Dr Mariko Carey

Senior Research Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
Dr Mariko Carey is a NHMRC Translating Research into Practice (TRIP) Fellow working within the Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour, University of Newcastle. Key research interests include health behaviour interventions, measurement of patient reported outcomes, multidisciplinary care, systems of care, evidence-based practice and quality of care. Her work has a strong focus on developing interventions to improve quality of care, behavioural and psychosocial outcomes for people with chronic diseases, including cancer.Dr. Carey has produced over 90 publications over the course of her career. Recent studies include a study of health risk behaviours of over 3,000 general practice patients, a NHMRC-funded study assessing psychosocial outcomes of cancer patients across 13 medical oncology treatment centres; and a NHMRC-funded randomised controlled trial to test an educational intervantion to improve adherence to colorectal cancer screening recommendations among first-degree relatives of people with colorectal cancer. Dr Carey has worked as part of teams which have attracted approximately $4 million in competitive research funding.

Teaching Expertise
Dr. Carey's main contribution to teaching is through supervision of Research Higher Degree students. She has supervised 4 students to completion and has 6 current students. In 2011 she received the Newcastle University Postgraduate Association's (NUPSA) Supervisor of the Year Award. She has also contributed to communication skills training for medical students on topics such as informed consent and preparation for potentially threatening medical interventions. 

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Psychology (Health), University of Melbourne
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Melbourne

Keywords

  • cancer
  • communication skills training
  • evidence-based practice
  • patient information
  • psychosocial
  • quality of care
  • survivorship

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified 30
111299 Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified 15
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 55

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/05/2007 - 1/12/2008 Senior Research Fellow The Cancer Council Victoria
Centre for Behavioural Research in Cancer
Australia
1/10/2003 - 1/05/2007 Research Assistant/ Fellow Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
Supportive Care Research Group
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Waller AE, Boyes A, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Screening and Assessment for Unmet Needs', Psycho-Oncology, Oxford University Press, New York 369-377 (2015)
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller

Journal article (105 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Paul CL, Carey ML, Russell G, D'Este C, Sanson-Fisher RW, Zwar N, 'Prevalence of FOB testing in eastern-Australian general practice patients: What has a national bowel cancer screening program delivered?', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 26 39-44 (2015)

Issues addressed The National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) was introduced in Australia in 2006, offering free immunochemical Faecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT) to persons a... [more]

Issues addressed The National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) was introduced in Australia in 2006, offering free immunochemical Faecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT) to persons aged 50, 55 or 65. The study aimed to examine the prevalence of self-reported screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) using the FOBT and factors associated with not having an FOBT. Methods A cross-sectional study of Australian general practice patients aged 50 and over with no personal history of CRC completed a health risk survey while waiting for scheduled appointments between November 2010 and November 2011. Results A total of 5671 patients from 12 practices were approached to participate. Of the 4707 eligible patients (adults attending for care who understood English and were capable of providing informed consent), 4062 (86%) consented to participate, with 2269 eligible to complete the FOBT items. Approximately half (52%) of participants reported ever having an FOBT. More than one-third (39.7%) of the sample reported having an FOBT in the prior three years. Those who recalled receiving a mailed kit as part of the NBCSP were five times more likely to report being screened. Those less likely to report screening were aged 50-59 years, were female and had been diagnosed with a form of cancer other than CRC. Conclusions There is justification for the extension of the NBCSP to ensure a majority of the age-appropriate population is screened for CRC. So what? Further work is needed to identify whether high rates of screening are achievable using the mailed-kit approach, and how to increase participation by females, those aged 50-69 years and those diagnosed with other cancers.

DOI 10.1071/HE14058
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Noble N, Paul C, Conigrave K, Lee K, Blunden S, Turon H, et al., 'Does a retrospective seven-day alcohol diary reflect usual alcohol intake for a predominantly disadvantaged Australian Aboriginal population?', Subst Use Misuse, 50 308-319 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/10826084.2014.980951
Co-authors Chris Paul
2015 Noble N, Paul C, Conigrave K, Lee K, Blunden S, Turon H, et al., 'Does a Retrospective Seven-day Alcohol Diary Reflect Usual Alcohol Intake for a Predominantly Disadvantaged Australian Aboriginal Population?', SUBSTANCE USE & MISUSE, 50 308-319 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/10826084.2014.980951
Co-authors Chris Paul
2015 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Stevenson W, Smits R, Henskens F, Wei A, et al., 'Protocol of a multi-centre randomised controlled trial of a web-based information intervention with nurse-delivered telephone support for haematological cancer patients and their support persons.', BMC Cancer, 15 295 (2015)
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1314-x
Co-authors Frans Henskens, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis
2015 Bryant J, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Mansfield E, Regan T, Bisquera A, 'Missed opportunities: General practitioner identification of their patients' smoking status', BMC Family Practice, 16 (2015)

Background: In order to provide smoking cessation support to their patients in line with clinical practice guidelines, general practitioners must first ascertain whether their pat... [more]

Background: In order to provide smoking cessation support to their patients in line with clinical practice guidelines, general practitioners must first ascertain whether their patients' use tobacco. This study examined (i) the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of general practitioner detection of smoking, and (ii) the general practitioner and patient characteristics associated with detection of tobacco use. Methods: Eligible patients completed a touchscreen computer survey while waiting for an appointment with their general practitioner. Patients self-reported demographic characteristics, medical history, and current smoking status. Following the patient's consultation, their general practitioner was asked to indicate whether the patient was a current smoker (yes/no/unsure/not applicable). Smoking prevalence, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive values (with 95% confidence intervals) were calculated using patient self-report of smoking status as the gold standard. Generalised estimating equations were used to examine the general practitioner and patient characteristics associated with detection of tobacco use. Results: Fifty-one general practitioners and 1,573 patients in twelve general practices participated. Patient self-report of smoking was 11.3% compared to general practitioner estimated prevalence of 9.5%. Sensitivity of general practitioner assessment was 66% [95% CI 59-73] while specificity was 98% [95% CI 97-98]. Positive predictive value was 78% [95% CI 71-85] and negative predictive value was 96% [95% CI 95-97]. No general practitioner factors were associated with detection of smoking. Patients with a higher level of education or who responded 'Other ' were less likely to be detected as smokers than patients who had completed a high school or below level of education. Conclusion: Despite the important role general practitioners play in providing smoking cessation advice and support, a substantial proportion of general practitioners do not know their patient's smoking status. This represents a significant missed opportunity in the provision of preventive healthcare. Electronic waiting room assessments may assist general practitioners in improving the identification of smokers.

DOI 10.1186/s12875-015-0228-7
Co-authors Timothy Regan, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Elise Mansfield
2015 Carey M, Noble N, Mansfield E, Waller A, Henskens F, Sanson-Fisher R, 'The Role of eHealth in Optimizing Preventive Care in the Primary Care Setting.', J Med Internet Res, 17 e126 (2015)
DOI 10.2196/jmir.3817
Co-authors Amy Waller, Frans Henskens, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Elise Mansfield
2015 Zucca A, Sanson-Fisher R, Waller A, Carey M, Fradgley E, Regan T, 'Medical Oncology Patients: Are They Offered Help and Does It¿Provide Relief?', J Pain Symptom Manage, (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2015.04.018
Co-authors Amy Waller, Alison Zucca, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Waller A, Forshaw K, Bryant J, Carey M, Boyes A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Preparatory education for cancer patients undergoing surgery: A systematic review of volume and quality of research output over time.', Patient Educ Couns, (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2015.05.008
Co-authors Amy Waller, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Allison Boyes
2015 Waller A, Carey M, Mazza D, Yoong S, Grady A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Patient-reported areas for quality improvement in general practice: a cross-sectional survey.', Br J Gen Pract, 65 e312-e318 (2015)
DOI 10.3399/bjgp15X684841
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller
2015 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-Mcharg T, 'Development and psychometric evaluation of the Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care measure with hematological cancer survivors', Cancer, 121 2383-2392 (2015)

BACKGROUND The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended 6 objectives for achieving patient-centered care. However, most patient-reported outcome measures developed with cancer popu... [more]

BACKGROUND The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended 6 objectives for achieving patient-centered care. However, most patient-reported outcome measures developed with cancer populations fail to address all 6 patient-centeredness dimensions. The Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care (QPCCC) measure was developed on the basis of IOM recommendations, and the measure's validity, reliability, and floor and ceiling effects were examined. METHODS The development of the QPCCC measure included interviews with hematological cancer survivors and feedback from hematologists and cancer patients. To evaluate the measure's psychometric properties, hematological cancer survivors were identified via 2 cancer registries and were mailed the QPCCC measure. To examine test-retest reliability, a second QPCCC measure was mailed to survivors 7 to 14 days after they had returned the first measure. RESULTS Overall, 545 hematological cancer survivors completed the 48-item QPCCC measure. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a 10-factor structure with factor loadings>0.40. The subscales were labeled Treatment Delivery, Treatment Decision Making, Coordinated and Integrated Care, Emotional Support, Timely Care, Follow-Up Care, Respectful Communication, Patient Preferences and Values, Cancer Information, and Equitable Care. The QPCCC measure demonstrated acceptable internal consistency for all subscales (Cronbach's a=.73-.94). When test-retest reliability was assessed, 4 items demonstrated substantial agreement (¿>0.60), whereas 40 items showed moderate agreement (¿=0.41-0.60). Ceiling effects were present for 8 subscales. CONCLUSIONS The QPCCC measure has acceptable face and content validity, construct validity, and internal consistency. However, the measure's discriminant validity and test-retest reliability could be improved. The QPCCC measure could be used to improve patient-centered cancer care. Cancer 2015;121:2383-2392.

DOI 10.1002/cncr.29384
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Alix Hall, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Carey M, Yoong SL, Grady A, Bryant J, Jayakody A, Sanson-Fisher R, Inder KJ, 'Unassisted detection of depression by GPs: who is most likely to be misclassified?', Fam Pract, 32 282-287 (2015)
DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmu087
Co-authors Kerry Inder, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-Mcharg T, 'The quality of patient-centred care: Haematological cancer survivors' perceptions', Psycho-Oncology, 24 796-803 (2015)

Objective Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that assess the quality of patient-centred cancer care have failed to measure all six patient-centredness dimensions endorsed b... [more]

Objective Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that assess the quality of patient-centred cancer care have failed to measure all six patient-centredness dimensions endorsed by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). This study is the first to use the Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care (QPCCC) measure that covers all six IOM patient-centredness dimensions to examine haematological cancer survivors' perceptions of care and characteristics associated with perceived quality of care. Methods Haematological cancer survivors diagnosed in the last 6 years and aged 18-80 years were recruited from two Australian state population-based cancer registries. Survivors were mailed the 48-item QPCCC measure. Results Overall, 545 haematological cancer survivors completed the measure. Areas of care most commonly identified as delivered were hospital staff showing respect to survivors (93%) and making sure the correct treatment was received (93%). Aspects of care most frequently nominated as not delivered were hospital staff helping family and friends (34%) or the survivor (32%) to find other people with similar experiences to talk to. Characteristics associated with survivors perceiving higher quality care was delivered included being employed, having private health insurance, being younger, a Non-Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis and more recent diagnosis. Being depressed or stressed was associated with perceived lower quality of care. Conclusions Provision of peer support programs that allow haematological cancer survivors and families and friends to talk to others in similar situations could be improved. Using PROMs to identify areas where cancer survivors perceive improvements are needed is essential to quality improvement efforts.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3728
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alix Hall, Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis
2015 Grady A, Carey M, Oldmeadow C, Bryant J, Mazza D, Sanson-Fisher R, 'GP detection of health risk factors among general practice patients at risk of primary and secondary stroke.', Fam Pract, 32 336-342 (2015)
DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmv024
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Grady AM, Bryant J, Carey ML, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Levi CR, 'Agreement with evidence for tissue Plasminogen Activator use among emergency physicians: A cross-sectional survey', BMC Research Notes, 8 (2015)

Background: Emergency department staff play a crucial role in the triage of stroke patients and therefore the capacity to deliver time-dependent treatments such as tissue Plasmino... [more]

Background: Emergency department staff play a crucial role in the triage of stroke patients and therefore the capacity to deliver time-dependent treatments such as tissue Plasminogen Activator. This study aimed to identify among emergency physicians, (1) rates of agreement with evidence supporting tissue Plasminogen Activator use in acute stroke care; and (2) individual and hospital factors associated with high agreement with evidence supporting tissue Plasminogen Activator use. Methods: Australian fellows and trainees of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine were invited to complete an online cross-sectional survey assessing perceptions of tissue Plasminogen Activator use in acute stroke. Demographic and hospital characteristics were also collected. Results: 429 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine members responded (13% response rate). Almost half (47.2%) did not agree with any statements regarding the benefits of tissue Plasminogen Activator use for acute stroke. Perceived routine administration of tissue Plasminogen Activator by the head of respondents' emergency department was significantly associated with high agreement with the evidence supporting tissue Plasminogen Activator use in acute stroke. Conclusions: Agreement with evidence supporting tissue Plasminogen Activator use in acute stroke is not high among responding Australian emergency physicians. In order for tissue Plasminogen Activator treatment to become widely accepted and adopted in emergency settings, beliefs and attitudes towards treatment need to be in accordance with clinical practice guidelines.

DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1242-5
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Levi, Chris Paul
2015 Regan T, Carey M, Bryant J, Waller A, Mansfield E, Sitas F, Tracey E, 'Prevalence and correlates of current smoking among medical oncology outpatients.', Psychooncology, (2015)
DOI 10.1002/pon.3893
Co-authors Amy Waller
2015 Grady AM, Bryant J, Carey ML, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Levi CR, 'Agreement with evidence for tissue Plasminogen Activator use among emergency physicians: a cross-sectional survey.', BMC Res Notes, 8 267 (2015)
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1242-5
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, Chris Levi
2015 Mackenzie LJ, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, Yoong SL, 'A cross-sectional study of radiation oncology outpatients' concern about, preferences for, and perceived barriers to discussing anxiety and depression.', Psychooncology, (2015)
DOI 10.1002/pon.3806
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie
2014 Paul C, Yoong SL, Sanson-Fisher R, Carey M, Russell G, Makeham M, 'Under the radar: A cross-sectional study of the challenge of identifying at-risk alcohol consumption in the general practice setting', BMC Family Practice, 15 (2014) [C1]

Background: Primary care providers are an important source of information regarding appropriate alcohol consumption. As early presentation to a provider for alcohol-related concer... [more]

Background: Primary care providers are an important source of information regarding appropriate alcohol consumption. As early presentation to a provider for alcohol-related concerns is unlikely, it is important that providers are able to identify at-risk patients in order to provide appropriate advice. This study aimed to report the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of General Practitioner (GP) assessment of alcohol consumption compared to patient self-report, and explore characteristics associated with GP non-detection of at-risk status. Method. GP practices were selected from metropolitan and regional locations in Australia. Eligible patients were adults presenting for general practice care who were able to understand English and provide informed consent. Patients completed a modified AUDIT-C by touchscreen computer as part of an omnibus health survey while waiting for their appointment. GPs completed a checklist for each patient, including whether the patient met current Australian guidelines for at-risk alcohol consumption. Patient self-report and GP assessments were compared for each patient. Results: GPs completed the checklist for 1720 patients, yielding 1565 comparisons regarding alcohol consumption. The sensitivity of GPs' detection of at-risk alcohol consumption was 26.5%, with specificity of 96.1%. Higher patient education was associated with GP non-detection of at-risk status. Conclusions: GP awareness of which patients might benefit from advice regarding at-risk alcohol consumption appears low. Given the complexities associated with establishing whether alcohol consumption is 'at-risk', computer-based approaches to routine screening of patients are worthy of exploration as a method for prompting the provision of advice in primary care. © 2014 Paul et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2296-15-74
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul
2014 Grady A, Bryant J, Carey M, Paul C, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Enablers of the implementation of tissue plasminogen activator in acute stroke care: A cross-sectional survey', PLoS ONE, 9 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0114778
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Carey ML, Noble N, Paul CL, 'Evaluation of Systems-Oriented Public Health Interventions: Alternative Research Designs', ANNUAL REVIEW OF PUBLIC HEALTH, VOL 35, 35 9-27 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1146/annurev-publhealth-032013-182445
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Carey ML, Noble N, Paul CL, 'Evaluation of Systems-Oriented Public Health Interventions: Alternative Research Designs', ANNUAL REVIEW OF PUBLIC HEALTH, VOL 35, 35 9-27 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1146/annurev-publhealth-032013-182445
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Chris Paul, Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Clinton-Mcharg T, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Tzelepis F, Bryant J, Williamson A, 'Anxiety and depression among haematological cancer patients attending treatment centres: Prevalence and predictors', Journal of Affective Disorders, 165 176-181 (2014) [C1]

Background This study aimed to: (1) estimate the prevalence of anxiety and/or depression among haematological cancer patients attending treatment centres; and (2) explore the demo... [more]

Background This study aimed to: (1) estimate the prevalence of anxiety and/or depression among haematological cancer patients attending treatment centres; and (2) explore the demographic, disease and treatment characteristics associated with anxiety and/or depression. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with outpatients from three haematology clinics in Australia. Patients with a confirmed diagnosis of haematological cancer were approached by a research assistant while waiting for their appointment and invited to participate in the survey. Participants completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and self-reported demographic, disease and treatment characteristics. Results Questionnaires from 304 participants were returned. Twenty-seven percent of patients reported anxiety and 17% reported depression. Specifically, 15% reported anxiety without depression, 5% reported depression without anxiety, and 12% reported comorbid anxiety and depression. Participants who had to relocate to receive treatment had almost three times the odds of reporting anxiety and/or depression compared to those who did not have to move. Former smokers also had significantly higher odds of reporting anxiety and/or depression. Limitations The HADS is likely to have produced some false positives and false negatives when compared with gold standard structured clinical interviews for assessing psychological morbidity. Conclusions Approximately 20% of haematological cancer patients attending outpatient clinics may experience clinically significant levels of anxiety and/or depression. Providing additional tailored support to patients who have had to relocate for treatment, and to former smokers, may help to reduce anxiety and depression among these subgroups. © 2014 Published by Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2014.04.072
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Flora Tzelepis
2014 Cameron E, Rose S, Carey M, 'Assessment of family history of colorectal cancer in primary care: Perceptions of first degree relatives of people with colorectal cancer', Patient Education and Counseling, 94 427-431 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2013.11.014
2014 Cameron E, Rose S, Carey M, 'Assessment of family history of colorectal cancer in primary care: Perceptions of first degree relatives of people with colorectal cancer', Patient Education and Counseling, 94 427-431 (2014) [C1]

Objective: First degree relatives (FDRs) of someone with colorectal cancer (CRC) are at increased risk of the disease. In this study we examine the factors associated with discuss... [more]

Objective: First degree relatives (FDRs) of someone with colorectal cancer (CRC) are at increased risk of the disease. In this study we examine the factors associated with discussing family history of CRC with a health professional. Methods: People with CRC, recruited through the population-based Victorian Cancer Registry in Australia, were asked to refer FDRs to the study. Eight hundred and nineteen FDRs completed a telephone interview. Results: Thirty-six percent of FDRs recalled ever being asked about their family history of bowel cancer by a health professional. Factors associated with having this discussion were being aged 50-60 years, having a university education, being in the potentially high risk category, being very worried about getting bowel cancer and knowing that family history increases risk through discussions with family, friends or their own education. Conclusion: Despite evidence that doctor endorsement is a key factor in the uptake of CRC screening, our study shows that the majority of FDRs do not recall being asked by a health professional about their family history. Practice implications: There is a need to identify the most appropriate method to improve rates of health professional discussion of family history with relatives of CRC patients in order to improve screening rates. © 2013 The Authors.

DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2013.11.014
2014 Grady A, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Assessing awareness of appropriate responses to symptoms of stroke', Patient Education and Counseling, 95 400-405 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2014.03.007
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Grady A, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Assessing awareness of appropriate responses to symptoms of stroke', Patient Education and Counseling, 95 400-405 (2014) [C1]

Objective: The study explored (1) the level of awareness, and associates of greater awareness, of the appropriate action to take in response to stroke symptoms; and (2) actions ta... [more]

Objective: The study explored (1) the level of awareness, and associates of greater awareness, of the appropriate action to take in response to stroke symptoms; and (2) actions taken in response to potential stroke symptoms, among general practice patients. Methods: Patients attending general practice clinics in New South Wales, Australia completed a paper and pencil survey. Results: 308 participants returned the survey. 76% indicated they would call an ambulance within 10. min for 'difficulty speaking or understanding others, with blurred vision (in one eye), and face, arm or leg weakness or numbness (on one side of the body)'. Having a first degree relative with a history of stroke was significantly associated with greater awareness of the appropriate action to take in response to stroke symptoms. Of those reporting they had experienced 'dizziness, loss of balance or an unexplained fall' 80% did not call an ambulance at the time of experiencing this symptom. Conclusion: There appears to be high awareness of the appropriate response to take for stroke symptoms among this sample, however this does not translate into actions when individuals experience a potential stroke symptom. Practice implications: Education campaigns should be targeted towards individuals without a family history of stroke. © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2014.03.007
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Mackenzie L, Boyes A, 'A cross-sectional study examining Australian general practitioners' identification of overweight and obese patients', Journal of General Internal Medicine, 29 328-334 (2014) [C1]

BACKGROUND: Overweight and obese patients attempt weight loss when advised to do so by their physicians; however, only a small proportion of these patients report receiving such a... [more]

BACKGROUND: Overweight and obese patients attempt weight loss when advised to do so by their physicians; however, only a small proportion of these patients report receiving such advice. One reason may be that physicians do not identify their overweight and obese patients. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to determine the extent that Australian general practitioners (GP) recognise overweight or obesity in their patients, and to explore patient and GP characteristics associated with non-detection of overweight and obesity. METHODS: Consenting adult patients (n = 1,111) reported weight, height, demographics and health conditions using a touchscreen computer. GPs (n = 51) completed hard-copy questionnaires indicating whether their patients were overweight or obese. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for GP detection, using patient self-reported weight and height as the criterion measure for overweight and obesity. For a subsample of patients (n = 107), we did a sensitivity analysis with patient-measured weight and height. We conducted an adjusted, multivariable logistic regression to explore characteristics associated with non-detection, using random effects to adjust for correlation within GPs. RESULTS: Sensitivity for GP assessment was 63 % [95 % CI 57-69 %], specificity 89 % [95 % CI 85-92 %], PPV 87 % [95 % CI 83-90 %] and NPV 69 % [95 % CI 65-72 %]. Sensitivity increased by 3 % and specificity was unchanged in the sensitivity analysis. Men (OR: 1.7 [95 % CI 1.1-2.7]), patients without high blood pressure (OR: 1.8 [95 % CI 1.2-2.8]) and without type 2 diabetes (OR: 2.4 [95 % CI 1.2-8.0]) had higher odds of non-detection. Individuals with obesity (OR: 0.1 [95 % CI 0.07-0.2]) or diploma-level education (OR: 0.3 [95%CI 0.1-0.6]) had lower odds of not being identified. No GP characteristics were associated with non-detection of overweight or obesity. CONCLUSIONS: GPs missed identifying a substantial proportion of overweight and obese patients. Strategies to support GPs in identifying their overweight or obese patients need to be implemented. © 2013 Society of General Internal Medicine.

DOI 10.1007/s11606-013-2637-4
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Lisa Mackenzie, Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2014 Zucca A, Sanson-Fisher R, Waller A, Carey M, 'Patient-centred care: Making cancer treatment centres accountable', Supportive Care in Cancer, 22 1989-1997 (2014) [C1]

Patient-centred care is argued to be an essential component in the delivery of quality health and cancer care. This manuscript discusses the need to generate credible data which i... [more]

Patient-centred care is argued to be an essential component in the delivery of quality health and cancer care. This manuscript discusses the need to generate credible data which indicates the quality of patient-centred care provided by cancer treatment centres. Patient-centred care covers six domains including physical comfort; emotional support; respect for patients' preferences and values; integration and coordination; involvement of family and friends; and the provision of information, communication and education to enable patients to understand and make informed decisions about their care. First, we identify priority areas within each domain. Next, we propose three questions that should be asked of every patient across the six domains of patient-centred care. The first question explores whether patients were specifically asked by a healthcare provider at the cancer treatment centre about their concerns, values and preferences. Research indicates that it cannot be assumed that clinicians are aware of patient's needs or preferences in these six areas. Second, if the answer from the patient suggests that they would like assistance, then it would be expected that this would be offered. Thirdly, if the patient indicates that they would like such assistance and it is provided, then it might be expected that the patient would report that the provided assistance did relieve their suffering, or the assistance provided was consistent with their preferences, needs and values. Regular measurement and reporting of these aspects of patient-centred cancer care has the potential to identify deficits and inequities in care delivery, allow for comparisons across treatment centres and stimulate an improvement in the patient-centred care provided to cancer patients. © 2014 Springer-Verlag.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-014-2221-4
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alison Zucca, Amy Waller
2014 Zucca A, Sanson-Fisher R, Waller A, Carey M, 'Patient-centred care: Making cancer treatment centres accountable', Supportive Care in Cancer, 22 1989-1997 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/s00520-014-2221-4
Co-authors Alison Zucca, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller
2014 Carey M, Small H, Yoong SL, Boyes A, Bisquera A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Prevalence of comorbid depression and obesity in general practice: A cross-sectional survey', British Journal of General Practice, 64 (2014)
DOI 10.3399/bjgp14X677482
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Allison Boyes
2014 Carey M, Small H, Yoong SL, Boyes A, Bisquera A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Prevalence of comorbid depression and obesity in general practice: A cross-sectional survey', British Journal of General Practice, 64 (2014) [C1]

Background: General practice is a common setting for the provision of weight-management advice, as well as the treatment of depression. While there is some evidence of a reciproca... [more]

Background: General practice is a common setting for the provision of weight-management advice, as well as the treatment of depression. While there is some evidence of a reciprocal relationship between obesity and depression, there are limited data about the rates of depression among general practice patients who are underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese. Aim: To explore the prevalence of depression among underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese general practice patients. Design and setting: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 12 Australian general practices. Method: Patients aged =18 years and older who were presenting for general practice care were eligible to participate. Consenting patients completed a touchscreen computer survey assessing self-reported weight and height. Depression was assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), with a score of =10 used to indicate possible depression. Results: Data were obtained from 3361 participants. The prevalence of depression was 24% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 11.86 to 39.28) among underweight participants, 11% (95% CI = 8.5 to 14.0) among normal weight participants, 12% (95% CI = 0.9 to 15.2) among overweight participants, and 23% (95% CI = 17.8 to 29.0) among obese participants. The prevalence of depression was higher for women than for men across all weight categories except underweight. Conclusion: Weight and depression demonstrated a U-shaped relationship, with higher prevalence of depression observed among underweight and obese general practice patients. These conditions may act as red flags for opportunistic screening of depression in the general practice setting. ©British Journal of General Practice.

DOI 10.3399/bjgp14X677482
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Campbell SH, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Barker D, Turner D, Taylor-Brown J, Hall A, 'Measuring the unmet supportive care needs of cancer support persons: The development of the Support Person's Unmet Needs Survey - short form', European Journal of Cancer Care, 23 255-262 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/ecc.12138
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alix Hall
2014 Campbell SH, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Barker D, Turner D, Taylor-Brown J, Hall A, 'Measuring the unmet supportive care needs of cancer support persons: The development of the Support Person's Unmet Needs Survey - short form', European Journal of Cancer Care, 23 255-262 (2014) [C1]

Few rigorous measures of unmet needs have been developed for cancer support persons. This study describes the development of a short version of the Support Person's Unmet Needs Su... [more]

Few rigorous measures of unmet needs have been developed for cancer support persons. This study describes the development of a short version of the Support Person's Unmet Needs Survey (SPUNS). Cancer survivors [n = 1589, 612 (52%) men, mean age of 62.5 years, SD 11.5] 1-5 years post diagnosis and recruited through three Canadian population-based cancer registries were asked to pass a survey package on to their principal support person. Surveys were returned by 1183 support persons. The survey included the long form of the SPUNS, which contains 78 items. Fifty-two items were deleted using a combination of expert opinion and statistical criteria. Analysis of the remaining items revealed a five-factor structure. The original factors were retained with the exception of a merging of the personal and emotional needs subscales. Cronbach's alpha co-efficients for all subscales were =0.87, and intraclass correlation of domain scores of the short and long versions of the SPUNS were high. The SPUNS short form was able to discriminate between support persons of survivors who had (n = 147), and those who had not received treatment in the past month (n = 969). At just 26 items, it is likely to have strong clinical and research applicability. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/ecc.12138
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alix Hall
2014 Grady A, Carey M, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Recruitment of healthcare specialists', EMA - Emergency Medicine Australasia, 26 516-517 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/1742-6723.12275
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Paul C, Courtney R, Sanson-Fisher R, Carey M, Hill D, Simmons J, Rose S, 'A randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of a pre-recruitment primer letter to increase participation in a study of colorectal screening and surveillance', BMC MEDICAL RESEARCH METHODOLOGY, 14 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2288-14-44
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Noble NE, Paul CL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Blunden SV, Stewart JM, Conigrave KM, 'A cross-sectional survey assessing the acceptability and feasibility of self-report electronic data collection about health risks from patients attending an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service', BMC MEDICAL INFORMATICS AND DECISION MAKING, 14 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1472-6947-14-34
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Grady A, Carey M, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Recruitment of healthcare specialists', EMA - Emergency Medicine Australasia, 26 516-517 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/1742-6723.12275
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Grady A, Carey M, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Recruitment of healthcare specialists', EMERGENCY MEDICINE AUSTRALASIA, 26 516-517 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/1742-6723.12275
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-McHarg T, 'DEVELOPMENT AND PSYCHOMETRIC EVALUATION OF THE QUALITY OF PATIENT-CENTERED CANCER CARE MEASURE WITH HAEMATOLOGICAL CANCER SURVIVORS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 10 254-255 (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Alix Hall, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2014 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-Mcharg T, 'The quality of patient-centred care: Haematological cancer survivors' perceptions', Psycho-Oncology, (2014)

Objective: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that assess the quality of patient-centred cancer care have failed to measure all six patient-centredness dimensions endorsed ... [more]

Objective: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that assess the quality of patient-centred cancer care have failed to measure all six patient-centredness dimensions endorsed by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). This study is the first to use the Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care (QPCCC) measure that covers all six IOM patient-centredness dimensions to examine haematological cancer survivors' perceptions of care and characteristics associated with perceived quality of care. Methods: Haematological cancer survivors diagnosed in the last 6 years and aged 18-80 years were recruited from two Australian state population-based cancer registries. Survivors were mailed the 48-item QPCCC measure. Results: Overall, 545 haematological cancer survivors completed the measure. Areas of care most commonly identified as delivered were hospital staff showing respect to survivors (93%) and making sure the correct treatment was received (93%). Aspects of care most frequently nominated as not delivered were hospital staff helping family and friends (34%) or the survivor (32%) to find other people with similar experiences to talk to. Characteristics associated with survivors perceiving higher quality care was delivered included being employed, having private health insurance, being younger, a Non-Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis and more recent diagnosis. Being depressed or stressed was associated with perceived lower quality of care. Conclusions: Provision of peer support programs that allow haematological cancer survivors and families and friends to talk to others in similar situations could be improved. Using PROMs to identify areas where cancer survivors perceive improvements are needed is essential to quality improvement efforts.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3728
Co-authors Alix Hall, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul
2014 Mackenzie LJ, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Paul CL, Yoong SL, 'Agreement between HADS classifications and single-item screening questions for anxiety and depression: a cross-sectional survey of cancer patients.', Ann Oncol, 25 889-895 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/annonc/mdu023
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Lisa Mackenzie, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Carey M, Jones K, Meadows G, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, Inder K, et al., 'Accuracy of general practitioner unassisted detection of depression.', Aust N Z J Psychiatry, 48 571-578 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0004867413520047
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste, Kerry Inder
2014 Tzelepis F, Rose SK, Sanson-Fisher RW, Clinton-McHarg T, Carey ML, Paul CL, 'Are we missing the Institute of Medicine's mark? A systematic review of patient-reported outcome measures assessing quality of patient-centred cancer care', BMC Cancer, 14 (2014) [C1]

Background: The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has endorsed six dimensions of patient-centredness as crucial to providing quality healthcare. These dimensions outline that care must ... [more]

Background: The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has endorsed six dimensions of patient-centredness as crucial to providing quality healthcare. These dimensions outline that care must be: 1) respectful to patients' values, preferences, and expressed needs; 2) coordinated and integrated; 3) provide information, communication, and education; 4) ensure physical comfort; 5) provide emotional support-relieving fear and anxiety; and 6) involve family and friends. However, whether patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) comprehensively cover these dimensions remains unexplored. This systematic review examined whether PROMs designed to assess the quality of patient-centred cancer care addressed all six IOM dimensions of patient-centred care and the psychometric properties of these measures.Methods: Medline, PsycINFO, Current Contents, Embase, CINAHL and Scopus were searched to retrieve published studies describing the development and psychometric properties of PROMs assessing the quality of patient-centred cancer care. Two authors determined if eligible PROMs included the six IOM dimensions of patient-centred care and evaluated the adequacy of psychometric properties based on recommended criteria for internal consistency, test-retest reliability, face/content validity, construct validity and cross-cultural adaptation.Results: Across all 21 PROMs, the most commonly included IOM dimension of patient-centred care was " information, communication and education" (19 measures). In contrast, only five measures assessed the " involvement of family and friends." Two measures included one IOM-endorsed patient-centred care dimension, two measures had two dimensions, seven measures had three dimensions, five measures had four dimensions, and four measures had five dimensions. One measure, the Indicators (Non-small Cell Lung Cancer), covered all six IOM dimensions of patient-centred care, but had adequate face/content validity only. Eighteen measures met the recommended adequacy criteria for construct validity, 15 for face/content validity, seven for internal consistency, three for cross-cultural adaptation and no measure for test-retest reliability.Conclusions: There are no psychometrically rigorous PROMs developed with cancer patients that capture all six IOM dimensions of patient-centred care. Using more than one measure or expanding existing measures to cover all six patient-centred care dimensions could improve assessment and delivery of patient-centred care. Construction of new comprehensive measures with acceptable psychometric properties that can be used with the general cancer population may also be warranted. © 2014 Tzelepis et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2407-14-41
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Carey M, Jones KA, Yoong SL, D'Este C, Boyes AW, Paul C, et al., 'Comparison of a single self-assessment item with the PHQ-9 for detecting depression in general practice.', Fam Pract, (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmu018
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Kerry Inder, Chris Paul, Allison Boyes, Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Bryant J, Boyes A, Jones K, Sanson-Fisher R, Carey M, Fry R, 'Examining and addressing evidence-practice gaps in cancer care: A systematic review', Implementation Science, 9 (2014) [C1]

Background: There is increasing recognition of gaps between best scientific evidence and clinical practice. This systematic review aimed to assess the volume and scope of peer-rev... [more]

Background: There is increasing recognition of gaps between best scientific evidence and clinical practice. This systematic review aimed to assess the volume and scope of peer-reviewed cancer research output in the years 2000, 2005, and 2010.Methods: Eligible papers were published in English and reported on evidence-practice gaps in cancer care. The electronic database Medline was searched for three time periods using MeSH headings and keywords. Abstracts were assessed against eligibility criteria by one reviewer and checked by a second. Papers meeting eligibility criteria were coded as data-based or non-data-based, and by cancer type of focus. All data-based papers were then further classified as descriptive studies documenting the extent of, or barriers to addressing, the evidence-practice gap; or intervention studies examining the effectiveness of strategies to reduce the evidence-practice gap.Results: A total of 176 eligible papers were identified. The number of publications significantly increased over time, from 25 in 2000 to 100 in 2010 (p < 0.001). Of the 176 identified papers, 160 were data-based. The majority of these (n = 150) reported descriptive studies. Only 10 studies examined the effectiveness of interventions designed to reduce discrepancies between evidence and clinical practice. Of these, only one was a randomized controlled trial. Of all data-based studies, almost one-third (n = 48) examined breast cancer care.Conclusions: While the number of publications investigating evidence-practice gaps in cancer care increased over a ten-year period, most studies continued to describe gaps between best evidence and clinical practice, rather than rigorously testing interventions to reduce the gap. © 2014 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1748-5908-9-37
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Allison Boyes
2013 Boyes AW, Girgis A, D'Este CA, Zucca AC, Lecathelinais C, Carey ML, 'Prevalence and predictors of the short-term trajectory of anxiety and depression in the first year after a cancer diagnosis: a population-based longitudinal study.', J Clin Oncol, 31 2724-2729 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2012.44.7540
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Alison Zucca, Allison Boyes, Catherine Deste
2013 Yoong SL, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Grady A, 'A systematic review of behavioural weight-loss interventions involving primary-care physicians in overweight and obese primary-care patients (1999-2011).', Public Health Nutrition, 16 2083-2099 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1368980012004375
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Paul CL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Houlcroft LE, Turon HE, 'The impact of web-based approaches on psychosocial health in chronic physical and mental health conditions', Health Education Research, 28 450-471 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyt053
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, 'Recruitment in general practice', Australian Family Physician, 42 9-9 (2013) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Paul CL, Hall AE, Carey ML, Cameron EC, Clinton-McHarg T, 'Access to Care and Impacts of Cancer on Daily Life: Do They Differ for Metropolitan Versus Regional Hematological Cancer Survivors?', Journal of Rural Health, 29 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jrh.12020
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Chris Paul, Alix Hall
2013 Mackenzie LJ, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, 'Psychological distress in cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy treatment', SUPPORTIVE CARE IN CANCER, 21 1043-1051 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-012-1624-3
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Lisa Mackenzie, Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Boyes AW, D'Este CA, Carey ML, Lecathelinais C, Girgis A, 'How does the Distress Thermometer compare to the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale for detecting possible cases of psychological morbidity among cancer survivors?', Supportive Care in Cancer, 21 119-127 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Catherine Deste
2013 Paul CL, Carey M, Yoong SL, D'Este C, Makeham M, Henskens F, 'Access to chronic disease care in general practice: The acceptability of implementing systematic waiting-room screening using computer-based patient-reported risk status', British Journal of General Practice, 63 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3399/bjgp13X671605
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Frans Henskens, Chris Paul, Catherine Deste
2013 Hall A, Campbell HS, Sanson-Fisher R, Lynagh M, D'Este C, Burkhalter R, Carey M, 'Unmet needs of Australian and Canadian haematological cancer survivors: a cross-sectional international comparative study', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY, 22 2032-2038 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pon.3247
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Marita Lynagh, Alix Hall, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 MacKenzie LJ, Carey ML, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, 'Do we get it right? Radiation oncology outpatients' perceptions of the patient centredness of life expectancy disclosure', Psycho-Oncology, 22 2720-2728 (2013) [C1]

Objective A patient-centred approach to discussing life expectancy with cancer patients is recommended in Western countries. However, this approach to eliciting and meeting patien... [more]

Objective A patient-centred approach to discussing life expectancy with cancer patients is recommended in Western countries. However, this approach to eliciting and meeting patient preferences can be challenging for clinicians. The aims of this study were the following: (i) to examine cancer patients' preferences for life expectancy disclosure; and (ii) to explore agreement between cancer patients' preferences for, and perceived experiences of, life expectancy disclosure. Methods Cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment in metropolitan Australia completed a cross-sectional touchscreen computer survey including optional questions about their life expectancy disclosure preferences and experiences. Results Of the 208 respondents, 178 (86%) indicated that they would prefer their clinician to ask them before discussing life expectancy, and 30 (14%) indicated that they would prefer others (i.e. clinicians, family) to decide whether they were given life expectancy information. Of the 175 respondents who were classified as having a self- determined or other-determined disclosure experience, 105 (60%) reported an experience of life expectancy disclosure that was in accordance with their preferences. Cohen's ¿ was -0.04 (95% CI, -0.17, 0.08), indicating very poor agreement between patients' preferences for and perceived experiences of life expectancy disclosure (p = 0.74). Conclusions In light of patient-centred prognosis disclosure guidelines, our findings of a majority preference for, and experience of, a self-determined approach to life expectancy disclosure amongst radiation oncology patients are encouraging. However, poor agreement between preferences and experiences highlights that additional effort from clinicians is required in order to achieve a truly patient-centred approach to life expectancy disclosure. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3337
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, Lisa Mackenzie, Catherine Deste
2013 Schofield P, Ugalde A, Gough K, Reece J, Krishnasamy M, Carey M, et al., 'A tailored, supportive care intervention using systematic assessment designed for people with inoperable lung cancer: A randomised controlled trial', Psycho-Oncology, 22 2445-2453 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pon.3306
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
2013 Yoong SL, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, 'Prevalence and correlates of overweight and obesity in adult Australian general practice patients', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 37 586-586 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12117
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Paul C, Sanson-Fisher R, Carey M, 'Measuring psychosocial outcomes: is the consumer or the professional the best judge?', European Journal of Cancer Care, 22 281-288 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ecc.12048
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Yoong SL, Carey ML, D'Este C, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'Agreement between self-reported and measured weight and height collected in general practice patients: a prospective study', BMC MEDICAL RESEARCH METHODOLOGY, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2288-13-38
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2013 Carey M, Bryant J, Yoong SL, Russell G, Barker D, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Prostate specific antigen testing in family practice: a cross sectional survey of self-reported rates of and reasons for testing participation and risk disclosure', BMC FAMILY PRACTICE, 14 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2296-14-186
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, 'A cross-sectional study assessing Australian general practice patients' intention, reasons and preferences for assistance with losing weight', BMC FAMILY PRACTICE, 14 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2296-14-187
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2013 Courtney RJ, Paul CL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Macrae FA, D'Este C, et al., 'A population-based cross-sectional study of colorectal cancer screening practices of first-degree relatives of colorectal cancer patients', BMC CANCER, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2407-13-13
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Courtney RJ, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Macrae FA, Carey ML, Attia J, McEvoy M, 'Individual- and provider-level factors associated with colorectal cancer screening in accordance with guideline recommendation: a community-level perspective across varying levels of risk', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-248
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, John Attia
2013 Paul CL, Piterman L, Shaw J, Kirby C, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, et al., 'Diabetes in rural towns: effectiveness of continuing education and feedback for healthcare providers in altering diabetes outcomes at a population level: protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 8 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1748-5908-8-30
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul
2013 Mackenzie LJ, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, D'Este CA, 'Radiation oncology outpatient perceptions of patient-centred care: a cross-sectional survey', BMJ OPEN, 3 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2012-001265
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie, Catherine Deste
2012 Courtney RJ, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Macrae FA, Carey ML, Attia JR, McEvoy MA, 'Colorectal cancer screening in Australia: A community-level perspective', Medical Journal of Australia, 196 516-520 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, John Attia
2012 Courtney RJ, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Macrae FA, Yoong SL, 'Community approaches to increasing colorectal screening uptake: A review of the methodological quality and strength of current evidence', Cancer Forum, 36 27-35 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2012 Carey ML, Anderson AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Lynagh MC, Paul CL, Tzelepis F, 'How well are we meeting haematological cancer survivors' preferences for involvement in treatment decision making?', Patient Education and Counseling, 88 87-92 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Marita Lynagh, Flora Tzelepis
2012 Carey ML, Clinton-Mcharg TL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Shakeshaft A, 'Development of cancer needs questionnaire for parents and carers of adolescents and young adults with cancer', Supportive Care in Cancer, 20 991-1010 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2012 Carey ML, Lambert SD, Smits RE, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Clinton-Mcharg TL, 'The unfulfilled promise: A systematic review of interventions to reduce the unmet supportive care needs of cancer patients', Supportive Care in Cancer, 20 207-219 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Chris Paul
2012 Mackenzie LJ, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Hall AE, 'Cancer patients' willingness to answer survey questions about life expectancy', Supportive Care in Cancer, 20 3335-3341 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-012-1477-9
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alix Hall, Catherine Deste, Lisa Mackenzie
2012 Carey ML, Paul CL, Mackenzie LJ, Sanson-Fisher RW, Cameron EC, 'Do cancer patients' psychosocial outcomes and perceptions of quality of care vary across radiation oncology treatment centres?', European Journal of Cancer Care, 21 384-389 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, Lisa Mackenzie
2012 Paul CL, Carey ML, Anderson AE, Mackenzie LJ, Sanson-Fisher RW, Courtney RJ, Clinton-Mcharg TL, 'Cancer patients' concerns regarding access to cancer care: Perceived impact of waiting times along the diagnosis and treatment journey', European Journal of Cancer Care, 21 321-329 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Lisa Mackenzie, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2012 Carey ML, Paul CL, Cameron EC, Lynagh MC, Hall AE, Tzelepis F, 'Financial and social impact of supporting a haematological cancer survivor', European Journal of Cancer Care, 21 169-176 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Marita Lynagh, Alix Hall
2012 Carey ML, Noble NE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Mackenzie LJ, 'Identifying psychological morbidity among people with cancer using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale: Time to revisit first principles?', Psycho-Oncology, 21 229-238 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie
2012 Schofield P, Gough K, Ugalde A, Carey ML, Aranda S, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'Cancer Treatment Survey (CaTS): Development and validation of a new instrument to measure patients' preparation for chemotherapy and radiotherapy', Psycho-Oncology, 21 307-315 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2012 Courtney RJ, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Macrae FA, Carey ML, Attia JR, McEvoy MA, 'Colorectal cancer risk assessment and screening recommendation: A community survey of healthcare providers' practice from a patient perspective', BMC Family Practice, 13 1-9 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Chris Paul, John Attia, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2012 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, 'A cross-sectional study assessing the self-reported weight loss strategies used by adult Australian general practice patients', BMC Family Practice, 13 48 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2012 Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Macrae F, Hill D, D'Este CA, Paul CL, Doran CM, 'Improving adherence to surveillance and screening recommendations for people with colorectal cancer and their first degree relatives: a randomized controlled trial', BMC Cancer, 12 62 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2012 Clinton-Mcharg TL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Shakeshaft A, 'Preliminary development and psychometric evaluation of an unmet needs measure for adolescents and young adults with cancer: The Cancer Needs Questionnaire - Young People (CNQ-YP)', Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 10 1-11 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2012 Carey ML, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Buchan H, 'Data systems for assessing quality of cancer care: Are building blocks in place for person-centered care?', The International Journal of Person Centred Medicine, 2 334-340 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.5750/ijpcm.v2i3.246
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul
2012 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Russell G, Mazza D, Makeham M, et al., 'Touch screen computer health assessment in Australian general practice patients: A cross-sectional study protocol', BMJ Open, 2 1-7 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Kerry Inder, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul
2012 Lambert SD, Harrison JD, Smith E, Bonevski B, Carey ML, Lawsin C, et al., 'The unmet needs of partners and caregivers of adults diagnosed with cancer: A systematic review', BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care, 2 224-230 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul
2011 Clinton-Mcharg TL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Tracey E, 'Recruitment of representative samples for low incidence cancer populations: Do registries deliver?', BMC Medical Research Methodology, 11 1-9 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2288-11-5
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2011 Carey ML, Yoong SL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Paul CL, Inder KJ, Makeham M, 'Efforts to close the evidence-practice gap in the management of cardiovascular risk factors in general practice: Strategic or haphazard?', International Journal of Person Centered Medicine, 1 660-667 (2011) [C1]
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Kerry Inder
2011 Carey ML, Clinton-Mcharg TL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Campbell S, Douglas HE, 'Patient or treatment centre? Where are efforts invested to improve cancer patients' psychosocial outcomes?', European Journal of Cancer Care, 20 152-162 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2354.2010.01211.x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2011 Paul CL, Carey ML, Hall AE, Lynagh MC, Sanson-Fisher RW, Henskens FA, 'Improving access to information and support for patients with less common cancers: hematologic cancer patients' views about web-based approaches', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 13 e112 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.1894
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alix Hall, Frans Henskens, Marita Lynagh, Chris Paul
2010 Clinton-Mcharg TL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Shakeshaft A, Rainbird KJ, 'Measuring the psychosocial health of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors: A critical review', Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 8 1-13 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1477-7525-8-25
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2010 Carey M, Sanson-Fisher RW, Lotfi-Jam K, Schofield P, Aranda S, 'Multidisciplinary care in cancer: Do the current research outputs help?', European Journal of Cancer Care, 19 434-441 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2354.2009.01105.x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2009 Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey M, Mackenzie LJ, Hill D, Campbell S, Turner D, 'Reducing inequities in cancer care: The role of cancer registries', Cancer, 115 3597-3605 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/cncr.24415
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie
2009 Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Paul CL, 'Measuring the unmet needs of those with cancer: A critical overview', Cancer Forum, 33 198-201 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2009 Carey M, Buchan H, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'The cycle of change: Implementing best-evidence clinical practice', International Journal for Quality in Health Care, 21 37-43 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/intqhc/mzn049
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2008 Schofield P, Ugalde A, Carey M, Milshkin L, Duffy M, Ball D, Aranda S, 'Lung Cancer: Challenges and solutions for supportive care intervention research', Palliative and Supportive Care, 6 281-287 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1478951508000424
Citations Scopus - 31
2008 Jefford M, Karahalios E, Pollard A, Baravelli C, Carey M, Franklin J, et al., 'Survivorship issues following treatment completion: results from focus groups with Australian cancer survivors and health professionals', Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 2 20-32 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11764-008-0043-4
Citations Scopus - 46
2008 Lotfi-Jam K, Carey M, Jefford M, Schofield P, Charleson C, Aranda S, 'Non-pharmacological strategies for managing common chemotherapy side-effects: A systematic review', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 26 5618-5629 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2007.15.9053
Citations Scopus - 51Web of Science - 39
2008 Schofield P, Jefford M, Carey M, Thomson K, Evans M, Baravelli C, Aranda S, 'Preparing patients for threatening medical treatments: effects of a chemotherapy educational DVD on anxiety, unmet needs and self efficacy', Supportive Care in Cancer, 16 37-45 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-007-0273-4
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 24
2008 Davies MJ, Heller S, Skinner TC, Campbell MJ, Carey ME, Cradock S, et al., 'Effectiveness of the diabetes education and self management for ongoing and newly diagnosed (DESMOND) programme for people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes: cluster randomised controlled trial', BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, 336 491-495 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmj.39474.922025.BE
Citations Scopus - 267Web of Science - 185
2007 Carey M, Schofield P, Jefford M, Krishnasamy M, Aranda S, 'The development of audio-visual materials to prepare patients for medical procedures: An oncology application', European Journal of Cancer Care, 16 417-433 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2354.2006.00772.x
2007 Karahalios E, Baravelli C, Carey M, Schofield P, Pollard A, Aranda S, et al., 'An audiovisual information resource to assist in the transition from completion of potentially curative treatment for cancer to survivorship: a systematic development process', Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 1 226-236 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11764-007-0022-1
2006 Schofield P, Carey M, Love A, Nehill C, Wein S, ''Would you like to talk about your future treatment options?' discussing the transition from curative cancer treatment to palliative care', Palliative Medicine, 20 397-406 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1191/0269216306pm1156oa
2006 Schofield P, Carey M, Aranda S, 'Psychosocial issues for people with advanced cancer: overcoming the research challenges', Cancer Forum, 30 18-21 (2006) [C1]
2006 Schofield P, Carey M, Bonevski B, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'Barriers to the provision of evidence-based psychosocial care in oncology', Psycho-Oncology, 15 863-872 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pon.1017
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2006 Carey M, Jefford M, Schofield P, Kelly S, Krishnasamy M, Aranda S, 'Development and evaluation of an audiovisual information resource to promote self-management of chemotherapy side effects', Supportive Care in Cancer, 14 361-368 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-005-0909-1
2005 Carey M, Bonevski B, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Barriers to the provision of evidence-based psychosocial care in oncology', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 57 189-189 (2005)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2005 Holmes VM, Babauta ML, 'Single or dual representations for reading and spelling?', Reading and Writing, 18 257-280 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11145-004-8129-5
Show 102 more journal articles

Conference (24 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Henskens FA, Paul DJ, Wallis M, Bryant J, Carey M, Fradgley E, et al., 'Web-based support for population-based medical research: Presenting the QuON survey system', HEALTHINF 2014 - 7th International Conference on Health Informatics, Proceedings; Part of 7th International Joint Conference on Biomedical Engineering Systems and Technologies, BIOSTEC 2014 (2014) [E1]

This paper discusses the needs of medical researchers working in the area of patient-centred medicine, in particular their use of survey data in measuring patient opinions, needs,... [more]

This paper discusses the needs of medical researchers working in the area of patient-centred medicine, in particular their use of survey data in measuring patient opinions, needs, perceived quality of care received, and priorities of health service interventions. Until quite recently, collection of survey data has been either paper-based, or achieved using computer software that largely duplicated paper-based processes with limited additional functionality. The authors investigate the use of web-based technology to support collection of such data from patients, including experiences and observations on enhanced/additional functionality made possible by its adoption. A novel software design termed QuON is presented, together with examples of its capabilities and uses in current research projects. Copyright © 2014 SCITEPRESS - Science and Technology Publications. All rights reserved.

Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Mark Wallis, Frans Henskens, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, Alison Zucca
2014 Mackenzie LJ, Suzuki E, Ogura M, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Asada H, et al., 'JAPANESE CANCER PATIENTS' PREFERENCES FOR DISCUSSING LIFE EXPECTANCY WITH THEIR RADIATION ONCOLOGIST', ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, Fukuoka, JAPAN (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1093/annonc/mdu435.35
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Lisa Mackenzie, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Henskens FA, Paul DJ, Wallis M, Bryant J, Carey M, Fradgley E, et al., 'How Do Health Researchers Benefit From Web-Based Survey Systems?', Proceedings of e-Health 2014, Lisbon, Portugal (2014) [E1]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mark Wallis, Frans Henskens, Alison Zucca, Chris Paul
2014 Hall A, Nguyen S, Tran H, Sanson-Fisher R, Carey M, 'PATIENTS PERCEPTIONS OF WHAT MAY HAVE CAUSED THEIR CANCER: A CROSS-SECTIONAL INVESTIGATION OF VIETNAMESE RADIOTHERAPY CANCER PATIENTS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alix Hall
2014 Mackenzie LJ, Sanson-Fisher R, Carey M, D'Este C, 'CANCER PATIENTS' PREFERENCES FOR INVOLVEMENT IN RESEARCH AND CONSUMER ACTIVITIES: A CROSS-SECTIONAL SURVEY', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Lisa Mackenzie, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2014 Mackenzie L, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, Yoong SL, 'RADIATION ONCOLOGY OUTPATIENTS' CONCERN ABOUT, PREFERENCES FOR, AND PERCEIVED BARRIERS TO DISCUSSING ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie
2014 Zucca A, Sanson-Fisher R, Waller A, Carey M, 'LIFE EXPECTANCY DISCUSSIONS IN A MULTI-SITE SAMPLE OF AUSTRALIAN MEDICAL ONCOLOGY OUTPATIENTS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Alison Zucca, Amy Waller, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Bryant J, Yoong SL, Sanson-Fisher R, Mazza D, Carey M, Walsh J, Bisquera A, 'IS IDENTIFICATION OF SMOKING, RISKY ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION AND OVERWEIGHT AND OBESITY BY GENERAL PRACTITIONERS IMPROVING? A COMPARISON OF DETECTION RATES IN AUSTRALIA BETWEEN 1982 AND 2011', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Carey M, Bryant J, Mansfield E, Bisquera A, Sanson-Fisher R, Mazza D, 'CORRELATES OF THE DETECTION OF CANCER RISK FACTORS BY GENERAL PRACTITIONERS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Elise Mansfield, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher R, Hall A, Carey M, Paul C, Clinton-McHarg T, 'Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Quality of Patient-Centred Cancer Care Measure', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Alix Hall, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul
2013 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Boyes A, Jones K, Carey M, 'The Evidence-Practice Gap in Oncology: Are We Contributing to Implementation Science?', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Allison Boyes
2013 Tzelepis F, Rose S, Sanson-Fisher R, Clinton-McHarg T, Carey M, Paul C, 'A Systematic Review of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures Assessing Quality of Patient-Centred Cancer Care', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2012 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Paul CL, Inder KJ, et al., 'A cross-sectional study of the prevalence of multiple risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in overweight or obese general practice patients', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine: Abstracts from the ICBM 2012 Meeting, Budapest, Hungary (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Kerry Inder, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, Catherine Deste
2012 Mackenzie LJ, Suzuki E, Ogura M, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Asada H, et al., 'Agreement between cancer patients and their radiation oncologist regarding diagnosis and prognosis disclosure experiences in Japan', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Brisbane, Queensland (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie, Catherine Deste
2012 Suzuki E, Mackenzie LJ, Ogura M, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Asada H, et al., 'Acceptability of touch screen computer psychosocial survey to Japanese radiation therapy patients', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Brisbane, Qld. (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Lisa Mackenzie, Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2012 Mackenzie LJ, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Paul CL, D'Este CA, 'Anxiety and depression during radiotherapy treatment: a comparison of touchscreen computer administration of the hospital anxiety and depression scale and single-item self-report measures', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Brisbane, Qld (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Lisa Mackenzie, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2012 Mackenzie LJ, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, 'Perceptions of patient-centred cancer care during radiotherapy treatment: A cross sectional survey', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Brisbane, Qld (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste, Lisa Mackenzie
2012 Mackenzie LJ, Suzuki E, Ogura M, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Asada H, et al., 'Perceptions of psychological distress in Japanese cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Brisbane, Qld (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie, Catherine Deste
2012 Mackenzie LJ, Suzuki E, Ogura M, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Asada H, et al., 'Japanese cancer patients' preferences for life expectancy discussions', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Brisbane, Qld (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Lisa Mackenzie, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2011 Courtney RJ, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Macrae FA, Carey ML, Attia JR, McEvoy MA, 'Colorectal cancer screening in Australia: A community-level perspective', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology: COSA 38th Annual Scientific Meeting Poster Abstracts, Perth, WA (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.5694/mja11.10661
Co-authors Chris Paul, John Attia, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2011 Mackenzie LJ, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Hall AE, 'Who should make disclosure decisions? Cancer patients' preferences for life expectancy disclosure', Psycho-Oncology, Antalya, Turkey (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie, Alix Hall
2010 Schofield P, Gough K, Carey ML, Ugalde A, Aranda S, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'Cancer treatment survey (CaTS): A new instrument to assess the adequacy of communication to prepare patients for chemotherapy and radiotherapy', International Conference on Communication in Healthcare 2010, Verona, Italy (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2009 White VM, Carey ML, Hill D, Ieropoli S, Giles GG, 'Understanding cancer patients' experiences of care: The Clinical Cancer Care Events Survey', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Gold Coast, QLD (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1743-7563.2009.01252.x
2009 Schofield P, Ugalde A, Sharkey K, Krishnasamy M, Reece J, Carey ML, et al., 'Meeting needs of people with inoperable lung cancer through an innovative supportive care intervention: A randomised controlled trial', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Gold Coast, QLD (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1743-7563.2009.01253.x
Show 21 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 23
Total funding $3,277,259

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20155 grants / $417,872

Evaluating the Quit for New Life $271,908

Funding body: NSW Health

Funding body NSW Health
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Lisa Mackenzie, Mr Justin Walsh, Doctor Josephine Gwynn, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Professor Peter Radoll, Professor Ian Symonds, Professor Sandra Eades
Scheme Evaluation of Quit for New Life
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401375
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Consultancy Tender: To assess needs and outcomes in relation to cancer control for people who are socioeconomically disadvantaged and have experienced cancer.$84,870

Funding body: Cancer Institute NSW

Funding body Cancer Institute NSW
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Associate Professor Anthony Proietto, Dr Jarad Martin, Dr James Lynam
Scheme Request for Quote
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401189
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Health Exchange: acceptability of an electronic tailored chronic disease needs assessment tool$27,094

Funding body: NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation (ACI)

Funding body NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation (ACI)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Mrs Amanda Jayakody, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Mariko Carey, Ms Eunice Simons
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401380
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Improving uptake of colorectal screening among primary care attendees.$17,000

Funding body: Australian Rotary Health

Funding body Australian Rotary Health
Project Team Ms Natalie Dodd, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow
Scheme PhD Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1400854
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Delivery of care, are we doing enough? An investigation in to the treatment provided for depression in Australian alcohol treatment centers. $17,000

Funding body: Australian Rotary Health

Funding body Australian Rotary Health
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Ms Breanne Hobden
Scheme Ian Scott Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401254
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20145 grants / $283,188

Improving implementation of guideline recommendations for early detection and prevention of cancer in general practice$170,688

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Mariko Carey
Scheme Translating Research into Practice (TRIP) Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1300684
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Improving uptake of colorectal cancer screening among primary care attendees$37,500

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Ms Natalie Dodd, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Doctor Elise Mansfield, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1401420
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

End-of-life care: An investigation of advance care planning amongst haematological cancer patients$30,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Lisa Mackenzie, Doctor Amy Waller, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301373
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Develop and evaluate a three-year strategic plan addressing sun exposure, skin cancer prevention and vitamin D$25,000

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Mariko Carey, Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Amy Waller, Mrs Elizabeth Tracey, Miss Alix Hall
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400744
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Quality of cancer care from the patient perspective: An international comparison study$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Dr Megumi Uchida, Doctor Flora Tzelepis, Ms Alison Zucca, Miss Alix Hall, Miss Lisa Mackenzie
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400058
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20131 grants / $20,000

Reducing psychosocial burden among women diagnosed with breast cancer and their support persons: A randomised controlled trial of a web-based intervention.$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Charles Douglas, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Mariko Carey, Associate Professor Frans Henskens
Scheme Near Miss
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300705
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20124 grants / $320,939

Improving cancer treatment systems: An RCT of a consumer action model for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy$249,408

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Ms A Tang, Doctor Mariko Carey, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Flora Tzelepis, Ms Kathryn Chapman, Ms Paula Vallentine, Conjoint Professor Christopher Doran, Doctor Patrick McElduff
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100618
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Multiple substance use, mental health and other health risk behaviours among patients of Aboriginal Medical Services: Patient priorities for change and preferences for models of support$39,324

Funding body: NSW Health

Funding body NSW Health
Project Team Associate Professor Christine Paul, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Mr Steve Blunden, Doctor Mariko Carey, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Associate Professor Kate Conigrave, Ms Natasha Noble
Scheme Drug and Alcohol Grants Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200697
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Evaluating the acceptability of a web-based approach to improve knowledge transfer to general practice regarding care for sleep disorders $18,000

Funding body: Sleep Health Foundation

Funding body Sleep Health Foundation
Project Team Associate Professor Christine Paul, Emeritus Professor Michael Hensley, Doctor Jeffrey Pretto, Doctor Mariko Carey, Associate Professor Frans Henskens, Doctor Tara Clinton-Mcharg
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100881
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Improving cancer care for lymphoma: patients' perceptions of optimal care$14,207

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Flora Tzelepis, Doctor Mariko Carey, Associate Professor Christine Paul, Doctor Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Ms Alison Zucca
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200212
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20115 grants / $1,687,437

Chronic Care Service Enhancements Program: Evaluation Project$571,103

Funding body: NSW Health

Funding body NSW Health
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Associate Professor Christine Paul, Associate Professor Billie Bonevski, Conjoint Professor Cate d'Este, Associate Professor John Hall, Conjoint Professor Christopher Doran
Scheme Consultancy/Tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100894
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

A cluster randomised trial to test a systems based collaborative for type 2 diabetes among Indigenous Australians$542,240

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Professor Sandra Eades, Associate Professor Christine Paul, Professor Paul Zimmet, Doctor Mariko Carey, Dr Mark Wenitong
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100186
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

The role of individual patient, social support and treatment centre variables in the psychosocial outcomes of cancer patients$494,604

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Professor Ian Olver, Associate Professor Christine Paul, Associate Professor Frans Henskens
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000303
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Type 2 Diabetes among Indigenous Australians Project$45,000

Funding body: Baker IDI

Funding body Baker IDI
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Professor Sandra Eades, Associate Professor Christine Paul, Doctor Mariko Carey, Dr Mark Wenitong
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1001070
Type Of Funding Donation - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFD
UON Y

Acceptability and feasibility of providing feedback to ACCHO patients and their GPs about patients' risky alcohol, tobacco and drug use.$34,490

Funding body: NSW Health

Funding body NSW Health
Project Team Doctor Mariko Carey, Associate Professor Kate Conigrave, Ms Jessica Stewart, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Mr Steve Blunden, Associate Professor Christine Paul
Scheme Drug and Alcohol Council Research Grants Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100306
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20102 grants / $28,985

Delay in seeking treatment for symptoms of bowel cancer: a community survey of self-reported delay timeframes and triggers for seeking treatment among those aged 55+$21,485

Funding body: Hunter Children`s Research Foundation

Funding body Hunter Children`s Research Foundation
Project Team Associate Professor Christine Paul, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Mr Ryan Courtney, Conjoint Professor Cate d'Este, Mr Mark McEvoy
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0900147
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Providing accessible support for the support persons of people with haematological cancers$7,500

Funding body: Psycho-Oncology Co-operative Research Group

Funding body Psycho-Oncology Co-operative Research Group
Project Team Associate Professor Christine Paul, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Mariko Carey, Dr Anna Williamson
Scheme Pilot Study Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0190650
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20091 grants / $518,838

Blood cancer survivors and support persons: A national survey of rural/urban unmet needs and psychological disturbance$518,838

Funding body: Cancer Australia

Funding body Cancer Australia
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Associate Professor Christine Paul, Professor Kenneth Bradstock, Dr Anna Williamson, Doctor Mariko Carey
Scheme Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0188899
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Current Supervision

Commenced Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 Colorectal Cancer is a Major Cause of Mortality and Morbidity
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2014 Patient Adherence to Physiotherapy Prescribed Self-Management Strategies
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2013 Reducing High Rates of Unplanned Hospital Readmissions Among Aboriginal People with Chronic Disease
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2013 Patient Perceptions of Potentially Threatening Interventions
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2011 Patient-Centred Care in Cancer Treatment Centres
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2011 Impediments to the Implementation of Thrombolytic Treatment in Acute Ischaemic Stroke
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2014 Patient-Centred Cancer Care: A Road Less Travelled. An Investigation in Australian Radiotherapy Settings
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2014 Management of Excess Weight in Australian General Practice Patients: Informing Practice
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2013 Cancer Survivors' Psychosocial Outcomes: A Population-Based Investigation of Anxiety, Depression and Unmet Needs at Six to Twelve Months Post-diagnosis
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2011 Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Measure of Perceived Need for Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
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News

Obesity

Weighty Problem

November 1, 2013

In a region where 70 per cent of adults are overweight or obese, a new study conducted by University of Newcastle and HMRI researchers has found that doctors are falling short in detecting weight conditions, which may lead to inadequate assistance with managing weight.

Dr Mariko Carey

Position

Senior Research Fellow
Public Health
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email mariko.carey@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4042 0702

Office

Building HMRI Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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