Ms Jennifer Powers

Conjoint Senior Lecturer

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Jennifer Powers is a statistician with the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH) at the Research Centre for Gender, Health and Ageing at the University of Newcastle. As a public health researcher, Jennifer has a strong interest in modifiable factors that effect the health and well-being of women. Her research has included drinking patterns across the lifespan, the physical and mental health effects of alcohol, the effect of drought on mental health, and women's drinking and smoking behaviour during pregnancy.

Specific statistical interests include methodological issues associated with longitudinal data analysis. For example, she has investigated ways of handling missing data at individual time points and over time. She has assessed the representativeness of the four ALSWH cohorts, including problems arising from permanent or temporary attrition, particularly among the younger two cohorts. As a member of the data management group, she has also validated several scales used in the ALSWH and assessed the effectiveness of linkage with the National Death Index.

She has co-authored over 60 publications in peer-reviewed refereed journals as well as a number of reports to government and other agencies, and been invited to present at workshops and conferences. She has reviewed manuscripts for a number of journals including Alcohol and Alcoholism, Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research, Medical Journal of Australia, Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, Drug and Alcohol Review, Addiction, International Journal of Psychology, Environment Research, Evaluation Review, BMC Medical Research Methodology and Plos One.

As a public health researcher, she has collaborated with researchers at the University of Newcastle, the University of Queensland, the University of New South Wales, the Australian National University, University of Canberra, Latrobe University, Hunter Medical Research Institute and Menzies School of Health Research.

Qualifications

  • Master of Medical Statistics, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science, Monash University
  • Associate Diploma in Applied Science, Northern Territory University

Keywords

  • alcohol
  • biostatistics
  • epidemiology
  • statistics
  • women's health

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 50
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 30
149999 Economics not elsewhere classified 20
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2005 Young AF, Powers JR, Australian Women and Alcohol Consumption: 1996-2003, Commonwealth of Australia, Canberra, 76 (2005) [A2]
Co-authors Anne Young

Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2001 Patterson AJ, Patterson AJ, Brown WJ, Powers JR, Roberts DCK, 'Why am I so tired? Iron deficiency and well-being.', Women's Health Australia: What do we know? What do we need to know? Progress on the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health 1995-2000, Australian Academic Press, Brisbane 10-30 (2001)
Co-authors Amanda Patterson

Journal article (68 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Hure A, Powers J, Chojenta C, Loxton D, 'Rates and Predictors of Caesarean Section for First and Second Births: A Prospective Cohort of Australian Women', Maternal and Child Health Journal, 1-10 (2017)

© 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New YorkObjective To determine rates of vaginal delivery, emergency caesarean section, and elective caesarean section for first and second ... [more]

© 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New YorkObjective To determine rates of vaginal delivery, emergency caesarean section, and elective caesarean section for first and second births in Australia, and to identify maternal predictors of caesarean section. Methods Data were from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health. A total of 5275 women aged 18¿38 years, who had given birth to their first child between 1996 and 2012 were included; 75.0% (n = 3956) had delivered a second child. Mode of delivery for first and second singleton birth(s) was obtained from longitudinal survey data. Socio-demographic, lifestyle, anthropometric and medical history variables were tested as predictors of mode of delivery for first and second births using multinomial logistic regression. Results Caesarean sections accounted for 29.1% (n = 1535) of first births, consisting of 18.2% emergency and 10.9% elective caesareans. Mode of delivery for first and second births was consistent for 85.5% of women (n = 3383) who delivered both children either vaginally or via caesarean section. Higher maternal age and body mass index, short-stature, anxiety and having private health insurance were predictive of caesarean section for first births. Vaginal birth after caesarean section was more common in women who were older, short-statured, or had been overweight or obese for both children, compared to women who had two vaginal deliveries. Conclusions for Practice Rates of caesarean section in Australia are high. Renewed efforts are needed to reduce the number of unnecessary caesarean births, with particular caution applied to first births. Interventions could focus on elective caesareans for women with private health insurance or a history of anxiety.

DOI 10.1007/s10995-016-2216-5
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Catherine Chojenta, Deborah Loxton
2016 Powers J, Duffy L, Burns L, Loxton D, 'Binge drinking and subsequent depressive symptoms in young women in Australia', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 161 86-94 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.Background: The long-term impact of binge drinking on subsequent depressive symptoms is unclear. The aims were to identify longitudinal patterns of bi... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.Background: The long-term impact of binge drinking on subsequent depressive symptoms is unclear. The aims were to identify longitudinal patterns of binge drinking and whether binge drinking preceded depressive symptoms in the short-term (1-6 years) and long-term (10-15 years). Methods: Longitudinal data from 1996, 2000 and 2009 mailed surveys of 8,197 women in the 1973-78 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Latent class analysis was used to identify binge drinking patterns and logistic regression to estimate associations with subsequent depressive symptoms. Results: Five binge drinking trajectories were identified with predicted proportions of women who were very infrequent (24%), fluctuating infrequent (17%), frequent (17%), very frequent (26%) or extremely frequent binge drinkers (16%) between 16 and 21 years. At 22-27 years, depressive symptoms were significantly higher for extremely frequent binge drinkers (31% versus 21% in the short-term; 22% versus 16%-18% in the long-term) than for less frequent bingers. Unadjusted odds of depressive symptoms were 1.70 (95%CI:1.38;2.08) times for extremely frequent binge drinkers than very infrequent bingers and were 1.30 (95%CI:1.04;1.63) after adjusting for demographics, relationships and experience of violence. At 31-36 years, the odds of depressive symptoms were 1.34 (95%CI:1.09-1.64) times for extremely frequent than very infrequent binge drinkers, but were not significant after adjusting for relationships and violence. Conclusions: Extremely frequent binge drinking (more than weekly) in late adolescence appears to elevate the risk of subsequent depressive symptoms in young women in their early twenties and thirties, emphasising the need for preventive strategies to curb binge drinking.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2016.01.019
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2016 Otterbach S, Tavener M, Forder P, Powers J, Loxton D, Byles J, 'The effect of motherhood and work on women's time pressure: A cohort analysis using the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF WORK ENVIRONMENT & HEALTH, 42 500-509 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.5271/sjweh.3590
Co-authors Meredith Tavener, Deborah Loxton, Julie Byles, Peta Forder
2015 Loxton D, Powers J, Anderson AE, Townsend N, Harris ML, Tuckerman R, et al., 'Online and Offline Recruitment of Young Women for a Longitudinal Health Survey: Findings From the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health 1989-95 Cohort.', J Med Internet Res, 17 e109 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.4261
Citations Scopus - 9
Co-authors Melissa Harris, Julie Byles, Deborah Loxton, Amy Anderson
2015 Powers J, Tavener M, Graves A, Loxton D, 'Loss to follow-up was used to estimate bias in a longitudinal study: A new approach', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, (2015) [C1]

Objectives: To examine bias arising from loss to follow-up due to lack of contact. Study Design and Setting: The 1973-1978 cohort of Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Healt... [more]

Objectives: To examine bias arising from loss to follow-up due to lack of contact. Study Design and Setting: The 1973-1978 cohort of Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health was first surveyed in 1996 and followed up in 2000, 2003, 2006, and 2009. At the 2000 survey, 9,688 women responded (responders), 2,972 could not be contacted, of whom 1,515 responded subsequently (temporary no contact) and 1,457 did not (permanent no contact). Characteristics were compared for these groups at baseline and follow-up in 2003, 2006, or 2009. Relative risk ratios were used to estimate bias. Results: No-contacts were younger, more likely to live in cities, to be less educated and stressed about money than responders. No-contacts were more likely to be in de facto relationships, separated, divorced, or widowed, to have experienced partner violence and be smokers. Compared with temporary no contact, permanent no contact were less educated, less likely to be studying or employed. Despite differences in prevalence estimates, relative odds ratios were close to one and had confidence intervals that included one, indicating little effect of bias. Conclusion: Although various characteristics were related to loss to follow-up, the relative risks estimates did not indicate serious bias due to loss to follow-up in this cohort of young women.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2015.01.010
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Meredith Tavener, Deborah Loxton
2015 Hure AJ, Chojenta CL, Powers JR, Byles JE, Loxton D, 'Validity and Reliability of Stillbirth Data Using Linked Self-Reported and Administrative Datasets', JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, 25 30-37 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.2188/jea.JE20140032
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Julie Byles, Alexis Hure, Catherine Chojenta, Deborah Loxton
2015 Powers JR, Anderson AE, Byles JE, Mishra G, Loxton DJ, 'Do women grow out of risky drinking? A prospective study of three cohorts of Australian women', Drug and Alcohol Review, (2015) [C1]

Introduction and Aims: To examine women's drinking behaviour relative to Australian guidelines and identify associated factors over the lifespan. Design and Methods: Data came fro... [more]

Introduction and Aims: To examine women's drinking behaviour relative to Australian guidelines and identify associated factors over the lifespan. Design and Methods: Data came from three prospective cohorts of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health aged 18-23 (n=14247), 45-50 (n=13715) and 70-75 years (n=12432) when first surveyed in 1996. The same women were re-surveyed at roughly 3-year intervals until 2012. At each survey, four drinking behaviours were based on two guidelines: long-term drinking (no more than two standard drinks per day) and episodic drinking (no more than four standard drinks on an occasion): (i) no risk (within both guidelines); (ii) low episodic risk (less than once a month); high episodic risk (at least once a month); long-term risk (more than two drinks per day regardless of episodic drinking). Results: No risk drinking increased with age, low episodic risk drinking remained almost constant between ages 18 and 39, and high episodic risk drinking declined rapidly. Few women drank at long-term risk. Factors associated with risky drinking varied with age; however, being a past or current smoker consistently increased the risk, and risks for smokers increased with age. Risky drinking was less likely to be practised by women providing care and needing help with daily tasks, or by pregnant women and those living with children. Discussion and Conclusions: Risky drinking behaviour should be addressed in younger women and in those who smoke. Interventions to reduce risky drinking, possibly in combination with reducing smoking, could be offered through general practice centres.

DOI 10.1111/dar.12246
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Amy Anderson, Julie Byles
2015 Loxton D, Powers J, Anderson AE, Townsend N, Harris ML, Tuckerman R, et al., 'Online and Offline Recruitment of Young Women for a Longitudinal Health Survey: Findings From the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health 1989-95 Cohort', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, 17 (2015)
DOI 10.2196/jmir.4261
Citations Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Amy Anderson, Julie Byles, Deborah Loxton
2015 Powers JR, Dobson AJ, Berry HL, Graves AM, Hanigan IC, Loxton D, 'Lack of association between drought and mental health in a cohort of 45-61 year old rural Australian women.', Aust N Z J Public Health, 39 518-523 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12369
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2014 Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Forder PM, Powers J, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Risky drinking patterns are being continued into pregnancy: a prospective cohort study.', PLoS One, 9 e86171 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0086171
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin, Alexis Hure, Amy Anderson, Deborah Loxton, Peta Forder
2014 Mishra GD, Hockey R, Powers J, Loxton D, Tooth L, Rowlands I, et al., 'Recruitment via the internet and social networking sites: The 1989-1995 cohort of the Australian longitudinal study on women's health', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 16 (2014) [C1]

Background: Faced with the challenge of recruiting young adults for health studies, researchers have increasingly turned to the Internet and social networking sites, such as Faceb... [more]

Background: Faced with the challenge of recruiting young adults for health studies, researchers have increasingly turned to the Internet and social networking sites, such as Facebook, as part of their recruitment strategy. As yet, few large-scale studies are available that report on the characteristics and representativeness of the sample obtained from such recruitment methods.Objective: The intent of the study was to describe the sociodemographic and health characteristics of a national sample of young Australian women recruited mainly through the Internet and social networking sites and to discuss the representativeness of their sociodemographic, health, and lifestyle characteristics relative to the population.Methods: A cohort of 17,069 women (born between 1989 and 1995) was recruited in 2012-13 for the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Sociodemographic characteristics (percentages, means, and 95% confidence intervals) from the online survey data were compared with women aged 18-23 years from the 2011 Australian Census. Sample data were compared by age and education level with data from the 2011-13 Australian Health Survey (AHS).Results: Compared to the Australian Census data, study participants were broadly representative in terms of geographical distribution across Australia, marital status (95.62%, 16,321/17,069) were never married), and age distribution. A higher percentage had attained university (22.52%, 3844/17,069) and trade/certificate/diploma qualifications (25.94%, 4428/17,069) compared with this age group of women in the national population (9.4% and 21.7% respectively). Among study participants, 22.05% (3721/16,877) were not in paid employment with 35.18% (5931/16,857) studying 16 or more hours a week. A higher percentage of study participants rated their health in the online survey as fair or poor (rather than good, very good, or excellent) compared with those participating in face-to-face interviews in the AHS (18.77%, 3203/17,069 vs 10.1%). A higher percentage of study participants were current smokers (21.78%, 3718/17,069 vs 16.4%) and physically active (59.30%, 10,089/17,014 were classified as sufficiently active vs 48.3%) but alcohol consumption was lower (59.58%, 9865/16,558 reported drinking alcohol at least once per month vs 65.9% in the AHS). Using self-reported height and weight to determine body mass index (BMI, kg/m2), 34.80% (5901/16,956) of the cohort were classified as overweight or obese (BMI of 25 or more), compared with 33.6% respectively using measured height and weight in the AHS.Conclusions: Findings indicated that using the Internet and social networking sites for an online survey represent a feasible recruitment strategy for a national cohort of young women and result in a broadly representative sample of the Australian population.

DOI 10.2196/jmir.3788
Citations Scopus - 11
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Julie Byles
2013 Loxton D, Powers J, Fitzgerald D, Forder P, Anderson A, Taft A, Hegarty K, 'The Community Composite Abuse Scale: Reliability and Validity of a Measure of Intimate Partner Violence in a Community Survey from the ALSWH', Journal of Women's Health, Issues & Care, 2 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.4172/2325-9795.1000115
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Amy Anderson, Peta Forder
2013 Powers JR, McDermott LJ, Loxton DJ, Chojenta CL, 'A Prospective Study of Prevalence and Predictors of Concurrent Alcohol and Tobacco Use During Pregnancy', MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH JOURNAL, 17 76-84 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10995-012-0949-3
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Catherine Chojenta
2013 Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Forder P, Powers JR, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Predictors of antenatal alcohol use among Australian women: A prospective cohort study', BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 120 1366-1374 (2013) [C1]

Objective To identify predictors of antenatal alcohol consumption among women who usually consume alcohol. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Australian Longitudinal Study o... [more]

Objective To identify predictors of antenatal alcohol consumption among women who usually consume alcohol. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH). Population or Sample A total of 1969 women sampled from the ALSWH 1973-78 cohort. Methods Women were included if they were pregnant in 2000, 2003, 2006 or 2009. The relationship between antenatal alcohol consumption and sociodemographics, reproductive health, mental health, physical health, health behaviours, alcohol guidelines and healthcare factors was investigated using a multivariate logistic regression model. Main outcome measures Alcohol use during pregnancy. Results Most (82.0%) women continued to drink alcohol during pregnancy. Women were more likely to drink alcohol during pregnancy if they had consumed alcohol on a weekly basis before pregnancy (odds ratio [OR] 1.47; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.13-1.90), binge drank before pregnancy (OR 2.28; 95% CI 1.76-2.94), or if they were pregnant while alcohol guidelines recommended low alcohol versus abstinence (OR 1.60; 95% CI 1.26-2.03). Drinking during pregnancy was less likely if women had a Health Care Card (OR 0.63; 95% CI 0.45-0.88) or if they had ever had fertility problems (OR 0.64; 95% CI 0.48-0.86). Conclusions Most Australian women who drank alcohol continued to do so during pregnancy. Prepregnancy alcohol consumption was one of the main predictors of antenatal alcohol use. Alcohol guidelines, fertility problems and Health Care Card status also impacted antenatal alcohol consumption. © 2013 RCOG.

DOI 10.1111/1471-0528.12356
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Amy Anderson, Frances Kaylambkin, Alexis Hure, Deborah Loxton, Peta Forder
2013 Loxton D, Chojenta C, Anderson AE, Powers JR, Shakeshaft A, Burns L, 'Acquisition and Utilization of Information About Alcohol Use in Pregnancy Among Australian Pregnant Women and Service Providers', Journal of Midwifery & Women¿s Health, 58 523-530 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jmwh.12014
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Catherine Chojenta, Amy Anderson
2013 Schofield MJ, Powers JR, Loxton D, 'Mortality and Disability Outcomes of Self-Reported Elder Abuse: A 12-Year Prospective Investigation', Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 61 679-685 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jgs.12212
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2013 Powers JR, Loxton DJ, O'Mara AT, Chojenta CL, Ebert L, 'Regardless of where they give birth, women living in non-metropolitan areas are less likely to have an epidural than their metropolitan counterparts', WOMEN AND BIRTH, 26 E77-E81 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2012.12.001
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Lyn Ebert, Catherine Chojenta, Deborah Loxton
2013 Hure AJ, Powers JR, Chojenta CL, Byles JE, Loxton D, 'Poor Adherence to National and International Breastfeeding Duration Targets in an Australian Longitudinal Cohort', PLOS ONE, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0054409
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Julie Byles, Alexis Hure, Deborah Loxton
2012 Powers JR, Loxton DJ, Baker J, Rich JL, Dobson AJ, 'Empirical evidence suggests adverse climate events have not affected Australian women's health and well-being', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 36 452-457 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jane Rich, Deborah Loxton
2012 Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Powers JR, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Determinants of pregnant women's compliance with alcohol guidelines: A prospective cohort study', BMC Public Health, 12 1-10 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Frances Kaylambkin, Amy Anderson, Deborah Loxton
2012 Hure AJ, Powers JR, Mishra GD, Herbert DL, Byles JE, Loxton DJ, 'Miscarriage, preterm delivery, and stillbirth: Large variations in rates within a cohort of Australian women', PLOS One, 7 1-8 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Deborah Loxton, Julie Byles
2011 Mackerras D, Powers JR, Boorman J, Loxton DJ, Giles GG, 'Estimating the impact of mandatory fortification of bread with iodine on pregnant and post-partum women', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 65 1118-1122 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2011 Burns L, Black E, Powers JR, Loxton DJ, Elliott E, Shakeshaft A, Dunlop AJ, 'Geographic and maternal characteristics associated with alcohol use in pregnancy', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 35 1-8 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, A Dunlop
2010 Powers JR, Loxton DJ, Burns LA, Shakeshaft A, Elliott EJ, Dunlop AJ, 'Assessing pregnant women's compliance with different alcohol guidelines: An 11-year prospective study', Medical Journal of Australia, 192 690-693 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
Co-authors A Dunlop, Deborah Loxton
2010 Powers JR, Loxton DJ, 'The impact of attrition in an 11-Year prospective longitudinal study of younger women', Annals of Epidemiology, 20 318-321 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.annepidem.2010.01.002
Citations Scopus - 55Web of Science - 51
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2010 Lucke JC, Brown W, Tooth L, Loxton DJ, Byles JE, Spallek M, et al., 'Health across generations: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Biological Research for Nursing, 12 162-170 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1099800410373804
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Julie Byles
2009 Loxton DJ, Powers JR, Schofield M, Hussain R, Hosking SJ, 'Inadequate cervical cancer screening among mid-aged Australian women who have experienced partner violence', Preventive Medicine, 48 184-188 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2008.10.019
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2009 Allan RC, Sayers S, Powers JR, Singh G, 'The development and evaluation of a simple method of gestational age estimation', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 45 15-19 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1754.2008.01429.x
2008 Furuya H, Young AF, Powers JR, Byles JE, 'Alcohol consumption and physical health-related quality of life in elder women using the transformation of SF-36 to account for death', Japanese Journal of Alcohol Studies & Drug Dependence, 43 97-109 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Anne Young, Julie Byles
2008 Powers JR, Young AF, 'Longitudinal analysis of alcohol consumption and health of middle-aged women in Australia', Addiction, 103 424-432 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2007.02101.x
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Anne Young
2007 Clemens SL, Matthews SL, Young AF, Powers JR, 'Alcohol consumption of Australian women: Results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Drug and Alcohol Review, 26 525-535 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09595230701499142
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Anne Young
2007 Young AF, Powers JR, Wheway VL, 'Working with longitudinal data: Attrition and retention, data quality, measures of change and other analytical issues', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 1 175-187 (2007) [C1]
Co-authors Anne Young
2007 Baines SK, Powers JR, Brown WJ, 'How does the health and well-being of young Australian vegetarian and semi-vegetarian women compare with non-vegetarians?', Public Health Nutrition, 10 436-442 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/s1368980007217938
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Surinder Baines
2007 Helman J, Loxton DJ, Adamson LR, Graves AM, Powers JR, 'Conducting substudies in a longitudinal research project', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 1 187-198 (2007) [C1]
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2006 Young AF, Powers JR, Bell SL, 'Attrition in longitudinal studies: who do you lose?', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 30 353-361 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2006.tb00849.x
Citations Scopus - 101Web of Science - 93
Co-authors Anne Young
2006 Byles JE, Powers JR, Chojenta CL, Warner-Smith PA, 'Older women in Australia: ageing in urban, rural and remote environments', Australasian Journal on Ageing, 25 151-157 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1741-6612.2006.00171.x
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Julie Byles
2005 Powers JR, Mishra G, Young AF, 'Differences in mail and telephone responses to self-rated health: use of multiple imputation in correcting for response bias', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 29 149-154 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2005.tb00065.x
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Anne Young
2004 France CA, Lee CE, Powers JR, 'Correlates of depressive symptoms in a representative sample of young Australian women', Australian Psychologist, 39 228-237 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/00050060412331295054
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 18
2004 Young AF, Russell A, Powers JR, 'The sense of belonging to a neighbourhood: can it be measured and is it related to health and well being in older women?', Social Science and Medicine, 59 2627-2637 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.socscimed.2004.05.001
Citations Scopus - 91Web of Science - 70
Co-authors Anne Young
2004 Powers JR, Goodger BG, Byles JE, 'Assessment of the abbreviated Duke Social Support Index in a cohort of older Australian women', Australasian Journal on Ageing, 23 71-76 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1741-6612.2004.00008.x
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Julie Byles
2003 Powers JR, Young AF, Russell A, Pachana NA, 'Implications of non-response of older women to a short form of the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale', International Journal of Aging & Human Development, 57 37-54 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.2190/BR9Y-J1CL-LM6M-JACJ
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Anne Young
2003 Powers JR, Young AF, 'Beware mixing mail and telephone administration of surveys', Australasian Epidemiologist, 10 41-44 (2003) [C2]
Co-authors Anne Young
2002 Patterson AJ, Young AF, Powers JR, Brown W, Byles J, 'Relationships between nutrition screening checklists and the health and well-being of older Australian women', Public Health Nutrition, 5(1) 65-71 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Anne Young, Amanda Patterson, Julie Byles
2002 Schofield M, Reynolds R, Mishra G, Powers JR, Dobson A, 'Screening for Vulnerability to Abuse among Older Women: Women's Health Australia Study', The Journal of Applied Gerontology, 21(1) 24-39 (2002) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0733464802021001002
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 18
2002 Feldman S, Byles J, Mishra GD, Powers JR, 'The health and social needs of recently widowed older women in Australia', Australasian Journal on Ageing, 21(3) 135-140 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Julie Byles
2002 Lee CE, Powers JR, 'Number of Social Roles, Health, and Well-being in Three Generations of Australian Women', International Journal of Behavioural Medicine, 9 195-215 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 33
2001 Brown P, Brown W, Powers JR, 'Time pressure, satisfaction with leisure and health among Australian women', Annals of Leisure Research, 4 1-18 (2001) [C1]
2000 McFadden M, Powers JR, Brown WJ, Walker M, 'Vehicle And Driver Attributes Affecting Distance From The Steering Wheel In Motor Vehicles', HUMAN FACTORS, 42(4) 676-682 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
2000 Powers JR, Ball JI, Adamson LR, Dobson A, 'EFFECTIVENESS OF THE NATIONAL DEATH INDEX FOR ESTABLISHING THE VITAL STATISTICS OF OLDER WOMEN IN THE AUSTRALIAN LONGITUDINAL STUDY ON WOMEN'S HEALTH', THE AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 24 526-528 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 63Web of Science - 64
2000 Patterson AJ, Brown W, Powers J, Roberts DC, 'Iron deficiency, general health and fatigue: results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Quality of Life Research, 9 491-497 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 47Web of Science - 44
Co-authors Amanda Patterson
1999 Carapetis JR, Powers JR, Currie BJ, Sangster JF, Begg A, Fisher DA, et al., 'Outcomes of cardiac valve replacement for rheumatic heart disease in aboriginal Australians', Asia Pacific Heart Journal, 8 138-147 (1999)

Background: Few studies have looked specifically at the outcomes of cardiac valve replacement for rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in developing or indigenous populations. Aims: To d... [more]

Background: Few studies have looked specifically at the outcomes of cardiac valve replacement for rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in developing or indigenous populations. Aims: To describe outcomes of cardiac valve replacement in patients with rheumatic heart disease living in urban and rural communities in northern Australia. Methods: Retrospective chart review with some prospective follow-up of 81 consecutive patients, predominantly aboriginal, who underwent mitral and/or aortic valve replacement for RHD between 1964 and 1996. Survival analyses were performed using the Kaplan-Meier method, and multivariable analyses using the Cox Proportional Hazards model. Results: Most patients received mechanical prostheses. There was 1 (1.2) perioperative death. 27/29 late deaths were related to RHD. Actuarial probability estimates for survival at 1, 5 and 10 years were 91, 79 and 68 and for complication-free survival were 81, 52 and 44. Linearised rates (per 100 person-years) were: death, 4.82; all complications, 14.62; emboli, 3.92; bleeding, 2.68; endocarditis, 1.25; reoperation, 0.50; non-structural dysfunction, 2.10. Diminished preoperative left ventricular function was the only variable strongly associated with death (hazard ratio 3.38, 95 CI, 1.01 to 11.28), and this effect was greatest in the first 2 postoperative years. Conclusions: Survival and freedom from complications in this population are less than in similar studies from developing countries. Consideration should be given to operating before the left ventricular function diminishes substantially and to using techniques which obviate the need for anticoagulation.

Citations Scopus - 17
1999 Dobson AJ, Brown WJ, Ball JI, Powers JR, McFadden M, 'Women Drivers' Behaviour, Socio-Demographic Characteristics And Accidents', ACCIDENT ANALYSIS AND PREVENTION, 31 525-535 (1999) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 71Web of Science - 56
1998 Brown WJ, Ball K, Powers JR, 'Is life a party for young women?', ACHPER HEALTHY LIFESTYLES JOURNAL, 45(3) 21-26 (1998) [C1]
1997 Sayers S, Powers J, Humphrey M, 'Low aboriginal birth-weight - Prematurity or intrauterine growth restriction, Humphrey MD. Aust NZ J Obstet and Gynaecol 1996; 36: 126-128 (multiple letters) [1]', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 37 131-132 (1997)
Citations Scopus - 3
1997 Sayers S, Powers J, 'Missing values ignored [2]', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 33 174 (1997)
1997 Sayers S, Powers J, 'Risk factors for Aboriginal low birthweight, intrauterine growth retardation and preterm birth in the Darwin Health Region', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 21 524-530 (1997)

Risk factors for Aboriginal low birthweight (<2500 g), preterm birth (<37 weeks' gestation) and intrauterine growth retardation (under the tenth percentile of Australian birthweig... [more]

Risk factors for Aboriginal low birthweight (<2500 g), preterm birth (<37 weeks' gestation) and intrauterine growth retardation (under the tenth percentile of Australian birthweights for gestational age) were examined in 503 live-born singletons recorded as born to an Aboriginal mother and routinely delivered at the Royal Darwin Hospital between January 1987 and March 1990. Infants born to mothers with body mass index less than 18.5 kg/m 2 had five times the risk of having low birthweight and 2.5 times the risk of intrauterine growth retardation. Population-attributable risk percentages suggest that 28 per cent of low birthweight and 15 per cent of growth retardation could be attributed to maternal malnutrition. Risk percentages for maternal smoking of more than half a packet of cigarettes a day were 18 per cent for low birthweight and 10 per cent for growth retardation. For growth retardation, 18 per cent could be attributed to a maternal age under 20 years. Risk factors for preterm birth were predominantly obstctric: the population-attributable risk percentage for pregnancy-induced hypertension was 26 per cent and for other obstetric conditions was 16 per cent. For Aboriginal births in the Darwin Health Region, maternal malnutrition and smoking are key elements in the prevention of low birthweight and intrauterine growth retardation. Teenage pregnancy is an important risk for intrauterine growth retardation, and pregnancy-induced hypertension is a risk for preterm birth.

Citations Scopus - 36
1997 'Letters to the Editor', The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 37 131-134 (1997)
DOI 10.1111/j.1479-828X.1997.tb02238.x
1996 Weeramanthri TS, Powers JR, Collier JW, 'Cardiac pathology and adult aboriginal mortality: A coronial study of sudden and external cause deaths in the top end of the Northern Territory in 1990', Pathology, 28 40-44 (1996)

A retrospective review of coronial records was performed for 179 adult decedents who came to coronial autopsy in 1990 and who had been living in the Top End of the Northern Territ... [more]

A retrospective review of coronial records was performed for 179 adult decedents who came to coronial autopsy in 1990 and who had been living in the Top End of the Northern Territory at the time of death. The directly standardized rate of autopsy-examined sudden death was 7.4 times higher for Aboriginal people than for non-Aboriginal people. Coronary atherosclerosis was the cause of 37% (14/38) of the Aboriginal sudden deaths and 52% (16/31) of the non-Aboriginal sudden deaths. Evidence of coronary atherosclerosis rose with age and was seen more frequently in those dying suddenly compared to those dying of external causes. When directly standardized, the rate of autopsy-examined sudden death attributable to ischemic heart disease was 5.5 times higher for Aboriginal people than for non-Aboriginal people. Contrary to a previously published statement, there is considerable overlap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal heart weights, with 75% (55/73) of Aboriginal decedents and 84% (89/106) of non-Aboriginal decedents having heart weights between 250 and 500 g. We concluded that the rate of autopsy-examined sudden death from all causes, and specifically from ischemic heart disease, was much higher in Aboriginal people. However in a case of sudden death a presumptive clinical diagnosis of ischemic heart disease prior to autopsy is not justified in either Aboriginal or non-Aboriginal people, due to the high prevalence of other fatal conditions. The diagnosis of pathologically increased heart weight, which is critical in the assessment of sudden death, should be made on the same basis in both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people.

DOI 10.1080/00313029600169503
Citations Scopus - 4
1996 Lee AJ, Bonson APV, Powers JR, 'The effect of retail store managers on Aboriginal diet in remote communities', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 20 212-214 (1996)

Key nutrient densities of the diet of two remote northern coastal Aboriginal communities were measured using the store-turnover method during the periods that three store managers... [more]

Key nutrient densities of the diet of two remote northern coastal Aboriginal communities were measured using the store-turnover method during the periods that three store managers were responsible for each store respectively. Individual store managers were a greater determinant of nutrient density than the community itself. Furthermore, nutrient densities tended to be highest in both communities when their stores were administered by one particular store manager The results support the notion that store managers wield considerable power over the food supply of remote Aboriginal communities, and raise questions concerning the ability of Aboriginal community members to influence their own food supplies in retail stores. However the study also confirms that store managers can be important allies in efforts to improve Aboriginal dietary intake.

Citations Scopus - 13
1996 Powers JR, Burns CB, Currie BJ, 'An evaluation of unleaded petrol as a harm reduction strategy for petrol sniffers in an Aboriginal community', Journal of Toxicology - Clinical Toxicology, (1996)
Citations Scopus - 11
1995 Sayers SM, Powers JR, 'An evaluation of three methods used to assess gestational age of Aboriginal neonates [5]', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 31 261 (1995)
Citations Scopus - 1
1994 Burns CB, Sriprakash KS, Powers JR, Currie BJ, 'Method for preserving erythrocytic d-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity that facilitates population studies on lead intoxication', Journal of Applied Toxicology, 14 365-368 (1994)
DOI 10.1002/jat.2550140508
Citations Scopus - 10
1994 Burns CB, Powers JR, Currie BJ, 'Elevated Serum Creatine Kinase (CK-MM) in Petrol Sniffers Using Leaded or Unleaded Fuel', Journal of Toxicology: Clinical Toxicology, 32 527-539 (1994)
DOI 10.3109/15563659409011057
Citations Scopus - 5
1993 Powers JR, Sayers SM, 'Birth size of Australian Aboriginal babies', Medical Journal of Australia, 159 (1993)
Citations Scopus - 27
1992 Sayers SM, Powers JR, 'An evaluation of three methods used to assess the gestational age of Aboriginal neonates', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 28 312-317 (1992)

Many Aboriginal women do not recall their last menstrual period date, so alternative methods of estimating gestational age are necessary for optimal obstetric and neonatal care. I... [more]

Many Aboriginal women do not recall their last menstrual period date, so alternative methods of estimating gestational age are necessary for optimal obstetric and neonatal care. In this retrospective review of 605 Aboriginal infants born at the Royal Darwin Hospital, the gestational age was estimated by the Dubowitz method and compared with available gestational age estimates from first fundal height and first ultrasound measurement. There was good agreement between the Dubowitz and ultrasound estimates of gestational age with best agreement occurring when ultrasound was done in the first trimester and worst agreement in the third trimester. Agreement between fundal height and Dubowitz estimates was poor but the measurement of fundal height was not standardized. When accurate last menstrual period information is absent, these findings suggest that good estimates of gestational age in Aboriginal neonates can be determined from the Dubowitz assessment at birth and from ultrasound measurements taken in the first trimester.

Citations Scopus - 13
1992 Powers JR, Munoz E, Nienhuys TG, Mathews JD, 'Social and environmental factors in 10 aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory: relationship to hospital admissions of children', Medical Journal of Australia, (1992)
Citations Scopus - 27
1992 Powers JR, Munoz E, Mathews JD, 'Hospitalisation patterns in children from 10 aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory', Medical Journal of Australia, (1992)
Citations Scopus - 6
1988 Powers JR, Matthews JD, Riley MD, Fejo L, Munoz E, Milns NR, et al., 'Effects of the heavy usage of kava on physical health: summary of a pilot survey in an aboriginal community', Medical Journal of Australia, (1988)
Citations Scopus - 128
Show 65 more journal articles

Conference (23 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Loxton DJ, Powers J, 'Recruiting participants in the 21st century: Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2014 Powers JR, Loxton D, 'The ups and downs of recruiting in the 21st century' (2014)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2013 Powers J, Loxton DJ, 'Subsequent level of depression in young women who binge drink in late adolescence' (2013)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2013 Hure A, Chojenta CL, Powers J, Loxton D, Byles J, 'Validation of self-reported stillbirths using administrative datasets' (2013)
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Catherine Chojenta, Deborah Loxton, Julie Byles
2012 Powers JR, Dobson A, Mishra G, Brown W, 'Australia's Public Health Guidelines' (2012)
2012 Breen C, Burns L, Conroy E, Powers J, Loxton DJ, Hutchinson D, et al., 'Caring for individuals affected by foetal alcohol spectrum disorders: Positives, challenges and suggestions for improvement', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012 (2012) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop, Deborah Loxton
2012 Anderson AE, Loxton DJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Powers JR, 'Compliance with alcohol guidelines for pregnant women: Using data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Journal of Women's Health (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin, Amy Anderson, Deborah Loxton
2011 Powers J, Loxton DJ, 'Differences in birth interventions by area of residence' (2011)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2011 Powers JR, Loxton D, 'Does drought affect women¿s mental health? Results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health' (2011)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2011 Byles JE, Dolja-Gore X, Powers JR, Loxton DJ, Dobson A, 'Pap tests and mammograms: Are there urban/rural differences in take-up in women?', Posters - Abstracts. 11th National Rural Health Conference (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Julie Byles, Deborah Loxton, Xenia Doljagore
2010 Loxton DJ, Powers J, McDermott L, Chojenta C, 'Alcohol and tobacco consumption during pregnancy' (2010)
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Deborah Loxton
2010 Loxton DJ, Powers J, Furber K, 'Intimate partner violence, health and social support' (2010)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2010 Loxton DJ, Chojenta C, Powers J, 'Alcohol consumption among pregnant women: How do service providers and mothers learn about and react to official guidelines?' (2010)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Catherine Chojenta
2010 Powers JR, Loxton D, 'Do adverse climate conditions affect women¿s self-rated health?' (2010)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2009 Loxton DJ, Powers J, Furber K, 'Intimate partner violence, health and social support: Findings over the long term' (2009)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2009 Powers JR, Loxton DJ, 'Does wave non-response affect the results in longitudinal studies?', Australasian Epidemiologist (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2008 Mackerras D, Powers J, Boorman J, Loxton DJ, Giles G, 'Estimating the impact on pregnant and post-partum women of fortifying bread with iodine' (2008)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2008 Loxton DJ, Powers J, Mooney R, Hosking S, 'Sole motherhood, mental health and the role of social support' (2008)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2008 Powers J, Loxton DJ, 'How do pregnant women respond to alcohol guidelines?' (2008)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2007 Powers JR, Young A, 'Mental health: what is the effect of heavy drinking?' (2007)
2006 Powers JR, Young A, 'Abstinence: is it bad for you or a case of mistaken identity?' (2006)
2005 Powers JR, Young AF, 'Long-term effects of alcohol on the health of mid-age women' (2005)
2005 Loxton DJ, Powers J, Schofield M, Hussain R, 'Gynecological and breast health and partner violence: Preventive healthcare' (2005)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
Show 20 more conferences

Report (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Mishra G, Loxton DJ, Anderson A, Hockey R, Powers J, Brown W, et al., 'Health and wellbeing of women aged 18 to 23 in 2013 and 1996: findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health', Department of Health, 183 (2014)
Co-authors Meredith Tavener, Julie Byles, Melissa Harris, Deborah Loxton, Amy Anderson
2012 Dobson A, Byles JE, Brown W, Mishra G, Loxton DJ, Hockey R, et al., 'Adherence to health guidelines: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, 90 (2012) [R1]
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Deborah Loxton, Alexis Hure, Julie Byles, Amy Anderson
2011 Dobson A, Byles J, Dolja-Gore X, Fitzgerald D, Hockey R, Loxton DJ, et al., 'Rural, remote and regional differences in women¿s health: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health', Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, 134 (2011)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Xenia Doljagore, Deborah Loxton, Jane Rich
2010 Byles J, Dobson A, Pachana N, Tooth L, Loxton DJ, Berecki J, et al., 'Women, health and ageing: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health', Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, 268 (2010)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Deborah Loxton
2008 Dolja-Gore X, Byles J, Loxton D, Berecki J, Gibson R, Hockey R, et al., 'Use and costs of medications and other health care resources: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Department of health and Ageing (2008)
Co-authors Xenia Doljagore, Anne Young, L Parkinson, Julie Byles, Deborah Loxton
2006 Dolja-Gore X, Brown W, Byles J, Carrigan G, Dobson A, Gibson R, et al., 'Trends in women's health: Results from the ALSWH - priority conditions, risk factors and health behaviours', Department of Health and Ageing (2006)
Co-authors Xenia Doljagore, Julie Byles, Anne Young
2005 Loxton DJ, Powers J, Young A, Wood A, 'Report on the provision of data to the Office of Women', Office for Women, Department of Family and Community Services, 726 (2005)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2005 Adamson L, Brown W, Byles J, Chojenta C, Dobson A, Fitzgerald D, et al., 'Women¿s weight: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health', Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, 99 (2005)
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Julie Byles, Deborah Loxton
Show 5 more reports
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 6
Total funding $165,308

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20111 grants / $34,550

The mental health of women who binge drink$34,550

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Ms Jennifer Powers, Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Drug and Alcohol Council Research Grants Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000947
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20091 grants / $1,500

Australasian Epidemiological Association Scientific Meeting, Dunedin, New Zealand, 30 August - 1 September 2009$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Ms Jennifer Powers
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190433
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20081 grants / $6,813

Iodine-related food intake among pregnant, breastfeeding and other women$6,813

Funding body: Food Standards Australia New Zealand

Funding body Food Standards Australia New Zealand
Project Team Ms Jennifer Powers
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189008
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20071 grants / $49,854

Alcohol use in pregnancy$49,854

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Dr Lucy Burns, Ms Jennifer Powers
Scheme Drug and Alcohol Council Research Grants Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0188302
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20061 grants / $30,091

Analysis of the role of alcohol consumption in poor mental health among middle aged women in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health 1996-2004$30,091

Funding body: Australian Brewers Foundation

Funding body Australian Brewers Foundation
Project Team Associate Professor Anne Young, Ms Jennifer Powers
Scheme Alcohol-related Medical Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0185559
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20051 grants / $42,500

Data provision for the Women's Data Warehouse $42,500

Funding body: Department of Family and Community Services

Funding body Department of Family and Community Services
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton, Ms Jennifer Powers, Associate Professor Anne Young
Scheme Consultancy/Tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0185597
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y
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Ms Jennifer Powers

Position

Conjoint Senior Lecturer
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email jenny.powers@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 40420677

Office

Room W4115
Building HMRI
Location Other

,
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