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Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber

Associate Professor

School of Engineering (Chemical Engineering)

A catalyst for success

Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber has long held a fascination for catalytic reactions and their almost unlimited scope when it comes to solutions for industry and the community.

Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber and team

Joining UON in January 2008, Associate Professor Stockenhuber has honed his focus on catalysts because of its practical application in enabling technologies.

“Catalysis research has, at least in my opinion, a big advantage in that it can be rather fundamental in its nature, but it is also very applied. As a result, there is a significant commercial interest in this technology. The largest tonnage amount of chemicals produced is done through catalysis."

The key to catalytic conversion’s success is that catalysts increase the speed of any reaction - this is crucial - otherwise the process would be far too slow and wouldn’t be viable economically or environmentally.

Environmentally-friendly applications

Many environmentally-friendly technologies such as biofuels, have a significant oxygen content in the fuel, which is problematic for use in standard engines. However, we can remove the oxygen from the fuels using catalytic technology. This makes a fuel that originates from a biological source, such as wood or biowaste, waste oils or even molasses, more usable and a viable alternative.

Making by-products the product

In fuel production it is vital that every part of the process is utilised: you need to find a solution for the by-products and make them value-added products.

Glycerol is a by-product of biodiesel manufacturing, so researchers are trying to make it economically useful by creating a product from it. Using catalytic technology plastics can be manufactured using glycerol – making a useful product from a by-product.

Cleaner air through end-of-pipe-technology

End of pipe technology is the process of cleaning up waste products at the end stage of production. The catalytic converter for cars is a typical end-of-pipe product which converts harmful nitrogen oxide into nitrogen and oxygen. With the rise in diesel cars or lean-burn engines, we don’t have a very efficient catalytic converter to convert the emissions safely. Michael and his team are working on developing an efficient product can reduce airborne pollution and emissions in these increasingly popular vehicles.

“Another area we’re very interested in is the catalytic conversion of methane. This end-of-pipe technology is used in coal mines which have significant methane emissions. Methane is a very effective greenhouse gas, so we are trying to convert the methane to CO2 to reduce the methane levels,” Michael says.

“This will be a significant outcome for reducing global warming. Around 65% of all coal mining related greenhouse gas  emissions come from ventilation air, we can look to reduce these by a factor of 21 on a molecular basis. Which is significant on a tonnage basis. With catalytic technologies we are converting methane at very low temperatures with very little energy penalty.”

Bringing the world of catalysis research to Newcastle

As a member of the International Advisory Board for the International Conference on Environmental Catalysis Michael made the proposal to bring the International conference to Australia. With the aim of starting an invigoration of the Australian catalysis scene, the conference was held in Newcastle from July 10 2016.

As President of the Catalysis Society, Michael brings his enthusiasm to the community and industry. “Australia has a large body of people publishing in the catalysis area, we’re near one of the classical catalysis countries such as The Netherlands. Now we have a focal point, bringing conferences and attention to the Asia-Pacific.”

“The scope with catalysis is almost unlimited, there are virtually no conversions that cannot be undertaken with catalysis. With environmental considerations the field has become invigorated again as it is being seen as one of the major enabling technologies for specificity of production of products. One of the big advantages is that you can scale up very nicely, you can transform the technology from the laboratory to industry very easily. We have the technology to transform a fossil fuel or biological fuels into a more renewable-based future. It’s exciting technology with enormous economies of scale potential."

Catalysis is one of the main enabling technologies that will be able to implement new commercially viable and environmentally friendly processes for manufacturing and emission control. The possibilities to manufacture future energy carriers, materials, chemicals, pharmaceuticals and to reduce emissions are endless.

A catalyst for success

Professor Michael Stockenhuber has long held a fascination for catalytic reactions and their scope when it comes to solutions for industry and community.

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Career Summary

Biography

Associate Prof Stockenhuber has published more than 90 peer reviewed papers and holds 4 patents. He has a H index of 17 and has been cited more than 1100 times. He has been hon. secretary of the British Zeolite Association and has been secretary and is now president of the Australian Catalysis Society. He has established and is head of the catalysis and process research laboratory at the University of Newcastle. From 2013 to 2016 he has been Assistant Dean, Research Training in the Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment.

Michael Stockenhuber was awarded his diploma (Dipl.Ing.) in “Chemical Technology” in 1990 at the Technical University of Vienna.  He continued his studies for a PhD at the Institute of Physical Chemistry (Prof. Johannes Lercher) which he was awarded with distinction in 1994 (Dr.Techn.)  He then did a brief study postdoc at the University of Twente. He joined Nottingham Trent University in 1995 as postdoctoral researcher and was later appointed lecturer (1998) and promoted to Reader in 2007. In 2008 he was appointed senior lecturer in Chemical Engineering at University of Newcastle. In 2012 he was promoted to Associate Professor.

His main research interest is heterogeneous catalysis and nanoporous materials with a special emphasis on structure- function relationships. Current topics of interest include mineral carbonation, catalytic combustion of ventilation air methane, conversion of glycerol to useful products, acid site characterisation using i.r. and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, dehydrogenation of hydrocarbons, zeolites as base catalysts, selective hydrocarbon oxidation and fine chemical synthesis using “green” solid catalysts.

Associate Prof Stockenhuber received funding from highly prestigious projects with BP, EADS (Airbus), BHP, AEL and setup collaborations with a number of research groups all over the world. That is evident not only through the high impact of his papers but also the number of institutions seeking collaboration with him. In Australia he received more than $4.2 million AUD research funding from ARC, other Australian funding bodies, and industry. The funding was for fundamental (such as the work on local site structure in zeolites) as well as applied studies, such as mineral carbonation, the development of a catalytic system to produce hydrogen on board an aircraft (EADS) and catalytic combustion of ventilation air methane and conversion of high value products from glycerol as well as methane conversion to value added products. 

Research Expertise

  • Development of catalysts and environmentally friendly processes
  • Dehydrogenation of large hydrocarbons
  • Base catalysis for manufacturing intermediate chemicals
  • In situ spectroscopic characterisation of heterogeneous catalysts
  • I.R. spectroscopic investigation of acidic properties of modified zeolite catalysts
  • Activation and deactivation of redox catalysts
  • Understanding catalysts using synchrotron radiation
  • Local structure determination of active sites using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy
  • The chemistry and structure of selective oxidation catalysts
  • Structure function relationships in phosphate catalysts



Qualifications

  • Doctor of Technical Sciences, Technical University of Vienna - Austria
  • Bachelor of Engineering, Technical University of Vienna - Austria

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
030299 Inorganic Chemistry not elsewhere classified 5
030699 Physical Chemistry not elsewhere classified 15
091499 Resources Engineering and Extractive Metallurgy not elsewhere classified 80

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Engineering
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2007 - 1/12/2007 Reader - Physical Chemistry Nottingham Trent University
1/01/1998 - 1/01/2007 Senior Lecturer - Chemistry Nottingham Trent University

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
Member - International Zeolite Association International Zeolite Association
Australia
Member - Austrian Chemical Society Austrian Chemical Society
Austria
Member - British Zeolite Association British Zeolite Association
United Kingdom
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2009 Stockenhuber M, 'X-ray adsorption spectroscopy of oxides and oxidation catalysts', Metal Oxide Catalysis, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, Germany 299-321 (2009) [B1]
DOI 10.1002/9783527626113.ch7

Journal article (59 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Gaikwad V, Kennedy E, Mackie J, Holdsworth C, Molloy S, Kundu S, et al., 'Reaction of dichloromethane under non-oxidative conditions in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor and characterisation of the resultant polymer', Chemical Engineering Journal, 290 499-506 (2016)

© 2016 Elsevier B.V.This paper presents the results of dichloromethane (DCM) decomposition to polymers utilising dielectric barrier discharge under non-oxidative reaction conditi... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V.This paper presents the results of dichloromethane (DCM) decomposition to polymers utilising dielectric barrier discharge under non-oxidative reaction conditions. The conversion levels, mass balance, reaction mechanism and polymer characterisation in relation to DCM reaction are presented in this paper. Reaction pathways describing the decomposition of DCM and subsequent formation of the major products are outlined. Speculation of the mechanism of formation of CHCl3 and C2HCl3 are supported by quantum chemical calculations. In addition, the effect of introducing methane in the reaction feed on the conversion level of DCM and the polymer structure is also examined in this paper.

DOI 10.1016/j.cej.2015.12.105
Co-authors Bogdan Dlugogorski, Clovia Holdsworth, Eric Kennedy
2016 Sánchez G, Dlugogorski BZ, Kennedy EM, Stockenhuber M, 'Zeolite-supported iron catalysts for allyl alcohol synthesis from glycerol', Applied Catalysis A: General, 509 130-142 (2016)

© 2015 Elsevier B.V.Under most reaction conditions studied, acrolein is reported as the primary product in the conversion of glycerol over zeolites. In such processes, acrolein f... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V.Under most reaction conditions studied, acrolein is reported as the primary product in the conversion of glycerol over zeolites. In such processes, acrolein forms at relatively high yields, with negligible allyl alcohol selectivity. In this contribution, we report the development of ZSM5-supported iron catalysts, modified by rubidium deposition, as stable materials for production of allyl alcohol from glycerol. Our results demonstrate a reduced rate of formation of acrolein over modified catalysts. Both unmodified and modified catalysts were analysed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, ammonia temperature programmed desorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. These techniques revealed that differences in product distribution and catalyst performance are due to the combined effects of iron loading, catalyst acidity and changes in the porosity of the catalyst.

DOI 10.1016/j.apcata.2015.09.039
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Bogdan Dlugogorski, Eric Kennedy
2016 Setiawan A, Friggieri J, Hosseiniamoli H, Kennedy EM, Dlugogorski BZ, Adesina AA, Stockenhuber M, 'Towards understanding the improved stability of palladium supported on TS-1 for catalytic combustion.', Phys Chem Chem Phys, 18 10528-10537 (2016)
DOI 10.1039/c6cp00319b
Co-authors Eric Kennedy, Bogdan Dlugogorski
2016 Stanger R, Tran QA, Xie W, Smith N, Lucas J, Yu J, et al., 'The use of LDI-TOF imaging mass spectroscopy to study heated coal with a temperature gradient incorporating the plastic layer and semi-coke', Fuel, 165 33-40 (2016)

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd.This work has used high range imaging mass spectrometry to study a coal sample that has undergone heating with a temperature gradient. A custom made hotplate ... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd.This work has used high range imaging mass spectrometry to study a coal sample that has undergone heating with a temperature gradient. A custom made hotplate was heated to 1000°C and the coal was allowed to heat naturally through conduction to produce a large thermal gradient typical of conditions in a coke oven. The sample was quenched, sectioned and analysed using laser desorption time of flight imaging mass spectrometry (LDI-TOF-IMS) to study the molecular changes that occur within the plastic layer and in the semi-coke. The raw coal was observed to have a molecular weight range between 500 and 20,000 Da with a peak occurring at 2000 Da. The plastic layer was observed to have a prevalence for increasing 500-1000 Da structures though this formed part of the larger molecular weight range. Resolidification of the plastic layer coincided with a rise in 4000 Da structures. The semi-coke spectrum had a series of repeating peaks separated by 24 Da extending from 1000 Da to 3000 Da. This was considered evidence of broad molecular ordering. A second phenomenon was observed in the semi-coke associated with low range molecular weights (50-300 Da). This appeared as high intensity signals in a molecular range typically considered as ion fragments (being too low in size to remain in the high vacuum environment). It was speculated that these low range structures may be associated with the coking of volatile tars exiting the hot-side of the plastic layer through high temperature semi-coke. Overall, this preliminary work provides a novel methodology to study the heating impacts during coking on a molecular level.

DOI 10.1016/j.fuel.2015.10.028
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Lucas, Rohan Stanger, Terry Wall, Eric Kennedy, Jianglong Yu
2016 Farhang F, Oliver TK, Rayson M, Brent G, Stockenhuber M, Kennedy E, 'Experimental study on the precipitation of magnesite from thermally activated serpentine for CO2 sequestration', Chemical Engineering Journal, 303 439-449 (2016)

© 2016 Elsevier B.V.Mineral carbonation has the potential to store billions of tonnes of CO2 safely and permanently. Enhancement of the kinetics of the formation of magnesium car... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V.Mineral carbonation has the potential to store billions of tonnes of CO2 safely and permanently. Enhancement of the kinetics of the formation of magnesium carbonate from magnesium-bearing silicate minerals has been the subject of numerous research studies. However, significant progress is yet to be achieved. This is, in part, due to a lack of understanding of the mechanism of the formation of magnesite in the presence of additives and under mineral carbonation conditions. In this work, an in-depth study was performed to investigate the precipitation of magnesium carbonate during single step high pressure, high temperature carbonation of thermally activated serpentine in an aqueous bicarbonate solution. Slurry samples were obtained throughout the duration of the carbonation experiments, enabling analysis of both the aqueous and solid compositions over time, providing insight into the reaction mechanism. Additionally, the effect of operating temperature on the formation of various magnesium carbonate species was examined. TGA-MS, in combination with XRD and SEM, confirmed the formation of hydromagnesite in the absence of carbon dioxide (CO2) during the reactor heat up period, owing to a reaction with the sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) carrier solution. Hydromagnesite was transformed to magnesite over time, with the rate of this phase transformation highly dependent on the reaction temperature. At 185¿°C all hydromagnesite converted to magnesite in a few minutes whereas at 120¿°C even after 90¿min hydromagnesite remained in the reactor. PHREEQC thermodynamic software was used to assess the observed formation of carbonate species. The model prediction was consistent with the experimental results obtained in this work.

DOI 10.1016/j.cej.2016.06.008
Co-authors Eric Kennedy
2016 Tran QA, Stanger R, Xie W, Lucas J, Yu J, Stockenhuber M, et al., 'Maceral separation from coal by the Reflux Classifier', FUEL PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY, 143 43-50 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.fuproc.2015.11.009
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Eric Kennedy, Rohan Stanger, John Lucas, Terry Wall, Jianglong Yu
2016 Dharmarathne NK, Mackie JC, Kennedy EM, Stockenhuber M, 'Gas phase pyrolysis of endosulfan and formation of dioxin precursors of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F)', Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, (2016)

© 2016.This article reports the results of a computational and experimental study on the thermal degradation of endosulfan, a broad-spectrum chlorinated cyclodiene insecticide. T... [more]

© 2016.This article reports the results of a computational and experimental study on the thermal degradation of endosulfan, a broad-spectrum chlorinated cyclodiene insecticide. The objective of the study was to identify its decomposition pathways, and to gain an understanding of the mechanism of formation of toxic species including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF) and their precursors. We implemented pyrolysis experiments in a tubular reactor and identified the pyrolysis products and demonstrate good qualitative agreement between the experimental species measurements and quantum chemical calculations. A sampling system intercepted the gaseous products exiting the reactor which were analysed by FTIR spectroscopy and trapped (at -10°C) volatile organic compounds (VOC) generated from the thermal decomposition of endosulfan were analysed by GC/MS. Decomposition commences at about 573K in a flow reactor at a residence time of 5s. The initial primary decomposition reaction of endosulfan involves a retro Diels-Alder elimination to form hexachlorocyclopentadiene (HCCP) and 4,7-dihydro-1,3,2-dioxathiepine-2-oxide (2HDTO). Under these conditions, 2HDTO decomposes via two competing reaction channels, both eliminating SO2. At reaction temperatures of 663K and above, fission of a Cl atom results in the formation of endosulfan radical, which promotes further decomposition of endosulfan via a low barrier free radical pathway. As the temperature increases further, we observe a rise in secondary products including pentachlorocyclopentadiene (PCCP), tetrachlorostyrene (TCS) and pentachlorostyrene (PCS). At 823K, chlorinated benzene products were identified comprising pentachlorobenzene and isomers of tetrachlorobenzenes which are known precursors for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans PCDD/PCDF under oxidative conditions. Under oxidative conditions (10% oxygen), PCDD/PCDF congeners are formed, dominated by mono- to octa- chlorinated dibenzofurans and tetra- to octa- chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins.

DOI 10.1016/j.proci.2016.05.001
Co-authors Eric Kennedy, John Mackie
2016 Sánchez G, Gaikwad V, Holdsworth C, Dlugogorski B, Kennedy E, Stockenhuber M, 'Catalytic conversion of glycerol to polymers in the presence of ammonia', Chemical Engineering Journal, 291 279-286 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V.In this contribution, the development of a process for the synthesis of potentially highly valuable polymeric products from the reaction of waste glycerol wit... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V.In this contribution, the development of a process for the synthesis of potentially highly valuable polymeric products from the reaction of waste glycerol with ammonia is reported for the first time. The polymers were the result of a single step, continuous gas phase process, catalysed by an alumina-supported iron catalyst, operating under relatively mild reaction conditions. The solid product was characterised using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, qualitative chemical tests and elemental analysis. Characterisation revealed building blocks with unsaturated, amido and ester functionalities shaping a mixture of polymers. Nitrogen atoms were present in the main chain of the resultant polymers. NMR analyses of the polymer denotes the formation of structural defects such as unsaturation and branching; whilst the partial solubility of the polymer in solvents such as CDCl3 and THF is indicative of the formation of cross-linked structures. Insights into the mechanism of formation of these functional groups were based on the liquid and gas phase product distribution. Polymers with chain structures similar to those synthesised in this work are currently manufactured from fossil fuels and are widely used in biomedical applications not only because of their architecture but also due to their response to changes in pH and temperature.

DOI 10.1016/j.cej.2016.01.049
Co-authors Clovia Holdsworth, Bogdan Dlugogorski, Eric Kennedy
2016 Mosallanejad S, Dlugogorski BZ, Kennedy EM, Stockenhuber M, Lomnicki SM, Assaf NW, Altarawneh M, 'Formation of PCDD/Fs in Oxidation of 2-Chlorophenol on Neat Silica Surface', Environmental Science and Technology, 50 1412-1418 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 American Chemical Society.This contribution studies partial oxidation of 2-chlorophenol on surfaces of neat silica at temperatures of 250, 350, and 400 °C; i.e., temperat... [more]

© 2015 American Chemical Society.This contribution studies partial oxidation of 2-chlorophenol on surfaces of neat silica at temperatures of 250, 350, and 400 °C; i.e., temperatures that frequently lead to catalytic formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) from their precursors. We have identified 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCPh), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCPh), and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TriCPh), but have detected no chlorinated benzenes (CBzs). The detected chlorinated and nonchlorinated DD/Fs comprise dibenzo-p-dioxin (DD), 1- and 2-monochlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (1-, 2-MCDD), 1,6-, 1,9-, 1,3-dichlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (1,6-, 1,9-, 1,3-DCDD), 4-monochlorodibenzofuran (4-MCDF), and 4,6-dichlorodibenzofuran (4,6-DCDF) at the reaction temperatures of 350 and 400 °C. However, at a lower reaction temperature, 250 °C, we have detected no PCDD/Fs. We have demonstrated that neat silica surfaces catalyze the generation of PCDD/Fs from chlorophenols at the upper range of the catalytic formation temperature of PCDD/F. The present finding proves the generation of PCDD/Fs on particles of fly ash, even in the absence of transition metals.

DOI 10.1021/acs.est.5b04287
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Bogdan Dlugogorski, Eric Kennedy
2015 Drewery M, Kennedy E, Alenazey F, Dlugogorski B, Stockenhuber M, 'The effect of synthesis gas composition on the performance of Ni-based solid oxide fuel cells', Chemical Engineering Research and Design, 101 22-26 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 The Institution of Chemical Engineers.An increased interest in using hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells for the production of power has led to research into operation ... [more]

© 2015 The Institution of Chemical Engineers.An increased interest in using hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells for the production of power has led to research into operation on synthesis (syn) gas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Hydrocarbons are typically reformed, either internally or in an external reformer prior to the fuel cell, producing syngas with various H2:CO ratios depending on the hydrocarbon used. This paper examines the effect of varying the H2:CO ratio with respect to C1 to C4 steam reforming reactions and additionally a mixture containing a higher ratio of carbon monoxide. It was found that there was no significant relationship between cell performance and H2:CO ratio when a high feed rate was employed. For low flow rates, however, the high carbon monoxide concentration resulted in a significant decrease in cell performance. It was determined that this was caused by reversible carbon deposition as opposed to a decrease in carbon monoxide reactivity.

DOI 10.1016/j.cherd.2015.07.008
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Eric Kennedy, Bogdan Dlugogorski
2015 Setiawan A, Kennedy EM, Dlugogorski BZ, Adesina AA, Stockenhuber M, 'The stability of Co3O4, Fe2O3, Au/Co3O4 and Au/Fe2O3 catalysts in the catalytic combustion of lean methane mixtures in the presence of water', Catalysis Today, 258 276-283 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.Nano-sized Co3O4, Fe2O3, Au/Co3O4 and Au/Fe2O3 catalysts were prepared and evaluated for catalytic combustion of lean methane-air mixture... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.Nano-sized Co3O4, Fe2O3, Au/Co3O4 and Au/Fe2O3 catalysts were prepared and evaluated for catalytic combustion of lean methane-air mixtures. Characteristics and catalytic activities under dry and wet feed conditions were investigated at gas hourly space velocities up to 100 000 h-1 mimicking the typical flow and conversion requirements of a catalytic system designed to treat a ventilation air methane stream. In order to gain a better understanding of the interaction between H2O and the catalyst surface, temperature-programmed desorption of water over fresh and used samples were studied, and supported by other catalyst characterization techniques such as N2-adsorption desorption, XRD, TEM, SEM and XPS analyses. The activity measurements of the catalysts studied identify Co3O4 as the most active material. Co-precipitating gold particles with cobalt oxide or iron oxide do not enhance the activity of the catalyst, which is most likely due to blocking the active site of support by the gold particle. The presence of strong hydroxyl bonds on the catalyst surface is substantiated by TPD and XPS analyses, and is suggested to be responsible for the rapid deactivation of Fe2O3 and Au/Fe2O3 catalysts.

DOI 10.1016/j.cattod.2014.11.031
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Bogdan Dlugogorski, Eric Kennedy
2015 Li JPH, Stockenhuber M, 'A temperature programmed desorption study of the interaction of ethyl cyanoacetate and benzaldehyde on metal oxide surfaces', Catalysis Today, 245 108-115 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.Reagents from a base catalysed condensation reaction (Knoevenagel condensation reaction between ethyl cyanoacetate and benzaldehyde), wer... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.Reagents from a base catalysed condensation reaction (Knoevenagel condensation reaction between ethyl cyanoacetate and benzaldehyde), were adsorbed on ZnO and Al2O3 catalyst surfaces and subject to temperature programmed desorption experiments, monitored using mass spectrometry. Ethyl formate, ketenimine species, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide were desorption products from ethyl cyanoacetate, while benzene, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide were desorbed from the catalysts loaded with benzaldehyde. The formation of the ketenimine species was confirmed by in situ FTIR experiments. The observation of the decomposition species further substantiates a proposed reaction mechanism for the Knoevenagel condensation reaction on the catalyst surface of some oxide catalysts.

DOI 10.1016/j.cattod.2014.07.020
2015 Harvey L, Kennedy E, Dlugogorski BZ, Stockenhuber M, 'Influence of impurities on the epoxidation of allyl alcohol to glycidol with hydrogen peroxide over titanium silicate TS-1', APPLIED CATALYSIS A-GENERAL, 489 241-246 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.apcata.2014.10.046
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Bogdan Dlugogorski, Eric Kennedy
2015 Harvey L, Sánchez G, Kennedy EM, Stockenhuber M, 'Enhancing allyl alcohol selectivity in the catalytic conversion of glycerol; influence of product distribution on the subsequent epoxidation step', Asia-Pacific Journal of Chemical Engineering, n/a-n/a (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/apj.1909
Co-authors Eric Kennedy
2015 Setiawan A, Friggieri J, Bryant G, Kennedy EM, Dlugogorski BZ, Stockenhuber M, 'Accelerated hydrothermal ageing of Pd/Al2O3 for catalytic combustion of ventilation air methane', Catalysis Science and Technology, 5 4008-4016 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/c5cy00186b
Co-authors Bogdan Dlugogorski, Eric Kennedy
2014 Li JPH, Kennedy E, Stockenhuber M, 'Oxidative coupling and hydroxylation of phenol over transition metal and acidic zeolites: Insights into catalyst function', Catalysis Letters, 144 9-15 (2014) [C1]

Reaction of phenol with hydrogen peroxide over H-MFI, Fe-MFI, H-BEA, Fe-BEA and TS-1 zeolite catalysts was investigated. Over H-BEA, biphenyl product was observed. It is suggested... [more]

Reaction of phenol with hydrogen peroxide over H-MFI, Fe-MFI, H-BEA, Fe-BEA and TS-1 zeolite catalysts was investigated. Over H-BEA, biphenyl product was observed. It is suggested, that the larger pore size of H-BEA facilitates coupling of two phenol molecules. Two distinct reaction mechanisms are proposed for acid and redox catalysts. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

DOI 10.1007/s10562-013-1142-z
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Eric Kennedy
2014 Suleiman IA, Radny MW, Gladys MJ, Smith PV, Mackie JC, Stockenhuber M, et al., 'Water formation via HCl oxidation on Cu(100)', APPLIED SURFACE SCIENCE, 299 156-161 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.apsusc.2014.01.204
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Eric Kennedy, Phil Smith, Marian Radny, Michael Gladys, Bogdan Dlugogorski, John Mackie
2014 Gaikwad V, Kennedy E, Mackie J, Holdsworth C, Molloy S, Kundu S, et al., 'Reaction of carbon tetrachloride with methane in a non-equilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure, and characterisation of the polymer thus formed', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 280 38-45 (2014) [C1]

In this paper we focus on the development of a methodology for treatment of carbon tetrachloride utilising a non-equilibrium plasma operating at atmospheric pressure, which is not... [more]

In this paper we focus on the development of a methodology for treatment of carbon tetrachloride utilising a non-equilibrium plasma operating at atmospheric pressure, which is not singularly aimed at destroying carbon tetrachloride but rather at converting it to a non-hazardous, potentially valuable commodity. This method encompasses the reaction of carbon tetrachloride and methane, with argon as a carrier gas, in a quartz dielectric barrier discharge reactor. The reaction is performed under non-oxidative conditions. Possible pathways for formation of major products based on experimental results and supported by quantum chemical calculations are outlined in the paper. We elucidate important parameters such as carbon tetrachloride conversion, product distribution, mass balance and characterise the chlorinated polymer formed in the process. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2014.07.049
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Clovia Holdsworth, Bogdan Dlugogorski, Eric Kennedy, John Mackie
2014 Sánchez G, Friggieri J, Keast C, Drewery M, Dlugogorski BZ, Kennedy E, Stockenhuber M, 'The effect of catalyst modification on the conversion of glycerol to allyl alcohol', Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, 152-153 117-128 (2014) [C1]

Conversion of glycerol to allyl alcohol was carried out over an iron on alumina catalyst. With the aim of enhancing selectivity towards the desired product and to reduce acrolein ... [more]

Conversion of glycerol to allyl alcohol was carried out over an iron on alumina catalyst. With the aim of enhancing selectivity towards the desired product and to reduce acrolein formation (a detrimental impurity in the subsequent epoxidation of allyl alcohol) the supported iron catalyst was modified using alkali metals. It was found that lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium deposition on the catalyst surface increased allyl alcohol yield and reduced the rate of catalyst deactivation. Coincidently, acrolein selectivity decreased by up to 75% following treatment with the alkali salt.Changes in the product distribution were determined to be associated with altering the acid/base properties of the catalyst, as confirmed by isopropanol dehydration/dehydrogenation, ammonia and carbon dioxide temperature programmed desorption. The treatment was also found to influence the physical properties of the catalyst surface. A correlation between acid to basic site concentration and allyl alcohol selectivity was established. A reduction in the former value results in an enhancement in the rate of allyl alcohol formation. A reaction mechanism was developed based on the effect of iron and alkali metals catalysing the conversion of glycerol into allyl alcohol. The proposed catalyst modification technique is a straightforward method, readily applicable at a larger scale due to the simplicity of the alkali inclusion and its striking influence on the reaction selectivity. © 2014.

DOI 10.1016/j.apcatb.2014.01.019
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Bogdan Dlugogorski, Eric Kennedy
2014 Khan NA, Kennedy EM, Dlugogorski BZ, Adesina AA, Stockenhuber M, 'Partial oxidation of methane with nitrous oxide forms synthesis gas over cobalt exchanged ZSM-5', CATALYSIS COMMUNICATIONS, 53 42-46 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.catcom.2014.04.012
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Eric Kennedy, Bogdan Dlugogorski
2014 Setiawan A, Friggieri J, Kennedy EM, Dlugogorski BZ, Stockenhuber M, 'Catalytic combustion of ventilation air methane (VAM)-long term catalyst stability in the presence of water vapour and mine dust', Catalysis Science and Technology, 4 1793-1802 (2014) [C1]

In this paper, we report new insights into the deactivation phenomenon of palladium based catalysts for catalytic combustion of ventilation air methane (VAM). It was found that th... [more]

In this paper, we report new insights into the deactivation phenomenon of palladium based catalysts for catalytic combustion of ventilation air methane (VAM). It was found that the primary factor responsible for low temperature catalyst deactivation is the water vapour present in the feed stream. The influence of water vapour on VAM was examined by comparing the properties of fresh catalysts with catalysts following over 1000 h reaction time-on-stream. The techniques applied to characterize the catalysts included TPD, XRD, N 2-isotherm adsorption, H2-chemisorption and XPS analyses. Alternating between dry and water vapour-saturated VAM feed disclosed ca. 50% reversible drop in activity. XPS analysis suggests an absence of a palladium hydroxide phase during the initial 2 h on stream, although prolonged exposure to the reactant leads to the formation of palladium hydroxide, which appears to match the progressive deactivation of the Pd/Al2O3 catalyst. Introduction of VAM dust (a mixture of fine coal, CaCO3 and aluminosilicate particles) causes a variation in catalytic activity originating from coal-dust ignition and the effect of chloride on the surface of the catalyst. In the presence of these inhibiting agents, an average methane conversion of higher than 75% over 1100 h was achieved at reaction temperatures below 600°C. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

DOI 10.1039/c4cy00120f
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Eric Kennedy, Bogdan Dlugogorski
2014 Sánchez G, Friggieri J, Adesina AA, Dlugogorski BZ, Kennedy EM, Stockenhuber M, 'Catalytic conversion of glycerol to allyl alcohol; Effect of a sacrificial reductant on the product yield', Catalysis Science and Technology, 4 3090-3098 (2014) [C1]

A continuous process for the conversion of glycerol to allyl alcohol, where ammonia or organic acids are added to the feed as sacrificial reductants, was investigated. Significant... [more]

A continuous process for the conversion of glycerol to allyl alcohol, where ammonia or organic acids are added to the feed as sacrificial reductants, was investigated. Significant enhancement on the rate of formation and yield of the allyl alcohol is observed with some of the reducing agents examined over an alumina-supported iron catalyst. Optimising the molar ratio of the reductant relative to feed glycerol results in an increase in the yield of allyl alcohol from 9% (in the absence of additives) to 11.3% with ammonia, 15.1% with ammonium hydroxide, 17.8% with oxalic acid and 19.5% with formic acid. Moreover, the addition of other organic acids, which are produced in a typical glycerol conversion experiment, was studied. However, acetic and propanoic acids had little effect on the rate of formation of allyl alcohol. Analysis of the product distribution in the liquid and gas phases when oxalic and formic acids were added suggests a two-step process for the formation of allyl alcohol under the operating conditions of the reaction; the initial step involves the dehydration of glycerol while the second comprises the reduction of the species produced in step one. © the Partner Organisations 2014.

DOI 10.1039/c4cy00407h
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Bogdan Dlugogorski, Eric Kennedy
2014 Setiawan A, Kennedy EM, Dlugogorski BZ, Adesina AA, Tkachenko O, Stockenhuber M, 'Evidence of the Formation of Surface Palladium Carbide during the Catalytic Combustion of Lean Methane/Air Mixtures', ENERGY TECHNOLOGY, 2 243-249 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/ente.201300119
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Bogdan Dlugogorski, Eric Kennedy
2013 Mosallanejad S, Dlugogorski BZ, Kennedy EM, Stockenhuber M, 'HCl adsorption on copper-modified ZSM-5: FTIR and DFT study', Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 117 19365-19372 (2013) [C1]

The adsorption complex of hydrogen chloride on copper-modified ZSM-5 was studied by FTIR and theoretical calculations. The results indicate that the Cl atom of hydrogen chloride i... [more]

The adsorption complex of hydrogen chloride on copper-modified ZSM-5 was studied by FTIR and theoretical calculations. The results indicate that the Cl atom of hydrogen chloride is bound to the Cu cations when adsorbed at low pressures (<1 µbar). At higher pressures, HCl adsorbs on the zeolite Brønsted acid sites as well as is hydrogen bonded to the Cu in a larger cluster. Using in situ infrared spectroscopy, we observed a sharp decrease in stretching vibrational frequency of HCl of about 700 cm-1 compared with the H-Cl stretching vibration of gaseous hydrochloric acid. The findings were supported by density functional theory cluster quantum chemical calculations. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

DOI 10.1021/jp3122243
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Bogdan Dlugogorski, Eric Kennedy
2013 Ahmad K, Mowla O, Kennedy EM, Dlugogorski BZ, Mackie JC, Stockenhuber M, 'A Melamine-Modified ß-Zeolite with Enhanced CO2 Capture Properties', Energy Technology, 1 345-349 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/ente.201300027
Citations Web of Science - 8
Co-authors John Mackie, Eric Kennedy, Bogdan Dlugogorski
2012 Brooks AC, France L, Gayot C, Li JPH, Sault R, Stafford A, et al., 'A designed organic-zeolite hybrid acid-base catalyst', Journal of Catalysis, 285 10-18 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 9
2009 Stockenhuber M, 'X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Oxides and Oxidation Catalysts 299-321 (2009)
DOI 10.1002/9783527626113.ch7
Citations Scopus - 1
2009 Hargreaves JSJ, Howe RF, McKay D, Morrison E, Rico JL, Stockenhuber M, 'Nitridation of MoO3/HZSM-5 and Fe-MoO3/HZSM-5', Topics in Catalysis, 52 1559-1565 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11244-009-9288-z
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
2009 Stockenhuber M, Allender CJ, Castell OK, Davies PR, Fiddy S, Hedin-Dahlstrom J, 'A glimpse of the inner workings of the templated site', Chemical Communications, - 165-167 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/b811578h
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
2009 Mathisen K, Stockenhuber M, Nicholson DG, 'In situ XAS and IR studies on Cu:SAPO-5 and Cu:SAPO-11: The contributory role of monomeric linear copper(I) species in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx by propene', Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 11 5476-5488 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/b902491c
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 21
2007 Burns S, Hargreaves JSJ, Stockenhuber M, Wells RPK, 'An al K-edge EXAFS study of MoO3/H-ZSM-5 catalyst precursors', MICROPOROUS AND MESOPOROUS MATERIALS, 104 97-102 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.micromeso.2007.01.019
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2007 Bonati MLM, Joyner RW, Stockenhuber M, 'On the mechanism of aromatic acylation over zeolites', MICROPOROUS AND MESOPOROUS MATERIALS, 104 217-224 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.micromeso.2007.02.023
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
2007 Joyner RW, Sonntag O, Smith AD, Stockenhuber M, 'A soft X-ray EXAFS study of the variation of the local aluminium structure on adsorption of bases in various zeolite types', FROM ZEOLITES TO POROUS MOF MATERIALS: THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY OF INTERNATIONAL ZEOLITE CONFERENCE, PROCEEDINGS OF THE 15TH INTERNATIONAL ZEOLITE CONFERENCE, 170 756-761 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2006 Shiju NR, Fiddy S, Sonntag O, Stockenhuber M, Sankar G, 'Selective oxidation of benzene to phenol over FeAlPO catalysts using nitrous oxide as oxidant', CHEMICAL COMMUNICATIONS, 4955-4957 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/b608982h
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 29
2005 Mellor IM, Burrows A, Coluccia S, Hargreaves JSJ, Joyner RW, Kiely CJ, et al., 'Probing possible structure sensitivity in the exchange of isotopic oxygen with the surface of MgO', JOURNAL OF CATALYSIS, 234 14-23 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jcat.2005.05.015
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
2005 Mathisen K, Nicholson DG, Fitch AN, Stockenhuber M, 'Selective catalytic reduction of NOx over microporous CuAPO-5: structural characterisation by XAS and XRD', JOURNAL OF MATERIALS CHEMISTRY, 15 204-217 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/b413360a
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17
2005 Mathisen K, Nicholson DG, Stockenhuber M, 'The influence of silicon on the catalytic properties of CuSAPO-5 towards the selective reduction of NOx in the presence of propene', MICROPOROUS AND MESOPOROUS MATERIALS, 84 261-274 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.micromeso.2005.05.032
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
2004 Hudson MJ, Jackson DB, Ward JL, Chinn MJ, Stockenhuber M, 'Peroxydisulfate in MCM-48 silicas: powerful and clean materials for the removal of toxic gases', JOURNAL OF MATERIALS CHEMISTRY, 14 1180-1186 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/b314426g
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
2004 Joyner RW, Smith AD, Stockenhuber M, van den Berg MWE, 'The local structure of aluminium sites in zeolites', PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY CHEMICAL PHYSICS, 6 5435-5439 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/b411001c
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 21
2003 Mirzaei AA, Shaterian HR, Joyner RW, Stockenhuber M, Taylor SH, Hutchings GJ, 'Ambient temperature carbon monoxide oxidation using copper manganese oxide catalysts: Effect of residual Na+ acting as catalyst poison', CATALYSIS COMMUNICATIONS, 4 17-20 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S1566-7367(02)00231-5
Citations Scopus - 48Web of Science - 40
2003 Bonati MLM, Joyner RW, Stockenhuber M, 'A temperature programmed desorption study of the interaction of acetic anhydride with zeolite beta (BEA)', CATALYSIS TODAY, 81 653-658 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0920-5861(03)00163-9
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
2003 Joyner RW, Stockenhuber M, Tkachenko OP, 'Synthesis, structure, and reactivity of iron-sulfur species in zeolites', CATALYSIS LETTERS, 85 193-197 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1023/A:1022193730075
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2002 Grubert G, Stockenhuber M, Tkachenko OP, Wark M, 'Titanium oxide species in molecular sieves: Materials for the optical sensing of reductive gas atmospheres', CHEMISTRY OF MATERIALS, 14 2458-2466 (2002) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/cm0107732
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 36
2001 Burton ID, Hargreaves JSJ, Nicholson DG, Nilsen MH, Stockenhuber M, 'An X-ray absorption study on copper-containing AlPO4-5 for selective catalytic reduction of NOX by propene', JOURNAL OF MATERIALS CHEMISTRY, 11 1441-1446 (2001)
DOI 10.1039/b009024g
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2001 Stockenhuber M, Joyner RW, Dixon JM, Hudson MJ, Grubert G, 'Transition metal containing mesoporous silicas - redox properties, structure and catalytic activity', MICROPOROUS AND MESOPOROUS MATERIALS, 44 367-375 (2001)
DOI 10.1016/S1387-1811(01)00203-7
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 39
2000 Grubert G, Hudson MJ, Joyner RW, Stockenhuber M, 'The room temperature, stoichiometric conversion of N2O to adsorbed NO by Fe-MCM-41 and Fe-ZSM-5', JOURNAL OF CATALYSIS, 196 126-133 (2000)
DOI 10.1006/jcat.2000.3005
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 40
2000 Stockenhuber M, Hudson MJ, Joyner RW, 'Preparation, characterization, and unusual reactivity of Fe-MCM-41', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY B, 104 3370-3374 (2000)
DOI 10.1021/jp993355h
Citations Scopus - 55Web of Science - 55
2000 Krylov AS, Poliakoff JF, Stockenhuber M, 'An Hermite expansion method for EXAFS data treatment and its application to FeK-edge spectra', PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY CHEMICAL PHYSICS, 2 5743-5749 (2000)
DOI 10.1039/b004346j
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
1999 Joyner R, Stockenhuber M, 'Preparation, characterization, and performance of Fe-ZSM-5 catalysts', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY B, 103 5963-5976 (1999)
DOI 10.1021/jp990978m
Citations Scopus - 229Web of Science - 221
1998 Henson NJ, Cheetham AK, Stockenhuber M, Lercher JA, 'Modelling aromatics in siliceous zeolites: a new forcefield from thermochemical studies', JOURNAL OF THE CHEMICAL SOCIETY-FARADAY TRANSACTIONS, 94 3759-3768 (1998)
DOI 10.1039/a806175k
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 23
1997 Eder F, Stockenhuber M, Lercher JA, 'Bronsted acid site and pore controlled siting of alkane sorption in acidic molecular sieves', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY B, 101 5414-5419 (1997)
DOI 10.1021/jp9706487
Citations Web of Science - 171
1997 Eder F, Stockenhuber M, Lercher JA, 'Brønsted acid site and pore controlled siting of alkane sorption in acidic molecular sieves', Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 101 5414-5419 (1997)

The sorption of alkanes in zeolites was investigated using calorimetry, gravimetry, and in situ infrared spectroscopy. At temperatures below 373 K alkanes are found to sorb locali... [more]

The sorption of alkanes in zeolites was investigated using calorimetry, gravimetry, and in situ infrared spectroscopy. At temperatures below 373 K alkanes are found to sorb localized on the strong Brønsted acid sites (bridging Si-OH-Al groups) of H-MFI, H-MOR, and H-FAU via hydrogen bonding of the dipole induced in the alkane and the hydroxyl group. Two n-alkanes, but only one isoalkane, simultaneously interact with the Brønsted acid sites of H-MFI. With the other zeolites only one alkane molecule is sorbed locally per strong Brønsted acid site. About one-third of these sites are accessible to alkanes in H-MOR and about 70% in H-FAU. The heat of sorption decreases in the sequence H-MFI > H-MOR > H-FAU. With increasing size of the hydrocarbon the heat of adsorption increases primarily due to an increase in the dispersion forces. The linear relationships between the enthalpies and the entropies of sorption suggest that the interaction is of similar nature for all hydrocarbons and characteristic for a particular zeolite.

Citations Scopus - 168
1997 Connerton J, Joyner RW, Stockenhuber M, 'Activity of carbonaceous deposits in the selective reduction of nitrogen oxides', CHEMICAL COMMUNICATIONS, 185-186 (1997)
DOI 10.1039/a606618f
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
1997 Joyner RW, Stockenhuber M, 'Unusual structure and stability of iron-oxygen nano-clusters in Fe-ZSM-5 catalysts', CATALYSIS LETTERS, 45 15-19 (1997)
DOI 10.1023/A:1019063511784
Citations Scopus - 64Web of Science - 66
1996 Narbeshuber TF, Stockenhuber M, Brait A, Seshan K, Lercher JA, 'Hydrogen/deuterium exchange during n-butane conversion on H-ZSM-5', JOURNAL OF CATALYSIS, 160 183-189 (1996)
DOI 10.1006/jcat.1996.0137
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 27
1995 STOCKENHUBER M, LERCHER JA, 'CHARACTERIZATION AND REMOVAL OF EXTRA LATTICE SPECIES IN FAUJASITES', MICROPOROUS MATERIALS, 3 457-465 (1995)
DOI 10.1016/0927-6513(94)00056-2
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 31
1995 Eder F, Stockenhuber M, Lercher JA, 'Sorption of light alkanes on H-ZSM5 and H-mordenite', ZEOLITES: A REFINED TOOL FOR DESIGNING CATALYTIC SITES, 97 495-500 (1995)
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 43
1994 Lercher JA, Mirth G, Stockenhuber M, Narbeshuber T, Kogelbauer A, '2.6 Elementary Steps of Acid-Base Catalyzed Reactions in Molecular Sieves. Elementary Steps of Acid-Base Catalyzed Reactions in Molecular Sieves', Studies in Surface Science and Catalysis, 90 147-156 (1994)

The role of Brönsted acid (and basic) sites of molecular sieves is compared for four different acid-base catalyzed reactions, i.e., n-alkane conversion, isomenzation of xylene, r... [more]

The role of Brönsted acid (and basic) sites of molecular sieves is compared for four different acid-base catalyzed reactions, i.e., n-alkane conversion, isomenzation of xylene, reaction of methanol to dimethylether and alkylation of toluene. The coverage at the catalytically active sites and the surface chemistry during the reaction is followed by in situ i.r. spectroscopy using CSTR with i.r. light transparent windows. This allows to directly compare the surface chemistry with the catalytic activities and selectivities. Conventional isotope labelling and steady state isotope transient experiments are used to further support the mechanistic models of the acid-base catalyzed reactions outlined above. © 1994 Kodansha Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/S0167-2991(08)61813-3
Citations Scopus - 8
1993 STOCKENHUBER M, MAYER H, LERCHER JA, 'PREPARATION OF BARIUM TITANATES FROM OXALATES', JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CERAMIC SOCIETY, 76 1185-1190 (1993)
DOI 10.1111/j.1151-2916.1993.tb03738.x
Citations Web of Science - 103
Show 56 more journal articles

Conference (34 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Dharmarathne W, Mackie J, Kennedy E, Stockenhuber M, 'Non-Oxidative Thermal Decomposition of Endosulfan', Australian Combustion Symposium 2015 Proceedings (2015) [E1]
Co-authors John Mackie, Eric Kennedy
2015 Mackie J, Dharmarathne W, Kennedy E, Stockenhuber M, 'Non-Oxidative Thermal Decomposition of Endosulfan II. Mechanism of Decomposition', Australian Combustion Symposium 2015 Proceedings (2015) [E1]
Co-authors Eric Kennedy, John Mackie
2015 Hosseiniamoli H, Harvey L, Kennedy E, Stockenhuber M, 'VAM oxidation over Palladium loaded on high silica BEA and MFI zeolites' (2015) [E1]
Co-authors Eric Kennedy
2015 Wright B, Kennedy E, Stockenhuber M, 'Magnitude of the deuterium kinetic isotope effect during the combustion of methane over a Pd/Al2O3 catalyst', Australian Combustion symposium 2015: Proceedings (2015) [E1]
Co-authors Eric Kennedy
2014 Mowla O, Kennedy EM, Stockenhuber M, 'Using N2O for Oxidative Coupling of Methane (O.C.M) on Na2WO4Mn/SiO2 catalyst at different operating conditions', ICEC2014 Scientific Program (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Eric Kennedy
2014 Setiawan A, Kennedy EM, Dlugogorski BZ, Stockenhuber M, 'Hydrothermal stability evaluation of cobalt and iron oxides catalysts during total oxidation of lean methane mixtures', Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Environmental Catalysis (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Eric Kennedy, Bogdan Dlugogorski
2014 Mowla O, Kennedy EM, Stockenhuber M, 'Effect of various operating parameters on the oxidative coupling of methane over Na2WO4Mn/SiO2 catalyst with N2O as an oxidant', Proceedings of CHEMECA 2014 (2014) [E1]
Co-authors Eric Kennedy
2014 Stockenhuber M, 'Understanding Selectivity and Activity of Redox Catalysts for Industrial and environmental Applications', CHEMECA 2014 Proceedings (2014) [E1]
2014 Ahmad K, Kennedy EM, Dlugogorski BZ, Mackie JC, Stockenhuber M, 'CO2 capture by amine-modified materials, tailored for enhanced adsorption capacity and selectivity', CHEMECA 2014 (2014) [E1]
Co-authors Eric Kennedy, John Mackie, Bogdan Dlugogorski
2014 Khan NA, Kennedy EM, Dlugogorski BZ, Adesina AA, Stockenhuber M, 'Reaction of nitrous oxide with methane to produce synthesis gas (CO + H2); a thermodynamic and catalytic analysis', CHEMECA 2014 (2014) [E1]
Co-authors Bogdan Dlugogorski, Eric Kennedy
2014 Drewery M, Stockenhuber M, Kennedy EM, Dlugogorski BZ, 'The effect of synthesis gas on the performance of Ni based solid oxide fuel cells', CHEMECA 2014 (2014) [E1]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Eric Kennedy, Bogdan Dlugogorski
2013 Wood JH, Kennedy, Stockenhuber M, 'The use of H2O and N2O as selective oxidising agents for the oxidative coupling of methane over a high surface area Mn-Na2WO4/SiO2 catalyst', 10th Natural Gas Conversion Symposium (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Eric Kennedy
2013 Setiawan A, Dlugogorski BZ, Kennedy EM, Stockenhuber M, 'Catalytic combustion of methane - mechanistic insights into the effect of contaminants present in ventilation air methane', 10th Natural Gas Conversion Symposium (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Eric Kennedy, Bogdan Dlugogorski
2013 Mosallanejad S, Dlugogorski B, Kennedy E, Stockenhuber M, Altarawneh M, 'FORMATION OF DIBENZO-p-DIOXINS AND DIBENZOFURANS IN OXIDATION OF 2-CHLOROPHENOL OVER IRON OXIDE/SILICA SURFACE', Organohalogen Compounds (2013) [E1]
Co-authors Eric Kennedy, Bogdan Dlugogorski
2013 Sanchez G, Harvey L, Friggieri J, Dlugogorski BZ, Kennedy EM, Stockenhuber M, 'The decomposition of nitrous oxide and partial oxidation of methane over ZSM5 catalysts; the effect of cobalt or iron loading', Proceedings 17th International Zeolite Conference (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Bogdan Dlugogorski, Eric Kennedy
2013 Sanchez G, Harvey L, Friggieri J, Dlugogorski BZ, Kennedy E, Stockenhuber M, 'The Catalytic Conversion of Waste Glycerol to Value-Added Products', Proceedings 17th International Zeolite Conference (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Bogdan Dlugogorski, Eric Kennedy
2013 Setiawan A, Stockenhuber M, Kennedy EM, Dlugogorski BZ, 'Low temperature methane combustion over palladium supported on a mixture of TiO2 and ZSM-5 catalyst in the presence of water', WCOC (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Bogdan Dlugogorski, Eric Kennedy
2013 Kennedy EM, Kundu SK, Gaikwad VV, Molloy TS, King KM, Stockenhuber M, et al., 'Comparative study of the decomposition of CH4 in a nonequilibrium plasma and under high temperature pyrolytic conditions', Proceedings of the Australian Combustion Symposium 2013 (2013) [E1]
Co-authors Bogdan Dlugogorski, John Mackie, Eric Kennedy
2012 Stockenhuber M, Sanchez, Friggieri, Keast, Harvey, Dlugogorski, Kennedy, 'Effect of Catalyst Modification on the selective conversion of glycerol to allyl alcohol', http://events.dechema.de/en/icc2012.html (2012)
Co-authors Bogdan Dlugogorski, Eric Kennedy
2012 Stockenhuber M, setiawan, Kennedy, Dlugogorski, 'Study on the inhibitory effect of water on palladium and gold catalysts during catalytic combustion of ventilation air methane M. Stockenhuber, A. Setiawan, E.M. Kennedy, B.Z. Dlugogorski', http://events.dechema.de/icc2012 (2012)
Co-authors Bogdan Dlugogorski, Eric Kennedy
2011 Stockenhuber M, 'Conversion and Utilisation of Methane - Opportunities Resulting from a New Carbon Economy.', BIT's 1st Annual Low Carbon Earth Summit (2011) [E3]
2011 Stockenhuber M, li, 'Function, Structure and Reactivity Relationships in Knoevenagel Condensation reactions', Chemeca (2011)
2011 Li JPH, Stockenhuber M, 'Function, structure and reactivity relationships in knoevenagel condensation reactions', Chemeca 2011: Engineering a Better World (2011) [E1]
2011 Alsoufi A, Dlugogorski BZ, Mackie JC, Stockenhuber M, Kennedy EM, 'Predicting the heat of formation of chlorinated phenols and associated chlorine isotopologues', Proceedings of the 11th Australian Combustion Symposium (2011) [E1]
Co-authors John Mackie, Bogdan Dlugogorski, Eric Kennedy
2010 Li JPH, Suleiman IA, Stafford A, Stockenhuber M, 'New ways of understanding site structure and function in fuel production catalysts', CIMTEC 2010: Proceedings of the 5th Forum on New Materials (2010) [E3]
2010 Dlugogorski, Evans C, Joyner RW, Kennedy, Sonntag O, Stafford A, Stockenhuber M, 'Selective oxidation of light alkanes with nitrous oxide', http://www.ngcb.org/index.asp?bid=416 (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Eric Kennedy, Bogdan Dlugogorski
2010 Li JPH, Stockenhuber M, 'Base catalysed transesterification processes using magnesium and barium oxide composites', Chemeca 2010: Proceedings of the 40th Australasian Chemical Engineering Conference (2010) [E1]
2008 Hargreaves JSJ, Howe RF, McKay D, Stockenhuber M, Sun X, 'Metal nitrides: Activity for ammonia synthesis and their potential as 'stores' of active nitrogen', 14th International Congress on Catalysis: Abstracts (2008) [E3]
2008 Joyner RW, Li JPH, Starokon E, Sonntag O, Stockenhuber M, 'In situ investigation of the active catalyst for green direct benzene to phenol oxidation', Chemeca2008 (2008) [E1]
2004 Joyner RW, Smith AD, Stockenhuber M, Van den Berg MWE, 'A soft X-ray EXAFS study of the local structure of tetrahedral aluminium in zeolites', RECENT ADVANCES IN THE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY OF ZEOLITES AND RELATED MATERIALS, PTS A - C (2004) [E1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2004 Bonati MLM, Joyner RW, Paine GS, Stockenhuber M, 'Adsorption studies of acylation reagents and products on zeolite beta catalysts', RECENT ADVANCES IN THE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY OF ZEOLITES AND RELATED MATERIALS, PTS A - C (2004) [E1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2004 Burgess G, Joyner RW, Stockenhuber M, 'A comparative study of literature methods of introducing acidity into MCM-41', RECENT ADVANCES IN THE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY OF ZEOLITES AND RELATED MATERIALS, PTS A - C (2004) [E1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2002 Joyner RW, Stockenhuber M, Tkachenko OP, 'Synthesis, structure, and reactivity of iron-sulfur species in zeolite ZSM-5', IMPACT OF ZEOLITES AND OTHER POROUS MATERIALS ON THE NEW TECHNOLOGIES AT THE BEGINNING OF THE NEW MILLENNIUM, PTS A AND B (2002) [E1]
1994 LERCHER JA, MIRTH G, STOCKENHUBER M, NARBESHUBER T, KOGELBAUER A, 'ELEMENTARY STEPS OF ACID-BASE CATALYZED-REACTIONS IN MOLECULAR-SIEVES', ACID-BASE CATALYSIS II (1994)
Citations Web of Science - 10
Show 31 more conferences

Patent (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Stockenhuber M, Kennedy EM, Dlugogorski BZ, A Method Of Producing Alcohol From Glycerol (2013) [I1]
Co-authors Bogdan Dlugogorski, Eric Kennedy
2012 Stockenhuber M, Epoxidation of glycerol and derivatives therefrom (2012)
2011 Stockenhuber M, Jehle W, Sonntag O, Wolff C, Production of hydrogen from heavy hydrocarbons. (2011)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 26
Total funding $16,113,654

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20163 grants / $352,690

A novel route to produce olefin feedstock for Australia$320,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber, Professor Adesoji Adesina
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1500113
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Scoping study on Matmor feed material using novel thermal analysis$30,000

Funding body: Environmental Clean Technologies Limited

Funding body Environmental Clean Technologies Limited
Project Team Doctor Rohan Stanger, Emeritus Professor Terry Wall, Associate Professor John Lucas, Doctor Wei Xie, Professor Eric Kennedy, Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600680
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Licella SXR catalysts/Enviropacific $2,690

Funding body: Australian Synchrotron

Funding body Australian Synchrotron
Project Team Professor Eric Kennedy, Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600831
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20153 grants / $56,427

A collaborative supply chain study, with a focus on pre-farm inputs, using Life Cycle Assessment.$50,000

Funding body: Grains Research and Development Corporation

Funding body Grains Research and Development Corporation
Project Team Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber, Associate Professor Frank Agbola
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1501061
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Rural R&D
Category 1RS
UON Y

Summer vacation research project$5,000

Funding body: Qenos Pty Ltd

Funding body Qenos Pty Ltd
Project Team Professor Eric Kennedy, Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber
Scheme Summer Vacation Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501331
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

The role of supported iron catalysts for the formation of dioxins$1,427

Funding body: Australian Synchrotron

Funding body Australian Synchrotron
Project Team Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber, Professor Eric Kennedy
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501469
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20141 grants / $1,152

Australian Synchrotron 2014/15 Visits$1,152

Funding body: Australian Synchrotron

Funding body Australian Synchrotron
Project Team Doctor Merrick Mahoney, Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber, Professor Eric Kennedy, Doctor Richard Roest, Doctor Hannah Lomas, Dr Karen Steel, Dr David Jenkins, Dr Sheridan Mayo, Dr David Cookson, Dr Chris Hall
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1401009
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20134 grants / $7,585,000

Mineral Carbonation - Pilot Plant$4,790,000

Funding body: Newcastle Innovation

Funding body Newcastle Innovation
Project Team Professor Eric Kennedy, Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber
Scheme Administered Research
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1500790
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Mineral Carbonation$1,800,000

Funding body: Mineral Carbonation International

Funding body Mineral Carbonation International
Project Team Professor Eric Kennedy, Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber, Professor Bill Collins
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1400555
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

African Explosives Limited (AEL) - Fuels project$760,000

Funding body: Newcastle Innovation

Funding body Newcastle Innovation
Project Team Professor Eric Kennedy, Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber
Scheme Administered Research
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500792
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

A novel route for the production of ethylene.$235,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber, Professor Adesoji Adesina
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1200262
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20126 grants / $1,316,667

Catalytic combustion of VAM - effect of varying composition and concentration of gases$757,067

Funding body: Australian Coal Research Limited

Funding body Australian Coal Research Limited
Project Team Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber, Professor Eric Kennedy, Conjoint Professor Bogdan Dlugogorski
Scheme Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1200592
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Simultaneous Measurements of Reaction Kinetics and Particle Distributions for Cutting-Edge Research into CO2 Storage, Catalysis and Novel Materials$200,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Conjoint Professor Bogdan Dlugogorski, Professor Eric Kennedy, Professor Behdad Moghtaderi, Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber, Professor Robert Melchers, Laureate Professor Scott Sloan
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100634
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Simultaneous Measurements of Reaction Kinetics and Particle Distributions for Cutting-Edge Research into CO2 Storage, Catalysis and Novel Materials$160,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Professor Bogdan Dlugogorski, Professor Eric Kennedy, Professor Behdad Moghtaderi, Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber, Professor Robert Melchers, Dr Ali Abbas, Associate Professor Marjorie Valix, Associate Professor Andrew Harris, Dr Gallage Kannangara, Professor John Bartlett, Dr Adriyan Milev, Dr Nguyen Tran, Professor Eric May, Associate Professor Thomas Rufford, Associate Professor Brian O'Neill
Scheme Linkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100806
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

Simultaneous Measurements of Reaction Kinetics and Particle Distributions for Cutting-Edge Research into CO2 Storage, Catalysis and Novel Materials$160,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Professor Bogdan Dlugogorski, Professor Eric Kennedy, Professor Behdad Moghtaderi, Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber, Professor Robert Melchers, Dr Ali Abbas, Associate Professor Marjorie Valix, Associate Professor Andrew Harris, Dr Gallage Kannangara, Professor John Bartlett, Dr Adriyan Milev, Dr Nguyen Tran, Professor Eric May, Associate Professor Thomas Rufford, Associate Professor Brian O'Neill
Scheme Linkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF) Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200631
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

A Raman facility for advanced research supporting Australia's natural gas, oil, coal and minerals industries$30,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Eric May, Professor Erica Wanless, Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber, Associate Professor Marian Radny, Associate Professor Grant Webber
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100662
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Hydrogenolysis of waste glycerol to aliphatic diols$9,600

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Eric Kennedy, Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber, Conjoint Professor Bogdan Dlugogorski
Scheme Linkage Pilot Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1201061
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20112 grants / $74,525

The influence of water content and methane as fuel on the operational parameters of solid oxide fuel cells$73,025

Funding body: Bloomfield Colleries Pty Ltd

Funding body Bloomfield Colleries Pty Ltd
Project Team Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber, Professor Eric Kennedy, Conjoint Professor Bogdan Dlugogorski
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100840
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Low Carbon Earth Summit, Dalian China, 10/10/11 - 26/10/11$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Engineering & Built Environment

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Engineering & Built Environment
Project Team Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100579
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20103 grants / $6,112,500

Ironmaking Raw Materials Collaboration$6,000,000

Funding body: BHP Billiton Innovation Pty Ltd

Funding body BHP Billiton Innovation Pty Ltd
Project Team Associate Professor John Lucas, Professor Geoffrey Evans, Mr Juha Heikkinen, Dr Daniel Maldonado, Professor Eric Kennedy, Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber, Professor Mark Jones
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G0900101
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

A solid oxide fuel cell system as an energy source in vehicles$82,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Engineering & Built Environment

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Engineering & Built Environment
Project Team Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber
Scheme Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0900021
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

IRMC Sub-Account: Smaller project from sub-project GS100001$30,000

Funding body: BHP Billiton Innovation Pty Ltd

Funding body BHP Billiton Innovation Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Merrick Mahoney, Professor Eric Kennedy, Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2014
GNo GS140001
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20092 grants / $562,293

Fires of pesticides: New source of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) in the environment$560,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Professor Bogdan Dlugogorski, Professor Eric Kennedy, Conjoint Professor John Mackie, Associate Professor Marian Radny, Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber, Professor Michael Delichatsios, Professor George Hadjisophocleous
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G0188729
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Australian Synchrotron Support for Michael Stockenhuber$2,293

Funding body: Australian Synchrotron

Funding body Australian Synchrotron
Project Team Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190340
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20082 grants / $52,400

Stockenhuber Research Grant$44,900

Funding body: Nottingham Trent University

Funding body Nottingham Trent University
Project Team Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0188754
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON Y

DVC Lab Support$7,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188678
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed5
Current15

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD7.8

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD The Selective Epoxidation of Allyl Alcohol to Glycidol
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Fundamental Studies of Light Hydrocarbon Formation from Carbon Oxides
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Developing Heterogeneous Catalyst for the Conversion of CO2
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Treatment of Wastes
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Novel process for treatment of complex mixtures of fluorine-containing synthetic greenhouse and ozone-depleting gases
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Catalytic Nitration
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Mineral Carbonation of CO2 using Alternative Feedstocks
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Development of Mesoporous Catalysis Process for Synthesis of Biofuel from Microalgae Biomass
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Formation of toxic pollutants during the thermal decomposition and oxidation of cyclodiene pesticides
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Enhancing Allyl Alcohol Selectivity in the Heterogeneous Catalytic Conversion of Glycerol
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Study on the Heterogeneous Catalytic Hydroesterification of Varying Oil Types to Develop an Understanding of FAME Formation
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Fundamental Studies on Catalytic Combustion System for VAM
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Mineral Carbonation
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Effect of Water on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Performance
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Development of Organic Modified Zeolites and Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture from Humid Flue Gas Streams
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Selective Oxidation of Methane with Nitrous Oxide Over Cobalt Catalyst
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Heterogeneous Catalytic Reactions of 2-chlorophenol
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Catalytic Combustion of Ventilation Air Methane Released from Coal Mines
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Characterisation of Heterogeneous Acid/Base Catalysts and their Application in the Synthesis of Fine and Intermediate Chemicals
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 31
United Kingdom 30
Netherlands 7
United States 7
Austria 5
More...
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News

Australian Research Council (ARC)

ARC Discovery Projects funding success 2016

November 5, 2015

Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber and Professor Adesoji Adesina have been awarded $320,000 in ARC Discovery Project funding commencing in 2016 for their research project A novel route to produce olefin feedstock for Australia.

Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber

Position

Associate Professor
Catalysis and processes
School of Engineering
Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment

Focus area

Chemical Engineering

Contact Details

Email michael.stockenhuber@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 49854433
Fax (02) 4921 6920

Office

Room ATC260C
Building ATC building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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