Dr Karen Blackmore

Dr Karen Blackmore

Lecturer

School of Design Communication and IT (Information Technology)

Career Summary

Biography

Karen Blackmore received her BInfoTech(SpatialInfo) With Distinction in 2001 and her PhD in 2008 from Charles Sturt University, Australia. Her PhD research was cross-disciplinary in nature and focused on agent-based modelling of business strategies and their associated changing resource needs. Specifically, this work involved the use of data mining, clustering and visualisation to identify and explore patterns in a large longitudinal data set. Her postdoctoral research work was conducted at the University of Newcastle, in collaboration with Hunter Councils. This work focused on the use of self-organising maps and data analysis techniques to model the environmental impacts of climate change. This work was awarded LGSA’s Environment Award for Energy Saving and Climate Projection Winner C Division & Overall Category Winner 2009. She also has a research track record in the areas of business strategy modelling, data mining, information visualisation, pattern recognition, computer games and education.

Research Expertise
My major areas of research interest include: * Agent based models of complex adaptive systems * Application of data mining and pattern recognition techniques to understand patterns in global climate model data * Spatial and aspatial models of social and physical systems * Cross-disciplinary research issues My early research focus centred on data mining and spatial data modelling. For example, I explored the use of rule based classifiers, neural networks, genetic algorithms and fuzzy logic to find patterns in “Missing Persons Data” (Blackmore, et al. 2005; Blackmore & Bossomaier 2003a, 2003b; Blackmore & Bossomaier 2002a, 2002b; Blackmore et al. 2002). Data mining, clustering and statistical modelling also featured significantly in my PhD and Postdoctoral research. My PhD research involved modelling and analysing patterns associated with changing resource needs in organisations. A number of publications have arisen from this work (Blackmore et al. 2003; Blackmore & Nesbitt 2009; Blackmore & Nesbitt 2012). More recently, I have published results from my postdoctoral work that uses Self-Organising Maps (SOMS) and statistical downscaling to model regional climate variability (Goodwin, Freeman & Blackmore 2010; Goodwin & Blackmore forthcoming). In addition to the above academic publications, during 2008 to 2010 I was principal or co-author on eleven (11) reports (six allocated ISBN numbers) associated with my industry based postdoctoral studies and my employment with the University of Newcastle’s Centre for Urban and Regional Studies (CURS). The postdoctoral work was in collaboration with the Hunter Central Coast Regional Environment Strategy (HCCREMS). This work has been applied and used as the basis for the development of climate change adaptation strategies by local government authorities within the Hunter and Central Coast region. My work with CURS was conducted under an ARC Linkage grant and focussed on inter-agency data sharing and involved spatial data analysis of social vulnerability. The work was conducted in collaboration with the University of Western Sydney and the Department of Premier and Cabinet. Lastly, I have a research record and interest in areas relating to teaching and learning. I have investigated the complex factors associated with plagiarism in courses offered through partner or offshore campuses (Moffatt & Blackmore 2005, 2006) and issues in cross-disciplinary research higher degree research (Blackmore & Nesbitt 2008). In my role with Planning, Quality and Reporting at the University of Newcastle, I authored numerous research reports on a range of topics related to improving the student experience and developing strategies to improve the University’s performance in global ranking schemes. One of these reports formed the basis of a current University project aimed at reducing student attrition. Additionally, my work titled “Fuzzy Data Mining Approaches to Predicting Student Success and Retention” was presented at Australasian Association for Institutional Research Annual Forum held in November, 2012.

Teaching Expertise
I have teaching experience at a University level in a range of IT areas. This experience encompasses different modes of delivery (eg. Internal and Distance Education) and ranges in level from 1st year to Masters and Graduate Certificate programs. I have delivered courses in the following areas:
• Computer Games Production • Database Management Systems • Database Systems • Principles of Database Development • ICT Fundamentals • Managing Internet Marketing Information • Market Research • Geographic Information Systems • Digital Image Analysis • Strategic Information Management • Commerce on the Information Superhighway • Introduction to the Senses • Relationship Marketing • Introduction to Remote Sensing

I am committed to the delivery of high quality teaching and engage in continuing professional development activities (eg. Tertiary Teaching Colloquium and education research publications) to ensure my skills in this area are appropriate and relevant to the needs of students. The quality of my teaching has been evidenced through positive student and peer feedback, both in terms of the way I deal with students and the quality of the materials I develop to support my teaching.

Administrative Expertise
I have been an active member of school based marketing and research committees, as well as being a member of Faculty level Marketing committees. My involvement in the marketing committees stems from expertise in this area and also an interest in making courses more attractive to, and reaching, potential students.

Collaborations
Macquarie University - Continued research building on from postdoctoral work to derive regional climate change projections. Research involves the use of self organising maps (SOMs) to produce synoptic types, statistical analysis of weather station data, statistical downscaling and rule based classification. Ongoing work focuses on spatial modelling of shoreline changes and analysis of complex global climate data.

Qualifications

  • PhD, Charles Sturt University
  • Bachelor of Information Technology, Charles Sturt University

Keywords

  • Agent-Based Modelling
  • Complex systems
  • Conceptual modelling
  • Data mining
  • Game Design
  • Human Computer Interaction
  • Pattern Recognition

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
080602 Computer-Human Interaction 40
080109 Pattern Recognition and Data Mining 30
190202 Computer Gaming and Animation 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Design Communication and IT
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/05/2009 - 1/12/2012 Research Fellow Macquarie University
Department of Environment and Geography - Environmental Science
Australia
1/01/2008 - 1/05/2010 Postdoctoral Fellow

Climate Science.

University of Newcastle
Australia
1/01/2006 - 1/01/2008 Lecturer Charles Sturt University
School of Information Technology

Awards

Distinction

Year Award
1999 Dean’s Award for Academic Excellence (Autumn & Spring sessions)
Charles Sturt University

Prize

Year Award
2014 LGSA’s Environment Award for Energy Saving and Climate Projection Winner C Division & Overall Category Winner 2009
Hunter and Central Coast Regional Environment Management Strategy (NCCREMS)
1999 AISIST Achievement Prize in Spatial Information Systems
Australian Institute of Spatial Information Sciences and Technology (AISIST)
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Smith SP, Blackmore K, Nesbitt K, 'A Meta-analysis of Data Collection in Serious Games Research', Serious Games Analytics: Methodologies for Performance Measurement, Assessment, and Improvement, Springer, New York 31-55 (2015) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-05834-4_2
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Keith Nesbitt, Shamus Smith
2015 Nesbitt K, Blackmore K, Hookham G, Kay-Lambkin F, Walla P, 'Using the Startle Eye-Blink to Measure Affect in Players', Serious Games Analytics: Methodologies for Performance Measurement, Assessment, and Improvement, Springer, Cham, Switzerland 401-434 (2015) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-05834-4_18
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Peter Walla, Keith Nesbitt, Frances Kaylambkin
2006 Moffatt S, Blackmore KL, 'National anti plagiarism strategies: A shared responsibility in transnational university partnerships?', Breaking down boundaries: International experience in open, distance and flexible learning, Open and Distance Learning Association of Australia, Adelaide, Australia 1-12 (2006) [B1]
2005 Blackmore K, Bossomaier T, Foy S, Thomson D, 'Data mining of missing persons data', , SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN 305-314 (2005) [B1]
Show 1 more chapter

Journal article (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Gu X, Blackmore KL, 'Recent trends in academic journal growth', Scientometrics, 1-24 (2016)

© 2016 Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, HungarySince the publication of the first academic journal in 1665, the number of academic journal titles has grown steadily. In 2001, Mabe an... [more]

© 2016 Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, HungarySince the publication of the first academic journal in 1665, the number of academic journal titles has grown steadily. In 2001, Mabe and Amin studied the pattern of growth in the number of academic journals worldwide, identifying three key development periods between 1900 and 1996. These three episodes are from 1900 to 1944, from 1944 to 1978, and from 1978 to 1996. The compound annual growth rates for each episode are 3.30, 4.68 and 3.31 % respectively. In this research, we seek to validate these findings, and extend on previous work to analyze journal growth patterns from 1986 to 2013. Our results show academic journals grew at an average rate of 4.7 % from 1986 to 2013, which is very similar to the growth rate during the Big Science period observed in the previous study. Our results also show that academic journals had an estimated 92 % Active rate, and 8 % Inactive rate annually. Out of all Active journals, approximately 43 % have high impact and reach JCR or SJR databases, and 26 % have relatively higher impact and are thus collected in the JCR database. The comparison results of Active/InactiveSJR and JCR journals suggest that lower impact journals have a higher chance to become Inactive than higher impact journals. With the wide use of the Internet in academic science, our results expectedly show that the number of Print-Only journals is gradually decreasing while the number of Online-Only journals is increasing. The growth of Online-Only journals exceeds the growth of Print-Only journals in 2007, and the number of Online-Only journals exceeded the number of Print and Only journals in 2012. More than 30 % Newly Created journals provide Open Access. It is suggested that we are experiencing the second journal boom in history and Internet technology has changed the academic publication system.

DOI 10.1007/s11192-016-1985-3
2015 Nalivaiko E, Davis SL, Blackmore KL, Vakulin A, Nesbitt KV, 'Cybersickness provoked by head-mounted display affects cutaneous vascular tone, heart rate and reaction time', Physiology and Behavior, 151 583-590 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.Evidence from studies of provocative motion indicates that motion sickness is tightly linked to the disturbances of thermoregulation. The major aim of the cur... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.Evidence from studies of provocative motion indicates that motion sickness is tightly linked to the disturbances of thermoregulation. The major aim of the current study was to determine whether provocative visual stimuli (immersion into the virtual reality simulating rides on a rollercoaster) affect skin temperature that reflects thermoregulatory cutaneous responses, and to test whether such stimuli alter cognitive functions. In 26 healthy young volunteers wearing head-mounted display (Oculus Rift), simulated rides consistently provoked vection and nausea, with a significant difference between the two versions of simulation software (Parrot Coaster and Helix). Basal finger temperature had bimodal distribution, with low-temperature group (n. =. 8) having values of 23-29. °C, and high-temperature group (n. =. 18) having values of 32-36. °C. Effects of cybersickness on finger temperature depended on the basal level of this variable: in subjects from former group it raised by 3-4. °C, while in most subjects from the latter group it either did not change or transiently reduced by 1.5-2. °C. There was no correlation between the magnitude of changes in the finger temperature and nausea score at the end of simulated ride. Provocative visual stimulation caused prolongation of simple reaction time by 20-50. ms; this increase closely correlated with the subjective rating of nausea. Lastly, in subjects who experienced pronounced nausea, heart rate was elevated. We conclude that cybersickness is associated with changes in cutaneous thermoregulatory vascular tone; this further supports the idea of a tight link between motion sickness and thermoregulation. Cybersickness-induced prolongation of reaction time raises obvious concerns regarding the safety of this technology.

DOI 10.1016/j.physbeh.2015.08.043
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Keith Nesbitt, Eugene Nalivaiko
2015 Gu X, Blackmore KL, 'A systematic review of agent-based modelling and simulation applications in the higher education domain', Higher Education Research and Development, (2015) [C1]

This paper presents the results of a systematic review of agent-based modelling and simulation (ABMS) applications in the higher education (HE) domain. Agent-based modelling is a ... [more]

This paper presents the results of a systematic review of agent-based modelling and simulation (ABMS) applications in the higher education (HE) domain. Agent-based modelling is a ¿bottom-up¿ modelling paradigm in which system-level behaviour (macro) is modelled through the behaviour of individual local-level agent interactions (micro). This approach of considering the behaviour of systems of interacting ¿agents¿ has been applied to a wide variety of domains. Of particular interest, are the ways that ABMS applications have been used to further understand the dynamics of the HE domain. We conduct a systematic review of literature to analyse publications by year, role of the simulator, development stage of the models, and any associated validation. We also identify areas for future work, which includes an emphasis on validating existing and future models, detailed description of simulations to allow replication and further development, and the use of agent-based models in other contexts within the increasingly complex HE domain.

DOI 10.1080/07294360.2015.1011088
2015 Gu X, Blackmore K, Cornforth D, Nesbitt K, 'Modelling Academics as Agents: An Implementation of an Agent-Based Strategic Publication Model', Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, 18 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.18564/jasss.2725
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors David Cornforth, Keith Nesbitt
2013 Goodwin ID, Freeman R, Blackmore K, 'An insight into headland sand bypassing and wave climate variability from shoreface bathymetric change at Byron Bay, New South Wales, Australia', Marine Geology, 341 29-45 (2013) [C1]

The headland sand bypassing mechanisms in the Eastern Australian longshore sand transport system are investigated at Cape Byron, in response to wave climate variability. The mecha... [more]

The headland sand bypassing mechanisms in the Eastern Australian longshore sand transport system are investigated at Cape Byron, in response to wave climate variability. The mechanisms are interpreted from shoreface bathymetric change between surveys in 1883, 2002 and 2011 CE. They involve a split in the sand transport to follow a nearshore path along the inner bar and a cross-embayment path connecting the up-coast and down-coast outer bars. The relative magnitude of the net sand transported via the two pathways is controlled by a rotation in directional wave conditions. Two bypassing mechanisms were interpreted: (i) a predominantly cross embayment transport during unimodal east-southeast wave climate such as those interpreted for the period prior to 1883; and, (ii) a split transport between the inner nearshore and cross-embayment paths during a bimodal dominant south-south-easterly and sub-dominant east-north-easterly wave climate such as in the 2000s. The net sand transport bypassing Cape Byron was dominated by a connected outer bar system prior to 1883 and conversely, a stronger inner bar system during the 1960s to 2000s. This is manifest in the 10° rotation in seabed morphology and shoreline planforms. These changes are in accordance with decadal climate variability described by the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO). The switching between headland sand bypassing mechanisms on interannual to decadal timescales determines the geometry of the bypass strand with the downcoast littoral zone and has important implications for understanding the shoreline rotation and the application of the headland-bay beach concept to predicting planform curvature in open compartments. © 2013.

DOI 10.1016/j.margeo.2013.05.005
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2013 King RAR, Blackmore KL, 'Physical and political boundaries as barriers to the continuity of social vulnerability', Applied Geography, 44 79-87 (2013) [C1]

The dynamics of social vulnerability are of key interest to many government agencies and departments. Identifying the geographic distribution of vulnerability within regions, and ... [more]

The dynamics of social vulnerability are of key interest to many government agencies and departments. Identifying the geographic distribution of vulnerability within regions, and analysing how localised areas of social need change over time, is a key information requirement for decision-making, and the resultant allocation of resources. Typically, the delineation of areas for the determination of social vulnerability occurs using a combination of political and census boundaries. In many instances, the boundaries of these areas align to natural geographic features such as rivers or lakes. In other cases, a boundary is aligned to a man-made structure such as a road. The boundary may also be arbitrarily positioned based on some measure of distance and not align to any physical feature. In this research, we identify the various boundary types present in a political region. Using two measures of social vulnerability, we assess these boundaries as barriers to the continuity of social vulnerability. From our results, we identify motorways/highways and watercourses as potential barriers. We find no significant effects with lesser road structures suggesting there is no "wrong side of the street". These results have implications for decision-makers and emphasise the need to recognise the "softness" of boundaries, and consider the relationships between areas, when allocating resources. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.apgeog.2013.07.011
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Robert King
2013 Blackmore K, Nesbitt K, 'Verifying the Miles and Snow strategy types in Australian small- and medium-size enterprises', Australian Journal of Management, 38 171-190 (2013) [C1]

In this paper we set out to verify the existence of Miles and Snow strategy types in Australian small- and medium-size enterprises (SMEs) through objective classification. Austral... [more]

In this paper we set out to verify the existence of Miles and Snow strategy types in Australian small- and medium-size enterprises (SMEs) through objective classification. Australian SMEs, in particular, are interesting as they are reported to have some unique characteristics, with as many as 70% following a low growth or life-style pathway. While numerous empirical studies have been conducted to validate the existence and characteristics of the Miles and Snow strategy types in different domains for both larger and smaller enterprises, these studies typically rely on a subjective, 'self-typing' approach. In this study we employ a more objective approach by identifying measures from existing survey data that capture the strategic dimensions proposed by Miles and Snow. We use these objective measures in a K-means cluster analysis to identify four different strategic groups. Three of the groups correspond to the three 'viable' Miles and Snow strategy types of Defender, Prospector and Analyser; however, we also identify a 'Static' strategy type that constitutes 42% of SMEs in the sample. © The Author(s) 2012.

DOI 10.1177/0312896212444692
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Keith Nesbitt
2011 Jelinek H, Cornforth D, Blackmore KL, 'Visualisation in Biomedicine as a Means of Data Evaluation', Journal of Visualization, 14 353-359 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors David Cornforth
2009 Blackmore KL, Nesbitt KV, 'Defending against turbulent conditions: Results from an agent-based simulation', International Journal of Business Studies, 17 127-148 (2009) [C1]
Co-authors Keith Nesbitt
2003 Blackmore KL, Bossomaier TRJ, 'Soft computing methodologies for mining mission person data', International Journal of Knowledge Based and Intelligent Engineering Systems, 7 132-138 (2003) [C1]
Show 7 more journal articles

Conference (16 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Nesbitt K, Williams P, Ng P, Blackmore K, Eidels A, 'Designing Informative Sound to Ehance a Simple Decision Task', 22nd International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD - 2016 ) (2016)
Co-authors Ami Eidels, Keith Nesbitt
2016 Hookham G, Kay-Lambkin F, Blackmore K, Nesbitt K, 'Using startle probe to compare affect and engagement between a serious game and an online intervention program', ACM International Conference Proceeding Series (2016)

Copyright 2016 ACM.The widespread popularity of computer games have led to their expanded use in more serious applications for training and education. In many cases serious games ... [more]

Copyright 2016 ACM.The widespread popularity of computer games have led to their expanded use in more serious applications for training and education. In many cases serious games are being advanced as more compelling than traditional face-to-face or interactive online training. A typically reported motivation for developing serious games is to try and increase engagement of participants and thus ultimately the effectiveness of the training experience. In this paper we discuss the relation of affect to engagement. The training reported in this study relates to a psychological counseling program developed to assist patients with comorbidity in depression and alcohol use disorders. A pre-existing online intervention program, called "SHADE", had been found to provide effective treatment when participants completed the program. However, a significant number of participants failed to complete the program, with most exits occurring when Cognitive Based Training (CBT) was integrated into the online program. To try and increase the number of participants completing the program a serious game, called "Shadow" is being developed to cover similar material. This paper reports on a study that uses the startle reflex modulation measure to try and objectively quantify the affective engagement of players in the two treatment approaches, Shadow, the serious game, versus SHADE, the online intervention program. Also reported are the issues associated with using affective processing, as measured by the startle probe technique, as a means of evaluating engagement in serious games.

DOI 10.1145/2843043.2843481
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin, Keith Nesbitt
2016 Blackmore KL, Coppins W, Nesbitt KV, 'Using startle reflex to compare playing and watching in a horror game', ACM International Conference Proceeding Series (2016)

Copyright 2016 ACM.Human startle reflex has been identified as a valid physiological measure of valence and arousal, providing a useful mechanism for evaluating player engagement ... [more]

Copyright 2016 ACM.Human startle reflex has been identified as a valid physiological measure of valence and arousal, providing a useful mechanism for evaluating player engagement in video games. In this research, we use electromyography (EMG) recording of the startle reflex of participants to explore the impact of playing, versus watching a play through, of a game. Participants in the research played and watched Parsec Studio's Slender: The Eight Pages, a freely available video game within the horror genre. Experiments were conducted both with participants both playing and watching the game, with results showing a statistically significant difference in startle responses between the two conditions. The results suggest that the fear state of the game is enhanced through player interaction and increased attention.

DOI 10.1145/2843043.2843482
Co-authors Keith Nesbitt
2016 Hickmott D, Smith SP, Bille R, Burd E, Stephens L, Southgate E, 'Building apostrophe power: Lessons learnt for serious games development', ACM International Conference Proceeding Series (2016)

Copyright 2016 ACM.There is increasing interest in the application of serious games for learning. Growth in the take-up of digital devices, e.g. smartphones and tablets, and their... [more]

Copyright 2016 ACM.There is increasing interest in the application of serious games for learning. Growth in the take-up of digital devices, e.g. smartphones and tablets, and their use for gaming provides new opportunities for mobile learning (m-learning). A serious game m-learning app for improving adult learners' apostrophe usage, called Apostrophe Power, has been developed. The research team, which consisted of software engineers and educationalists, encountered a number of discipline spanning issues while designing and developing this m-learning app. This paper overviews the issues encountered, the recommendations from recent literature and how the issues were ultimately addressed, exemplified in a case study. These lessons learnt offer insight for serious game development and highlight practical solutions for m-learning apps involving interdisciplinary teams.

DOI 10.1145/2843043.2843475
Co-authors Shamus Smith, Erica Southgate
2015 Ng P, Nesbitt K, Blackmore K, 'Sound improves player performance in a multiplayer online battle arena game', Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) (2015) [E1]

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.Sound in video games is often used by developers to enhance the visual experience on screen. Despite its importance in creati... [more]

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.Sound in video games is often used by developers to enhance the visual experience on screen. Despite its importance in creating presence and improving visual screen elements, sound also plays an important role in providing additional information to a player when completing various game tasks. This preliminary study focuses on the use of informative sound in the popular multiplayer online battle arena game, Dota 2. Our initial results indicate that team performance improves with the use of sound. However, mixed results with individual performances were measured, with some individual performances better with sound and some better without sound.

Co-authors Keith Nesbitt
2014 Blackmore K, Nesbitt KV, Smith SP, 'IE2014: Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Interactive Entertainment', Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Interactive Entertainment (2014) [E4]
Co-authors Keith Nesbitt, Shamus Smith
2014 Gu X, Blackmore K, 'The Publishing Game: An Analysis of "Game" Related Academic Publishing Patterns', Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Interactive Entertainment (2014) [E1]
DOI 10.1145/2677758.2677759
2014 'Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Interactive Entertainment, IE 2014, Newcastle, NSW, Australia, December 2-3, 2014' (2014)
2014 Ng P, Nesbitt K, Blackmore K, 'Informative Sound and Performance in a Team Based Computer Game', Entertainment Computing¿ICEC 2014 (2014) [E1]
Co-authors Keith Nesbitt
2013 Blackmore K, Nesbitt K, Cornforth D, 'Simulating stable, trending and turbulent operating environments', Proceedings of the 2013 IEEE 8th Conference on Industrial Electronics and Applications, ICIEA 2013 (2013) [E1]
DOI 10.1109/ICIEA.2013.6566348
Co-authors Keith Nesbitt, David Cornforth
2012 Blackmore KL, Nesbitt KV, 'Simulating the performance of small-medium enterprises in different market conditions', 2012 International Conference on Applied and Theoretical Information Systems Research Proceedings (2012) [E1]
Co-authors Keith Nesbitt
2010 Goodwin ID, Freeman R, Blackmore KL, 'Decadal Wave Climate Variability and Implications for Interpreting New South Wales Coastal Behaviour', Proceedings of the Australian Wind Waves Research Symposium (2010) [E1]
2008 Blackmore KL, Nesbitt KV, 'Identifying risks for cross-disciplinary higher degree research students', Computing Education 2008: Proceedings of the Tenth Australasian Computing Education Conference (ACE2008) (2008) [E1]
Co-authors Keith Nesbitt
2005 Moffatt S, Blackmore KL, 'National anit plagiarism strategies: A shared responsibility in transnational university partnerships?', Biennial Conference of the Open Distance Learning Association of Australia (17th : 2005) (9 - 11 November 2005 : Adelaide) (2005) [E1]
2002 Blackmore K, Bossomaier TRJ, 'Comparison of See5 and J48.PART Algorithms for Missing Persons Profiling', Proceedings of the First International Conference on Information Technology and Applications (ICITA 2002) (2002)

Algorithms to derive rules from data sets can obtain differing results from the same data set. The J48.PART and the See5 schemes use similar methodologies to derive rules, however... [more]

Algorithms to derive rules from data sets can obtain differing results from the same data set. The J48.PART and the See5 schemes use similar methodologies to derive rules, however, differences appear in the number and constitution of rules produced to predict outcomes for missing persons cases. See5 generates fewer rules to obtain the same level of accuracy as J48.PART. Analysis of the input-output space using a measure of concept variation indicates missing persons profiling is characteristic of a difficult classification problem, resulting in fragmentation problems. This provides explanation for the differences that occur in the number and constitution of rules.

2002 Blackmore K, Bossomaier T, Foy S, Thomson D, 'Data Mining of Missing Persons Data.', FSKD (2002)
Show 13 more conferences

Report (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Mee KJ, McGuirk P, O'Neill P, Blackmore K, King R, 'Indicators of Social Vulnerability: Comparison of SDAP Composite Score, Hunter Region, 2008 and Census Composite Score, Hunter Region, 2006', Department of Premier and Cabinet Hunter Region, 16 (2010)
Co-authors Robert King
2010 McGuirk P, Mee K, O'Neill P, Blackmore K, King R, Dimeski B, Askew L, 'Indicators of Social Vulnerability: SDAP Composite Score2006, 2007, 2008 Hunter Region Section 3', Department of Premier and Cabinet Hunter Region, 23 (2010)
2010 O'Neill P, McGuirk P, Mee K, Blackmore K, King R, Dimeski B, 'Indicators of Social Vulnerability: Change in SDAP Composite Score 2006-2008', Department of Premier and Cabinet Hunter Region, 41 (2010)
Co-authors Robert King
2010 Mee KJ, McGuirk P, O'Neill P, Blackmore K, King R, 'Indicators of Social Vulnerability 2006-2008, Hunter Region: Summary Report', Department of Premier and Cabinet Hunter Region, 15 (2010)
Co-authors Robert King
2010 Mcguirk P, mee K, O'Neill P, Blackmore K, King R, Dimeski B, et al., 'Indicators of Social Vulnerability: SDAP Composite Score 2006, 2007, 2008, Hunter Region Sections 1 and 2', Department of Premier and Cabinet Hunter Region, 65 (2010)
Co-authors Robert King
2010 Blackmore KL, Goodwin ID, Wilson S, 'CASE STUDY 2: Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Extreme Heat Events Affecting Public Health in the Hunter, Lower North Coast and Central Coast Region', HCCREMS (Hunter Councils Inc. as legal agent), 40 (2010) [R1]
2010 Blackmore KL, Goodwin ID, Wilson S, 'CASE STUDY 3: Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Bushfire Risk in the Hunter, Lower North Coast and Central Coast Region', HCCREMS (Hunter Councils Inc. as legal agent), 70 (2010) [R1]
2009 Blackmore K, Goodwin I, 'Report 3: Climate Change Impact for the Hunter, Lower North Coast and Central Coast Region of NSW, Report prepared for Hunter & Central Coast Regional Environmental Strategy, NSW' (2009)
2009 Blackmore KL, Goodwin ID, Wilson S, 'CASE STUDY 1: Analysis of Past Trends and Future Projections of Climate Change and their Impacts on the Hunter Valley Wine Industry', HCCREMS (Hunter Councils Inc. as legal agent), 48 (2009) [R1]
Show 6 more reports
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 5
Total funding $345,585

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20162 grants / $331,000

Assessing coal properties and their effects on coking performance: a data mining approach$330,000

Funding body: Australian Coal Research Limited

Funding body Australian Coal Research Limited
Project Team Miss Lauren North, Doctor Merrick Mahoney, Doctor Karen Blackmore, Doctor Keith Nesbitt
Scheme Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1600137
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Workshop participant$1,000

Funding body: RPDE: Rapid Prototyping, Development and Evaluation Program

Funding body RPDE: Rapid Prototyping, Development and Evaluation Program
Project Team Doctor Karen Blackmore
Scheme Industry Workshop Participant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600799
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20141 grants / $8,500

Climate Change Model Validation and Projected Climate Surface Generation$8,500

To assist HCCREMS identify the long-term threats of climate change on a number of regionally key species, regional scale climate change projections were required to be incorporated into species distribution models (SDM). The potential impacts of climate change on the Hunter, Central and Lower North Coast region have been previously modelled (Verdon, 2007; Blackmore & Goodwin, 2008 & 2009). This project aimed to update regional historic data and plots, validate the existing models to determine their suitability to incorporate into the SDMs.

Funding body: Hunter and Central Coast Regional Environment Management Strategy (NCCREMS)

Funding body Hunter and Central Coast Regional Environment Management Strategy (NCCREMS)
Project Team

Karen Blackmore

Scheme Regional Conservation Assessment Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON N

20131 grants / $4,085

Spatial Data Analytics: Addressing critical application problems concerning the environment and human society, and the interactions between them, using spatial data analytic approaches$4,085

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Karen Blackmore
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300663
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20061 grants / $2,000

International Travel Grant$2,000

Funding body: Complex Open Systems Research Network (COSNet)

Funding body Complex Open Systems Research Network (COSNet)
Project Team

Karen Blackmore

Scheme Internation Travel Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current5

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD2.3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Avatar and Participant Gender Differences in the Perception of Uncanniness of Virtual Humans
PhD (Information Technology), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Data Mining to Better Predict Coking Performance of Coals
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD A Theory of Commodity Market Development
PhD (Economics), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Analysis of Influential Factors in Academic Publication System using Agent-Based Modelling and Simulation
PhD (Information Technology), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2012 PhD Design and Development of Engaging Active Video Games (AVG) to Combat Childhood Obesity
PhD (Information Technology), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
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Research Opportunities

Rapid Development Environment for Visualisation Scenario Generation In Military Simulations

Industry Based Honours Project in collaboration with the Australian Defence College Simulation Centre

Honours

School of Design Communication and IT

18/12/2015 - 19/12/2016

Contact

Doctor Karen Blackmore
University of Newcastle
School of Design Communication and IT
karen.blackmore@newcastle.edu.au

Desktop Video Games To Improve Critical Thinking

Industry Based Honours Project in collaboration with the Australian Defence College Simulation Centre

Honours

School of Elect Engineering and Computer Science

18/12/2015 - 19/12/2016

Contact

Doctor Shamus Smith
University of Newcastle
School of Elect Engineering and Computer Science
shamus.smith@newcastle.edu.au

Fidelity Effects on Actor Driven Avatars In Military Simulations

Industry Based Honours Project in collaboration with the Australian Defence College Simulation Centre

Honours

School of Design Communication and IT

18/12/2015 - 19/12/2016

Contact

Doctor Karen Blackmore
University of Newcastle
School of Design Communication and IT
karen.blackmore@newcastle.edu.au

Evaluating IT Banking Systems

Industry Based Honours Project in collaboration with the Greater Building Society

Honours

School of Design Communication and IT

18/12/2015 - 19/12/2016

Contact

Doctor Karen Blackmore
University of Newcastle
School of Design Communication and IT
karen.blackmore@newcastle.edu.au

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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 20
United States 2
Austria 1
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Dr Karen Blackmore

Position

Lecturer
School of Design, Communication and IT (DCIT)
School of Design Communication and IT
Faculty of Science and Information Technology

Focus area

Information Technology

Contact Details

Email karen.blackmore@newcastle.edu.au
Phone +61 2 492 15206
Fax +61 2 492 15896
Links Personal Blogs
Personal webpage
Research Networks
Twitter

Office

Room 3-61
Building ICT Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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