Professor Kypros Kypri

Professor Kypros Kypri

Senior Brawn Research Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health (Health Behaviour Sciences)

Career Summary

Biography

Updated 14 August 2015

Current position

I am an NHMRC Senior Research Fellow (SRF-B) in alcohol-related injury epidemiology. I am a professor in the School of Medicine & Public Health, and hold a Senior Brawn Research Fellowship.

Training

I was trained in experimental and clinical psychology at the University of NSW, University of Otago, and University of California San Diego from 1994-1998. I completed a PhD in Injury Epidemiology at the University of Otago in 2002. With the input of many colleagues I have established an alcohol research group at the University of Newcastle which is the hub of several national and international collaborative studies. These address a range of methodological, aetiological and intervention studies addressing the burden of injury and disease attributable to alcohol. I have a growing interest in research integrity, particularly in relation to how research is funded, conflicts of interest, and the public good.

Research Expertise

I am a behavioural scientist interested in the influence of the social and physical environmental on drinking behaviour, and in determining the effectiveness of strategies aimed at preventing alcohol-related harm. I am, or have been, a chief investigator on substantial national competitive grants, from government agencies including: 

Australia

- National Health and Medical Research Council – Project Grants

- Australian Research Council – Discovery Projects and Linkage Projects

- Australian National Preventive Health Agency

- Australian Rotary Health

International

- Health Research Council – New Zealand

- National Council of Science and Technology – Brazil

- National Institute of Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse – USA

- National Institute of Drug Abuse – USA

Publications

My work is reflected in >150 peer-reviewed publications including several invited papers, editorials, and commentaries. The papers are published in leading journals: 

- General medical journals: JAMA, PloS Medicine, Archives of Internal Medicine, Medical Journal of Australia

- Leading public health journals: American Journal of Public Health, Epidemiology, International Journal of Epidemiology, Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, Journal of Clinical Epidemiology

- Leading substance use journals: Addiction, Drug & Alcohol Dependence, Drug & Alcohol Review

The papers reveal expertise in a range of areas: use of official data, population surveys, cohort studies, intervention development, quasi-experimental study designs, and clinical trials. The clinical trials and survey methods studies have been recognised internationally for their innovation, scale, and careful implementation (e.g., the Dan Anderson Research Award 2009). 

Scientific review

I am a Deputy Editor of the Drug and Alcohol Review (2014 impact factor 2.3), the leading journal in the substance use field outside Europe and the USA.

I have fulfilled my responsibilities in the review of competitive grant applications for the NHMRC as a: 

- Grant Review Panel Assistant Chair

- Member, Postgraduate Scholarships Review Panel 

- Member, Grant Review Panel 

- Member (co-opted), Indigenous Grant Review Panel 

- Project Grant External Assessor

I have been an external reviewer for the Australian Research Council annually since 2010, and I have been Chair of the Project Grant Assessing Committee for, Healthway, Western Australia.

I have undertaken competitive grant review for:                    

- Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research, Canada

- Alcohol Education & Research Council, United Kingdom

- Auckland Medical Research Foundation

- Drug & Alcohol Office, Western Australia Government

- Health Research Council of New Zealand

- Ireland Health Review Board

- Marsden Fund, Royal Society of New Zealand

- Medical Research Council, United Kingdom

- Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development

- Swiss National Science Federation

- Victorian Health Promotion Foundation

Current collaborations
I have ongoing collaboration with leading researchers in Australia, New Zealand, Great Britain, and the USA: 

AUSTRALIA 

Institution: National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, UNSW

Collaborators: Professor Richard Mattick, Professor Jake Najman 

Project: Australian Parent Supply of Alcohol Longitudinal Study (APSALS) 

Funding: Australian Research Council (2010-14) and Rotary Health (2011-15). 

My role: Co-investigator 

Institution: Deakin University, School of Psychology 

Collaborators: A/Professor Peter Miller, Professor Tanya Chikritzhs 

Project: Evaluation of risk-based licensing of alcohol sales for reducing alcohol-related harm Funding: Australian Research Council, 2015-2017 

My role: Co-investigator 

Institution: Deakin University, School of Psychology 

Collaborators: A/Professor Peter Miller, Professor Mike Daube, Professor Melanie Wakefield 

Project: Corporate political activity of tobacco, alcohol and gambling companies in Australia 

Funding: Australian Research Council, 2014-2016) 

My role: Co-investigator 

Institution: National Drug Research Institute, Curtin University of Technology

Collaborators: Professor Tanya Chikritzhs, Professor Peter Miller

Project: Pub extended trading hours: effects on drunkenness and alcohol-related harm

Funding: Healthway, Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation, 2015-16

My role: Co-investigator 

NEW ZEALAND 

Institution: Injury Prevention Research Unit, University of Otago

Collaborators: Dr Brett Maclennan, Professor Jennie Connor, Tuari Potiki, Professor Robin Room 

Project: Evaluation of New Zealand’s alcohol reform legislation 

Funding: Health Research Council, 2014-18

My role: Co-investigator 

Institution: Injury Prevention Research Unit, University of Otago

Collaborators: Professor Jennie Connor, Gabrielle Davie, Emeritus Professor John Langley 

Project: Effects of lowering the minimum alcohol purchasing age on traffic crash injury and assault rates 

Funding: Health Research Council, 2012-15

My role: Lead investigator 

GREAT BRITAIN

Institution: Department of Health Sciences, University of York

Collaborators: Professor Jim McCambridge

Project: Investigations of Research Participation Effects

Funding: Australian Research Council 2010-14; Wellcome Trust 2011-2015

My role: Co-investigator 

USA

Institution: Boston University School of Medicine

Collaborators: Professor Richard Saitz

Project: Hospital Outpatients and Alcohol Project

Funding: National Health and Medical Research Council 2012-15

My role: Lead investigator


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Otago - New Zealand

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Alcohol Policy
  • Health Behaviour
  • Public Health
  • Research integrity

Languages

  • Greek (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 75
160599 Policy and Administration not elsewhere classified 25

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/07/2013 -  Professor University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/06/2013 -  Senior Brawn Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/01/2013 -  NHMRC Senior Research Fellow (Level B)

NHMRC - Research Fellowships Scheme

University of Newcastle
Australia
1/07/2010 - 1/06/2013 Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/01/2009 - 1/12/2012 NHMRC Career Development Fellow

NHMRC - Career Development Fellowships (Formerly Career Development Awards)

University of Newcastle
Australia
1/01/2009 - 1/06/2010 Senior Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/01/2006 -  Membership - Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and Drugs Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and Drugs
Australia
1/11/2005 - 1/10/2007 Senior Research Fellow University of Otago
Injury Prevention Research Unit
New Zealand
1/11/2005 - 1/04/2006 Member Health Research Council Public Health Assessment Committee
New Zealand
1/02/2004 - 1/01/2007 Senior Lecturer in Population Health University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/07/2001 - 1/02/2004 Research Fellow University of Otago
Injury Prevention Research Unit
New Zealand

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2006 - 1/01/2007 Member National Alcohol Strategy
Australia

Awards

Research Award

Year Award
2009 Dan Anderson Research Award
Hazelden Foundation
2009 Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Research Excellence
University of Newcastle
2006 IVO Award
IVO Addiction Research Institute (Rotterdam)
2006 Early Career Researcher Award
Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and Drugs

Invitations

Keynote Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2013 Public health evidence for addressing risky drinking
Organisation: Drug and Alcohol Services South Australia
2012 Web-based interventions for unhealthy alcohol use
Organisation: Annual Conference of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol & Drugs
2011 Alcohol industry sponsorship and hazardous drinking among sportspeople
Organisation: Sport and Alcohol Conference
2011 Electronic forms of alcohol screening and brief intervention: What reviews tell us
Organisation: INEBRIA Conference, Boston

Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2013 Effects of trading hour restrictions on assault rates. NSW Alcohol Summit
Organisation: NSW Alcohol Summit
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2007 Kypri K, Cunningham JA, 'Self-help therapies for problem drinking', Handbook of Self-Help Therapies, Taylor & Francis, London 243-264 (2007) [B1]
2006 McAnally H, Kypri K, 'Alcohol and road safety behaviour', Adolescence and Alcohol : an international perspective, Freund Publishing House, Tel Aviv, Israel 15-23 (2006) [B1]

Journal article (174 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Kypri K, Wilson A, Attia J, Sheeran PJ, McCambridge J, 'Effects of study design and allocation on self-reported alcohol consumption: randomized trial.', Trials, 16 127 (2015)
DOI 10.1186/s13063-015-0642-0
Co-authors John Attia, Amanda Wilson
2015 O'Brien KS, Carr S, Ferris J, Room R, Miller P, Livingston M, et al., 'Alcohol Advertising in Sport and Non-Sport TV in Australia, during Children's Viewing Times.', PLoS One, 10 e0134889 (2015)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0134889
2015 Kypri K, Connor J, Sellman D, 'The dissolution of the alcohol advisory council: A blow for public health', New Zealand Medical Journal, 128 56-60 (2015)

In June 2012 the Alcohol Advisory Council (ALAC) ceased to be after more than three decades of providing advice on alcohol policy, undertaking health promotion activities, and fun... [more]

In June 2012 the Alcohol Advisory Council (ALAC) ceased to be after more than three decades of providing advice on alcohol policy, undertaking health promotion activities, and funding research on the prevalence and causes of unhealthy alcohol use and strategies to address alcohol-related harm. Perversely, its dissolution followed soon after the Law Commission¿s ¿once in a generation¿ review recommending law reform to address New Zealand¿s substantial alcohol-related health burden. ALAC¿s functions were ostensibly taken over by the Health Promotion Agency (HPA) but this new entity was given less autonomy than ALAC and a remit including areas as disparate as rheumatic fever and sun safety. In addition, HPA was compromised from the start by the appointment of a food, alcohol and tobacco industry representative to its Board. ALAC sometimes fell short of community and scientists¿ expectations that it provide independent and fearless advice on politically contested matters, such as controls on alcohol marketing. However, it seems that the way the HPA has been set up makes effective action to address health and social problems caused by alcohol consumption in New Zealand unlikely.

Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Wadolowski M, Bruno R, Aiken A, Stone C, Najman J, Kypri K, et al., 'Sipping, Drinking, and Early Adolescent Alcohol Consumption: A Cautionary Note', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 39 350-354 (2015)

Background: Epidemiological studies report markedly varying rates of adolescent alcohol involvement. Despite being a common adolescent behavior, a potential cause of this variatio... [more]

Background: Epidemiological studies report markedly varying rates of adolescent alcohol involvement. Despite being a common adolescent behavior, a potential cause of this variation is that consumption of sips is either not measured or not distinguished from consumption of whole beverages. Methods: Participants were 1,843 grade 7 adolescents recruited across 49 Australian secondary schools (M age = 12.4, SD = 0.5). Quantity and frequency of lifetime and past 6-month consumption were assessed, distinguishing between sipping and drinking. For comparison with international population surveys, quantity was reported as any consumption, sipping only, and drinking only. Results: Combining sipping and drinking into a single category, lifetime consumption was reported by 67.3% of the present sample. Distinguishing lifetime consumption by sipping and drinking: only 7.8% of adolescents had consumed a whole beverage; the remaining 59.6% had only sipped. Consumption of whole beverages was mostly limited to 1 to 2 drinks (84.2% of drinkers). Sipping and drinking were also infrequent: 78.2% of sipping and 60.4% of drinking, occurred less than monthly. Heavy episodic consumption was uncommon (1.2% of the sample). When other population studies were inspected, a clear trend for higher drinking rates were found in those studies where sipping was counted as drinking and vice versa. Conclusions: Consumption of whole beverages appears infrequent in early adolescence, as sipping, but not drinking, was common in our sample. Comparing the present data with international population consumption measures highlights the need to more precisely measure and report adolescent consumption, particularly in relation to sipping.

DOI 10.1111/acer.12613
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 McCambridge J, Kypri K, Miller P, Hawkins B, Hastings G, 'Where is the evidence?', Addiction, 110 540-541 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/add.12830
2015 Kypri K, Davie G, McElduff P, Langley J, Connor J, 'Effects of lowering the alcohol minimum purchasing age on weekend hospitalised assaults of young Maori in New Zealand.', Drug Alcohol Rev, 34 299-303 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12241
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff
2015 Kypri K, Davie G, Mcelduff P, Langley J, Connor J, 'Effects of lowering the alcohol minimum purchasing age on weekend hospitalised assaults of young Maori in New Zealand', Drug and Alcohol Review, 34 299-303 (2015)

Introduction and Aims: We examine the association between reducing the alcohol minimum purchasing age from 20 to 18 years in December 1999 and rates of weekend assault hospitalisa... [more]

Introduction and Aims: We examine the association between reducing the alcohol minimum purchasing age from 20 to 18 years in December 1999 and rates of weekend assault hospitalisation among young Maori in the following 12 years. Our previous work showed deleterious effects for young people overall. In keeping with Treaty of Waitangi principles, we sought to determine whether the policy was similarly detrimental for Maori. Design and Methods: We used Poisson regression to examine data from 1995 to 2011 on Maori hospitalised on Friday-Sunday following assault, separately by gender among 15- to 17-year-olds and 18- to 19-year-olds, versus 20- to 21-year-olds as a control for changes in economic and environmental factors. Results: There was no evidence to suggest weekend assault hospitalisations increased significantly more among 15- to 17-year-old or 18- to 19-year-old Maori males in the post-change periods (incidence rate ratios varied between 0.83 and 1.13; P values >0.25) compared with increases observed in 20- to 21-year-old Maori males. For Maori females, estimates were more variable, but overall, there was no evidence of the hypothesised effect (incidence rate ratios between 0.60 and 1.09; P values >0.07). Discussion and Conclusions: Overall, we find no evidence that lowering the minimum alcohol purchasing age increased weekend hospitalised assaults among young Maori. Inferences are compromised by lack of statistical power which underlines the importance of planning for evaluation of important policies well before they are implemented, particularly with a view to meeting obligations to Maori arising from the Treaty of Waitangi.

DOI 10.1111/dar.12241
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff
2015 Naimi TS, Babor T, Chikritzhs T, Stockwell TR, McCambridge J, Miller P, et al., 'Let's Not "Relax" Evidence Standards when Recommending Risky Preventive Therapeutic Agents.', Alcohol Clin Exp Res, 39 1275-1276 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/acer.12724
Citations Web of Science - 1
2015 Naimi TS, Babor T, Chikritzhs T, Stockwell TR, Mccambridge J, Miller P, et al., 'Let's Not "Relax" Evidence Standards when Recommending Risky Preventive Therapeutic Agents', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 39 1275-1276 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/acer.12724
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2015 Kypri K, Davie G, Mcelduff P, Langley J, Connor J, 'Effects of lowering the alcohol minimum purchasing age on weekend hospitalised assaults of young Maori in New Zealand', Drug and Alcohol Review, 34 299-303 (2015)

Introduction and Aims: We examine the association between reducing the alcohol minimum purchasing age from 20 to 18 years in December 1999 and rates of weekend assault hospitalisa... [more]

Introduction and Aims: We examine the association between reducing the alcohol minimum purchasing age from 20 to 18 years in December 1999 and rates of weekend assault hospitalisation among young Maori in the following 12 years. Our previous work showed deleterious effects for young people overall. In keeping with Treaty of Waitangi principles, we sought to determine whether the policy was similarly detrimental for Maori. Design and Methods: We used Poisson regression to examine data from 1995 to 2011 on Maori hospitalised on Friday-Sunday following assault, separately by gender among 15- to 17-year-olds and 18- to 19-year-olds, versus 20- to 21-year-olds as a control for changes in economic and environmental factors. Results: There was no evidence to suggest weekend assault hospitalisations increased significantly more among 15- to 17-year-old or 18- to 19-year-old Maori males in the post-change periods (incidence rate ratios varied between 0.83 and 1.13; P values >0.25) compared with increases observed in 20- to 21-year-old Maori males. For Maori females, estimates were more variable, but overall, there was no evidence of the hypothesised effect (incidence rate ratios between 0.60 and 1.09; P values >0.07). Discussion and Conclusions: Overall, we find no evidence that lowering the minimum alcohol purchasing age increased weekend hospitalised assaults among young Maori. Inferences are compromised by lack of statistical power which underlines the importance of planning for evaluation of important policies well before they are implemented, particularly with a view to meeting obligations to Maori arising from the Treaty of Waitangi.

DOI 10.1111/dar.12241
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff
2015 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Wiggers J, Kypri K, Bonevski B, McElduff P, et al., 'Targeting multiple health risk behaviours among vocational education students using electronic feedback and online and telephone support: protocol for a cluster randomised trial.', BMC Public Health, 15 550 (2015)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1898-8
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Marita Lynagh, Philip Morgan, Billie Bonevski, Patrick Mcelduff
2015 Naimi TS, Babor T, Chikritzhs T, Stockwell TR, Mccambridge J, Miller P, et al., 'Let's Not "Relax" Evidence Standards when Recommending Risky Preventive Therapeutic Agents', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 39 1275-1276 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/acer.12724
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Kypri K, 'Suppression clauses in university health research: case study of an Australian government contract negotiation.', Med J Aust, 203 72-74 (2015)
2015 Wadolowski M, Hutchinson D, Bruno R, Aiken A, Clare P, Slade T, et al., 'Early Adolescent Alcohol Use: Are Sipping and Drinking Distinct?', Alcohol Clin Exp Res, (2015)
DOI 10.1111/acer.12826
2015 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Wiggers J, Kypri K, Bonevski B, McElduff P, et al., 'Targeting multiple health risk behaviours among vocational education students using electronic feedback and online and telephone support: Protocol for a cluster randomised trial Health behavior, health promotion and society', BMC Public Health, 15 (2015)

Background: Technical and Further Education (TAFE) colleges are the primary provider of vocational education in Australia. Most TAFE students are young adults, a period when healt... [more]

Background: Technical and Further Education (TAFE) colleges are the primary provider of vocational education in Australia. Most TAFE students are young adults, a period when health risk behaviours become established. Furthermore, high rates of smoking, risky alcohol consumption, inadequate fruit and vegetable intake and insufficient physical activity have been reported in TAFE students. There have been no intervention studies targeting multiple health risk behaviours simultaneously in this population. The proposed trial will examine the effectiveness of providing TAFE students with electronic feedback regarding health risk behaviours and referral to a suite of existing online and telephone services addressing smoking, risky alcohol consumption, fruit and vegetable intake, and physical activity levels. Methods/Design: A two arm, parallel, cluster randomised trial will be conducted within TAFE campuses in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. TAFE classes will be randomly allocated to an intervention or control condition (50 classes per condition). To be eligible, students must be: enrolled in a course that runs for more than 6 months; aged 16 years or older; and not meet Australian health guideline recommendations for at least one of the following: smoking, alcohol consumption, fruit and/or vegetable intake, or physical activity. Students attending intervention classes, will undertake via a computer tablet a risk assessment for health risk behaviours, and for behaviours not meeting Australian guidelines be provided with electronic feedback about these behaviours and referral to evidence-based online programs and telephone services. Students in control classes will not receive any intervention. Primary outcome measures that will be assessed via online surveys at baseline and 6 months post-recruitment are: 1) daily tobacco smoking; 2) standard drinks of alcohol consumed per week; 3) serves of fruit consumed daily; 4) serves of vegetables consumed daily; and 5) metabolic equivalent minutes of physical activity per week. Discussion: Proactive enrolment to existing online and telephone services has the potential to address modifiable determinants of disease. This trial will be the first to examine a potentially scalable intervention targeting multiple health risk behaviours among students in the vocational training setting.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1898-8
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Philip Morgan, Patrick Mcelduff, Clare Collins, Billie Bonevski, Marita Lynagh
2015 Kypri K, 'Evidence of harm from late night alcohol sales continues to strengthen.', Addiction, 110 965-966 (2015)
DOI 10.1111/add.12935
2015 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Wiggers J, Kypri K, Bonevski B, McElduff P, et al., 'Targeting multiple health risk behaviours among vocational education students using electronic feedback and online and telephone support: protocol for a cluster randomised trial', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 15 (2015)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1898-8
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Patrick Mcelduff, Flora Tzelepis, Marita Lynagh, Luke Wolfenden, Chris Paul
2015 Aiken A, Wadolowski M, Bruno R, Najman J, Kypri K, Slade T, et al., 'Cohort Profile: The Australian Parental Supply of Alcohol Longitudinal Study (APSALS).', Int J Epidemiol, (2015)
DOI 10.1093/ije/dyv051
2014 Gilligan C, Thompson K, Bourke J, Kypri K, Stockwell T, '"Everybody else is doing it"--norm perceptions among parents of adolescents.', J Stud Alcohol Drugs, 75 908-918 (2014) [C1]
Co-authors Conor Gilligan
2014 McCambridge J, Kypri K, Drummond C, Strang J, 'Alcohol harm reduction: corporate capture of a key concept.', PLoS Med, 11 e1001767 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001767
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 Hossain MS, Kypri K, Rahman B, Arslan I, Akter S, Milton AH, 'Prevalence and correlates of smokeless tobacco consumption among married women in rural Bangladesh', PLoS ONE, 9 (2014) [C1]

Objective: To estimate the prevalence and identify correlates of smokeless tobacco consumption among married rural women with a history of at least one pregnancy in Madaripur, Ban... [more]

Objective: To estimate the prevalence and identify correlates of smokeless tobacco consumption among married rural women with a history of at least one pregnancy in Madaripur, Bangladesh. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey using an interviewer administered, pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaire. All women living in the study area, aged 18 years and above with at least one pregnancy in their lifetime, who were on the electoral roll and agreed to participate were included in the study. Information on sociodemographic characteristics and smokeless tobacco consumption was collected. Smokeless tobacco consumption was categorized as 'Current', 'Ever but not current' and 'Never'. Associations between smokeless tobacco consumption and the explanatory variables were estimated using simple and multiple binary logistic regression. Results: 8074 women participated (response rate 99.9%). The prevalence of 'Current consumption', 'Ever consumption but not current', and 'Never consumption' was 25%, 44% and 31%, respectively. The mean age at first use was 31.5 years. 87% of current consumers reported using either Shadapata or Hakimpuree Jarda. Current consumption was associated with age, level of education, religion, occupation, being an income earner, marital status, and age at first use of smokeless tobacco. After adjustment for demographic variables, current consumption was associated with being over 25 years of age, a lower level of education, being an income earner, being Muslim, and being divorced, separated or widowed. Conclusion: The prevalence of smokeless tobacco consumption is high among rural women in Bangladesh and the age of onset is considerably older than that for smoking. Smokeless tobacco consumption is likely to be producing a considerable burden of non-communicable disease in Bangladesh. Smokeless tobacco control strategies should be implemented. © 2014 Hossain et al.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0084470
Co-authors Milton Hasnat
2014 Toumbourou JW, Kypri K, Jones SC, 'Should the legal age for buying alcohol be raised to 21 years? REPLY', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 201 571-571 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.5694/mja14.00988
2014 Toumbourou JW, Kypri K, Jones SC, Hickie IB, 'Should the legal age for buying alcohol be raised to 21 years?', Medical Journal of Australia, 200 568-570 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.5694/mja13.10465
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2014 Kypri K, Davie G, McElduff P, Connor J, Langley J, 'Effects of lowering the minimum alcohol purchasing age on weekend assaults resulting in hospitalization in New Zealand', American Journal of Public Health, 104 1396-1401 (2014) [C1]

Objectives. We estimated the effects on assault rates of lowering the minimum alcohol purchasing age in New Zealand from 20 to 18 years. We hypothesized that the law change would ... [more]

Objectives. We estimated the effects on assault rates of lowering the minimum alcohol purchasing age in New Zealand from 20 to 18 years. We hypothesized that the law change would increase assaults among young people aged 18 to 19 years (the target group) and those aged 15 to 17 years via illegal sales or alcohol supplied by older friends or family members. Methods. Using Poisson regression, we examined weekend assaults resulting in hospitalization from 1995 to 2011. Outcomes were assessed separately by gender among young people aged 15 to 17 years and those aged 18 to 19 years, with those aged 20 and 21 years included as a control group. Results. Relative to young men aged 20 to 21 years, assaults increased significantly among young men aged 18 to 19 years between 1995 and 1999 (the period before the law change), as well as the postchange periods 2003 to 2007 (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05, 1.39) and 2008 to 2011 (IRR = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.05, 1.37). Among boys aged 15 to 17 years, assaults increased during the postchange periods 1999 to 2003 (IRR = 1.28; 95% CI = 1.10, 1.49) and 2004 to 2007 (IRR = 1.25; 95% CI = 1.08, 1.45). There were no statistically significant effects among girls and young women. Conclusions. Lowering the minimum alcohol purchasing age increased weekend assaults resulting in hospitalization among young males 15 to 19 years of age.

DOI 10.2105/AJPH.2014.301889
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff
2014 Kypri K, Vater T, Bowe SJ, Saunders JB, Cunningham JA, Horton NJ, McCambridge J, 'Web-based alcohol screening and brief intervention for university students: A randomized trial', JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association, 311 1218-1224 (2014) [C1]

IMPORTANCE: Unhealthy alcohol use is a leading contributor to the global burden of disease, particularly among young people. Systematic reviews suggest efficacy of web-based alcoh... [more]

IMPORTANCE: Unhealthy alcohol use is a leading contributor to the global burden of disease, particularly among young people. Systematic reviews suggest efficacy of web-based alcohol screening and brief intervention and call for effectiveness trials in settings where it could be sustainably delivered. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a national web-based alcohol screening and brief intervention program. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A multisite, double-blind, parallel-group, individually randomized trial was conducted at 7 New Zealand universities. In April and May of 2010, invitations containing hyperlinks to the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption (AUDITC) screening test were e-mailed to 14 991 students aged 17 to 24 years. INTERVENTIONS: Participants who screened positive (AUDIT-C score =4) were randomized to undergo screening alone or to 10 minutes of assessment and feedback (including comparisons with medical guidelines and peer norms) on alcohol expenditure, peak blood alcohol concentration, alcohol dependence, and access to help and information. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: A fully automated 5-month follow-up assessment was conducted that measured 6 primary outcomes: consumption per typical occasion, drinking frequency, volume of alcohol consumed, an academic problems score, and whether participants exceeded medical guidelines for acute harm (binge drinking) and chronic harm (heavy drinking). A Bonferroni-corrected significance threshold of .0083 was used to account for the 6 comparisons and a sensitivity analysis was used to assess possible attrition bias. RESULTS: Of 5135 students screened, 3422 scored 4 or greater and were randomized, and 83% were followed up. There was a significant effect on 1 of the 6 prespecified outcomes. Relative to control participants, those who received intervention consumed less alcohol per typical drinking occasion (median 4 drinks [interquartile range {IQR}, 2-8] vs 5 drinks [IQR 2-8]; rate ratio [RR], 0.93 [99.17%CI, 0.86-1.00]; P = .005) but not less often (RR, 0.95 [99.17%CI, 0.88-1.03]; P = .08) or less overall (RR, 0.95 [99.17%CI, 0.81-1.10]; P = .33). Academic problem scores were not lower (RR, 0.91 [99.17%CI, 0.76-1.08]; P = .14) and effects on the risks of binge drinking (odds ratio [OR], 0.84 [99.17%CI, 0.67-1.05]; P = .04) and heavy drinking (OR, 0.77 [99.17%CI, 0.56-1.05]; P = .03) were not significantly significant. In a sensitivity analysis accounting for attrition, the effect on alcohol per typical drinking occasion was no longer statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: A national web-based alcohol screening and brief intervention program produced no significant reductions in the frequency or overall volume of drinking or academic problems. There remains a possibility of a small reduction in the amount of alcohol consumed per typical drinking occasion. TRIAL REGISTRATION: anzctr.org.au Identifier: ACTRN12610000279022. Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1001/jama.2014.2138
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 11
2014 Palfai TP, Saitz R, Winter M, Brown TA, Kypri K, Goodness TM, et al., 'Web-based screening and brief intervention for student marijuana use in a university health center: Pilot study to examine the implementation of eCHECKUP TO GO in different contexts', Addictive Behaviors, 39 1346-1352 (2014) [C1]

This pilot study sought to test the feasibility of procedures to screen students for marijuana use in Student Health Services (SHS) and test the efficacy of a web-based interventi... [more]

This pilot study sought to test the feasibility of procedures to screen students for marijuana use in Student Health Services (SHS) and test the efficacy of a web-based intervention designed to reduce marijuana use and consequences. Students were asked to participate in voluntary screening of health behaviors upon arrival at SHS. One hundred and twenty-three students who used marijuana at least monthly completed assessments and were randomized to one of four intervention conditions in a 2 (intervention: Marijuana eCHECKUP TO GO vs. control). ×. 2 (site of intervention: on-site vs. off-site) between-groups design. Follow-up assessments were conducted online at 3 and 6. months. Latent growth modeling was used to provide effect size estimates for the influence of intervention on outcomes. One thousand and eighty undergraduate students completed screening. The intervention did not influence marijuana use frequency. However, there was evidence of a small overall intervention effect on marijuana-related consequences and a medium effect in stratified analyses in the on-site condition. Analyses of psychological variables showed that the intervention significantly reduced perceived norms regarding peer marijuana use. These findings demonstrate that it is feasible to identify marijuana users in SHS and deliver an automated web-based intervention to these students in different contexts. Effect size estimates suggest that the intervention has some promise as a means of correcting misperceptions of marijuana use norms and reducing marijuana-related consequences. Future work should test the efficacy of this intervention in a full scale randomized controlled trial. © 2013.

DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2014.04.025
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 McCambridge J, Kypri K, McElduff P, 'Regression to the mean and alcohol consumption: A cohort study exploring implications for the interpretation of change in control groups in brief intervention trials', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 135 156-159 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2013.11.017
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff
2014 McCambridge J, Kypri K, McElduff P, 'Regression to the mean and alcohol consumption: A cohort study exploring implications for the interpretation of change in control groups in brief intervention trials', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 135 156-159 (2014) [C1]

Background: Reductions in drinking among individuals randomised to control groups in brief alcohol intervention trials are common and suggest that asking study participants about ... [more]

Background: Reductions in drinking among individuals randomised to control groups in brief alcohol intervention trials are common and suggest that asking study participants about their drinking may itself cause them to reduce their consumption. We sought to test the hypothesis that the statistical artefact regression to the mean (RTM) explains part of the reduction in such studies. Methods: 967 participants in a cohort study of alcohol consumption in New Zealand provided data at baseline and again six months later. We use graphical methods and apply thresholds of 8, 12, 16 and 20 in AUDIT scores to explore RTM. Results: There was a negative association between baseline AUDIT scores and change in AUDIT scores from baseline to six months, which in the absence of bias and confounding, is RTM. Students with lower baseline scores tended to have higher follow-up scores and conversely, those with higher baseline scores tended to have lower follow-up scores. When a threshold score of 8 was used to select a subgroup, the observed mean change was approximately half of that observed without a threshold. The application of higher thresholds produced greater apparent reductions in alcohol consumption. Conclusions: Part of the reduction seen in the control groups of brief alcohol intervention trials is likely to be due to RTM and the amount of change is likely to be greater as the threshold for entry to the trial increases. Quantification of RTM warrants further study and should assist understanding assessment and other research participation effects. © 2013 The Authors.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2013.11.017
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff
2014 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Latter J, McElduff P, Saunders JB, Saitz R, et al., 'Prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use in hospital outpatients', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 144 270-273 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.08.014
Co-authors John Attia, Natalie Johnson, Patrick Mcelduff, Joanna Latter, Luke Wolfenden
2014 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Latter J, McElduff P, Saunders JB, Saitz R, et al., 'Prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use in hospital outpatients', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 144 270-273 (2014) [C1]

Background: Few studies have examined the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use in the hospital outpatient setting. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use a... [more]

Background: Few studies have examined the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use in the hospital outpatient setting. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use among patients attending a broad range of outpatient clinics at a large public hospital in Australia. Methods: Adult hospital outpatients were invited to complete the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test Consumption questions (AUDIT-C) using an iPad as part of a randomised trial testing the efficacy of alcohol electronic screening and brief intervention. Unhealthy alcohol use was defined as an AUDIT-C score =5 among men and =4 among women. Results: Sixty percent (3616/6070) of invited hospital outpatients consented, of whom 89% (3206/3616) provided information on their alcohol consumption (either reported they had not consumed any alcohol in the last 12 months or completed the AUDIT-C). The prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use was 34.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 33.0-36.3%). The prevalence among men aged 18-24 years, 25-39 years, 40-59 years and 60 years and older, was 74.4% (95% CI: 68.4-80.4%), 54.3% (95% CI: 48.7-59.8%), 44.1% (95% CI: 39.9-48.3%), and 27.0% (95% CI: 23.6-30.4%), respectively (43.1% overall; 95% CI: 40.8-45.5%). The prevalence among women aged 18-24 years, 25-39 years, 40-59 years, and 60 years and older, was 48.6% (95% CI: 39.2-58.1%), 36.9% (95% CI: 31.2-42.6%), 25.2% (95% CI: 21.5-29.0%) and 14.5% (95% CI: 11.7-17.3%), respectively (24.9% overall; 95% CI: 22.7-27.1%). Conclusion: A large number of hospital outpatients who are not currently seeking treatment for their drinking could benefit from effective intervention in this setting.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.08.014
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Natalie Johnson, John Attia, Luke Wolfenden, Joanna Latter
2014 Cousins K, Connor JL, Kypri K, 'Effects of the Campus Watch intervention on alcohol consumption and related harm in a university population', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 143 120-126 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.07.015
2014 McCambridge J, Kypri K, Elbourne D, 'In randomization we trust? There are overlooked problems in experimenting with people in behavioral intervention trials', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 67 247-253 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2013.09.004
Citations Scopus - 13
2014 McCambridge J, Kypri K, Elbourne D, 'In randomization we trust? There are overlooked problems in experimenting with people in behavioral intervention trials', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 67 247-253 (2014) [C1]

Objectives Behavioral intervention trials may be susceptible to poorly understood forms of bias stemming from research participation. This article considers how assessment and oth... [more]

Objectives Behavioral intervention trials may be susceptible to poorly understood forms of bias stemming from research participation. This article considers how assessment and other prerandomization research activities may introduce bias that is not fully prevented by randomization. Study Design and Setting This is a hypothesis-generating discussion article. Results An additivity assumption underlying conventional thinking in trial design and analysis is problematic in behavioral intervention trials. Postrandomization sources of bias are somewhat better known within the clinical epidemiological and trials literatures. Neglect of attention to possible research participation effects means that unintended participant behavior change stemming from artifacts of the research process has unknown potential to bias estimates of behavioral intervention effects. Conclusion Studies are needed to evaluate how research participation effects are introduced, and we make suggestions for how research in this area may be taken forward, including how these issues may be addressed in the design and conduct of trials. It is proposed that attention to possible research participation effects can improve the design of trials evaluating behavioral and other interventions and inform the interpretation of existing evidence.© 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2013.09.004
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 19
2014 McCambridge J, Kypri K, Elbourne D, 'In randomization we trust? There are overlooked problems in experimenting with people in behavioral intervention trials', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 67 247-253 (2014) [C1]

Objectives Behavioral intervention trials may be susceptible to poorly understood forms of bias stemming from research participation. This article considers how assessment and oth... [more]

Objectives Behavioral intervention trials may be susceptible to poorly understood forms of bias stemming from research participation. This article considers how assessment and other prerandomization research activities may introduce bias that is not fully prevented by randomization. Study Design and Setting This is a hypothesis-generating discussion article. Results An additivity assumption underlying conventional thinking in trial design and analysis is problematic in behavioral intervention trials. Postrandomization sources of bias are somewhat better known within the clinical epidemiological and trials literatures. Neglect of attention to possible research participation effects means that unintended participant behavior change stemming from artifacts of the research process has unknown potential to bias estimates of behavioral intervention effects. Conclusion Studies are needed to evaluate how research participation effects are introduced, and we make suggestions for how research in this area may be taken forward, including how these issues may be addressed in the design and conduct of trials. It is proposed that attention to possible research participation effects can improve the design of trials evaluating behavioral and other interventions and inform the interpretation of existing evidence.© 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2013.09.004
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 19
2014 McCambridge J, Kypri K, Elbourne D, 'Research participation effects: a skeleton in the methodological cupboard', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, (2014) [C3]

Objective: There have been concerns about impacts of various aspects of taking part in research studies for a century. The concerns have not, however, been sufficiently well conce... [more]

Objective: There have been concerns about impacts of various aspects of taking part in research studies for a century. The concerns have not, however, been sufficiently well conceptualized to form traditions of study capable of defining and elaborating the nature of these problems. In this article we present a new way of thinking about a set of issues attracting long-standing attention. Study Design and Setting: We briefly review existing concepts and empirical work on well-known biases in surveys and cohort studies and propose that they are connected. Results: We offer the construct of "research participation effects" (RPEs) as a vehicle for advancing multi-disciplinary understanding of biases. Empirical studies are needed to identify conditions in which RPE may be sufficiently large to warrant modifications of study design, analytic methods, or interpretation. We consider the value of adopting a more participant-centred view of the research process as a way of thinking about these issues, which may also have benefits in relation to research methodology more broadly. Conclusion: Researchers may too readily overlook the extent to which research studies are unusual contexts, and that people may react in unexpected ways to what we invite them to do, introducing a range of biases. © 2014 The Authors.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2014.03.002
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
2014 Kypri K, Wolfenden L, Langley J, Hutchesson M, Voas R, 'Public, official, and industry submissions on a Bill to increase the alcohol minimum purchasing age: A critical analysis', International Journal of Drug Policy, (2014) [C1]

Background: In 2005 a Bill was introduced to the New Zealand parliament to increase the alcohol minimum purchasing age (MPA) from 18 to 20 years and submissions were invited from ... [more]

Background: In 2005 a Bill was introduced to the New Zealand parliament to increase the alcohol minimum purchasing age (MPA) from 18 to 20 years and submissions were invited from interested parties. We sought to characterise and critique the arguments tendered for and against the proposal. Methods: We used template analysis to study written submissions on the Bill from 178 people and organisations in New Zealand. Independent raters coded submissions according to the source, whether for or opposed, and the arguments employed. Results: The most common sources of submissions were members of the public (28%), the alcohol industry (20%), and NGOs (20%). Overall, 40% opposed increasing the MPA, 40% were in favour, 4% supported a split MPA (18 years for on-premise, 20 years for off-premise), 7% were equivocal, and 8% offered no comment. The most common proponents of increasing the MPA were NGOs (36%) and members of the public (30%) and their arguments concerned the expected positive effects on public health (36%) and public disorder/property damage (16%), while 24% argued that other strategies should be used as well. The most common sources of opposition to increasing the MPA were the alcohol industry (50%) and the public (20%). It was commonly claimed that the proposed law change would be ineffective in reducing harm (22%), that other strategies should be used instead (16%), that it would infringe adult rights (15%), and that licensed premises are safe environments for young people (14%). There were noteworthy examples of NGOs and government agencies opposing the law change. The alcohol industry maximised its impact via multiple submissions appealing to individual rights while neglecting to report or accurately characterise the scientific evidence. Several health and welfare agencies presented confused logic and/or were selective in their use of scientific evidence. Conclusion: In contrast to the fragmented and inconsistent response from government and NGOs, the alcohol industry was organised and united, with multiple submissions from the sector with most at stake, namely the hospitality industry, and supporting submissions from the manufacturing, import, and wholesale sectors. Systematic reviews of research evidence should be routinely undertaken to guide the legislature and submissions should be categorised on the basis of pecuniary interest. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugpo.2014.05.001
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Luke Wolfenden
2014 Kypri K, Maclennan B, 'Public participation in local alcohol regulation: Findings from a survey of New Zealand communities', Drug and Alcohol Review, 33 59-63 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12094
Citations Scopus - 1
2014 Kypri K, Maclennan B, 'Public participation in local alcohol regulation: Findings from a survey of New Zealand communities', Drug and Alcohol Review, 33 59-63 (2014) [C1]

Introduction and Aims: In many high-income countries, the responsibility for alcohol regulation is being devolved from central to local governments. Although seeking public input ... [more]

Introduction and Aims: In many high-income countries, the responsibility for alcohol regulation is being devolved from central to local governments. Although seeking public input is typically required by law, there remains little empirical evidence on whether and how the public is involved. We investigated public participation in local liquor licensing and related regulation in New Zealand. Design and Methods: In 2007, we randomly sampled 2337 residents from the national electoral roll in seven communities and invited them to complete a postal questionnaire assessing their level of general community engagement, whether they had taken action on alcohol issues, and barriers to participation they perceived or encountered. Results: A total of 1372 individuals responded (59% response). Fifty-two percent were current members of community organisations, and 40% had ever taken action on a local issue. Respondents considered alcohol to be a major problem locally, but only 4% had been involved in action to address a problem, whereas 18% had considered taking action. In their communities, 12% and 24%, respectively, felt they could influence the number or location of alcohol outlets. There was little variation across communities. Discussion and Conclusion: Despite high levels of general community engagement and alcohol being widely regarded as a local problem, few community members reported acting on alcohol issues, and their self-efficacy to effect change was low. © 2013 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

DOI 10.1111/dar.12094
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 Hossain MS, Kypri K, Rahman B, Milton AH, 'Smokeless tobacco consumption in the South Asian population of Sydney, Australia: Prevalence, correlates and availability', Drug and Alcohol Review, 33 86-92 (2014) [C1]

Aim.: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and identify correlates of smokeless tobacco consumption among the South Asian residents of Sydney, Australia. Methods.:... [more]

Aim.: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and identify correlates of smokeless tobacco consumption among the South Asian residents of Sydney, Australia. Methods.: A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a pretested, self-administered mailed questionnaire among members of Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi community associations in Sydney. Results.: Of 1600 individuals invited to participate, 419 responded (26%). Prevalence rates of ever consumption, more than 100 times consumption and current consumption were 72.1%, 65.9% and 17.1%, respectively. Men (74.3%) were more likely to ever consume than women (67.6%). Over 96% of consumers reported buying smokeless tobacco products from ethnic shops in Sydney. Current consumption of smokeless tobacco products was associated with country of birth: Indians (odds ratio 5.7, 95% confidence interval 2.3-14.5) and Pakistanis (odds ratio 3.1, 95% confidence interval 1.5-6.5) were more likely to be current consumers than Bangladeshis after adjusting for sociodemographic variables. For ever consumption, there was a positive association with age (P for trend=0.013) and male gender (odds ratio 2.1, 95% confidence interval 1.5-3.1). Conclusions.: Given the availability of smokeless tobacco and the high prevalence and potential adverse health consequences of consumption, smokeless tobacco consumption may produce a considerable burden of non-communicable disease in Australia. Effective control measures are needed, in particular enforcement of existing laws prohibiting the sale of these products. © 2013 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

DOI 10.1111/dar.12074
Co-authors Milton Hasnat
2014 Kypri K, Mcelduff P, Miller P, 'Restrictions in pub closing times and lockouts in Newcastle, Australia five years on', Drug and Alcohol Review, 33 323-326 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12123
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff
2014 Kypri K, Mcelduff P, Miller P, 'Restrictions in pub closing times and lockouts in Newcastle, Australia five years on', Drug and Alcohol Review, 33 323-326 (2014) [C1]

Introduction and Aims.: In 2008 pub closing times were restricted from 5am to 3:30am in the central business district (CBD) of Newcastle, Australia. A previous study showed a one-... [more]

Introduction and Aims.: In 2008 pub closing times were restricted from 5am to 3:30am in the central business district (CBD) of Newcastle, Australia. A previous study showed a one-third reduction in assaults in the 18 months following the restriction. We assessed whether the assault rate remained lower over the following 3.5 years and whether the introduction of a 'lockout' in nearby Hamilton was associated with a reduction in assaults there. Design and Methods.: We used a pre-post design with comparison against two post-change periods. The setting was Greater Newcastle (population 530 000) and subjects were persons apprehended for assault in the CBD and nearby Hamilton, an area with late trading pubs where a lockout and other strategies were implemented in 2010. Cases were police-recorded assault apprehensions occurring from 10pm to 6am in one pre-change period: January 2001 to March 2008, and two post-change periods: (i) April 2008 to September 2009 and (ii) October 2009 to March 2013. Negative binomial regression with terms for secular trend and seasonal effects was used to estimate Post1: Pre and Post2: Pre Incidence Rate Ratios and confidence intervals. Results.: In the CBD recorded assaults fell from 99/quarter before the restriction to 68/quarter in the first post-change period [incidence rate ratio (IRR) 0.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.55-0.82] and 71/quarter (IRR: 0.68, 95% CI: 0.55-0.85) in the later post-change period. In the same periods in Hamilton, assault rates were 23, 24, and 22 per quarter respectively. Discussion and Conclusions.: The restriction in closing time was associated with a sustained lower assault rate in the Newcastle CBD. We find no evidence that lockouts and other outlet management strategies were effective in Hamilton. [Kypri K, McElduff P, Miller P. Restrictions in pub closing times and lockouts in Newcastle Australia 5 years on. Drug Alcohol Rev. © 2014 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

DOI 10.1111/dar.12123
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff
2014 O'Brien KS, Ferris J, Greenlees I, Jowett S, Rhind D, Cook PA, Kypri K, 'Alcohol industry sponsorship and hazardous drinking in UK university students who play sport', ADDICTION, 109 1647-1654 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/add.12604
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2014 McCambridge J, Hawkins B, Kypri K, Miller P, Hastings G, 'Be aware of Drinkaware', Addiction, 109 519-524 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/add.12356
Citations Scopus - 6
2014 McCambridge J, Kypri K, Miller P, Hawkins B, Hastings G, 'Be aware of Drinkaware', Addiction, 109 519-524 (2014) [C2]

In 2006, Drinkaware was established as a charity in the United Kingdom following a memorandum of understanding between the Portman Group and various UK government agencies. This d... [more]

In 2006, Drinkaware was established as a charity in the United Kingdom following a memorandum of understanding between the Portman Group and various UK government agencies. This debate piece briefly reviews the international literature on industry social aspects organizations, examines the nature of Drinkaware's activities and considers how the public health community should respond. Although the British addiction field and the wider public health community have distanced themselves from the Portman Group, they have not done so from Drinkaware, even though Drinkaware was devised by the Portman Group to serve industry interests. Both long-standing and more recent developments indicate very high levels of industry influence on British alcohol policy, and Drinkaware provides one mechanism of influence. We suggest that working with, and for, industry bodies such as Drinkaware helps disguise fundamental conflicts of interest and serves only to legitimize corporate efforts to promote partnership as a means of averting evidence-based alcohol policies. We invite vigorous debate on these internationally significant issues and propose that similar industry bodies should be carefully studied in other countries. ©2013 The Authors. Addiction published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Society for the Study of Addiction.

DOI 10.1111/add.12356
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
2014 McCambridge J, Kypri K, Miller P, Hawkins B, Hastings G, 'From tobacco control to alcohol policy', Addiction, 109 528-529 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/add.12463
Citations Web of Science - 1
2014 Gilligan C, Toumbourou JW, Kypri K, McElduff P, 'Factors Associated With Parental Rules for Adolescent Alcohol Use', SUBSTANCE USE & MISUSE, 49 145-153 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/10826084.2013.824471
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Conor Gilligan
2014 McCambridge J, Kypri K, Bendtsen P, Porter J, 'Deception in Research Is Morally Problematic ... and so too Is Not Using It Morally: Reply to Open Peer Commentaries on "The Use of Deception in Public Health Behavioral Intervention Trials: A Case Study of Three Online Alcohol Trials"', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF BIOETHICS, 14 W9-W12 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1080/15265161.2014.862418
2014 McCambridge J, Kypri K, Miller P, Hawkins B, Hastings G, 'Be aware of Drinkaware', ADDICTION, 109 519-524 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/add.12356
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
2014 Gilligan C, Kypri K, Bourke J, 'Social networking versus facebook advertising to recruit survey respondents: a quasi-experimental study.', JMIR Research Protocols, 3 1-5 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/resprot.3317
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Conor Gilligan
2014 Cousins K, Connor JL, Kypri K, 'Effects of the Campus Watch intervention on alcohol consumption and related harm in a university population', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 143 120-126 (2014) [C1]

Background: High levels of drinking and alcohol-related problems are pervasive among university students in New Zealand and other high-income countries, where controls on alcohol ... [more]

Background: High levels of drinking and alcohol-related problems are pervasive among university students in New Zealand and other high-income countries, where controls on alcohol availability and promotion are typically weak. Environmental interventions to reduce hazardous drinking and harm have shown promise in general populations, but require further evidence of effectiveness in university settings. The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of a community liaison and security program, Campus Watch, on drinking patterns and alcohol-related harm among university students. Methods: The study used a quasi-experimental design with non-equivalent control sites using before (2005) and after (2009) observations. Participants were full-time students aged 17-25 years selected randomly from the enrolment lists of six New Zealand universities. Changes in scores on the alcohol use disorders identification consumption scale (AUDIT-C) and alcohol-related harms at the intervention campus were compared with those at control campuses using linear and logistic regression models. Results: Compared to control campuses, AUDIT-C scores decreased in students at the intervention campus (ß= -0.5, 95% CI: -0.6 to -0.3). Campus Watch was associated with reductions in some harms (independent of its effect on drinking), such as aggression (aOR 0.66, 95% CI: 0.46 to 0.94), but not other harms, e.g., blackouts (aOR 1.06, 95% CI: 0.89 to 1.27). Conclusion: While not being focused on alcohol per se, Campus Watch reduced alcohol consumption and some related harms. Such programs may be useful in similar environments where controls on alcohol availability and promotion cannot be affected and where informal controls are weak.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.07.015
2014 Connor J, Cousins K, Samaranayaka A, Kypri K, 'Situational and contextual factors that increase the risk of harm when students drink: Case-control and case-crossover investigation', Drug and Alcohol Review, 33 401-411 (2014) [C1]

Introduction and Aims: Better understanding of the circumstances of alcohol-related adverse events experienced by university students could identify opportunities for prevention. ... [more]

Introduction and Aims: Better understanding of the circumstances of alcohol-related adverse events experienced by university students could identify opportunities for prevention. We aimed to identify situational and contextual factors associated with unintentional injury, assault, unsafe sex, sexual assault and drink-driving/riding amongst university students. Design and Methods: We conducted a Web-based survey of full-time students aged 17-25 years at five New Zealand universities (n=2683) and carried out between- and within-subjects comparisons (case-control and case-crossover, respectively) of situational and contextual characteristics of events in the last seven days and control drinking occasions. Results: The response fraction was 49%. For the seven days preceding the survey, 4.9% of women and 7.4% of men reported at least one of the defined events while they were drinking or soon after. The number of drinking locations and getting drunker than expected were strongly associated with risk of an event in both case-control and case-crossover models, independent of consumption. Total number of drinks, drinking later and into the morning, and drinking with close friends were also associated with increased risk in the case-control analysis. No gender difference was seen after controlling for drinking and contextual factors. Discussion and Conclusions: Strategies to reduce the duration and volume of alcohol consumption, including earlier closing of licensed premises, should be considered as countermeasures for alcohol-related adverse events. The use of two different comparison groups for the circumstances of adverse events when drinking can strengthen inferences about the contribution of contextual factors. © 2014 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

DOI 10.1111/dar.12172
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 Gilligan C, Kypri K, 'Recruiting by registered versus standard mail', Epidemiology, 25 317-317 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1097/EDE.0000000000000065
Co-authors Conor Gilligan
2013 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Saunders JB, Saitz R, Attia J, Dunlop A, et al., 'The hospital outpatient alcohol project (HOAP): protocol for an individually randomized, parallel-group superiority trial of electronic alcohol screening and brief intervention versus screening alone for unhealthy alcohol use.', Addict Sci Clin Pract, 8 14 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1940-0640-8-14
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Luke Wolfenden, John Attia, Natalie Johnson
2013 Cunningham JA, Kypri K, McCambridge J, 'Exploratory randomized controlled trial evaluating the impact of a waiting list control design', BMC Medical Research Methodology, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2288-13-150
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
2013 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Attia J, 'Development of an electronic alcohol screening and brief intervention program for hospital outpatients with unhealthy alcohol use.', JMIR Res Protoc, 2 e36 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/resprot.2697
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Natalie Johnson, John Attia
2013 Langley J, Gulliver P, Cryer C, Kypri K, Civil I, Davie G, 'Use of alcohol intoxication codes for serious non-fatal hospitalised injury', INJURY-INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF THE CARE OF THE INJURED, 44 1472-1476 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.injury.2012.11.021
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2013 Connor J, Psutka R, Cousins K, Gray A, Kypri K, 'Risky Drinking, Risky Sex: A National Study of New Zealand University Students', ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH, 37 1971-1978 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/acer.12175
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2013 Said D, Kypri K, Bowman J, 'Risk factors for mental disorder among university students in Australia: findings from a web-based cross-sectional survey', SOCIAL PSYCHIATRY AND PSYCHIATRIC EPIDEMIOLOGY, 48 935-944 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00127-012-0574-x
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Jenny Bowman
2013 Kypri K, Connor J, Maclennan B, Sellman D, 'What became of New Zealand's golden opportunity for liquor law reform?', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 32 557-560 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/dar.12075
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
2013 Kypri K, McCambridge J, Vater T, Bowe SJ, Saunders JB, Cunningham JA, Horton NJ, 'Web-based alcohol intervention for Maori university students: double-blind, multi-site randomized controlled trial', ADDICTION, 108 331-338 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2012.04067.x
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 17
2013 Maclennan B, Kypri K, Room R, Langley J, 'Local government alcohol policy development: case studies in three New Zealand communities', ADDICTION, 108 885-895 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/add.12017
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2013 Hallett J, Howat P, McManus A, Meng R, Maycock B, Kypri K, 'Academic and personal problems among Australian university students who drink at hazardous levels: web-based survey.', Health Promot J Austr, 24 170-177 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/HE13094
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2013 Wolfenden L, Kypri K, Britton B, James EL, Francis JL, Wyse R, 'Effects of Introductory Information on Self-Reported Health Behavior', EPIDEMIOLOGY, 24 170-172 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/EDE.0b013e3182788c98
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, Erica James
2013 McCambridge J, Kypri K, Bendtsen P, Porter J, 'The Use of Deception in Public Health Behavioral Intervention Trials: A Case Study of Three Online Alcohol Trials', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF BIOETHICS, 13 39-47 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/15265161.2013.839751
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
2012 Psutka R, Connor J, Cousins K, Kypri K, 'Sexual health, risks, and experiences of New Zealand university students: Findings from a national cross-sectional study', New Zealand Medical Journal, 125 62-73 (2012) [C1]

Aim To describe the sexual health and behaviour of university students as a sentinel population of young New Zealanders. Methods A random sample of 5770 students aged 17-24 from u... [more]

Aim To describe the sexual health and behaviour of university students as a sentinel population of young New Zealanders. Methods A random sample of 5770 students aged 17-24 from universities across New Zealand were invited to participate in an online survey in 2009. Questions on current sexual behaviours, lifetime unintended pregnancies and terminations, and sexual orientation were included. Results 2922 students responded (51% of the sample), including 1857 women (61% of respondents), reflecting the high proportion of women in the university population (57%) and higher response from women. Sixty-nine percent of both men and women had ever had sex. Of these, 47% reported =3 partners ever, and 20% had =3 partners in the last 12 months, with no significant gender differences. Describing the last time they had sex, 58% of men and 51% of women reported using a condom and 38% of men and 29% of women had consumed alcohol. Approximately 6% of women and 5% of men reported ever having sex that resulted in an unintentional pregnancy. Of these pregnancies, 74% of women and 72% of men reported a termination while another 19% of men did not know the outcome. Conclusion Multiple sexual partnerships were common. Condom use was uncommon and inversely associated with number of recent sexual partners. One in 20 students had or contributed to at least one unintentional pregnancy. The prevalence of risky sexual behaviours in this population raises concern about the number of students at risk of sexually transmitted infections and unintentional pregnancies. © NZMA.

Citations Scopus - 2
2012 Meiklejohn J, Connor J, Kypri K, 'One in three New Zealand drinkers reports being harmed by their own drinking in the past year', New Zealand Medical Journal, 125 28-36 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
2012 Maclennan B, Kypri K, Langley J, Room R, 'Non-response bias in a community survey of drinking, alcohol-related experiences and public opinion on alcohol policy', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 126 189-194 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2012.05.014
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 11
2012 Gilligan C, Kypri K, Lubman D, 'Changing parental behaviour to reduce risky drinking among adolescents: Current evidence and future directions', Alcohol and Alcoholism, 47 349-354 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Conor Gilligan
2012 Meiklejohn J, Connor JL, Kypri K, 'Drinking concordance and relationship satisfaction in New Zealand couples', Alcohol and Alcoholism, 47 606-611 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2012 Maclennan B, Kypri K, Langley J, Room R, 'Public sentiment towards alcohol and local government alcohol policies in New Zealand', International Journal of Drug Policy, 23 45-53 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2012 Baker AL, Callister R, Kelly PJ, Kypri K, ''Do more, smoke less!' Harm reduction in action for smokers with mental health/substance use problems who cannot or will not quit', Drug and Alcohol Review, 31 714-717 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Robin Callister
2012 Gilligan C, Kypri K, Johnson NA, Lynagh MC, Love S, 'Parental supply of alcohol and adolescent risky drinking', Drug and Alcohol Review, 31 754-762 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Conor Gilligan, Natalie Johnson, Marita Lynagh
2012 McCambridge J, Kypri K, Wilson AJ, 'How should debriefing be undertaken in web-based studies? Findings from a randomized controlled trial', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 14 e157 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Amanda Wilson
2012 Hallett J, Howat PM, Maycock BR, McManus A, Kypri K, Dhaliwal SS, 'Undergraduate student drinking and related harms at an Australian university: Web-based survey of a large random sample', BMC Public Health, 12 37 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 11
2012 Gilligan C, Kypri K, 'Parent attitudes, family dynamics and adolescent drinking: qualitative study of the Australian parenting guidelines for adolescent alcohol use', BMC Public Health, 12 491 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Conor Gilligan
2012 Meiklejohn J, Connor J, Kypri K, 'The effect of low survey response rates on estimates of alcohol consumption in a general population survey', PLoS One, 7 e35527 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 13
2012 Lapham GT, Hawkins EJ, Chavez LJ, Achtmeyer CE, Williams EC, Thomas RM, et al., 'Feedback from recently returned veterans on an anonymous web-based brief alcohol intervention', Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, 7 1-12 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
2011 Cunningham JA, Kypri K, McCambridge J, 'The use of emerging technologies in alcohol treatment', Alcohol Research & Health, 33 320-326 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 17
2011 Kypri K, McCambridge J, Wilson AJ, Attia JR, Sheeran P, Bowe S, Vater T, 'Effects of study design and allocation on participant behaviour- ESDA: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial', Trials, 12 42 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1745-6215-12-42
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Amanda Wilson, John Attia
2011 Connor JL, Kypri K, Bell ML, Cousins K, 'Alcohol involvement in aggression between intimate partners in New Zealand: a national cross-sectional study', BMJ Open, 1 1-10 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2011 Skov SJ, Chikritzhs TN, Kypri K, Miller PG, Hall WD, Daube MM, Moodie AR, 'Is the 'alcopops' tax working?: Probably yes but there is a bigger picture', Medical Journal of Australia, 195 84-86 (2011) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
2011 Maclennan B, Kypri K, Langley J, Room R, 'Public opinion and local government alcohol policy: A study of seven New Zealand communities', Contemporary Drug Problems, 38 367-386 (2011) [C1]
2011 Kypri K, Samaranayaka A, Connor J, Langley JD, Maclennan B, 'Non-response bias in a web-based health behaviour survey of New Zealand tertiary students', Preventive Medicine, 53 274-277 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 17
2011 Connor JL, Kypri K, Bell ML, Cousins K, 'Alcohol outlet density, levels of drinking and alcohol-related harm in New Zealand: a national study', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 65 841-846 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 13
2011 Cunningham JA, Kypri K, McCambridge J, 'The use of emerging technologies in alcohol treatment', Alcohol research & health : the journal of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 33 320-326 (2011)

Emerging technologies, such as the Internet and text messaging, have an ever-growing role in providing services to problem drinkers. This article summarizes selected examples of e... [more]

Emerging technologies, such as the Internet and text messaging, have an ever-growing role in providing services to problem drinkers. This article summarizes selected examples of emerging technologies that have been developed and implemented as stand-alone interventions and as part of other face-to-face interventions. It provides a taste of the different opportunities available for implementing emerging technologies as a way to improve the accessibility and effectiveness of services for problem drinkers.

Citations Scopus - 1
2011 Kypri K, Maclennan B, Langley JD, Connor JL, 'The Alcohol Reform Bill: More tinkering than reform in response to the New Zealand public's demand for better liquor laws', Drug and Alcohol Review, 30 428-433 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 5
2011 Kypri K, Jones C, McElduff P, Barker DJ, 'Effects of restricting pub closing times on night-time assaults in an Australian city', Addiction, 106 303-310 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2010.03125.x
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff
2011 Kypri K, Maclennan B, 'Commentary on Melson et al. (2011): Pluralistic ignorance is probably real but important questions remain about its relation to drinking and role in intervention', Addiction, 106 1085-1086 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
2011 Maclennan B, Langley J, Kypri K, 'Distributing surveys: Postal versus drop-and-collect', Epidemiology, 22 443-444 (2011) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2010 Howat P, Hallett J, Kypri K, Maycock B, Dhaliwal S, McManus A, 'Tobacco smoking in an Australian university sample and implications for health promotion', Preventive Medicine, 51 425-426 (2010) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
2010 McGee R, Williams S, Kypri K, 'College students' readiness to reduce binge drinking: Criterion validity of a brief measure', DRUG AND ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE, 109 236-238 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2009.12.009
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2010 Kypri K, Paschall MJ, Langley JD, Baxter J, Bourdeau B, 'The role of drinking locations in university student drinking: Findings from a national web-based survey', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 111 38-43 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2010.03.018
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 14
2010 Moss AC, Dyer KR, Albery IP, Allsop S, Kypri K, Erskine J, Mackintosh D, 'Alcohol pharmacokinetics, decision making and folk wisdom: A reply to Moxnes and Jensen (2009)', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 109 1-3 (2010) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2010 Kypri K, Langley JD, Connor J, 'Alcohol in our lives: A once-in-a generation opportunity for liquor law reform in New Zealand', Drug and Alcohol Review, 29 1-4 (2010) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
2010 Connor J, Gray A, Kypri K, 'Drinking history, current drinking and problematic sexual experiences among university students', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 34 487-494 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00595.x
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 12
2010 Cousins K, Connor JL, Kypri K, 'Reducing alcohol-related harm and social disorder in a university community: A framework for evaluation', Injury Prevention, 16 e1-e6 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/ip.2010.027961
2010 Dean J, Kypri K, McCambridge J, Cunnigham JA, Vater T, Bowe S, et al., 'Web-based alcohol screening and brief intervention for Maori and non-Maori: The New Zealand e-SBINZ trials', BMC Public Health, 10 1-7 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-781
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
2009 McCambridge J, Kypri K, 'The price of alcohol and the value of the ceteris paribus assumption', Addiction Research and Theory, 17 580-582 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/16066350903145106
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2009 Kypri K, Hallett J, Howat P, McManus A, Maycock B, Bowe SJ, Horton NJ, 'Randomized controlled trial of proactive web-based alcohol screening and brief intervention for university students', Archives of Internal Medicine, 169 1508-1514 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1001/archinternmed.2009.249
Citations Scopus - 66Web of Science - 61
2009 Chikritzhs TN, Dietze PM, Allsop SJ, Daube MM, Hall WD, Kypri K, 'The 'alcopops' tax: Heading in the right direction', Medical Journal of Australia, 190 294-295 (2009) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 19
2009 Miller PG, Kypri K, Chikritzhs TN, Skov SJ, Rubin G, 'Health experts reject industry-backed funding for alcohol research', Medical Journal of Australia, 190 713-714 (2009) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2009 McCambridge J, Kypri K, Attia JR, Elbourne D, 'Re: Promoting regular mammography screening I: A systematic assessment of validity in a randomized trial', Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 101 1029-1030 (2009) [C3]
DOI 10.1093/jnci/djp154
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Attia
2009 McCambridge J, Kypri K, Elbourne DR, 'A surgical safety checklist', New England Journal of Medicine, 360 2373-2374 (2009) [C3]
DOI 10.1056/NEJMc090417
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 7
2009 Kypri K, Davie G, Langley J, Voas R, Begg D, 'The utility of routinely collected data in evaluating important policy changes: The New Zealand alcohol purchasing age limit example', American Journal of Public Health, 99 1212-1215 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.2105/ajph.2007.120212
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
2009 Kypri K, Paschall MJ, Langley J, Baxter J, Cashell-Smith M, Bourdeau B, 'Drinking and alcohol-related harm among New Zealand university students: Findings from a national web-based survey', Alcoholism-Clinical and Experimental Research, 33 307-314 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1530-0277.2008.00834.x
Citations Scopus - 60Web of Science - 47
2009 Miller P, Kypri K, 'Why we will not accept funding from Drinkwise', Drug and Alcohol Review, 28 324-326 (2009) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2009.00072.x
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 9
2009 Kypri K, Lee N, 'New technologies in the prevention and treatment of substance use problems', Drug and Alcohol Review, 28 1-2 (2009) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2008.00014.x
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2009 Hallett J, Maycock B, Kypri K, Howat P, McManus A, 'Development of a Web-based alcohol intervention for university students: Processes and challenges', Drug and Alcohol Review, 28 31-39 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2008.00008.x
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 24
2009 Foxcroft DR, Kypri K, Simonite V, 'Bayes' Theorem to estimate population prevalence from Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) scores', Addiction, 104 1132-1137 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2009.02574.x
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2009 Kypri K, Walsh RA, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'Australian universities' open door policies on alcohol industry research funding', Addiction, 104 1765-1767 (2009) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2009.02651.x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2009 Paschall MJ, Grube JW, Kypri K, 'Alcohol control policies and alcohol consumption by youth: A multi-national study', Addiction, 104 1849-1855 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2009.02698.x
2009 Kypri K, O'Brien K, Miller P, 'Time for precautionary action on alcohol industry funding of sporting bodies', Addiction, 104 1949-1950 (2009) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2009.02711.x
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2009 Wolfenden L, Kypri K, Freund MA, Hodder R, 'Obtaining active parental consent for school-based research: A guide for researchers', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 33 270-275 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2009.00387.x
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden
2009 Hay G, Kypri K, Whigham P, Langley J, 'Potential biases due to geocoding error in spatial analyses of official data', Health and Place, 15 562-567 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.healthplace.2008.09.002
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
2009 Hay GC, Whigham PA, Kypri K, Langley JD, 'Neighbourhood deprivation and access to alcohol outlets: A national study', Health and Place, 15 1086-1093 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.healthplace.2009.05.008
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 18
2008 Kypri K, Langley JD, Saunders JB, Cashell-Smith ML, Herbison P, 'Randomized controlled trial of Web-based alcohol screening and brief intervention in primary care', Archives of Internal Medicine, 168 530-536 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1001/archinternmed.2007.109
Citations Scopus - 95Web of Science - 80
2008 Cousins K, Kypri K, 'Alcohol advertising in the New Zealand university student press', Drug and Alcohol Review, 27 566-569 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09595230802245246
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2008 O'Brien KS, Hunter J, Kypri K, Ali A, 'Gender equality in university sportspeople's drinking', Drug and Alcohol Review, 27 659-665 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09595230801935664
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
2008 Kypri K, Bell ML, Hay GC, Baxter J, 'Alcohol outlet density and university student drinking: A national study', Addiction, 103 1131-1138 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2008.002239.x
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 40
2008 O'Brien KS, Kypri K, 'Alcohol industry sponsorship and hazardous drinking among sportspeople', Addiction, 103 1961-1966 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2008.02371.x
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 31
2008 Langley J, Kypri K, Cryer C, Davie G, 'Assessing the validity of potential alcohol-related non-fatal injury indicators', Addiction, 103 397-404 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2007.02089.x
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
2007 Kypri K, Paschall MJ, Maclennan B, Langley JD, 'Intoxication by drinking location: A web-based diary study in a New Zealand university community', Addictive Behaviors, 32 2586-2596 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2007.05.013
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 19
2007 Kypri K, 'Methodological issues in alcohol screening and brief intervention research: Methodology trial, screening, brief intervention, alcohol, drinking', Substance Abuse, 28 31-42 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1300/j465v28n03_04
Citations Scopus - 18
2007 Kypri K, Dean JI, Stojanovski E, 'Parent attitudes on the supply of alcohol to minors', Drug and Alcohol Review, 26 41-47 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09595230601037018
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Elizabeth Stojanovski
2007 Cashell-Smith ML, Connor JL, Kypri K, 'Harmful effects of alcohol on sexual behaviour in a New Zealand university community', Drug and Alcohol Review, 26 645-651 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09595230701613577
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 11
2007 Kypri K, Langley JD, Saunders JB, Cashell-Smith ML, 'Assessment may conceal therapeutic benefit: findings from a randomized controlled trial for hazardous drinking', Addiction, 102 62-70 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2006.01632.x
Citations Scopus - 103Web of Science - 92
2007 Karam E, Kypri K, Salamoun M, 'Alcohol use among college students: An international perspective', Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 20 213-221 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/YCO.0b013e3280fa836c
Citations Scopus - 96Web of Science - 80
2007 Kypri K, McManus A, Howat PM, Maycock BR, Hallett JD, Chikritzhs TN, 'Ingredient and nutrition information labelling of alcoholic beverages: Do consumers want it?', Medical Journal of Australia, 187 669 (2007) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
2006 Kypri K, Voas RB, Langley JD, Stephenson SCR, Begg DJ, Tippetts AS, Davie GS, 'Minimum purchasing age for alcohol and traffic crash injuries among 15- to 19-year-olds in New Zealand (vol 96, pg 126, 2006)', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 96 591-591 (2006)
2006 Kypri K, Voas RB, Langley JD, Stephenson SCR, Begg DJ, Tippetts AS, Davie GS, 'Minimum purchasing age for alcohol and traffic crash injuries among 15- to 19-year-olds in New Zealand.(vol 96, pg 126, 2006)', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 96 767-767 (2006)
2006 Kypri K, Voas RB, Langley JD, Stephenson SCR, Begg DJ, Tippetts AS, Davie GS, 'Erratum: Minimum purchasing age for alcohol and traffic crash injuries among 15- to 19-year-olds in New Zealand (American Journal of Public Health (2006) 96 (126-131) DOI:10.2105/AJPH.2005.073122)', American Journal of Public Health, 96 591-591 (2006)
2006 Kypri K, Voas RB, Langley JD, Stephenson SCR, Begg DJ, Tippetts AS, Davie GS, 'Erratum: Minimum purchasing age for alcohol and traffic crash injuries among 15- to 19-year-olds in New Zealand (American Jourmal of Public Health (2006) 96 (126-131) doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2005.073122', American Journal of Public Health, 96 767-767 (2006)
2006 Kypri K, Voas RB, Langley JD, Stephenson SCR, Begg DJ, Tippetts AS, Davie GS, 'Minimum purchasing age for alcohol and traffic crash injuries among 15-to 19-year-olds in New Zealand', American Journal of Public Health, 96 126-131 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.2105/AJPH.2005.073122
Citations Scopus - 62Web of Science - 57
2006 Paschall MJ, Kypri K, Saltz RF, 'Friday class and heavy alcohol use in a sample of New Zealand college students', Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 67 764-769 (2006) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 13
2006 Kypri K, Langley J, 'Splitting the alcohol purchase age: gambling with youth health', Drug and Alcohol Review, 25 293-295 (2006) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2006 Langley J, Kypri K, 'Regarding New Zealand medical association's position on the minimum purchase age for alcohol [1]', New Zealand Medical Journal, 119 (2006)
Citations Scopus - 1
2006 Langley J, Kypri K, 'More on alcohol and youth. Has the NZMA demonstrated that it is not a credible source of advice to Parliament? [1]', New Zealand Medical Journal, 119 (2006)
2006 Langley J, Kypri K, 'More on alcohol and youth. Has the NZMA demonstrated that it is not aa credible source of advice to Parliament?', The New Zealand Medical Journal, 119 1-3 (2006) [C3]
2006 Langley J, Kypri K, 'Regarding New Zealand Medical Association's position on the minimum purchase age for alcohol', The New Zealand Medical journal, 119 1-3 (2006) [C3]
2006 Langley J, Kypri K, 'Politics can be deadly', Injury Prevention, 12 69-70 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/ip.2006.011452
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2006 Cunningham JA, Humphreys K, Kypri K, Van Mierlo T, 'Formative evaluation and three-month follow-up of an online personalized assessment feedback intervention for problem drinkers', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 8 Web page (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.8.2.e5
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 30
2006 Kypri K, Donaldson A, Johnstone E, 'The Physical Inactivity Matrix: Lessons from the classification of physical inactivity interventions', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 9 98-102 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2006.03.009
2006 Cunningham JA, Selby PL, Kypri K, Humphreys KN, 'Access to the Internet among drinkers, smokers and illicit drug users: Is it a barrier to the provision of interventions on the World Wide Web?', Medical Informatics and the Internet in Medicine, 31 53-58 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/14639230600562816
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 23
2005 Kypri K, Langley J, Stephenson S, 'Episode-centred analysis of drinking to intoxication in university students', Alcohol and Alcoholism, 40 447-452 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/alcalc/agh178
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 34
2005 Kypri K, Dean J, Kirby S, Harris J, Kake T, 'Think before you buy under-18s drink': evaluation of a community alcohol intervention', Drug and Alcohol Review, 24 13-20 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09595230500102731
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 15
2005 Kypri K, Cronin M, Wright CS, 'Do university students drink more hazardously than their non-student peers?', Addiction, 100 713-714 (2005) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 62Web of Science - 54
2005 Kypri K, Stephenson S, Langley J, Cashell-Smith M, Saunders J, Russell D, 'Computerised Screening for Hazardous Drinking in Primary Care', New Zealand Medical Journal, 118 1-10 (2005) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9
2005 Kypri K, Sitharthan T, Cunningham JA, Kavanagh DJ, Dean JI, 'Innovative approaches to intervention for problem drinking', Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 18 229-234 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/01.yco.0000165591.75681.ab
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 18
2005 Kypri K, Stephenson S, 'Drink-driving and perceptions of legally permissible alcohol use', Traffic Injury Prevention, 6 219-224 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/15389580590969120
Citations Scopus - 10
2004 Hunter JA, Kypri K, Stokell NM, Boyes M, O'Brien KS, McMenamin KE, 'Social Identity, self-evaluation and in-group bias: the relative importance of particular domains of self-esteem to the in-group', British Journal of Social Psychology, 43 59-81 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1348/014466604322915980
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 10
2004 Kypri K, Stephenson S, Langley J, 'Assessment of Nonresponse Bias in an Internet Survey of Alcohol Use', Alcoholism, 28 630-634 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/01.ALC.0000121654.99277.26
Citations Scopus - 61Web of Science - 55
2004 Saunders JB, Kypri K, Walters ST, Laforge RG, Larimer ME, 'Approaches to brief intervention for hazardous drinking in young people', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 28 322-329 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/01.ALC.0000113418.12889.08
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 33
2004 McAnally HM, Kypri K, 'Alcohol and road safety behaviour among New Zealand tertiary students', International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, 16 229-237 (2004) [C2]
Citations Scopus - 2
2004 Kypri K, Gallagher SJ, Cashell-Smith ML, 'An Internet-based survey method for college student drinking research', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 76 45-53 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2004.04.001
Citations Scopus - 87Web of Science - 77
2004 Kypri K, Saunders J, Williams SM, McGee RO, Langley JD, Cashell-Smith ML, Gallagher SJ, 'Web-based screening and brief intervention for hazardous drinking: a double-blind randomized controlled trial', Addiction, 99 1410-1417 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2004.00847.x
Citations Scopus - 184Web of Science - 157
2004 Kypri K, McCarthy DM, Coe M, Brown SA, 'Transition to independent living and substance involvement of treated and high risk youth', Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse, 13 85-100 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1300/J029v13n03_05
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
2004 Kypri K, Baxter J, 'Smoking in a Zew Zealand university student sample', Zew Zealand Medical Journal, 117 1-6 (2004) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8
2004 McGee R, Kypri K, 'Alcohol-related problems experienced by university students in New Zealand', Australian and New Zealan Journal of Public Health, 28 321-323 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2004.tb00437.x
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 32
2003 Langley JD, Dow N, Stephenson S, Kypri K, 'Missing Cyclists', Injury Prevention, 9 376-379 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/ip.9.4.376
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 26
2003 Kypri K, Langley JD, 'Perceived social norms and their relation to university student drinking', Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 64 829-834 (2003) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 66Web of Science - 55
2003 Kypri K, Saunders JB, Gallagher S, 'Acceptability of various brief intervention approaches for hazardous drinking among university students', Alcohol and Alcoholism, 38 626-628 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/alcalc/agg121
Citations Scopus - 59Web of Science - 49
2003 Kypri K, Gallagher S, 'Incentives to increase participation in an Internet alcohol survey: A controlled experiment', Alcohol and Alcoholism, 38 437-441 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/alcalc/agg107
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 30
2003 Langley JD, Kypri K, Stephenson S, 'Secondhand effects of alcohol use among university students: Computerised survey', BMJ: British Medical Journal, 327 1023-1024 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmj.327.7422.1023
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 30
2003 Kypri K, 'Maori/non-Maori alcohol consumption profiles: implications for reducing health inequalities', New Zealand Medical Journal, 116 1-3 (2003) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3
2002 Kypri K, Chalmers DJ, Langley JD, Wright CS, 'Adolescent injury morbidity in New Zealand, 1987-96', Injury Prevention, 8 32-37 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 17
2002 Kypri K, Chalmers DJ, Langley JD, 'Adolescent injury mortality in New Zealand and opportunities for prevention', International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, 14 27-41 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11
2002 Kypri K, Langley JD, McGee R, Saunders JB, Williams S, 'High prevalence, persistent hazardous drinking in New Zealand tertiary students', Alcohol & Alcoholism, 37 457-464 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 69Web of Science - 50
2002 Kypri K, McGee R, Saunders JB, Langley JD, Dean JI, 'Interpretation of items on the AUDIT questionnaire', Alcohol and Acloholism, 37 465-467 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 12
2001 Kypri K, Chalmers DJ, Langley JD, Wright CS, 'Child injury morbidity in New Zealand, 1987-1996', JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, 37 227-234 (2001)
DOI 10.1046/j.1440-1754.2001.00668.x
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 22
2001 Kypri K, 'Short falls and intracranial injury - Reply', JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, 37 603-603 (2001)
DOI 10.1046/j.1440-1754.2001.0776b.x
Citations Web of Science - 2
2001 Ryan M, Kypri K, 'Letter to the editor', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 37 603-603 (2001)
2000 Kypri K, Chalmers DJ, Langley JD, Wright CS, 'Child injury mortality in New Zealand 1986-95', JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, 36 431-439 (2000)
DOI 10.1046/j.1440-1754.2000.00559.x
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 21
1999 Andersen FM, DiGuiseppi C, Duncanson M, Gill A, Gladwin C, Greenidge T, et al., 'International smoke detector legislation', Injury Prevention, 5 254-255 (1999)
DOI 10.1136/ip.5.4.254
1997 Hunter JA, Platow MJ, Bell LM, Kypri K, Lewis CA, 'Intergroup bias and self-evaluation: Domain-specific self-esteem, threats to identity and dimensional importance', BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 36 405-426 (1997)
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 19
Show 171 more journal articles

Conference (31 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Gilligan C, Thompson K, Kypri K, Bourke J, 'EVERYBODY ELSE IS DOING IT? NORM PERCEPTIONS ABOUT THE SUPPLY OF ALCOHOL AMONG PARENTS OF ADOLESCENTS', ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH, Bellevue, WA (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Conor Gilligan
2014 Wadolowski M, Hutchinson D, Bruno R, Aiken A, Slade T, Najman J, et al., 'PARENTAL SUPPLY OF ALCOHOL: HOW DOES IT PROSPECTIVELY RELATE TO SIPPING AND DRINKING?', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2014) [E3]
2013 Johnson N, Latter J, Kypri K, 'PREVALENCE OF UNHEALTHY ALCOHOL USE AMONG HOSPITAL OUTPATIENTS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Natalie Johnson, Joanna Latter
2012 McCambridge J, Cunningham J, Kypri K, 'Back to the future: A very brief history of brief interventions', Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, Boston, MA (2012) [E3]
2012 Hasnat MA, 'Smokeless tobacco consumption in the South Asian population of Sydney, Australia: Prevalence, correlates and availablity', Interprofessional Partnership: Improvement for Global Health Outcomes. Abstracts, Chiang Mai, Thailand (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Milton Hasnat
2012 Saunders J, Kypri K, 'EFFECTIVENESS OF BRIEF ALCOHOL INTERVENTIONS: EVIDENCE FROM STUDIES OF ACADEMIC ATTAINMENT, SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY', ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH, Sapporo, JAPAN (2012) [E3]
2012 Livingston M, Maclennan B, Kypri K, Room R, Langley J, Wilkinson C, 'SYMPOSIUM - ALCOHOL POLICY AT THE LOCAL LEVEL - AN OPPORTUNITY FOR ACTION?', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2012) [E3]
2012 Maclennan B, Kypri K, Room R, Langley J, 'PRESENTATION 1-WHO SUPPORTS LOCAL GOVERNMENT ALCOHOL STRATEGIES AND WHY? SURVEY OF NEW ZEALAND COMMUNITIES', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2012) [E3]
2012 Hides L, Baker A, Christie G, Kypri K, 'SYMPOSIUM - HOW EFFECTIVE ARE BRIEF MOTIVATIONAL INTERVIEWING INTERVENTIONS: ARE THEY NECESSARY? DO THEY REQUIRE ENHANCEMENT? CAN THEY BE TRANSLATED INTO ROUTINE CLINICAL PRACTICE?', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Baker
2012 Aiken A, Wadolowski M, Bucello C, Mattick R, Najman J, Kypri K, et al., 'Context of early adolescent alcohol use: First results from a longitudinal Australian cohort', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012, Melbourne, Vic (2012) [E3]
2012 Maclennan B, Kypri K, Room R, Langley J, 'Who supports local government alcohol strategies and why? Survey of New Zealand communities', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012, Melbourne, Vic (2012) [E3]
2012 Johnson NA, Kypri K, 'The Hospital Outpatients Alcohol Project: Developmental research for a large randomised controlled trial', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012, Melbourne, Vic (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Natalie Johnson
2012 Kypri K, 'Web-based interventions for unhealthy alcohol use', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012, Melbourne, Vic (2012) [E3]
2012 Wadolowski M, Bucello C, Aiken A, Mattick R, Najman J, Kypri K, et al., 'Young and not so drunk: Sipping, drinking and australian adolescents', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012, Melbourne, Vic (2012) [E3]
2011 McCambridge J, Kypri K, Elbourne D, 'In randomisation we trust?: Research reactivity produces bias in behaviour change trials', Abstracts of the 2011 IEA World Congress of Epidemiology, Edinburgh, Scotland (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.1136/jech.2011.142976c.32
2011 Connor J, Kypri K, Bell M, Cousins K, 'Aggression between intimate partners in New Zealand: Gender differences and alcohol involvement', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, Edinburgh (2011) [E3]
2009 McCambridge J, Kypri K, 'Does simply asking questions change behavior? A systematic review of brief alcohol intervention trial data', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, San Diego, CA (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1530-0277.2009.00948.x
2009 Cousins K, Connor J, Kypri K, 'Reducing alcohol-related harm and social disorder in the university setting: A framework for evaluation', KBS 2009 Abstracts, Copenhagen, Denmark (2009) [E3]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2009 Kypri K, Jones C, McElduff P, Barker DJ, 'Effects of a restriction in pub trading hours on night-time assaults in an Australian city: Preliminary analyses', KBS 2009 Abstracts, Copenhagen, Denmark (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff
2009 Paschall M, Grube J, Kypri K, 'Alcohol control policies and alcohol consumption by youth: A multi-national study', KBS 2009 Abstracts, Copenhagen, Denmark (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2009.02698.x
Citations Scopus - 48Web of Science - 44
2009 Connor J, Kypri K, Bell M, 'Alcohol outlet density and alcohol-related harm', Australasian Epidemiologist, Dunedin, NZ (2009) [E3]
2009 Connor J, Kypri K, Bell M, 'Alcohol and partner aggression in New Zealand: National survey', Australasian Epidemiologist, Dunedin, NZ (2009) [E3]
2009 Kypri K, Jones C, McElduff P, Jones C, 'Effects of restricting pub closing times on night-time assaults in an Australian city: Preliminary analyses', Australasian Epidemiologist, Dunedin, NZ (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff
2008 Kypri K, 'Web-based screening and brief intervention (e-SBI) for tertiary student hazardous drinking', 2008 Enhancing Student Success Conference. Program, Ourimbah, NSW (2008) [E3]
2008 Kypri K, Hallett J, Howat P, McManus A, Maycock B, Bowe SJ, Horton N, 'Universal web-based alcohol screening and brief intervention for university students: A randomised controlled trial', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Newcastle, NSW (2008) [E3]
2006 Paschall MJ, Kypri K, Saltz RL, 'Friday class and heavy alcohol use in a sample of New Zealand college students.', ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH, Baltimore, MD (2006)
2006 Kypri K, Voas RB, Langley JD, Stephenson SCR, Begg DJ, Tippetts AS, Davie GS, 'Effects of lowering the minimum purchase age for alcohol on youth injury in New Zealand.', ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH, Baltimore, MD (2006)
2006 Kypri K, Saunders JB, D Langley J, 'Electronic screening and brief intervention (E-SBI) for hazardous drinking: Results of three randomized controlled trials', ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH, Sydney, AUSTRALIA (2006)
2005 Kypri K, 'A four-arm randomised controlled trial of electronic screening and brief intervention for hazardous drinking', ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH, Santa Barbara, CA (2005)
Citations Web of Science - 1
2005 Kypri K, Dean J, 'What have we learned from half a century of college drinking research?', ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH, Santa Barbara, CA (2005)
2002 Gallagher S, Kypri K, Cashell-Smith M, 'Computer-based approaches to alcohol and drug problems', Christchurch (2002) [E1]
Show 28 more conferences
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 58
Total funding $10,342,908

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20156 grants / $893,627

Does risk-based licensing of alcohol sales reduce alcohol-related harm?$457,200

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Impacts of parental supply of alcohol on late-adolescent alcohol outcomes: Phase II of a longitudinal cohort$170,000

Funding body: Australian Rotary Health

Funding body Australian Rotary Health
Project Team
Scheme Mental Health Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

Pub extended trading hours: effects on drunkenness and alcohol-related harm$148,880

Funding body: Healthway: Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation

Funding body Healthway: Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation
Project Team
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

Does risk-based licensing of alcohol sales reduce alcohol-related harm?$77,547

Student scholarship

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri, Associate Professor Peter Miller, Professor Tanya Chikritzhs, Professor Kathryn Graham
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500109
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Use the PSALS cohort to identify predictors of adolescent risk drinking to examine potentially modifiable parent factors in the pathway to the initiation of risky drinking$39,000

Funding body: Australian Rechabite Foundation

Funding body Australian Rechabite Foundation
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri, Mrs Sonia Sharmin
Scheme Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500777
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

12th Australasian Injury Prevention & Safety Promotion Conference, Sydney 25-27 November$1,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500946
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20143 grants / $1,212,021

Evaluation of New Zealand's alcohol reform legislation$1,190,021

Funding body: Health Research Council of New Zealand

Funding body Health Research Council of New Zealand
Project Team
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Effects of earlier cessation of alcohol sales in the Sydney CBD and rates of assault$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri, Doctor Patrick McElduff
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1401396
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

40th Annual Alcohol Epidemiology Symposium of the Kettil Bruun Society, Torino Italy, 7-13 June 2014$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400380
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20135 grants / $883,745

Reducing the burden of disease due to hazardous alcohol consumption: Methodological, Aetiological, and Intervention studies$652,765

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri
Scheme Research Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1200045
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Corporate political activity of tobacco, alcohol and gambling companies in Australia$150,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Young people, drinking, and the parental supply of alcohol: a longitudinal cohort study$44,969

Funding body: Australian Rotary Health

Funding body Australian Rotary Health
Project Team
Scheme Mental Health Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

Does electronic screening and brief intervention (e-SBI) increase uptake of referrals for further specialist care among non-treatment seeking hospital outpatients identified as possibly alcohol depend$34,011

Funding body: Health Administration Corporation

Funding body Health Administration Corporation
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri, Doctor Natalie Johnson, Associate Professor Adrian Dunlop, Ms Amanda Brown
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300040
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

39th Annual Alcohol Epidemiology Symposium of the Kettil Bruun Society, Kampala, Uganda, 2 - 7 June 2013$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300348
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20126 grants / $733,691

Double blind randomised controlled trial of electronic alcohol screening and brief intervention (e-SBI) for hospital outpatients$359,031

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri, Doctor Natalie Johnson, Professor John Saunders, Professor Richard Saitz, Professor John Attia
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100111
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Effects of lowering the minimum alcohol purchasing age on traffic crash injury and assault rates$264,911

Funding body: Health Research Council of New Zealand

Funding body Health Research Council of New Zealand
Project Team
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Alcohol advertising and sponsorship in Australian sport: associations with implicit (unconscious) and explicit alcohol attitudes and drinking behaviours$80,000

Funding body: ANPHA (Australian National Preventive Health Agency)

Funding body ANPHA (Australian National Preventive Health Agency)
Project Team
Scheme Preventive Health Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

National Tertiary Student Health Survey 2013$15,000

Funding body: University of Otago

Funding body University of Otago
Project Team
Scheme Deans Bequest Fund
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Parental norms regarding adolescent alcohol consumption and supply $12,749

Funding body: Australian Rechabite Foundation

Funding body Australian Rechabite Foundation
Project Team Doctor Conor Gilligan, Professor Kypros Kypri
Scheme Small Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200492
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Population health Congress, Adelaide, 10 - 12 September 2012$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200795
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20114 grants / $1,080,264

Implementing web-based screening and brief intervention for marijuana use in college student health centers$704,000

Funding body: National Institute for Drug Abuse

Funding body National Institute for Drug Abuse
Project Team
Scheme Research consultancy
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Patterns of alcohol and other substance use in Sao Paulo nightclubs: epidemiology, ethnography and intervention$300,000

Funding body: Sao Paulo State Foundation for Scientific Development and National Council of Science and Technology

Funding body Sao Paulo State Foundation for Scientific Development and National Council of Science and Technology
Project Team
Scheme Research consultancy
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Young people, drinking, and the parental supply of alcohol: a longitudinal cohort study$74,864

Funding body: Australian Rotary Health

Funding body Australian Rotary Health
Project Team
Scheme Mental Health Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

Australasian Society for Psychiatric Research Conference, Dunedin NZ, 5-8th December 2011$1,400

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100948
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20105 grants / $979,330

Can parents teach their children to drink alcohol responsibly? Or, is one drop a drop too many?$760,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Experimental Studies of the Effects of the Research Process on Participant Behaviour$178,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri, Dr Jim McCambridge, Professor John Attia, Mr Steven Bowe
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0190025
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Sources of alcohol for teenage binge drinking$38,330

Funding body: Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education

Funding body Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education
Project Team Doctor Conor Gilligan, Professor Kypros Kypri, Doctor Natalie Johnson, Associate Professor Marita Lynagh
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0190209
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

2009 FH Award for Research Excellence$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri
Scheme Award for Research Excellence
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000401
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

KBS Alcohol and Violence Conference, Vic Health, Melbourne, 15 - 19 march 2010$1,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000169
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20097 grants / $1,093,648

National trial of proactive web-based alcohol screening and brief intervention for university students$392,892

Funding body: Alcohol Advisory Council of New Zealand

Funding body Alcohol Advisory Council of New Zealand
Project Team
Scheme Research contract
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

Reducing the injury and disease burden attributable to alcohol: methodological, aetiological and intervention studies$370,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri
Scheme Career Development Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0188568
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Injury Prevention Research - Co-ordination of alcohol research$27,040

Funding body: University of Otago

Funding body University of Otago
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri
Scheme Consultancy
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190540
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON Y

Alcohol outlet accessibility, area deprivation, and adult drinking patterns$21,464

Funding body: The Department of Internal Affairs Lottery grants

Funding body The Department of Internal Affairs Lottery grants
Project Team
Scheme Lottery Health Research grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Modification and piloting of a web-based electronic screening and brief intervention (e-SBI) to reduce unhealthy drinking among hospital outpatients$12,391

Funding body: Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education

Funding body Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education
Project Team Doctor Natalie Johnson, Professor Kypros Kypri
Scheme Innovative Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190229
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Research Society on Alcoholism, San Diego USA, 20-24 June 09$2,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189951
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20085 grants / $124,300

Evaluation of the Campus Watch community intervention$72,300

Funding body: National Drug Policy Discretionary Fund

Funding body National Drug Policy Discretionary Fund
Project Team
Scheme Project grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Gender and Alcohol: An International Study$35,000

Funding body: Alcohol Advisory Council of New Zealand

Funding body Alcohol Advisory Council of New Zealand
Project Team
Scheme Bequest Funds
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

Investigation of performance biases in clinical trials of health behaviour interventions$9,500

Funding body: Australian Academy of Science

Funding body Australian Academy of Science
Project Team
Scheme Scientific Visits to Europe
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Adaptation of an Australian e-SBI program for use in US Veterans Affairs hospitals$5,000

Funding body: VA Hospital Puget Sound

Funding body VA Hospital Puget Sound
Project Team
Scheme Research consultancy
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

The 34th Annual Alcohol Epidemiology Symposium of the Kettil Bruun Society, Victoria, BC, Canada, 2/6/2008 - 6/6/2008$2,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188571
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20072 grants / $21,382

Liquor industry sponsorship at Australian Universities$18,882

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187245
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Joint Scientific Meetings of the Australasian Epidemiological Association, Hotel Grand Chancellor, Hobart Tasmania, 27/8/2007- 29/8/2007$2,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0188047
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20063 grants / $372,500

Web-based alcohol and tobacco intervention$314,000

Funding body: Healthway: Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation

Funding body Healthway: Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation
Project Team
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

Gender, drinking patterns and alcohol-related harm$50,000

Funding body: University of Otago

Funding body University of Otago
Project Team
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Alcohol industry sponsorship of sport: Estimates of prevalence and association with drinking levels$8,500

Funding body: Maurice and Phyllis Paykal Trust

Funding body Maurice and Phyllis Paykal Trust
Project Team
Scheme Project grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

20053 grants / $178,400

Geospatial aspects of alcohol-related harm in New Zealand$150,000

Funding body: University of Otago

Funding body University of Otago
Project Team
Scheme Dunedin School of Medicine Distinguished Researcher Fund
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Delivery of electronic screening and brief intervention in primary care$20,400

Funding body: Student Health Service, University of Otago: Ministry of Health

Funding body Student Health Service, University of Otago: Ministry of Health
Project Team
Scheme Research consultancy
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

Parent Attitudes to Alcohol Supply and Provision$8,000

Funding body: Alcohol Advisory Council of New Zealand

Funding body Alcohol Advisory Council of New Zealand
Project Team
Scheme Project grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

20042 grants / $1,185,000

Modifiable environmental determinants of hazardous drinking$932,000

Funding body: Health Research Council of New Zealand and Alcohol Advisory Council of New Zealand

Funding body Health Research Council of New Zealand and Alcohol Advisory Council of New Zealand
Project Team
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Evaluation of the 1999 reduction in the New Zealand drinking age$253,000

Funding body: National Institute for Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Funding body National Institute for Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
Project Team
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

20033 grants / $965,000

Enhanced Alcohol Intelligence Project$940,000

Funding body: New Zealand Police

Funding body New Zealand Police
Project Team
Scheme Contract
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

Computerised assessment and personalised feedback to enhance preventive healthcare$15,000

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of New Zealand

Funding body National Heart Foundation of New Zealand
Project Team
Scheme Project grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Alcohol control policies at local government level in New Zealand$10,000

Funding body: Dunedin City Council in collaboration with WHO Health Development Centre, Kobe, Japan

Funding body Dunedin City Council in collaboration with WHO Health Development Centre, Kobe, Japan
Project Team
Scheme Contract
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

20012 grants / $603,000

Hazardous Drinking Project$576,000

Funding body: Health Research Council of New Zealand and Alcohol Advisory Council of New Zealand

Funding body Health Research Council of New Zealand and Alcohol Advisory Council of New Zealand
Project Team
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2004
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Should You Supply Campaign Evaluation$27,000

Funding body: Alcohol Advisory Council of New Zealand

Funding body Alcohol Advisory Council of New Zealand
Project Team
Scheme Contract
Role Lead
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2003
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON N

20002 grants / $17,000

Early intervention for young hazardous drinkers: Preliminary investigations$12,000

Funding body: Health Research Council of New Zealand and Alcohol Advisory Council of New Zealand

Funding body Health Research Council of New Zealand and Alcohol Advisory Council of New Zealand
Project Team
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2000
Funding Finish 2000
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Tertiary student drinking behaviours and attitudes toward alcohol$5,000

Funding body: University of Otago

Funding body University of Otago
Project Team
Scheme Deans Bequest Fund
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2000
Funding Finish 2001
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed10
Current5

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Alcohol consumption and related harm among indigenous Australian university students
Peter Malouf
Public Health, James Cook University
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD The nature and extent of alcohol advertising and availability in Children's environments
Tim Chambers
Public Health, University of Otago
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Smokeless Tobacco consumption in Bangladesh: Contributing factors, economic consequences and current policies
Eva Naznin
Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Modifiable Parent Factors in the Initiation of Adolescent Risky Drinking
Sonia Sharmin
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2012 Masters Psychological distress and alcohol consumption among university students
Gwen Doran
Public Health, University of Otago
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2014 Masters Psychiatric diagnoses and service needs among users of a national drop-in service
Peita Harper
Psychology, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Epidemiology of Smokeless Tobacco Consumption Among South Asian People in Australia and Rural Women in Bangladesh
Mohammad Hossain
Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 Professional Doctorate Alcohol service laws in Thimphu, Bhutan: Outlet intervention trial
Gampo Dorji
Public Health, Boston University
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Reducing Alcohol Consumption Among Undergraduate Students via an Internet Intervention
Jonathan Hallett
Public Health, Curtin University of Technology
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Effectiveness of a community program to reduce alcohol related disorder
Kim Cousins
Public Health, University of Otago
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD The Prognostic Value of Trait Anger in Treatment of Methamphetamine Dependence
Melissa Claire
Psychiatry, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2012 Professional Doctorate Mental health in Australian university students: Web-based survey
David Said
Psychology, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2010 PhD Local government alcohol policy
Brett Maclennan
Public Health, University of Otago
Principal Supervisor
2010 Masters Drinking patterns, drinking in partnerships and informal social controls on drinking in New Zealand
Jess Meiklejohn
Public Health, University of Otago
Co-Supervisor
2005 Masters Residential hall alcohol policies and alcohol-related harm
Brett Maclennan
Public Health, University of Otago
Principal Supervisor
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News

beer

Web-based alcohol intervention has limited effect on consumption

March 25, 2014

New research from the University of Newcastle shows that a web-based self-assessment and feedback program for university students who drink hazardously produced little reduction in consumption.

The Conversation

Earlier pub closing times key to reducing alcohol-fuelled assaults

March 6, 2014

Earlier pub closing times have a large impact on curbing alcohol-fuelled violence, according to research my colleagues and I have published today in the international peer-reviewed journal Drug & Alcohol Review.

alcohol-fuelled violence

Newcastle research underpins statewide alcohol restrictions

January 22, 2014

University of Newcastle research that evaluated alcohol restrictions in Newcastle, identifying a 37 per cent drop in assaults, has underpinned sweeping changes announced by the State Government to curb alcohol-fuelled violence in Sydney.

Professor Kypros Kypri

Position

Senior Brawn Research Fellow
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Health Behaviour Sciences

Contact Details

Email kypros.kypri@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4042 0536
Mobile 0448898814
Fax (02) 4042 0041

Office

Room HMRI 4104
Building HMRI Building
Location Kookaburra Circuit, Rankin Park (behind JHH)

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