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Dr Kalpit Shah

Senior Lecturer

School of Engineering

Viable and value-added

Passionate and inventive, Dr Kalpit Shah is seeking to develop economic, safe and sustainable ways of using raw materials and energy.

Kalpit Shah

Dr Kalpit Shah is – quite literally – changing the world. From mining and the agricultural sector to petrochemicals, power and steelmaking, the young scientist is making a difference, giving back to society through the design and delivery of technically sound, environmentally friendly solutions for industry.

"My expertise lies in the area of thermochemical conversions of solid, liquid and gaseous fuels, such as coal and biomass," he explains.

"It covers things like plants, which in many instances are used not for food or feed but as a resource for making energy."

Supported by a "wide range" of advanced experimental and modelling tools, Kalpit's research straddles the engineering, physical and life sciences fields. Both fundamental and applied, it also dovetails into mathematics and social justice.

"I am deeply pained by the fact that climate change is already having a detrimental impact on economies, communities and ecologies," he states.

"With global warming comes an increased risk of flooding, drought and intense summer heat."

"The lower middleclass populations of developing countries are affected by these conditions the most."

"I feel I have a key role to play in alleviating their suffering."

Improvement via innovation

Before joining the academic front in 2008, Kalpit worked in the chemical industry in India. Aiming to boost its energy efficiency rating during the six-year stint, the esteemed investigator took on a number of privileged positions.

"I am the youngest professional in the state to have obtained a license as an energy auditor," he attests.

"I was a senior project executive and research manager too."

"These early efforts were recognised by the Gujarat Electricity Board, which presented me with an award in 2005."

Relocating to Western Australia a few years later, Kalpit undertook a PhD in Chemical Engineering. A joint effort between Curtin University and the Netherland's prestigious Energy Research Centre - ECN, the three-year probe sought to make sense of the co-firing mechanisms of coal and biomass during different conversion processes.

"We looked into pyrolysis, the thermochemical decomposition of organic compounds at high temperatures in the absence of oxygen, as well as gasification, a partial oxidation practice and combustion, a chemical reaction involving the rapid combination of fuel and oxygen whereby compounds are broken down into carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and methane," he clarifies.

Resorting to analytical and modelling techniques to explain the "difficult-to-predict" physico-chemical transformations that occur during these processes in few milliseconds, Kalpit helped ECN in developing a 'Co-Firing Advisory Tool' (CAT) for organisations wanting to implement biomass feedstock in coal-operated facilities.

"CAT provides a lot of technical advice," he shares.

"It's considered to be a valuable resource."

"Australia is the largest producer and user of coal so it has great potential to incorporate biomass as a co-firing constituent to reduce carbon dioxide emissions."

"Biomass is essentially carbon dioxide neutral."

Sensational and translational

Kalpit continued at Curtin University after receiving his doctorate at the beginning of 2011, employed as a research associate to collaborate on a handful of industry-led assignments. This "relatively short tenure" ended in the middle of that same year, however the senior lecturer found a more permanent home at the University of Newcastle's Institute for Energy and Resources.

"During my time here I've secured more than $2 million in funding for individual projects, as well as more than $6 million in funding for the team development of a self-patented Ventilation Air Methane (VAM) abatement system," he avows.

"This technology uses methane emitted in very dilute concentrations from coal mines and converts it to carbon dioxide and useable energy."

"With a global warming potential 25 times greater than that of the former, methane and therefore VAM mitigation, is widely seen as the biggest challenge for coal-producing countries."

Determined to help reduce these and other pollutant emissions, Kalpit is concurrently exploring a fundamental engineering principle called 'Chemical Looping.'

"It suggests some of the reactions occurring in industrial processes that emit carbon dioxide are reversible," he illuminates.

"It also suggests that if you're able to break a global chemical reaction into two elementary steps, you can reduce exergy losses and improve efficiency."

Applying the principle in several novel ways, such as with the development of Stone Dust Looping VAM Abatement Technology (SDL), Kalpit is steadily shoring up Australia's position as a world leader in innovative, near zero emission mining. Using limestone as a raw material and carrying out the process at "very low" methane concentrations, he's similarly backing the self-sustainability of associated industries.

"SDL works on the related principle of catalytic oxidation followed by carbon dioxide capture," he declares.

"It can operate without auxiliary fuel and at temperatures 40% lower than conventional processes of VAM mitigation as well."

"It's really quite impressive."

Bold steps

A master at multitasking, Kalpit is simultaneously seeking to create new technology platforms for biomass utilisation. He has recently procured a $1.1 million funding grant from VTara Energy Group, ensuring research efforts will continue well into 2016.

"The project is aimed at solving a missing link in the gasification of biomass," he reveals.

"Using agricultural waste and byproducts to generate heat and electricity will benefit developing nations and guarantee Australia's support of global economic advancement."

A "firm believer" in the potential of multipurpose organic compounds, Kalpit is also committed to evolving the science of this nuanced utilisation.

"Our country, being the largest source of coal and biomass, should focus on becoming self-reliant where meeting long-term oil and chemical demands are concerned," he concedes.

"If not used for power generation, both could – and perhaps should – be relied upon in other industrial sectors."

"For example, I'm currently using green solvents, such as ionic liquids, to process coal and biomass into liquids."

"It's a completely new, energy-efficient approach."

At the same time, Kalpit is looking to invent some environmentally friendly waste utilisation technologies.

"I'm trying to produce electricity from urinal waste generated at central locations, such as airports and shopping malls," he confirms.

"I'm developing a process to recover ultrafine coal waste from tailing ponds too."

Waste not, want not

Acknowledging that climate change, sustainable engineering and waste utilisation will be "ongoing issues" both here and abroad, Kalpit is looking to inspire confidence in current, related research endeavours at the University.

"I would like to strengthen our ties with different industries," he divulges.

"They can expect thorough solutions to their scientific and technical problems when they come to our doorstep."

Kalpit Shah

Viable and value-added

Passionate and inventive, Dr Kalpit Shah is seeking to develop economic, safe and sustainable ways of using raw materials and energy.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Dr. Kalpit Shah’s current research projects and career interests include the fundamental and applied research in the area of advanced thermochemical conversion systems. Few examples are low emission clean coal technologies such as oxy-fuel and chemical looping, coal and biomass pyrolysis, gasification and combustion followed by their utilization and improvement in the efficiency of steelmaking processes. He is currently leading the chemical looping related projects at the University of Newcastle in collaboration with Prof. Behdad Mogthaderi.

His self-patented technologies such as Chemical Looping Air Separation (CLAS) for oxygen production, Chemical Looping Oxy Combustor (CLOC) for coal combustion and Stone Dust Looping (SDL) process for Ventilation Air Methane (VAM) mitigation have gained significant interest from industry and global research community. Moreover, his other key research projects/interests in the area of chemical looping are developing new processes such as Chemical Looping Carbon Reforming (CLCR) for CO2 utilization and methanol production, Chemical/Calcium Looping Gasification (CLG) for hydrogen production, Soil Looping Carbon Arrestor Process (SLCAP) for emission reduction from poultry farms and piggery and Slag Carbon Arrestor Process (SCAP) for improving the efficiency of steelmaking process. He is also devising a novel pre-treatment process for improving the efficiency of Direct Coal Liquefaction (DCL) process.

Before joining the UoN, he worked as a Research Associate and a PhD student in the Chemical Engineering Department of Curtin University between 2007 and 2011. His research at Curtin University was mainly in the area of coal and biomass combustion. During his PhD, he also worked as a Guest Researcher at the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) from 2008-10. He was mainly looking at deriving the fundamental ash formation mechanisms during combustion/co-firing of coal and biomass. 

Beyond his research accomplishments (total 60 scientific outputs including 3 patents and ~35 industrial reports), he has around seven years of industrial and consultancy experience in the applied energy research area in India and overseas from 2001-07. Given the strong research and industrial background in the energy area, he has been engaged with International Energy Centre (IEC) of Australia for delivering Masters of Energy Studies (MES) Program on Advanced Power Generation Technologies since 2012. He led the Australian delegation for briefing the Energy Minister of the Gujarat State of India during the 1st Thermo and 1st Chemtech meetings in 2011 in India. He has briefed the Honourable Australian High Commissioner of South Africa about the low emission technology development at the University of Newcastle during NIER-SANEDI Symposium in Johannesburg in South Africa in 2013. 

Research Expertise
Dr. Kalpit Shah’s main research expertise lies in the area of thermochemical conversion of solid, liquid and gaseous fuels. However, with his strong chemical engineering fundamental knowledge and innovation skills, he has been fortunate to provide useful solutions to various industrial sectors ranging from technology development, product benefication, energy efficiency improvement and emission reduction. His research strength/experience is in the following areas: 1. Low emission technologies development 2. Process/Energy efficiency improvement in coal mining, chemical, petrochemical and steelmaking industries 3. Emission reduction from coal mines 4. Emission reduction from poultry and piggery farms 5. Advanced pyrolysis and gasification 6. Waste to energy 7. Coal/biomass liquefaction 8. Coal/biomass up gradation 9. CO2 utilization 10. Clay benefication 11. Biochar and Biofuels His research is supported by a wide range of novel and conventional experimental and modelling techniques. He has carried out several in-depth techno-economic assessments for power generators and government and private funding agencies in India and overseas. He has extensive research experience in the area of technology development from a laboratory concept to pilot-scale demonstration. His research is recognized both at national and international level and has won several best paper awards in number of national and international conferences.


Qualifications

  • PhD (Chemical Engineering), Curtin University of Technology
  • Bachelor of Engineering (Chemical Engineering), South Gujarat University - India

Keywords

  • Advanced Clean Coal Technologies
  • Advanced Energy Systems
  • Calcium looping
  • Chemical looping
  • Coal and Biomass
  • Coal liquefaction
  • Flue gas cleaning
  • Gas cleaning
  • Oxy-fuel combusiton
  • Process Modelling
  • Process Plant Engineering
  • Thermo-chemical Conversion
  • Ventilation air methane

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
090499 Chemical Engineering not elsewhere classified 60
091299 Materials Engineering not elsewhere classified 10
090405 Non-automotive Combustion and Fuel Engineering (incl. Alternative/Renewable Fuels) 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Engineering
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
27/07/2015 -  Senior Lecturer Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment - The University of Newcastle (Australia)
Australia
1/07/2011 -  Research Associate University of Newcastle
Australia
1/11/2010 - 1/07/2011 Research Associate Curtin University of Technology

Awards

Professional

Year Award
2005 Gujarat State Electricity Board Award for Young Engineers
Gujarat State Electricity Board

Research Award

Year Award
2015 Faculty Award for Research Excellence
Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment - The University of Newcastle (Australia)
2015 Award for Research Innovation
Newcastle Innovation

Scholarship

Year Award
2008 Guest Researcher Award
Energy Research Center of Netherlands

Teaching Award

Year Award
2014 Top Teachers Award for CHEE3731 (Student Feedback on Courses)
Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment - The University of Newcastle (Australia)
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Shah KV, Mariusz C, Vuthaluru H, 'A Review on Ash Formation During Pulverized Fuel Combustion: State of Art and Future Research Needs', Advances in Bioprocess Technology, Springer, Cham 27-56 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-17915-5_3

Journal article (33 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Patel S, Tremain P, Sandford J, Moghtaderi B, Shah K, 'Empirical Kinetic Model of a Stone Dust Looping Carbonator for Ventilation Air Methane Abatement', ENERGY & FUELS, 30 1869-1878 (2016)
DOI 10.1021/acs.energyfuels.5b02206
Co-authors Behdad Moghtaderi
2016 Yin F, Shah K, Zhou C, Tremain P, Yu J, Doroodchi E, Moghtaderi B, 'Novel Calcium-Looping-Based Biomass-Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle: Thermodynamic Modeling and Experimental Study', Energy and Fuels, 30 1730-1740 (2016)

© 2015 American Chemical Society. The current work focuses on the development of a novel calcium-looping-based biomass-integrated gasification combined cycle (CL-BIGCC) process. ... [more]

© 2015 American Chemical Society. The current work focuses on the development of a novel calcium-looping-based biomass-integrated gasification combined cycle (CL-BIGCC) process. The process is expected to improve the energy density of synthesis gas by capturing CO2 in a carbonator. Also, at the same time, the carbonator is expected to act as an ex situ tar removal unit, where tar cracking is expected to occur via catalytic reactions with CaO. The current work evaluates the feasibility of the proposed CL-BIGCC concept via thermodynamic analysis using Aspen Plus. Moreover, the tar cracking ability of CaO is demonstrated using thermogravimetric analyzer coupled to Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (TGA-FTIR) experiments. As part of the thermodynamic analysis, sensitivity analyses of the key process parameters, such as the calcium/biomass (Ca/B) ratio, steam/biomass (S/B) ratio, carbonator temperature, and calciner temperature, and their effects on net thermal-to-electricity efficiency have been studied in detail. The optimal values of key process parameters, such as a compression ratio of 5.1, an air/fuel mass ratio of 15, a Ca/B ratio of 0.53, a S/B ratio of 0.17, and carbonator and calciner temperatures of 650 and 800 °C, respectively, have been obtained. Furthermore, the CL-BIGCC process simulated in the current work was found to have a net thermal-to-electricity efficiency of ~25% based on the above optimal parameters, which is the highest among other conventional steam-based BIGCC processes. The biomass gasification (i.e., partial oxidation) experiments in a TGA-FTIR with a CaO/biomass ratio of 1:1 at different temperatures showed that CaO effectively catalyzed tar-cracking reactions.

DOI 10.1021/acs.energyfuels.5b02266
Co-authors Behdad Moghtaderi, Elham Doroodchi
2016 Zhou C, Shah K, Song H, Zanganeh J, Doroodchi E, Moghtaderi B, 'Integration Options and Economic Analysis of an Integrated Chemical Looping Air Separation Process for Oxy-fuel Combustion', Energy and Fuels, 30 1741-1755 (2016)

© 2015 American Chemical Society. This paper is concerned about a detailed techno-economic assessment of a hypothetical 500 MWe coal-fired power plant in New South Wales, Austral... [more]

© 2015 American Chemical Society. This paper is concerned about a detailed techno-economic assessment of a hypothetical 500 MWe coal-fired power plant in New South Wales, Australia, for oxy-fuel conversion using integrated chemical looping air separation (ICLAS) technology and cryogenic air separation unit (CASU). The key objectives of this study are to (i) investigate and compare the detailed integration options for oxy-fuel conversion using ICLAS and CASU and (ii) determine the technical merits of the above integration options and the conditions at which the technologies become economically feasible. The study produced scientific evidence that confirms the viability of the CLAS process from both technical and economic points of view under certain conditions. The detailed technical analysis revealed that ICLAS with natural gas integration is energy-efficient compared to CASU running on parasitic load. This is primarily due to the fact that ICLAS needs less auxiliary power compared to CASU. Despite the fact that ICLAS natural gas integration has resulted in higher efficiencies than CASU running on parasitic load, from a series of detailed economic analyses, it was observed that both ICLAS and CASU may not be viable under the present operating and economic conditions. Nevertheless, from sensitivity analysis, it was concluded that ICLAS can become feasible if economic conditions are improved, e.g., a low natural gas market price (<$3.5/GJ), a high electricity wholesale price (>$59/MWh), and/or a high carbon tax (>$33/tonne).

DOI 10.1021/acs.energyfuels.5b02209
Co-authors Elham Doroodchi, Behdad Moghtaderi
2015 Ahubelem N, Shah K, Moghtaderi B, Page AJ, 'Quantum Chemical Molecular Dynamics Simulations of 1,3-Dichloropropene Combustion.', J Phys Chem A, 119 9307-9316 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acs.jpca.5b06446
Co-authors Alister Page, Behdad Moghtaderi
2015 Ahubelem N, Shah K, Moghtaderi B, Altarawneh M, Dlugogorski BZ, Page AJ, 'Formation of chlorobenzenes by oxidative thermal decomposition of 1,3-dichloropropene', Combustion and Flame, (2015) [C1]

We combine combustion experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate the formation of chlorobenzenes from oxidative thermal decomposition of 1,3-dichl... [more]

We combine combustion experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate the formation of chlorobenzenes from oxidative thermal decomposition of 1,3-dichloropropene. Mono- to hexa-chlorobenzenes are observed between 800 and 1150. K, and the extent of chlorination was proportional to the combustion temperature. Higher chlorinated congeners of chlorobenzene (tetra-, penta-, hexa-chlorobenzene) are only observed in trace amounts between 950 and 1050. K. DFT calculations indicate that cyclisation of chlorinated hexatrienes proceeds via open-shell radical pathways. These species represent key components in the formation mechanism of chlorinated polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Results presented herein should provide better understanding of the evolution of soot from combustion/pyrolysis of short chlorinated alkenes.

DOI 10.1016/j.combustflame.2015.02.008
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Bogdan Dlugogorski, Behdad Moghtaderi, Alister Page
2015 Zhou C, Shah K, Doroodchi E, Moghtaderi B, 'Equilibrium thermodynamic analyses of methanol production via a novel Chemical Looping Carbon Arrestor process', Energy Conversion and Management, 96 392-402 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Abstract Methanol economy is considered as an alternative to hydrogen economy due to the better handling and storage characteristics of ... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Abstract Methanol economy is considered as an alternative to hydrogen economy due to the better handling and storage characteristics of methanol fuel than liquid hydrogen. This paper is concerned about a comprehensive equilibrium thermodynamic analysis carried out on methanol production via an innovative Chemical Looping Carbon Arrestor/Reforming process being developed at the University of Newcastle in order to reduce both energy consumption and carbon emissions. The detailed simulation revealed thermodynamic limitations within the Chemical Looping Carbon Reforming process however on the other hand it also confirmed that the new concept is a low energy requirement and low emission option compared to other methanol production technologies. Specifically, the mass and energy balance study showed that the Chemical Looping Carbon Reforming process typically consumes approximately 0.76-0.77 mole methane, 0.25-0.27 mole carbon dioxide, 0.49-0.50 mole water, and 0.51 mole iron oxide (in a chemical looping manner) per mole of methanol production. Moreover, the energy efficiency of Chemical Looping Carbon Reforming process was found to be ~64-70% and its emission profile was found as low as 0.14 mole carbon dioxide per mole of methanol, which is about 82-88% less than the conventional methanol production process and well below the emission levels of other emerging methanol production technologies.

DOI 10.1016/j.enconman.2015.03.008
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Behdad Moghtaderi, Elham Doroodchi
2015 Vuthaluru HB, Doshi V, Korbee R, Kiel JHA, Shah K, Moghtageri B, 'Co-firing of coal and biomass: Development of a conceptual model for ash formation prediction', Fuel, 139 594-605 (2015)

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. The co-firing technology of biomass with coal has been implemented to enhance the usage of biomass in power generation, thus reducing th... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. The co-firing technology of biomass with coal has been implemented to enhance the usage of biomass in power generation, thus reducing the release of greenhouse gas emissions. This study deals with the fireside issues, namely ash-related issues that arise during co-firing of coal and biomass. Ash release from biomass can lead to ash deposition problems such as fouling and slagging on surfaces of power generation boilers. The scope of this paper includes the development of a conceptual model that predicts the chemical composition of inorganics in coal and biomass and its release behaviour when combusted. An advanced analytical method was developed and introduced in this work to determine the speciation of biomass. The method known as pH-controlled extraction analysis was used to determine the inorganic speciation in three biomass samples, namely wood chips, wood bark and straw. The speciation of biomass and coal was used as an input to the model to predict the behaviour and release of ash. It was found that the main minerals species released as gas phases during the combustion of biomass are KCl, NaCl, K2SO4 and Na2SO4. Gas-to-particle formation calculations for such minerals were carried out to determine the chemical composition of coal and biomass when cooling takes place in the boiler. It was found that the possibility of heterogeneous condensation occurring on the heat exchange surface of boilers is much higher than homogeneous condensation. Preliminary study of interaction between coal and biomass during ash formation showed that Al, Si and S elements in coal may have a 'buffering' effect on biomass alkali metals, thus reducing the release of alkali-gases that can cause deposition and corrosion issues during co-firing. The results obtained in this work can be used in future work to determine the ash deposition of coal and biomass in boilers.

DOI 10.1016/j.fuel.2014.09.028
Co-authors Behdad Moghtaderi
2015 Cummings J, Shah K, Atkin R, Moghtaderi B, 'Physicochemical interactions of ionic liquids with coal; The viability of ionic liquids for pre-treatments in coal liquefaction', Fuel, 143 244-252 (2015) [C1]

Copyright © 2014 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Three Australian sub-bituminous coals were treated with three different ionic liquids (ILs) at a temperature of 1... [more]

Copyright © 2014 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Three Australian sub-bituminous coals were treated with three different ionic liquids (ILs) at a temperature of 100 °C. The thermal behaviour of these treated coals were compared against raw coals via pyrolysis experiments in a Thermogravimetric Analyser. Morphological comparisons were also made via Scanning Electron Microscopy. Among the studied ILs, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride [Bmim][Cl] was found to perform the most consistently in being able to alter the thermal and morphological properties of most of the coals used. It is posited that this may be due to the large difference in charge density between the delocalised charge of the large bmim cation and the chloride anion which allows this IL to disrupt the cross linked network of coal. It was also found that the interactions of the ionic liquids are coal specific, for instance none of the ionic liquids were able to change the thermal properties of coal A. Moreover, the results indicated that among the studied coals, coal R showed the highest mass loss during pyrolysis in TGA and coal C showed the highest amount of swelling and fragmentation in SEM images. The results displayed in this study indicate that the potential for ionic liquids to be used as pre-treatments in coal liquefaction is promising. Crown

DOI 10.1016/j.fuel.2014.11.042
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rob Atkin, Behdad Moghtaderi
2015 Shah K, Zhou C, Song H, Doroodchi E, Moghtaderi B, 'A novel hybrid chemical-looping oxy combustor process for the combustion of solid and gaseous fuels: Thermodynamic analysis', Energy and Fuels, 29 602-617 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 American Chemical Society. The larger reactor volume, additional oxygen polishing unit, and carbon stripper for the separation of oxygen carriers and ash in the chemical l... [more]

© 2014 American Chemical Society. The larger reactor volume, additional oxygen polishing unit, and carbon stripper for the separation of oxygen carriers and ash in the chemical looping combustion (CLC) and/or chemical looping oxygen uncoupling (CLOU) processes for solid fuels are anticipated not only to incur operational complexity but also to increase the capital and operating costs. As an alternative, this paper proposes a novel hybrid process, called "Chemical Looping Oxy Combustor (CLOC)". This novel process provides an integration of chemical looping air separation (CLAS) with fluidized bed oxy-fuel combustion and is expected to eliminate the need for an additional oxygen polishing unit and carbon stripper. It can be retrofitted to any existing coal circulating fluidized bed (CFB) at low cost. The other advantages of CLOC includes less solid handling issues, flexibility in handling low-grade coal with high moisture, no/less contamination of oxygen carriers, no/less slip of CO2/SOx in an air reactor, low energy penalty, etc. Also, in the CLOC process, coal combustion will occur in a separate fluidized bed combustor with relatively faster kinetics, because of the availability of high oxygen concentration (i.e., ~25-28 vol-"%), which eliminates the need for a larger fuel reactor volume. In the current paper, thermodynamic simulations of CLOC process using Cu-, Mn-, and Co-based metal oxide oxygen carriers were performed. Their performances were also compared against the conventional air-firing and oxy-firing technologies, e.g., oxy-fuel combustion integrated with cryogenic air separation unit (CASU) and CLOU. It was identified that the CLOC process needs external heat for reduction reactor provided by either direct or indirect methane combustion. Moreover, a maximum plant thermal efficiency was achieved for CLOC using Cu-based oxygen carrier. The energy penalty of the CLOC process, compared with the air-firing base case, was found to be ~2%-3%, which is ~4-5 times smaller than those of the CASU cases and only half of that of the CLOU process, indicating that CLOC offers a promising option for the combustion of solid fuels.

DOI 10.1021/ef502389t
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Behdad Moghtaderi, Elham Doroodchi
2015 Zhou C, Shah K, Moghtaderi B, 'Techno-economic assessment of integrated chemical looping air separation for oxy-fuel combustion: An Australian case study', Energy and Fuels, 29 2074-2088 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Chemical Society. A techno-economic analysis was carried out to assess the oxy-fuel conversion of eight major coal-fired power plants in the state of NSW, Austral... [more]

© 2015 American Chemical Society. A techno-economic analysis was carried out to assess the oxy-fuel conversion of eight major coal-fired power plants in the state of NSW, Australia. For this purpose, several alternative retrofit configurations, differing only in the air separation unit (ASU) but otherwise identical, were considered. More specifically, three types of oxygen plants were studied: a cryogenic-based air separation unit and integrated chemical looping air separation units using steam (ICLAS[S]) and recycled flue gas (ICLAS[FG]) as the reduction medium. The main objective of the techno-economic analysis was to determine if the economic viability of oxy-fuel operations could be enhanced by incorporating ICLAS technology. The results show that the normalized oxygen demand for the NSW fleet of coal-fired power plants was about 450-550 m3/MWh, with Bayswater having the lowest normalized oxygen demand and Munmorah having the highest one. Moreover, it was found that by replacing a cryogenic-based ASU with an ICLAS unit, the average reduction in the ASU power demand was up to 47% and 76%, respectively, for ICLAS[S] and ICLAS[FG]. Similarly, the average thermal efficiency penalty associated with the cryogenic and the ICLAS[S] and ICLAS[FG] units was found to be about 9.5%, 7.5%, and 5%, respectively, indicating that the ICLAS[FG] unit is the most energy efficient option for oxy-fuel plants. Economic analyses suggest that a retrofit cost reduction of about 32% can be achieved by incorporating an ICLAS[FG] unit. On average, the levelized cost of electricity associated with the cryogenic and the ICLAS[S] and ICLAS[FG] units for the NSW fleet of coal-fired power plants was found to be about $118/MWh, $105/MWh, and $95/MWh, respectively.

DOI 10.1021/ef5022076
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Behdad Moghtaderi
2015 Shah K, Moghtaderi B, Doroodchi E, Sandford J, 'A feasibility study on a novel stone dust looping process for abatement of ventilation air methane', Fuel Processing Technology, 140 285-296 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This paper describes the development of a novel stone dust looping process that relates to the removal of ventilation air methane using ... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This paper describes the development of a novel stone dust looping process that relates to the removal of ventilation air methane using stone dust. The working principle behind the stone dust looping process is incredibly simple which involves the catalytic oxidation of methane followed by carbonation and calcination reactions. In the current work, laboratory scale fluidized bed experiments and process simulations were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the stone dust looping process. The experimental work concluded that oxidation of ventilation air methane in the stone dust looping process can be successfully achieved at temperatures between 500 and 650 °C. The experimental results indicated that oxidation of methane was found to increase at higher temperatures while carbon dioxide capture efficiency showed a declining trend with increasing temperature. Furthermore, higher methane conversion and optimum (thermodynamic) carbon dioxide capture efficiency were observed for lower ventilation air methane flow rates and higher bed inventory. The concentration of methane in ventilation air methane and stone dust particle size did not have a significant effect on methane conversion or carbon dioxide capture. Also, comparison with synthetically prepared CuO and Fe2O3 catalysts has been made with CaO for VAM oxidation. CaO was found to be comparable to Fe2O3 and superior to CuO. From the process simulations, it was concluded that thermal energy generation in the carbonator was increased with higher methane and carbon dioxide concentrations. However, at the same time for higher methane and carbon dioxide concentrations, a greater CaO flux was required in the carbonator and hence a larger amount of goaf gas was required for the calcination reaction. The higher thermal energy generation in the carbonator was expected to improve the autothermicity of the stone dust looping process at concentrations of methane in the ventilation stream < 0.2 vol.% (thermodynamic limit).

DOI 10.1016/j.fuproc.2015.07.031
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Elham Doroodchi, Behdad Moghtaderi
2015 Ramezani M, Shah K, Doroodchi E, Moghtaderi B, 'Application of a novel calcium looping process for production of heat and carbon dioxide enrichment of greenhouses', Energy Conversion and Management, 103 129-138 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Abstract Greenhouses typically employ conventional burner systems to suffice heat and carbon dioxide required for plant growth. The energy requirement and ca... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Abstract Greenhouses typically employ conventional burner systems to suffice heat and carbon dioxide required for plant growth. The energy requirement and carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel burner are generally high. As an alternative, this paper describes a novel greenhouse calcium looping process which is expected to decrease the energy requirements and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The conceptual design of greenhouse calcium looping process is carried out in the ASPEN Plus v 7.3 simulator. In a greenhouse calcium looping process, the calcination reaction is considered to take place during day time in order to provide the required optimum carbon dioxide between 1000 and 2000 ppm, while the carbonation reaction is occurred during night time to provide required heat. The process simulations carried out in ASPEN indicates that greenhouse calcium looping process theoretically attributes to zero emission of carbon dioxide. Moreover, in a scenario modelling study compared to the conventional natural gas burner system, the heat duty requirements in the greenhouse calcium looping process were found to reduce by as high as 72%.

DOI 10.1016/j.enconman.2015.06.044
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Behdad Moghtaderi, Elham Doroodchi
2015 Peng Z, Doroodchi E, Alghamdi YA, Shah K, Luo C, Moghtaderi B, 'CFD-DEM simulation of solid circulation rate in the cold flow model of chemical looping systems', Chemical Engineering Research and Design, 95 262-280 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 The Institution of Chemical Engineers. In a chemical looping combustor (CLC) system, the solid circulation rate (SCR) is a key parameter that determines the design, operat... [more]

© 2014 The Institution of Chemical Engineers. In a chemical looping combustor (CLC) system, the solid circulation rate (SCR) is a key parameter that determines the design, operating conditions and the overall efficiency of the system. In the present work, the gas-solid flow of a CLC cold flow model (10kWth) has been simulated by the computational fluid dynamics-discrete element method (CFD-DEM). The results showed that the SCR at different locations of the system fluctuates with time with different amplitude, and the variation of SCR is periodically stable. The turbulent gas-solid flow regime in the air reactor was found to be the main mechanism driving the fluctuation of SCR and determined the fluctuation frequency and amplitude. The SCR increased with the flow rates of air/fuel reactors and loop seals, and the total solid inventory. Changes in operating conditions directly induced the change in the mass of solids that were entrained into the riser from the air reactor and how fast the solids were transported therein. A correlation was subsequently proposed to describe the SCR as a function of solid hold-up and gas flow velocity in the riser. The particle residence time decreased in a power law as the SCR increased. Reasonable agreements were obtained between simulations and experiments in terms of solid distribution, gas-solid flow patterns, pressure drop profiles and SCR.

DOI 10.1016/j.cherd.2014.11.005
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Elham Doroodchi, Caimao Luo, Behdad Moghtaderi
2015 Ahubelem N, Shah K, Moghtaderi B, Page AJ, 'Formation of benzofuran and chlorobenzofuran from 1,3-dichloropropene: A quantum chemical investigation', International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, 115 1739-1745 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. We present a quantum chemical investigation of benzofuran and cholorobenzofuran formation mechanisms during the combustion of 1,3-dichloropropene. ... [more]

© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. We present a quantum chemical investigation of benzofuran and cholorobenzofuran formation mechanisms during the combustion of 1,3-dichloropropene. Density functional theory and Gaussian-n thermochemical methods are used to propose detailed mechanistic reaction pathways. These calculations indicate that oxidation of phenylvinyl radical intermediates and subsequent ring closure are key mechanistic pathways in the formation of benzofuran and chlorobenzofuran. Thermochemical and kinetic parameters presented herein will assist in further elucidation of dioxin formation mechanisms from thermolyses of hydrocarbon moieties.

DOI 10.1002/qua.25010
Co-authors Alister Page, Behdad Moghtaderi
2015 Cummings J, Kundu S, Tremain P, Moghtaderi B, Atkin R, Shah K, 'Investigations into Physicochemical Changes in Thermal Coals during Low-Temperature Ionic Liquid Treatment', Energy and Fuels, 29 7080-7088 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Chemical Society. Two Australian thermal coals were treated with four different ionic liquids (ILs) at temperatures as low as 100 °C. The ILs used were 1-butylpy... [more]

© 2015 American Chemical Society. Two Australian thermal coals were treated with four different ionic liquids (ILs) at temperatures as low as 100 °C. The ILs used were 1-butylpyridinium chloride ([Bpyd][Cl]), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide ([Emim][DCM]), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim][Cl]), and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tricyanomethanide ([Bmim][TCM]). Visual comparisons were made between the raw and IL-treated coals via optical microscopy. Changes in thermal behavior of these treated coals were compared against raw coals via pyrolysis experiments in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). Changes in functional group composition in the treated coals were probed via Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The recovered ILs were also analyzed via FTIR and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies to observe any changes after recovery. Low-temperature IL treatment of each of the coals resulted in fragmentation and fracturing, reducing the average particle size. An increase in mass loss in the treated coals was also observed when compared to each raw coal, indicating an increase in lower molecular weight fragments after treatment. This was corroborated by a large increase in aliphatic hydrocarbons being observed in the treated coals, along with a decrease in oxygenated functional groups and mineral matter in one coal. The recovered ILs were shown to be unchanged by this treatment process, indicating their potential recyclability. These results indicate the potential for ILs to be implemented as solvent treatments for coal conversion processes.

DOI 10.1021/acs.energyfuels.5b01824
Co-authors Rob Atkin, Behdad Moghtaderi
2015 Alghamdi Y, Peng Z, Shah K, Moghtaderi B, Doroodchi E, 'Predicting the solid circulation rate in chemical looping combustion systems using pressure drop measurements', Powder Technology, 286 572-581 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. In chemical looping combustion systems, accurate measurement of the solid circulation rate (SCR) is crucial for optimising the system performance. Convention... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. In chemical looping combustion systems, accurate measurement of the solid circulation rate (SCR) is crucial for optimising the system performance. Conventionally, the SCR is predicted using the riser total pressure drop leading to an overestimation of up to 70%. In this work, a model has been proposed for the SCR prediction using the pressure drop at the top section of the riser. The height of this top section was determined by the riser gas-solid flow characteristics, namely, the axial solid holdup profile and lateral solid flux profile. A kinematic model was developed to predict the axial solid holdup profile and the reduced solid flux model developed by Rhodes et al. (1992) was employed to predict the mass fraction of upwards flowing solids. The prediction results of the proposed model were validated against the experimental data obtained in this work and those reported in the literature, where the prediction accuracy of SCR was significantly improved (by up to 60%) with a deviation of around 15%.

DOI 10.1016/j.powtec.2015.09.004
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Behdad Moghtaderi, Elham Doroodchi
2014 Shah K, Atkin R, Stanger R, Wall T, Moghtaderi B, 'Interactions between vitrinite and inertinite-rich coals and the ionic liquid - [bmim][Cl]', Fuel, 119 214-218 (2014) [C1]

The interactions between vitrinite and inertinite-rich coals and the ionic liquid butylimidazolium chloride ([bmim][Cl]) heated to 100 C have been characterised. Differences in th... [more]

The interactions between vitrinite and inertinite-rich coals and the ionic liquid butylimidazolium chloride ([bmim][Cl]) heated to 100 C have been characterised. Differences in the interactions of coal macerals and ionic liquids have been identified. [bmim][Cl] is able to dissolve 22 wt% of a high-vitrinite coal fraction compared to 14 wt% of a high-inertinite coal fraction. The vitrinite-rich coal fraction tends to swell to a greater extent compared to the inertinite-rich coal fraction, which was fractured and fragmented rather than swelled. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.fuel.2013.11.038
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rob Atkin, Behdad Moghtaderi, Rohan Stanger, Terry Wall
2014 Spörl R, Walker J, Belo L, Shah K, Stanger R, Maier J, et al., 'SO3 emissions and removal by ash in coal-fired oxy-fuel combustion', Energy and Fuels, 28 5296-5306 (2014) [C1]

The sulfur oxide (SOx) concentrations during oxy-fuel combustion are generally higher compared to conventional air firing. The higher SO x concentrations, particularly sulfur trio... [more]

The sulfur oxide (SOx) concentrations during oxy-fuel combustion are generally higher compared to conventional air firing. The higher SO x concentrations, particularly sulfur trioxide (SO3) in combination with high concentration of water in the recycled flue gas, increase the sulfuric acid dew point temperature in oxy-fuel fired systems, thereby increasing allowable flue gas temperatures and reducing the thermal efficiency of a power plant. This paper presents results of experiments carried out at a 20 kW once-through combustion rig of the Institute of Combustion and Power Plant Technology (IFK) of the University of Stuttgart simulating different extents of oxy-fuel recycle gas cleaning by impurities injection to the oxidant gas of a once-through combustion reactor. Three Australian coals that have previously been tested under air and oxy-fuel conditions at the Aioi furnace of IHI in Japan were used in the experiments. The SOx emissions were measured, conversion ratios of sulfur dioxide (SO2) to SO3 were calculated, and results were compared with existing literature, finding good agreement. The experiments with different extents of recycle gas cleaning and therefore different SO2 levels in the system, revealed differences in the SO3 generation behavior: A coal-specific trend of increasing conversion ratios of SO2 to SO3 with increased flue gas SO2 levels was observed that could be related to the ash composition of the three different coals. The capture of SOx in a baghouse filter was also evaluated. Acid dew point temperatures (ADPs) for the flue gas were calculated for the various firing conditions. Acid dew point (ADP) temperatures increased by up to 50°C when changing from air to oxy-firing with recycling of H2O and SO2. Considerable differences in the ADPs were found for different extents of oxy-fuel recycle gas treatment and were evaluated in respect to power plant efficiency implications. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

DOI 10.1021/ef500806p
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rohan Stanger, Terry Wall
2014 Spoerl R, Belo L, Shah K, Stanger R, Giniyatullin R, Maier J, et al., 'Mercury Emissions and Removal by Ash in Coal-Fired Oxy-fuel Combustion', ENERGY & FUELS, 28 123-135 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/ef4014604
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Rohan Stanger, Terry Wall
2014 Song H, Shah K, Doroodchi E, Moghtaderi B, 'Development of a Cu-Mg-Based Oxygen Carrier with SiO2 as a Support for Chemical Looping Air Separation', ENERGY & FUELS, 28 163-172 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/ef401485p
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Behdad Moghtaderi, Elham Doroodchi
2014 Song H, Shah K, Doroodchi E, Wall T, Moghtaderi B, 'Analysis on Chemical Reaction Kinetics of CuO/SiO2 Oxygen Carriers for Chemical Looping Air Separation', ENERGY & FUELS, 28 173-182 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/ef401487x
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Terry Wall, Elham Doroodchi, Behdad Moghtaderi
2014 Song H, Shah K, Doroodchi E, Wall T, Moghtaderi B, 'Reactivity of Al2O3- or SiO2-Supported Cu-, Mn-, and Co-based oxygen carriers for chemical looping air separation', Energy and Fuels, 28 1284-1294 (2014) [C1]

The chemical looping air separation (CLAS) is a novel method for producing high-purity oxygen, which can be effectively integrated to oxy-fuel power plants. CuO/Cu2O, Mn2O3/Mn3O 4... [more]

The chemical looping air separation (CLAS) is a novel method for producing high-purity oxygen, which can be effectively integrated to oxy-fuel power plants. CuO/Cu2O, Mn2O3/Mn3O 4, and Co3O4/CoO have been found to be the most thermodynamically suitable oxidation pairs for the CLAS process. In the current study, the reactivity and stability of these metal oxides were analyzed further. A total of six different oxygen carrier samples were prepared by the dry impregnation method on SiO2 and Al2O3 supports. Their redox behavior has been investigated in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at four different temperatures, i.e., 800, 850, 900, and 950 C, where the temperature-programmed oxygen release and oxidation were applied for 5 continuous cycles using nitrogen and air, respectively. The results indicate that, although relatively all oxygen carriers exhibited good reactivity, CuO/Cu2O with SiO2 and Co3O4/CoO with Al2O3 were found to be most stable. Furthermore, oxygen transport capacity (OTC) (%) and rate of oxygen transport (ROT) (% min-1) were calculated. It was found that Cu oxide with SiO 2 has the highest OTC of 4.77% as well as the highest ROT of 5.1 and 10.9% min-1 for oxygen release and oxidation, respectively, at 950 C. The CuO/SiO2 oxygen carrier also exhibited better stability for the 41 continuous cycle test, with only 10.3% loss in OTC compared to 22.3% for Co3O4/Al2O3. The grain size growth was found to be the key cause in the loss of OTC. The oxygen concentration in the outlet stream for the CuO/SiO2 oxygen carrier was measured in packed-bed experiments at different temperatures. It was observed that the oxygen concentration at the outlet of the reactor was consistent with the equilibrium values at studied temperatures. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

DOI 10.1021/ef402268t
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Behdad Moghtaderi, Terry Wall, Elham Doroodchi
2014 Belo LP, Spörl R, Shah KV, Elliott LK, Stanger RJ, Maier J, Wall TF, 'Sulfur capture by fly ash in air and oxy-fuel pulverized fuel combustion', Energy and Fuels, 28 5472-5479 (2014) [C1]

Ash produced during oxy-fuel combustion is expected to differ from ash produced during air combustion because of the higher CO2 and SO 2 atmospheres in which it is generated. For ... [more]

Ash produced during oxy-fuel combustion is expected to differ from ash produced during air combustion because of the higher CO2 and SO 2 atmospheres in which it is generated. For a quantitative understanding of the sulfation behavior of fly ash in oxy-fuel combustion, fly ash from three commercial Australian sub-bituminous coals was tested and decomposed under an inert atmosphere. Thermal evolved gas analysis was completed for ash produced in both air and oxy-fuel environments. Pure salts were also tested under the same conditions to allow for identification of the species in the ash that capture sulfur, along with thermodynamic modeling using FactSage 6.3. Sulfur evolved during the decomposition of air and oxy-fuel fly ash was compared to the total sulfur in the ash to close the sulfur balance. Both total sulfur captured by the ash and sulfur evolved during decomposition were higher for oxy-fuel fly ash than their air counterparts. Correlations of capture with ash chemistry are presented. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

DOI 10.1021/ef500855w
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Terry Wall, Rohan Stanger, Liza Elliott
2014 Belo LP, Elliott LK, Stanger RJ, Spörl R, Shah KV, Maier J, Wall TF, 'High-temperature conversion of SO2 to SO3: Homogeneous experiments and catalytic effect of fly ash from air and oxy-fuel firing', Energy and Fuels, 28 7243-7251 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 American Chemical Society. The reaction of SO2 with fly ash in the presence of O2 and H2O involves a series of reactions that lead to the formation of SO3 and eventually H... [more]

© 2014 American Chemical Society. The reaction of SO2 with fly ash in the presence of O2 and H2O involves a series of reactions that lead to the formation of SO3 and eventually H2SO4. Homogeneous experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of the procedural variables, i.e., temperature, gas concentrations, and residence time, on the post-combustion conversion of SO2 to SO3. The results were compared to existing global kinetics and found to be dependent upon SO2, O2, residence time, and temperature and independent of H2O content. For a residence time of 1 s, temperatures of about 900 °C are needed to have an observable conversion of SO2 to SO3. Literature suggested that the conversion of SO2 to SO3 is dependent upon the iron oxide content of the fly ash. Experiments using three different fly ash samples from Australian sub-bituminous coals were used to investigate the catalytic effects of fly ash on SO2 conversion to SO3 at a temperature range of 400-1000 °C. It was observed that fly ash acts as a catalyst in the formation of SO3, with the largest conversion occurring at 700 °C. A homogeneous reaction at 700 °C, without fly ash present, converted 0.10% of the available SO2 to SO3. When fly ash was present, the conversion increased to 1.78%. The catalytic effect accounts for roughly 95% of the total conversion. Average SO3/SO2 conversion values between fly ash derived from air and oxy-fuel firing and under different flue gas environments were found to be similar.

DOI 10.1021/ef5020346
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rohan Stanger, Terry Wall, Liza Elliott
2013 Shah K, Moghtaderi B, Zanganeh J, Wall T, 'Integration options for novel chemical looping air separation (ICLAS) process for oxygen production in oxy-fuel coal fired power plants', FUEL, 107 356-370 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.fuel.2013.01.007
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Terry Wall, Behdad Moghtaderi
2013 Shah K, Moghtaderi B, Wall T, 'Effect of flue gas impurities on the performance of a chemical looping based air separation process for oxy-fuel combustion', Fuel, 103 932-942 (2013) [C1]

Integrated Chemical Looping Air Separation (ICLAS) offers an energy efficient and cost effective option for large-scale oxygen generation in oxy-fuel type power plants. Oxygen pro... [more]

Integrated Chemical Looping Air Separation (ICLAS) offers an energy efficient and cost effective option for large-scale oxygen generation in oxy-fuel type power plants. Oxygen production in the ICLAS is achieved by reduction of oxidised metal oxides in an environment of steam/recycled flue gas (CO2-rich) using a dedicated reduction reactor. This paper provides the results of a thermodynamic investigation into the effect of flue gas impurities on the reduction of three metal oxide oxygen carriers (Cu, Mn and Co oxides) under conditions pertinent to an oxy-fuel coal-fired power plant. Relevant calculations were carried out using the Fact-sage 6.1 thermodynamic equilibrium calculation software package. Different gas streams, namely crude/wet, dry, pure CO2 and steam were considered in the simulations together with the additional hypothetical impure flue gas stream having larger concentrations of CO, SO2 and NO. Effects of SO2, NO, CO and O2 contents of the flue gas on oxygen carrier conversion and oxygen decoupling process were investigated in detail. It was established that the successful reduction of metal oxides in the presence of flue gas impurities can only be achieved at higher temperatures due to increased partial pressure of O2 and the formation of metal sulphates at temperatures less than 800-900 °C. This may increase the operating and capital costs of the CLAS based oxygen production. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.fuel.2012.09.018
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Behdad Moghtaderi, Terry Wall
2012 Moghtaderi B, Zanganeh J, Shah KV, Wu H, 'Application of concrete and demolition waste as CO2 sorbent in chemical looping gasification of biomass', Energy & Fuels, 26 2046-2057 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/ef300145t
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Behdad Moghtaderi
2012 Shah KV, Moghtaderi B, Wall TF, 'Selection of suitable oxygen carriers for chemical looping air separation: A thermodynamic approach', Energy & Fuels, 26 2038-2045 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Behdad Moghtaderi, Terry Wall
2012 Gandhi MB, Vuthaluru R, Vuthaluru H, French D, Shah KV, 'CFD based prediction of erosion rate in large scale wall-fired boiler', Applied Thermal Engineering, 42 90-100 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 7
2010 Shah KV, Cieplik MK, Betrand CI, van de Kamp WL, Vuthaluru HB, 'A kinetic-empirical model for particle size distribution evolution during pulverised fuel combustion', FUEL, 89 2438-2447 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.fuel.2009.12.013
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 7
2010 Shah KV, Cieplik MK, Betrand CI, van de Kamp WL, Vuthaluru HB, 'Correlating the effects of ash elements and their association in the fuel matrix with the ash release during pulverized fuel combustion', FUEL PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY, 91 531-545 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.fuproc.2009.12.016
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 10
2010 Korbee R, Shah KV, Cieplik MK, Betrand CI, Vuthaluru HB, van de Kamp WL, 'First Line Ash Transformations of Coal and Biomass Fuels during PF Combustion', ENERGY & FUELS, 24 897-909 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/ef9010737
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2009 Shah KV, Vuthaluru R, Vuthaluru HB, 'CFD based investigations into optimization of coal pulveriser performance: Effect of classifier vane settings', FUEL PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY, 90 1135-1141 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.fuproc.2009.05.009
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 11
Show 30 more journal articles

Conference (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Khairul MA, Shah KV, Doroodchi E, Moghtaderi B, 'Application of nanofluids to enhance heat transfer in renewable energy systems', In: 3rd ASEAN Australian Engineering Congress (AAEC 2015) : Australian Engineering Congress on Innovative Technologies for Sustainable Development and Renewable Energy. Barton, ACT: Engineers Australia, 2015: 49-54. (2015) [E2]
Co-authors Mohammadkhairul Alam Uon, Elham Doroodchi, Behdad Moghtaderi
2014 Spörl R, Maier J, Belo L, Shah K, Stanger R, Wall T, Scheffknecht G, 'Mercury and SO3 emissions in oxy-fuel combustion', Energy Procedia (2014) [E1]

© 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This paper presents results on experiments carried out at a 20 kW combustion rig simulating different extents of oxy-fuel recycle g... [more]

© 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This paper presents results on experiments carried out at a 20 kW combustion rig simulating different extents of oxy-fuel recycle gas cleaning by impurities injection to the oxidant gas of the once-through combustion reactor. A comprehensive set of total (Hgtot), elemental (Hg0) and oxidized (Hg2+) mercury as well as SO3 concentrations was obtained before and after the combustion rig's baghouse filter for in total 14 air and oxy-fuel experiments with 3 Australian coals. Based on this data, an assessment in respect to Hg oxidation, SO2/SO3 conversion and Hg and SO3 capture on the test rig's filter was performed. The air and the oxyfuel experiments with different extents of recycle gas cleaning, revealed differences in the Hg and SO3 formation and capture behavior: The Hg2+/Hgtot ratios in the flue gas are higher during oxy-fuel combustion compared to air-firing. This effect is even more pronounced at the filter outlet, after flue gas has passed through the filter ash. In some experiments, even a net oxidation of Hg0 entering the filter to Hg2+ was observed. The Hg capture by ash in the baghouse filter has been found to reduce the Hg emissions considerably. However, the Hg capture was altered by the different oxy-fuel recycle configurations, leading to decreased Hg capture efficiencies on the filter for one of the coals. A coal-specific trend of increased SO2/SO3 conversion ratios with increased flue gas SO2 levels was observed that could be related to the ash composition of the three different coals. This and the higher SO2 concentrations in the flue gas lead to considerably higher SO3 levels in oxy-fuel combustion with SO2 recycling. During the experiments, also a considerable capture of SO3 in the baghouse filter was observed (up to 80% under air- And up to 66% under oxy-fired conditions). A reduction of the SO3 capture on the filter under oxy-fuel conditions may be related to the higher SO3 levels in this process.

DOI 10.1016/j.egypro.2014.11.041
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Terry Wall, Rohan Stanger
2013 Shah K, Spörl R, Elliot L, Wall TF, 'Cost Estimates for the Sulfur Removal in Oxy-fuel Thermal Power Plant', Proceedings of the Australian Combustion Symposium (2013) [E1]
Co-authors Liza Elliott, Terry Wall
2012 Shah KV, Moghtaderi B, Wall T, 'Thermodynamic Analyses of Mn-, Co- and Cu- Oxides as Oxygen Carriers for Chemical Looping Air Separation', 37th International Technical Conference on Clean Coal & Fuel Systems 2012 (2012)
2011 Song H, Shah KV, Doroodchi E, Moghtaderi B, 'Thermogravimetric analysis of Ni0/Si02 oxygen carriers under CO/air environment for chemical looping combustion', Proceedings of the 11th Australian Combustion Symposium (2011) [E1]
Co-authors Behdad Moghtaderi, Elham Doroodchi
2011 Zhang YX, Shah KV, Moghtaderi B, 'Performance characteristics of a novel integrated gasification chemical looping combustion for solid fuels', Proceedings of the 11th Australian Combustion Symposium (2011) [E1]
Co-authors Behdad Moghtaderi
2011 Shah KV, Moghtaderi B, Wall TF, 'Chemical looping air separation (CLAS) for oxygen production: Thermodynamic and economic aspects', Proceedings of the Australian Combustion Symposium 2011 (2011) [E1]
Co-authors Behdad Moghtaderi, Terry Wall
Show 4 more conferences

Report (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Moghtaderi B, Wall T, Doroodchi E, Shah K, Zhou C, Song H, 'Chemical Looping Oxygen Generation for Oxy-fuel Combustion: Final Report', Australian National Low Emissions Coal Research & Development, 94 (2015) [R1]
Co-authors Elham Doroodchi, Terry Wall, Behdad Moghtaderi
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 12
Total funding $2,936,741

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20162 grants / $996,665

Demonstration of a 1MQh/day Novel Chemical Looping Based Redox Energy Storage System$643,800

Funding body: Infratech Industries Pty Ltd

Funding body Infratech Industries Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Kalpit Shah, Professor Behdad Moghtaderi
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1600828
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

SDL process at 1m3/s of VAM flow rate: Phase 3 (C23052 Extension)$352,865

Funding body: Australian Coal Research Limited

Funding body Australian Coal Research Limited
Project Team Doctor Kalpit Shah, Professor Behdad Moghtaderi
Scheme Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1500815
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20152 grants / $1,284,540

Development of Novel Ex-Situ Calcium Looping Process for Removal and Conversion of Tars Formed during Biomass Gasification$1,048,890

Funding body: VTara Energy Group Pty Ltd

Funding body VTara Energy Group Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Kalpit Shah, Professor Behdad Moghtaderi
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1501118
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Development of a Novel Stone Dust Looping Process for Mitigation of Ventilation Air Methane (Phase II)$235,650

Funding body: Australian Coal Research Limited

Funding body Australian Coal Research Limited
Project Team Doctor Kalpit Shah, Professor Behdad Moghtaderi
Scheme Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1400713
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20143 grants / $499,436

A Novel Hybrid Chemical Looping Process for Production of Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels with a Reduced Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile$270,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Behdad Moghtaderi, Emeritus Professor Terry Wall, Doctor Kalpit Shah
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1300530
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Development of a Novel Stone Dust Looping Process for Mitigation of Ventilation Air Methane$173,747

Funding body: Australian Coal Research Limited

Funding body Australian Coal Research Limited
Project Team Doctor Kalpit Shah, Professor Behdad Moghtaderi
Scheme Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1300819
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Scoping study on next generation approaches for effective mitigation of ventilation air methane: VAM Abatement Technology Assessment Tool$55,689

Funding body: Australian Coal Research Limited

Funding body Australian Coal Research Limited
Project Team Professor Behdad Moghtaderi, Doctor Kalpit Shah
Scheme Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1300818
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20131 grants / $11,600

2013 International Visitor - Kiel and Van der Drift$11,600

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Behdad Moghtaderi, Emeritus Professor Terry Wall, Doctor Kalpit Shah, Professor Jacob Kiel, Dr A (Bram) van der Drift
Scheme DVCR International Visitor Support
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1301109
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20121 grants / $9,500

Fundamental investigations into the physical and chemical interactions between ionic liquids and coal$9,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Kalpit Shah
Scheme Early Career Researcher Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1201194
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20111 grants / $20,000

Organizing 1st Thermo and Chem-tech meetings in India$20,000

First Thermo and Chem-tech meeting were organized in India which was co-sponsored by the Chemical Engineering Department of Curtin University

Funding body: Curtin University

Funding body Curtin University
Project Team

A/Prof. Hari Vuthaluru

Scheme Curtin University Internal Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20101 grants / $26,000

CFD Analysis of Suction Piping of AFT Lift Pump (Submersible) and Firewater Pumps$26,000

CFD Analysis were carried out on pumps.

Funding body: Access Petrotech and Mining Solutions

Funding body Access Petrotech and Mining Solutions
Project Team

AProf Hari Vuthaluru

Scheme Industrial Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20041 grants / $89,000

Process and Energy Auditing$89,000

Funding body: Small to Medium Scale Industries

Funding body Small to Medium Scale Industries
Project Team

Mr. Som Derashri

Scheme Industrial Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current7

Total current UON EFTSL

Masters0.6
PhD2.25

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Novel Applications of Ionic Liquids in Coal Utilisation and Beneficiation
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2016 Masters Development of a Novel Carbon Arrestor Process for Production of Designer Biochars
M Philosophy (Chemical Eng), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Methanol Production via Novel Chemical Looping Process
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Advanced Applications of Tunable Magnetite Nanofluids in Energy Systems and Energy Harvesters
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Application of Novel Calcium Looping Process for Providing CO2 and Heat to Greenhouses
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD A Novel Ex-Situ Calcium Looping Process for Removal and Conversion of Tars Formed During Biomass Gasification
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2011 PhD Thermal Studies of Monochlorothiophenols
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Formation of Toxic Compounds in the Thermal Decomposition of 1,3-Dichloropropene
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
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News

Dr Kalpit Shah and Professor Behdad Moghtaderi

Sustainable energy research powers developing world

August 28, 2015

A breakthrough sustainable energy technology at the University of Newcastle (UON) could help solve the global challenge of rural electrification in developing countries.

Dr Kalpit Shah

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Engineering
Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment

Contact Details

Email kalpit.shah@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4033 9332

Office

Room EB126B Or Building C - NIER
Building Engineering Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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