Dr Jenny Stewart Williams

Conjoint Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health (Public Health)

Career Summary

Biography

Jennifer (Jenny) Stewart Williams hold postgraduate qualifications in epidemiology, biostatistics and economics. She has worked in a number of policy environments – national monetary policy (Reserve Bank of Australia), health service planning and development (Hunter Area Health Service and Hunter Health Services Research Group), community and primary care (NSW Divisions of General Practice and NSW Rural Divisions Co-ordinating Unit), medical workforce planning (NSW Rural Doctors Resource Network), and tertiary teaching hospitals, (Australian Resource Centre for Hospital Innovations). All of these positions have involved working in inter-disciplinary teams with clinicians, policy advisers and researchers. Dr Stewart Williams spent several years in a health services research environment in which one of her main roles involved analysing state wide hospital separations data using Diagnostic Related Groups to inform service planning and hospital budget allocations.

The experience gained working in these areas provided a good basis for her move into public health research. In 1999-2000 Dr Stewart Williams completed a Graduate Diploma in Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics at the University of Newcastle. In 2001 she joined Newcastle Institute of Public Health as a research officer to undertake a body of work in health services research with a focus of health inequalities.

Dr Stewart Williams was part of a team that undertook equity-focused health impact assessments and was a main author of an NHMRC handbook titled “Using Socioeconomic Evidence in Clinical Practice Guidelines. In 2001 Dr Stewart Williams was awarded a full Australian Postgraduate Research Scholarship and in 2002 she enrolled in a PhD in the Discipline of Medicine and Public Health at the University of Newcastle. Dr Stewart Williams' doctoral dissertation involved record linkage between a population-based cardiovascular disease register, the Admitted Patients Data Collection and a specialised hospital cardiac rehabilitation program database. The work demonstrated novel applications of methods which policy and decision makers can use to measure, deconstruct and interpret inequalities and inequities in access to care. Two sole author international peer-reviewed papers resulted from this work.

Since completing her doctorate in 2008 Dr Stewart Williams built upon her extensive experience in policy analysis and health service development and evaluation in developing proposals for population based analyses using linked data sets. She has held a Hunter Medical Research Institute Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship under the NSW Health Department’s Capacity Building Program since 2008. The Fellowship has afforded her opportunities to work on a number of projects using linked data sets including the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health (ALSWH) the NSW Admitted Patient Data Collection and the Medicare Australia’s Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.

Dr Stewart Williams’ recent publications report upon analyses of Australian and international data sets, including the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health, Medicare Australia, the World Health Surveys and the Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE). She has been a visiting Research Fellow with the World Health Organization (2010-2012) and the Centre for Global Health Research at Umeå University in Sweden (2011). As a public health researcher, Dr Stewart Williams is committed to improving understanding of how gender and the social determinants impact on health, access to healthcare, and healthcare resource utilisation in different country settings.

Her goal is to inform policy for: major global reductions in behavioural risk factors for non-communicable diseases (NCDs); improvements in NCD inequalities between and within countries, and the achievement of universal, accessible, high quality health care in all countries.

Research Expertise
Dr Stewart Williams has expertise in epidemiology, biostatistics and health economics. She undertakes analyses of national and international data sets to address issues of global public health importance - population ageing, the increasing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCD) and social and economic inequalities in health. Dr Stewart Williams international research includes analyses of patterns of health and illness between and within countries at varying stages of economic development. Her national research platform includes longitudinal analyses of patterns of use and costs of health care resources in population cohorts.

Teaching Expertise
Dr Stewart Williams has experience in teaching undergraduate students in economics and medicine. She has supervised a number of World Health Organization interns. She successfully supervised one doctoral candidate to completion and is currently supervising another student (from Kenya) who is midway through her doctorate. Dr Stewart Williams also provides professional advice and support to postgraduate students from Australia, the United States, Mexico, India, Indonesia, Taiwan and China.

Administrative Expertise
Dr Stewart Williams has held executive officer positions with the Divisions of General Practice, the Rural Divisions Co-ordinating Unit and the Australian Resource Centre for Hospital Innovations. While working in these and other senior positions, she developed and implemented strategic and business plans in consultation with a range of stakeholders including clinicians, researchers, administrators, policy analysts and community representatives.

Collaborations
Dr Stewart Williams has ongoing collaborations with health economists at the School of Public Health at the University of Sydney and Hunter Medical Research Institute, and epidemiologists, statisticians and public health clinicians from the World Health Organization and the Centre for Global Health Research at Umeå University in Sweden. She is an approved supervisor for internships coordinated through the World Health Organization.


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Master of Commerce, University of Newcastle
  • Graduate Diploma in Clinical Epidemiology, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Ageing
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Diabetes
  • Equity
  • Gender
  • Global health
  • Health inequalities
  • Health services research
  • Longitudinal analyses
  • Non communicable diseases (NCDs)
  • Social determinants of health
  • Women

Languages

  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111706 Epidemiology 40
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 40
140208 Health Economics 20

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/07/2008 - 1/06/2013 Post Doctoral Research Fellow University of Newcastle
Australia
1/07/2001 - 1/12/2007 Research Officer University of Newcastle
Newcastle Institute of Public Health
Australia
1/01/2000 - 1/06/2001 National Project Director Australian Resource Centre for Hospital Innovations
Australia
1/07/1989 - 1/12/1992 Senior Research Fellow Hunter Area Health Service
Research & Planning

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/1999 - 1/12/1999 Manager NSW Rural Doctors Resource Network
Australia
1/01/1996 - 1/12/1998 Executive Officer NSW Rural Divisions Coordinating Unit
Australia
1/01/1994 - 1/12/1995 Executive Officer Hunter Rural Division of General Practice
Australia
1/01/1993 - 1/12/1993 Executive Officer Hunter Division of General Practice
Australia
1/01/1985 - 1/06/1989 Planning Officer Hunter Area Health Service
Research & Planning
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2007 Loxton DJ, Stewart Williams JA, Adamson LR, Barriers to Service Delivery for Young Pregnant Women and Mothers: Report to the National Youth Affairs Research Scheme (NYARS), National Youth Affairs Research Scheme, Canberra, 147 (2007) [A2]
Co-authors Deborah Loxton

Journal article (28 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Stewart Williams J, Kowal P, Hestekin H, O'Driscoll T, Peltzer K, Yawson A, et al., 'Prevalence, risk factors and disability associated with fall-related injury in older adults in low- and middle-incomecountries: Results from the WHO Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE)', BMC Medicine, (2015)

Background: In 2010 falls were responsible for approximately 80 % of disability stemming from unintentional injuries excluding traffic accidents in adults 50 years and over. Falls... [more]

Background: In 2010 falls were responsible for approximately 80 % of disability stemming from unintentional injuries excluding traffic accidents in adults 50 years and over. Falls are becoming a major public health problem in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where populations are ageing rapidly. Methods: Nationally representative standardized data collected from adults aged 50 years and over participating in the World Health Organization (WHO) Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) Wave 1 in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, the Russian Federation and South Africa are analysed. The aims are to identify the prevalence of, and risk factors for, past-year fall-related injury and to assess associations between fall-related injury and disability. Regression methods are used to identify risk factors and association between fall-related injury and disability. Disability was measured using the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule Version 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0). Results: The prevalence of past-year fall-related injuries ranged from 6.6 % in India to 1.0 % in South Africa and was 4.0 % across the pooled countries. The proportion of all past-year injuries that were fall-related ranged from 73.3 % in the Russian Federation to 44.4 % in Ghana. Across the six countries this was 65.7 %. In the multivariable logistic regression, the odds of past-year fall-related injury were significantly higher for: women (OR: 1.27; 95 % CI: 0.99,1.62); respondents who lived in rural areas (OR: 1.36; 95 % CI: 1.06,1.75); those with depression (OR: 1.43; 95 % CI: 1.01,2.02); respondents who reported severe or extreme problems sleeping (OR: 1.54; 95 % CI: 1.15,2.08); and those who reported two or more (compared with no) chronic conditions (OR: 2.15; 95 % CI: 1.45,3.19). Poor cognition was also a significant risk factor for fall-related injury. Conclusions: The findings provide a platform for improving understanding of risk factors for falls in older adults in this group of LMICs. Clinicians and public health professionals in these countries must be made aware of the extent of this problem and the need to implement policies to reduce the risk of falls in older adults.

DOI 10.1186/s12916-015-0390-8
2015 Navin Cristina TJ, Stewart Williams JA, Parkinson L, Sibbritt DW, Byles JE, 'Identification of diabetes, heart disease, hypertension and stroke in mid- and older-aged women: Comparing self-report and administrative hospital data records', Geriatrics and Gerontology International, (2015)

Aim: To estimate the prevalence of diabetes, heart disease, hypertension and stroke in self-report and hospital data in two cohorts of women; measure sensitivity and agreement bet... [more]

Aim: To estimate the prevalence of diabetes, heart disease, hypertension and stroke in self-report and hospital data in two cohorts of women; measure sensitivity and agreement between data sources; and compare between cohorts. Methods: Women born between 1946-1951 and 1921-1926 who participated in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH); were New South Wales residents; and admitted to hospital (2004-2008) were included in the present study. The prevalence of diabetes, heart disease, hypertension and stroke was estimated using self-report (case1 at latest survey, case2 across multiple surveys) and hospital records. Agreement (kappa) and sensitivity (%) were calculated. Logistic regression measured the association between patient characteristics and agreement. Results: Hypertension had the highest prevalence and estimates were higher for older women: 32.5% case1, 45.4% case2, 12.8% in hospital data (1946-1951 cohort); 57.8% case1, 73.2% case2, 38.2% in hospital data (1921-1926 cohort). Agreement was substantial for diabetes: ¿=0.75 case1, ¿=0.70 case2 (1946-1951 cohort); ¿=0.77 case1, ¿=0.80 case2 (1921-1926 cohort), and lower for other conditions. The 1946-1951 cohort had 2.08 times the odds of agreement for hypertension (95% CI 1.56 to 2.78; P<0.0001), and 6.25 times the odds of agreement for heart disease (95% CI 4.35 to 10.0; P<0.0001), compared with the 1921-1926 cohort. Conclusion: Substantial agreement was found for diabetes, indicating accuracy of ascertainment using self-report or hospital data. Self-report data appears to be less accurate for heart disease and stroke. Hypertension was underestimated in hospital data. These findings have implications for epidemiological studies relying on self-report or administrative data.

DOI 10.1111/ggi.12442
Co-authors L Parkinson, Julie Byles
2015 Stewart Williams J, Kowal P, Hestekin H, O'Driscoll T, Peltzer K, Yawson A, et al., 'Prevalence, risk factors and disability associated with fall-related injury in older adults in low- and middle-incomecountries: Results from the WHO Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE)', BMC Medicine, (2015)

Background: In 2010 falls were responsible for approximately 80 % of disability stemming from unintentional injuries excluding traffic accidents in adults 50 years and over. Falls... [more]

Background: In 2010 falls were responsible for approximately 80 % of disability stemming from unintentional injuries excluding traffic accidents in adults 50 years and over. Falls are becoming a major public health problem in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where populations are ageing rapidly. Methods: Nationally representative standardized data collected from adults aged 50 years and over participating in the World Health Organization (WHO) Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) Wave 1 in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, the Russian Federation and South Africa are analysed. The aims are to identify the prevalence of, and risk factors for, past-year fall-related injury and to assess associations between fall-related injury and disability. Regression methods are used to identify risk factors and association between fall-related injury and disability. Disability was measured using the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule Version 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0). Results: The prevalence of past-year fall-related injuries ranged from 6.6 % in India to 1.0 % in South Africa and was 4.0 % across the pooled countries. The proportion of all past-year injuries that were fall-related ranged from 73.3 % in the Russian Federation to 44.4 % in Ghana. Across the six countries this was 65.7 %. In the multivariable logistic regression, the odds of past-year fall-related injury were significantly higher for: women (OR: 1.27; 95 % CI: 0.99,1.62); respondents who lived in rural areas (OR: 1.36; 95 % CI: 1.06,1.75); those with depression (OR: 1.43; 95 % CI: 1.01,2.02); respondents who reported severe or extreme problems sleeping (OR: 1.54; 95 % CI: 1.15,2.08); and those who reported two or more (compared with no) chronic conditions (OR: 2.15; 95 % CI: 1.45,3.19). Poor cognition was also a significant risk factor for fall-related injury. Conclusions: The findings provide a platform for improving understanding of risk factors for falls in older adults in this group of LMICs. Clinicians and public health professionals in these countries must be made aware of the extent of this problem and the need to implement policies to reduce the risk of falls in older adults.

DOI 10.1186/s12916-015-0390-8
2015 Stewart Williams J, Kowal P, Hestekin H, O'Driscoll T, Peltzer K, Yawson A, et al., 'Prevalence, risk factors and disability associated with fall-related injury in older adults in low- and middle-incomecountries: Results from the WHO Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE)', BMC Medicine, 13 (2015)

In 2010 falls were responsible for approximately 80 % of disability stemming from unintentional injuries excluding traffic accidents in adults 50 years and over. Falls are becomin... [more]

In 2010 falls were responsible for approximately 80 % of disability stemming from unintentional injuries excluding traffic accidents in adults 50 years and over. Falls are becoming a major public health problem in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where populations are ageing rapidly. Methods: Nationally representative standardized data collected from adults aged 50 years and over participating in the World Health Organization (WHO) Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) Wave 1 in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, the Russian Federation and South Africa are analysed. The aims are to identify the prevalence of, and risk factors for, past-year fall-related injury and to assess associations between fall-related injury and disability. Regression methods are used to identify risk factors and association between fall-related injury and disability. Disability was measured using the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule Version 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0). Results: The prevalence of past-year fall-related injuries ranged from 6.6 % in India to 1.0 % in South Africa and was 4.0 % across the pooled countries. The proportion of all past-year injuries that were fall-related ranged from 73.3 % in the Russian Federation to 44.4 % in Ghana. Across the six countries this was 65.7 %. In the multivariable logistic regression, the odds of past-year fall-related injury were significantly higher for: women (OR: 1.27; 95 % CI: 0.99,1.62); respondents who lived in rural areas (OR: 1.36; 95 % CI: 1.06,1.75); those with depression (OR: 1.43; 95 % CI: 1.01,2.02); respondents who reported severe or extreme problems sleeping (OR: 1.54; 95 % CI: 1.15,2.08); and those who reported two or more (compared with no) chronic conditions (OR: 2.15; 95 % CI: 1.45,3.19). Poor cognition was also a significant risk factor for fall-related injury. The association between fall-related injury and the WHODAS measure of disability was highly significant (P<0.0001) with some attenuation after adjusting for confounders. Reporting two or more chronic conditions (compared with none) was significantly associated with disability (P<0.0001). Conclusions: The findings provide a platform for improving understanding of risk factors for falls in older adults in this group of LMICs. Clinicians and public health professionals in these countries must be made aware of the extent of this problem and the need to implement policies to reduce the risk of falls in older adults.

DOI 10.1186/s12916-015-0390-8
2015 Stewart Williams J, Ng N, Peltzer K, Yawson A, Biritwum R, Maximova T, et al., 'Risk Factors and Disability Associated with Low Back Pain in Older Adults in Low- and Middle-Income Countries. Results from the WHO Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health (SAGE).', PLoS One, 10 e0127880 (2015)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0127880
2014 Yego F, D'Este C, Byles J, Williams JS, Nyongesa P, 'Risk factors for maternal mortality in a Tertiary Hospital in Kenya: a case control study', BMC PREGNANCY AND CHILDBIRTH, 14 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2393-14-38
Co-authors Julie Byles, Catherine Deste
2014 Yego F, D'Este C, Byles J, Nyongesa P, Williams JS, 'A case-control study of risk factors for fetal and early neonatal deaths in a tertiary hospital in Kenya', BMC PREGNANCY AND CHILDBIRTH, 14 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12884-014-0389-8
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Julie Byles
2014 Peltzer K, Stewart Williams JA, Kowal P, Negin J, Snodgrass JJ, Yawson A, et al., 'Universal health coverage in emerging economies: findings on health care utilization by older adults in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, the Russian Federation, and South Africa', Global Health Action, 7 1-9 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3402/gha.v7.25314
2013 Hosseinpoor AR, Stewart Williams JA, Gautam J, Posarac A, Officer A, Verdes E, et al., 'Socioeconomic inequality in disability among adults: a multicountry study using the World Health Survey.', Am J Public Health, 103 1278-1286 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.2105/AJPH.2012.301115
Citations Scopus - 6
2013 Williams JAS, Wallick CJ, Byles JE, Doran CM, 'Assessing Patterns of Use of Cardio-Protective Polypill Component Medicines in Australian Women', DRUGS & AGING, 30 193-203 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s40266-013-0051-6
Co-authors Julie Byles
2013 Williams JS, Cunich M, Byles J, 'The impact of socioeconomic status on changes in the general and mental health of women over time: evidence from a longitudinal study of Australian women', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR EQUITY IN HEALTH, 12 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1475-9276-12-25
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Julie Byles
2013 Yego F, Williams JS, Byles J, Nyongesa P, Aruasa W, D'Este C, 'A retrospective analysis of maternal and neonatal mortality at a teaching and referral hospital in Kenya', REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH, 10 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1742-4755-10-13
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Julie Byles, Catherine Deste
2012 Hosseinpoor AR, Stewart Williams JA, Itani L, Chatterji S, 'Socioeconomic inequality in domains of health: Results from the World Health Surveys', BMC Public Health, 12 1-9 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 15
2012 Hosseinpoor AR, Stewart Williams JA, Jann B, Kowal PR, Officer A, Posarac A, Chatterji S, 'Social determinants of sex differences in disability among older adults: A multi-country decomposition analysis using the World Health Survey', International Journal for Equity in Health, 11 52 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7
2012 Hosseinpoor AR, Stewart Williams JA, Amin A, Araujo De Carvalho I, Beard J, Boerma T, et al., 'Social determinants of self-reported health in women and men: Understanding the role of gender in population health', PloS One, 7 e34799 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 17
2011 Parkinson L, Dolja-Gore X, Gibson RE, Doran E, Notley L, Stewart Williams JA, et al., 'An observational study of the discrediting of COX-2 NSAIDs in Australia: Vioxx or class effect?', BMC Public Health, 11 892 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Julie Byles, L Parkinson
2011 Byles JE, Dolja-Gore X, Loxton DJ, Parkinson L, Stewart Williams JA, 'Women's uptake of medicare benefits schedule mental health items for general practitioners, psychologists and other allied mental health professionals', Medical Journal of Australia, 194 175-179 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors L Parkinson, Julie Byles, Deborah Loxton
2011 Stewart Williams JA, 'Assessing the suitability of fractional polynomial methods in health services research: a perspective on the categorization epidemic', Journal of Health Services Research, 16 147-152 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1258/jhsrp.2010.010063
Citations Scopus - 3
2010 Stewart Williams JA, Byles JE, Inder KJ, 'Equity of access to cardiac rehabilitation: The role of system factors', International Journal for Equity in Health, 9 1-20 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1475-9276-9-2
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Kerry Inder, Julie Byles
2010 Fuller BG, Stewart Williams JA, Byles JE, 'Active Living - the perception of older people with chronic conditions', Chronic illness, 6 294-305 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1742395310377673
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Julie Byles
2009 Stewart Williams JA, 'Using non-linear decomposition to explain the discriminatory effects of male-female differentials in access to care: A cardiac rehabilitation case study', Social Science & Medicine, 69 1072-1079 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.socscimed.2009.07.012
Citations Scopus - 14
2005 Stewart Williams JA, Lowe JM, Candlish PM, 'Using pilot studies to inform health services', Australian Health Review, 29 478-481 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/AH050478
2005 Simpson S, Mahoney M, Harris E, Aldrich R, Stewart Williams JA, 'Equity-focused health impact assessment: A tool to assist policy makers in addressing health inequalities', Environmental Impact Assessment Review, 25 772-782 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eiar.2005.07.010
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
2005 Aldrich R, Mahoney M, Harris E, Simpson S, Stewart Williams JA, 'Building An Equity focus in Health Impact Assessment', NSW Public Health Bulletin, 16 118-119 (2005) [C2]
Citations Scopus - 1
2004 Harris E, Simpson SJ, Aldrich R, Stewart Williams JA, 'Achieving equity in the Australian healthcare system', MJA, 180 308 (2004) [C1]
2003 Aldrich R, Kemp L, Stewart Williams JA, Harris E, Simpson S, Wilson AJ, et al., 'Using Socioeconomic evidence in clinical practice guidelines', BMJ, 327 1283-1285 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmj.327.7426.1283
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Julie Byles, Amanda Wilson
1998 Williams JA, 'Understanding rural and remote divisions under a workforce framework', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 6 156-160 (1998) [C1]
1997 Williams JA, 'Coordinating rural and remote divisions under a workforce framework', Australian Health Review, 20 13-26 (1997) [C1]
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Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Stewart Williams JA, Cunich M, 'Equity and cardiovascular disease in Australian women', Heart & Mind 2010: Psychogenic Cardiovacular Diseases Conference Abstracts, Prato, Italy (2010) [E3]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 8
Total funding $578,483

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20111 grants / $1,330

7th Health Services and Policy Research Conference, Hilton Hotel Adelaide, 5-7th December 2011$1,330

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Jenny Stewart Williams
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100970
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20101 grants / $1,500

Psychogenic Cardiovascular Disease Conference, Prato, Italy, 1 - 4 September 2010$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Jenny Stewart Williams
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000595
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20091 grants / $31,990

Uptake and impact of new Medicare Benefits Schedule Items - Psychologists and Other Allied Mental Health Professionals$31,990

Funding body: Australian Rotary Health

Funding body Australian Rotary Health
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Associate Professor Deb Loxton, Conjoint Associate Professor Lynne Parkinson, Mr Richard Gibson, Doctor Jenny Stewart Williams, Doctor Paul Kowal
Scheme Mental Health Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189463
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20081 grants / $17,000

Domestic Violence$17,000

Funding body: The Sax Institute

Funding body The Sax Institute
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Associate Professor Deb Loxton, Doctor Jenny Stewart Williams
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189568
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20051 grants / $25,000

Measuring the impact of the Cessnock Uni-Clinic$25,000

Funding body: Cessnock Uni-Clinic

Funding body Cessnock Uni-Clinic
Project Team Professor Dimity Pond, Doctor Jenny Stewart Williams
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0185813
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON Y

20022 grants / $257,163

Health Inequalities Impact Assessment: Working collaboratively to develop a strategic framework.$219,400

Funding body: Commonwealth Department of Health & Aged Care

Funding body Commonwealth Department of Health & Aged Care
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Conjoint Associate Professor Rosemary Aldrich, Conjoint Associate Professor Julia Lowe, Doctor Jenny Stewart Williams
Scheme Innovative Projects in Relation to PHERP
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2002
GNo G0181643
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Literature Review and Preparation of a Handbook on using Evidence on Socio-Economic Determinants of Health in Clinical Practice Guidelines.$37,763

Funding body: Commonwealth Department of Health & Aged Care

Funding body Commonwealth Department of Health & Aged Care
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Rosemary Aldrich, Professor Julie Byles, Doctor Jenny Stewart Williams, Conjoint Associate Professor Julia Lowe
Scheme Consultancy/Tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2002
Funding Finish 2002
GNo G0181863
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

19961 grants / $244,500

South-East Asian Australian Preterm Labour Study Group.$244,500

Funding body: Department of Education, Training & Youth Affairs

Funding body Department of Education, Training & Youth Affairs
Project Team Emeritus Professor William Walters, Professor Roger Smith, Conjoint Professor Warwick Giles, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bisits, Doctor Cheng Chan, Dr Stephen O'Callaghan, Doctor Jenny Stewart Williams, Mrs Maria Bowman, Doctor John Fitter
Scheme Targetted Institutional Links Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 1996
Funding Finish 1996
GNo G0176589
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current0

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Maternal and Neonatal Mortality in Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital in Kenya
Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2010 PhD Promoting Physical Activity to Older People with COPD - The Active Living Framework
Behavioural Science, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
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Dr Jenny Stewart Williams

Position

Conjoint Fellow
Research Centre for Gender, Health & Ageing
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Public Health

Contact Details

Email jenny.stewartwilliams@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 40420678
Fax (02) 40420044

Office

Room HMRI-W4 116
Building HMRI Building, John Hunter Hospital campus
Location Other

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