for accessory nerve shoulder dysfunction following neck dissection surgery', Abstracts for the Tri-Society Head and Neck Oncology Meeting 2011, Singapore (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.1002/hed.21366
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2011 Walmsley S, Rivett DA, Osmotherly PG, 'Power doppler ultrasound in the early diagnosis of primary/idiopathic adhesive capsulitis: A pilot study', Proceedings of the 16th International WCPT Congress, Amsterdam (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2011 Rawson OA, Rowe LJ, Osmotherly PG, 'Is agar ligament orientation a function of dens height?', Clinical Anatomy, Hobart (2011) [E3]
2011 Farrell SF, Rowe LJ, Osmotherly PG, 'The influence of age on atlanto-dental interval', Clinical Anatomy, Hobart (2011) [E3]
2010 Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Rowe LJ, Mercer SR, 'Examination of the sidebending and rotation stress tests for alar ligament integrity using magnetic resonance imaging', Journal of Manual and Manipulative Therapy, UK (2010) [C3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2010 Johnston CL, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Physiotherapy student preparedness for working with patients with life limiting illnesses undergoing palliative care: The impact of the palliative care curriculum for undergraduates (PCC4U) resources', ANZAME 2010: Overcoming Barriers, Re(E)Forming Professional Practice, Townsville, QLD (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Cath Johnston, Pauline Chiarelli
2010 Chiarelli PE, Johnston CL, Osmotherly PG, 'An evaluation of the palliative care curriculum for undergraduates (PCC4U) resources by undergraduate physiotherapy students', ANZAME 2010: Overcoming Barriers, Re(E)Forming Professional Practice, Townsville, QLD (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Cath Johnston, Pauline Chiarelli
2010 Scott O, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Assessment of pelvic floor muscle contraction ability in healthy males follwoing brief verbal instruction', Handbook. 19th National Conference on Incontinence, Alice Springs, Australia (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2010 McGarvey A, Chiarelli PE, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman G, 'Physiotherapy for accessory nerve shoulder dysfunction following neck dissection surgery: A multicentre randomised controlled trial', Head & Neck 2010 Final Program, Manly, N.S.W. (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2010 McGarvey A, Chiarelli PE, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman G, 'Physiotherapy for accessory nerve shoulder dysfunction following neck dissection surgery: A literature review', Head & Neck 2010 Final Program, Manly, N.S.W. (2010) [E3]
DOI 10.1002/hed.21366
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2009 Clinton P, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Pelvic floor muscle function in men following radiation therapy for prostate cancer: A preliminary exploration using real time ultrasound imaging', Handbook: 18th National Conference on Incontinence, Adelaide, SA (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2009 Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Mercer SR, 'Craniovertebral instability testing: Do the tests really reflect the anatomy?', International Mulligan Concept Conference: Mobilization with Movement: The Science, Evidence and Art, Chicago, ILL (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2009 Osmotherly PG, Attia JR, McElduff P, 'The composite neck pain and disability questionnaire: Development and factor structure', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy: eSupplements, Sydney, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors John Attia
2009 Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Cowin G, Mercer SR, 'Confirmatory examination of the deep craniovertebral ligaments using high resolution MRI', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy: eSupplements, Sydney, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2009 Pickering PM, Osmotherly PG, Attia JR, McElduff P, 'An examination of outcome measures for pain and dysfunction in the cervical spine: A factor analysis', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy: eSupplements, Sydney, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors John Attia
2009 Walmsley S, Rivett DA, Osmotherly PG, 'Adhesive capsulitis: Establishing consensus on clinical identifiers for stage one using the Delphi technique', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy: eSupplements, Sydney, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2009 Ng Hung Shin PB, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Pre-activation of transversus abdominis protects the rectus abdominis diastasis of post-partum women doing a head lift', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy: eSupplements, Sydney, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2009 Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Mercer S, 'High resolution MRI examination of the deep craniovertebral ligaments', Surgical & Radiologic Anatomy, Istanbul, Turkey (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2008 Osmotherly PG, Mercer SR, Rivett DA, 'The knowledge and use of craniovertebral instability testing by Australian physiotherapists', Proceedings of the 9th Congress of the International Federation of Orthopaedic Manipulative Therapists (IFOMT 2008), Rotterdam, The Netherlands (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2008 Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Mercer SR, 'Craniovertebral anatomy and implications for clinical testing of ligamentous stability in the upper cervical spine', Proceedings of the 9th Congress of the International Federation of Orthopaedic Manipulative Therapists (IFOMT 2008), Rotterdam, The Netherlands (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2008 Walmsley S, Rivett DA, Osmotherly PG, 'Adhesive capsulitis: Establishing consensus on diagnostic criteria of stage one using the Delphi technique', Proceedings of the 9th Congress of the International Federation of Orthopaedic Manipulative Therapists (IFOMT 2008), Rotterdam, The Netherlands (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2008 Chiarelli PE, Mackenzie L, Osmotherly PG, 'The association between falls and urinary incontinence: A systematic review of the evidence', 3rd Australian and New Zealand Falls Prevention (ANZFP) Conference: Program and Abstracts, Melbourne, VIC (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2008 Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Mercer SR, 'Craniovertebral anatomy: New descriptions, lessons from history and implications for stability testing', Australian Physiotherapy Association New South Wales Branch 2008 State Symposium: Steps to Success: Programme and Abstracts, Sydney, NSW (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2008 Miller PA, Osmotherly PG, 'Facilitatory scapula taping for shoulder impingement: A pilot randomised controlled trial', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy: eSupplements, Cairns, QLD (2008) [E3]
2008 Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Mercer SR, 'Physiotherapists' use of craniovertebral instability testing: A survey of members of Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Australia', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy: eSupplements, Cairns, QLD (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2008 Osmotherly PG, Mercer SR, Rivett DA, 'Transverse band of the alar ligament: A common anatomical variant', Clinical Anatomy, Brisbane, QLD (2008) [E3]
DOI 10.1002/ca.20609
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2007 Osmotherly PG, Mercer SR, Rivett DA, 'The tectorial membrane: A multilayered structure', Clinical Anatomy (Abstracts presented at the 3rd Meeting of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Clinical Anatomists), Melbourne (2007) [E3]
DOI 10.1002/ca.20477
Co-authors Darren Rivett
2003 Osmotherly PG, Attia JR, 'Deep cervical flexor muscle performance and neck pain in call centre operators - a pilot study', Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Australia 13th Biennial Conference, Sydney, Australia (2003) [E3]
Co-authors John Attia
Show 66 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 15
Total funding $145,460

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20151 grants / $2,000

World Conference of Physical Therapy Congress 2015, Singapore, 1-4 May 2015$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Peter Osmotherly
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500285
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20131 grants / $1,207

APA Conference 2013 (Australian Physiotherapy Association), Melbourne Australia, 17-20 October 2013$1,207

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Peter Osmotherly
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1301058
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20124 grants / $37,200

Maximising shoulder function following accessory nerve neuropraxia after neck dissection surgery for cancer$13,700

Funding body: Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital

Funding body Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital
Project Team
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON Y

Kick, straight-line running or change of direction: a functional MRI study of the adductor group.$11,500

Funding body: Australian Sports Commission, Incorporating Australian Institute of Sport

Funding body Australian Sports Commission, Incorporating Australian Institute of Sport
Project Team
Scheme Applied Sports Research Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Histology of the adductor longus enthesis with reference to chronic groin pain in athletes$10,000

Funding body: Australian Sports Commission, Incorporating Australian Institute of Sport

Funding body Australian Sports Commission, Incorporating Australian Institute of Sport
Project Team
Scheme Applied Sports Research Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

IFOMPT 2012, the World Congress of Manual/Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy , Centre des congres/Convention Centre, Quebec City, Canada, 30 September - 5 October 2012$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Peter Osmotherly
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200635
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20113 grants / $42,652

Injuries, practices and perceptions of wheelchair sports participants in NSW$19,912

Funding body: NSW Sporting Injuries Committee

Funding body NSW Sporting Injuries Committee
Project Team Professor Darren Rivett, Associate Professor Suzanne Snodgrass, Doctor Peter Osmotherly, Mr ROBIN Haskins
Scheme Research & Injury Prevention Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100776
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Physical characteristics predisposing rugby players to neck injuries: A replicable model for acceleration/contact sport$19,740

Funding body: NSW Sporting Injuries Committee

Funding body NSW Sporting Injuries Committee
Project Team Associate Professor Suzanne Snodgrass, Professor Darren Rivett, Doctor Peter Osmotherly, Mrs Susan Reid
Scheme Research & Injury Prevention Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100796
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Dynamic EMG activity of scapular muscles in neck dissection patients with accessory nerve injury compared to matched controls.$3,000

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health Network

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health Network
Project Team
Scheme Hunter New England Allied Health Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON Y

20101 grants / $2,000

American Association of Orthopaedic manulipulative Physical Therapists Conference 2010, Grand Hyatt Hotel, San Antonio, Texas, USA, 7 - 10 October 2010$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Peter Osmotherly
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000764
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20091 grants / $800

10th Congress of the European Association of Clinical Anatomy, Istanbul, Turkey, 2-5 September 2009$800

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Peter Osmotherly
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0900244
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20083 grants / $59,186

Maximising shoulder function following accessory nerve neuropraxia after neck dissection surgery for cancer$52,686

Funding body: Calvary Mater Newcastle

Funding body Calvary Mater Newcastle
Project Team
Scheme James Lawrie Research Grant for head and neck cancer research
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON Y

Clinical Assessment of the craniovertebral ligaments. An assessment of clinical stress tests using magnetic resonance imaging.$4,800

Funding body: Physiotherapy Research Foundation

Funding body Physiotherapy Research Foundation
Project Team Doctor Peter Osmotherly, Professor Darren Rivett, Conjoint Associate Professor Lindsay Rowe
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189010
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

9th Congress of the International federation of orthopaedic manipulative therapists, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, 8/6/2008 - 13/6/2008$1,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Peter Osmotherly
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188704
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20031 grants / $415

Muscoskeletal Physiotherapy Australia, 13th Biennial Conference 27 to 30 November 2003$415

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Peter Osmotherly
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo G0183799
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Current Supervision

Commenced Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus: Validation of Standard Physiotherapy Assessment Tools
Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2015 Cervical Proprioception During Functional Tasks in Insidious Onset Neck Pain Patients
Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2013 The Relationship Between the Hip Joint and Chronic Non Specific Low Back Pain
Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2013 Cervical Spine Meniscoids and their Potential Role in Neck Pain and its Management
Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2012 The Diagnosis of Chronic Groin Pain in Athletes
Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2003 Clinical Prediction Rules for Low Back Pain
Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 Physiotherapy for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer
Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2014 Clinical Identifiers for Early Stage Primary/Idiopathic Adhesive Capsulitis
Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
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Dr Peter Osmotherly

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Physiotherapy

Contact Details

Email peter.osmotherly@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 7718
Fax (02) 4921 7902

Office

Room HC18
Building Hunter Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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