Professor Jennifer Martin

Professor Jennifer Martin

Chair of Clinical Pharmacology

School of Medicine and Public Health

Weeding out barriers to effective treatment

Optimising choice, dose and timing of medicines for a particular patient are the focus of Professor Jennifer Martin's clinical work and research career.

Jennifer Martin

Professor Jennifer Martin is the Chair of the discipline of Clinical Pharmacology in the School of Medicine and Public Health at the University of Newcastle.

Based at the Calvary Mater Hospital, Jennifer leads a team of pharmacy and medicine experts together with pharmacoepidemiologists and pharmacoeconomists, who work across a number of areas including cancer.

Most often centering on therapeutic drugs, the team look at everything from the design and development of drugs, to the clinical trials process, through to the post-marketing phase, where data is collected on how effective those drugs are in practice, and any side effects they might have.

MEDICAL CANNABIS TRIALS

In July 2015, the NSW government announced Australia's first medical cannabis trial for terminally ill adult cancer patients. The Hunter will serve as a recruitment hub for this study and the UON clinical pharmacology group will lead the dose-finding study at the Calvary Mater Newcastle, together with UON's Conjoint Professors Stephen Ackland and Katherine Clark.

Although likely to polarise opinion, the study could significantly improve the well being of terminal patients at the end of life.

To be conducted in two phases, the trial will assess the ability of cannabis to relieve symptoms including fatigue, low appetite, altered taste and smell for food, low mood, weight loss, nausea, insomnia and pain relief.

Jennifer believes the Calvary Mater team was chosen to run the pharmacology aspects of the cannabis trial due to the long history of excellence in the UON Clinical Pharmacology department (previous Chairs include Emeritus Professor Tony Smith and Professor David Henry), and the high level of analytical support offered by the University of Newcastle, led by Dr Peter Galettis.  

In line with her focus on optimising the therapeutic benefits of medication, Jennifer sees this trial as a vital opportunity to assess and quantify a drug already being used by many extremely ill patients.

The first phase of the trial will produce world-class pharmacokinetic analysis and sophisticated modelling to inform drug dosage and frequency of administration.

CHALLENGING CONFOUNDERS

Jennifer dismisses the notion expressed by certain quarters of the community that this trial has more to do with political agenda than patient quality of life.

"At the end of the day, we want our patients to access this drug if it proves effective."

"Identifying exactly what helps, how it helps, how much a patient needs and possible side effects is vital," she says, "especially if those side effects are worse than the symptoms being treated."

The team is sourcing pharmaceutical grade cannabis from commercial suppliers overseas who complete rigorous testing, which rule out contaminants such as mould, and authenticate uniform potency.

To further ensure consistency throughout the trial, vaporisers have been chosen as a method of delivery.

"We know that when you eat cannabis in food, there is a huge variability between the amount that you eat and how much you actually need to feel good," Jennifer explains.

"This depends on what meal you have eaten, other drugs you have taken and how well you are."

"But if you inhale it, it goes straight through the lining of your nose or mouth into the bloodstream," she continues. 

"If we can be sure the equipment and potency of the cannabis are uniform, we don't have any confounders muddying our understanding of the relationship between dose and effect in a particular person."

Patients will begin treatment in early 2016 with initial results expected by the end of 2016.

THE ROAD TO RHODES

Jennifer spent her childhood in Wellington, New Zealand, where her initial interest in medicine grew from a love of sport. She decided early on that she would become the doctor who travelled with the New Zealand Olympic team.

While studying at the University of Otago, changes to tertiary funding forced medical students to take out large loans, with interest accruing during their student years. Upon graduating, many began work as doctors in New Zealand, but then moved to the United Kingdom or Australia, to pay off their increasing debt.

"By that stage, my eyes were opened to the issues of unequal access to tertiary education, health care and user pays," she recalls.

In 1993, keen to further understand the consequences of inequity in healthcare access, Jennifer was awarded a prestigious Rhodes Scholarship to study politics, philosophy, and economics at the University of Oxford.

Returning to New Zealand, Jennifer trained as a specialist in pharmacology and internal medicine.

"I like that pharmacology is the study of drugs across all areas."

"You get very broad training, but it is also closely related to those wider issues of access to health care resources and drugs," explains Jennifer.

In 2000, Jennifer went to Melbourne to undertake her PhD from Monash University, examining innate immunity in Type 2 diabetes.  Subsequent postdoctoral work at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute focused on the function of macrophages with high fat diet.  A stint at the University of Queensland as Head of the Southside Clinical School followed.  Here, Jennifer became involved in medical curricula as a method of broadening the experiences and understanding doctors have about medicine and healthcare.

The opportunity to apply for the Chair of Clinical Pharmacology at the University of Newcastle combined with encouragement from leaders in the field to do so, convinced Jennifer to pursue the clinical pharmacology leadership position in 2013.

TEAM COACH

Jennifer is quick to point out that the entire Pharmacology team is working toward the improvement of patients' lives, not just on the cannabis trial, but on a range of research and community leadership roles in medicines' use.

She sees herself not as someone who must actively manage the work of those she leads, but more of a coach helping her team to reach their goals.

"We have a general understanding that people in this group contribute to clinical and medicines research and service."

"They are in charge of pursuing their own research agenda but we need to provide support and opportunities for that," she explains.

Postgraduate students under Jennifer's supervision are developing a mass spectroscopy library and clinical validation for synthetic drugs of abuse, and developing programs to optimise dose and timing of cancer therapies.

Future research will continue to focus on drug individualisation using drug phenotype data, and developing evidence around biosimilars.

Members of Jennifer's team also have a focus on generating evidence to guide the deprescribing of medications - particularly in people with a lot of comorbidity or at the end of life.

MOTIVATED TO RIGHT WRONGS

An intuitive and award winning teacher, Jennifer's style in the classroom is somewhat unconventional.

"My classes are very interactive because I want the students to think," she says.

"We do everything on the whiteboard so they have to interact."

She laughs as she reflects on her propensity to be diverted by tangents in class, but solemnly states her belief that teaching well involves admitting to past errors to prevent students from repeating them.

"I think one of the most important functions of being a professor is mentoring and training the next generation. I think it is a shame that the university system rewards you so well for research but not for teaching."

Not that Jennifer could ever be accused of lagging in research, or any other aspect of her career.

The practicing physician, teacher, researcher, multiple committee and editorial board member, and mother of four wants you to know she is not as intimidating as she looks on paper.

"I am very aware of the impression I make when I say things like 'I was a Rhodes Scholar'," she reflects.  

"I just applied for the scholarship, had a vision of what I wanted to do and I got it. So I don't think of it as any badge of achievement, it was just what I did."

"The experience has cemented a responsibility to do something helpful for the community," Jennifer adds.

"I am motivated, but my motivation is to try and ensure equity of access to opportunities based on merit in a society of entitlement, where some people get preferential treatment."

"I know I can't override thousands of years worth of inequity, but I'm doing it in my own small way and I hope that it eventually has some benefit in terms of access to medicines."

Jennifer Martin

Weeding out barriers to effective treatment

Optimising choice, dose and timing of medicines for a particular patient are the focus of Professor Jennifer Martin's clinical work and research career.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Professor Martin is a dual trained clinical pharmacologist and practising general physician. She has studied politics and health economics at Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar and has used this experience to serve on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee, the Economic Subcommittee of the PBAC and other Government and Statewide committees examining appropriate allocation, regulation, safety and efficacy in pharmaceuticals. She is a Member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors (Diploma).

Her PhD (Monash) examined innate immunity in Type 2 diabetes and subsequent postdoctoral work at the Walter and Eliza Hall focussed on the function of macrophages with high fat diet. Her recent research is in the area of clinical development of both novel and old drugs for a variety of diseases and has developed a collaboration with Leiden University using clinical pharmacological methods generally to improve dosing, with EKUT (Germany) in the combined role of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) and pharmacogenetics to individualise choice and dose of chemotherapy, and with the National Institutes of Health in identifying and managing synthetic drugs of abuse.

Her current PhD students are researching cannabinoid therapies, targeted cancer therapies, dosing in neonates and therapeutic drug monitoring in clinical care including with antimicrobial therapies. Professor Martin is passionate about teaching in the area of clinical pharmacology and been involved in curriculum development for medical students (Otago, Monash, Queensland and Melbourne Universities) was the recent teaching and learning representative on the STC in clinical pharmacology for the College of Physicians (RACP). She is currently a member of the RACP Policy and Advocacy Committee, the Council of the Australasian Society for Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Therapeutics, and a member of the Pharmacology and Therapeutics Advisory Committee of PHARMAC, the sole purchaser for pharmaceuticals in New Zealand.

Research Expertise
Professor Jennifer Martin is Chair of Clinical Pharmacology in the School of Medicine and Public Health at the University of Newcastle and a practicing general physician at the Calvary Mater Hospital Newcastle.

Qualifications

  • PhD, Monash University
  • Bachelor of Medicine & Surgery, University of Otago - New Zealand
  • Master of Arts, University of Oxford - UK

Keywords

  • Clinical pharmacology
  • Personalized medicine
  • Pharmaceutical pricing and regulation
  • Targeted therapies

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 20
111204 Cancer Therapy (excl. Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy) 30
111502 Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Chair of Clinical Pharmacology University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2013 -  Membership National Prescribing Service Executive – RADAR
Australia
1/01/2013 -  Membership Diamantina Health Partners Symposium Organising Committee
Australia
1/01/2013 -  Membership IATDMCT Oncology Committee
Australia
1/01/2012 -  Membership Diamantina Health Partners Evidence and Innovation Theme
Australia
1/01/2012 -  Membership Diamantina Health Partners Neuroscience and Recovery Centre Steering Committee
Australia
1/01/2011 -  Editorial Board Journal Clinical Toxicology
Australia
1/01/2011 -  Membership IATDMCT Standard Laboratory Practices (SLP) committee
Australia
1/01/2011 -  Membership Queensland Health Improving Presribing Steering Committee
Australia
1/01/2010 -  Editorial Board British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Australia
1/01/2010 -  Editorial Board Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety
Australia
1/01/2010 -  Membership Association of Scientific and Clinical Pharmacologists and Toxicologists
Australia
1/01/2010 -  Membership Australian Society of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacologists and Toxicologists
Australia
1/01/2010 -  Membership Clinical Advisory Group “Closing the Divide in Indigenous Cancer” Queensland Institute Medical Research
Australia
1/01/2010 -  Membership Editorial Advisory Group National Prescribing Service
Australia
1/01/2010 -  Membership PAH Clinical Council
Australia
1/01/2010 -  Membership UQ Discipline of Medicine Research Symposium Organising Committee and Sessional Chair
Australia
1/01/2010 -  Membership University of South Australia Sansom Institute Research Advisory Board
Australia
1/01/2009 -  Membership Medical Journal of Australia (MJA) Insight; Australian Doctor
Australia
1/01/2008 -  Membership QH Medicines Advisory Committee
Australia
1/01/2008 -  Membership Queensland Health Medicines Advisory Committee
Australia
1/01/2007 -  Editorial Board Australian Prescriber
Australia
1/01/2007 -  Editorial Board Internal Medicine Journal
Australia
1/01/2007 -  Membership Pharmacogenetics; Education ASCEPT (SIG)
Australia
1/01/2007 -  Membership Medical Observer
Australia
1/01/2006 -  Editorial Board Australian Medicine Handbook
Australia
1/01/2005 - 31/12/2009 Membership Therapeutic Guidelines Working Group
Australia

Awards

Recipient

Year Award
2014 Finalist Royal Australasian College of Physicians Teaching Award
Royal Australiasian College of Physicians (RACP)
2010 Finalist Clinical Educator of the Year
Postgraduate Medical Council Queensland (Australia)
2010 Nominee Teaching Award for Junior Medical Staff
PA (Princess Alexandra Hospital) Health Symposium

Recognition

Year Award
1999 "Best Registrar" teaching award for 5th year medical students
Christchurch School of Medicine, Otago University (New Zealand)
1998 "Best Registrar" teaching award for 4th year medical students
Christchurch School of Medicine, Otago University (New Zealand)

Research Award

Year Award
2014 University of Queensland Teaching Award
RBWH Clinical School, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Queensland (Australia)
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (15 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Martin JH, Somogyi A, 'Pharmacogenomics and Warfarin Therapy', Therapeutic Drug Monitoring, Academic Press, London 161-174 (2012)
2007 Krum H, Martin J, 'Novel Drug Treatments for Hypertension', Comprehensive Hypertension 1049-1060 (2007)
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-323-03961-1.50088-X
2007 Martin JH, 'Contraception', Therapeutic Guidelines 2007, Therapeutic Guidelines 2007, . . (2007)
2007 Martin JH, Krum H, 'Statin therapy in the prevention and treatment of heart failure', The Year In Heart Failure, Clinical Publishing, Atlas Medical Publishing, UK . (2007)
2007 Martin JH, 'Getting to know your drugs', Therapeutic Guidelines, Therapeutic Guidelines 2007 Endocrinology Group, . 161-174 (2007)
2007 Martin JH, Krum H, Gilbert R, 'Interactions between antihypertensive drugs and other medications', Comprehensive hypertension, Elsevier, New York (2007)
2006 Martin JH, 'Cardiovascular Drugs', Australian Medicines Handbook (7th Ed), Australian Medicines Handbook, Melbourne . (2006)
2003 Martin JH, Sim M, Hulse G, 'Opioids', Alcohol and Drug Problems- A Case Studies Workbook, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne 1-34 (2003)
2003 Martin JH, Liew D, Johnson S, 'Benzodiazepines', Alcohol and Drug Problems - A Case Studies Workbook, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne 132-157 (2003)
2003 Martin JH, Johnson S, Liew D, 'Cannabis, Hallucucinogens and CNS Stimulants', Alcohol and Drug Problems - A Case Studies Workbook, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne 61-97 (2003)
2002 Martin JH, Krum H, Haas S, Gilbert R, 'Metabolic co-morbid conditions in heart failure: Diabetes and hypercholesterolemia', Heart Failure Annual, Heart Failure Annual, London 35-58 (2002)
2002 Martin JH, Cape G, Hulse G, Robinson G, McLean S, Saunders J, Young R, 'Sedative-Hypnotics', Management of alcohol and drug problems, Oxford University Press, Adelaide 212-227 (2002)
2002 Martin JH, Todd F, McLean S, Krum H, Copeland J, 'Cannabis', Management of alcohol and drug problems, Oxford University Press, Adelaide 141-157 (2002)
2002 Martin JH, White J, Krum H, McLean S, Young R, Saunders J, 'Hallucinogens', Management of alcohol and drug problems, Oxford University Press, Adelaide 229-238 (2002)
2002 Martin JH, Young R, Saunders J, Hulse G, McLean S, Robinson G, 'Opiods', Management of alcohol and drug problems, Oxford University Press, Adelaide 79-99 (2002)
Show 12 more chapters

Journal article (162 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Ward MB, Reuter SE, Martin JH, 'How 'Optimal' are Optimal Sampling Times for Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Cancer? Practical Considerations.', Clin Pharmacokinet, 55 1171-1177 (2016)
DOI 10.1007/s40262-016-0394-3
2016 Bonomo Y, Zundel S, Martin JH, 'Addressing unconscious bias for female clinical academics.', Intern Med J, 46 391-393 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/imj.13022
2016 Reuter SE, Martin JH, 'Pharmacokinetics of Cannabis in Cancer Cachexia-Anorexia Syndrome.', Clin Pharmacokinet, 55 807-812 (2016)
DOI 10.1007/s40262-015-0363-2
2016 Hollingworth SA, Ostino R, David MC, Martin JH, Tett SE, 'Ezetimibe: use, costs and adverse events in Australia.', Cardiovasc Ther, (2016)
DOI 10.1111/1755-5922.12236
2016 Skinner TR, Scott IA, Martin JH, 'Diagnostic errors in older patients: A systematic review of incidence and potential causes in seven prevalent diseases', International Journal of General Medicine, 9 137-146 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Skinner et al.Background: Misdiagnosis, either over-or underdiagnosis, exposes older patients to increased risk of inappropriate or omitted investigations and treatments, ... [more]

© 2016 Skinner et al.Background: Misdiagnosis, either over-or underdiagnosis, exposes older patients to increased risk of inappropriate or omitted investigations and treatments, psychological distress, and financial burden. Objective: To evaluate the frequency and nature of diagnostic errors in 16 conditions prevalent in older patients by undertaking a systematic literature review. Data sources and study selection: Cohort studies, cross-sectional studies, or systematic reviews of such studies published in Medline between September 1993 and May 2014 were searched using key search terms of ¿diagnostic error¿, ¿misdiagnosis¿, ¿accuracy¿, ¿validity¿, or ¿diagnosis¿ and terms relating to each disease. Data synthesis: A total of 938 articles were retrieved. Diagnostic error rates of >10% for both over-and underdiagnosis were seen in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, dementia, Parkinson¿s disease, heart failure, stroke/transient ischemic attack, and acute myocardial infarction. Diabetes was overdiagnosed in <5% of cases. Conclusion: Over-and underdiagnosis are common in older patients. Explanations for overdiagnosis include subjective diagnostic criteria and the use of criteria not validated in older patients. Underdiagnosis was associated with long preclinical phases of disease or lack of sensitive diagnostic criteria. Factors that predispose to misdiagnosis in older patients must be emphasized in education and clinical guidelines.

DOI 10.2147/IJGM.S96741
2016 Meiklejohn JA, Mimery A, Martin JH, Bailie R, Garvey G, Walpole ET, et al., 'The role of the GP in follow-up cancer care: a systematic literature review', Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 10 990-1011 (2016)

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York.Purpose: The purpose of the present study is to explore the role of the general practitioners, family physicians and primary care... [more]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York.Purpose: The purpose of the present study is to explore the role of the general practitioners, family physicians and primary care physicians (GP) in the provision of follow-up cancer care. Methods: PubMed, MEDLINE and CINAHL were systematically searched for primary research focussing on the role of the GP from the perspective of GPs and patients. Data were extracted using a standardised form and synthesised using a qualitative descriptive approach. Results: The initial search generated 6487 articles: 25 quantitative and 33 qualitative articles were included. Articles focused on patients¿ and GPs¿ perspectives of the GP role in follow-up cancer care. Some studies reported on the current role of the GP, barriers and enablers to GP involvement from the perspective of the GP and suggestions for future GP roles. Variations in guidelines and practice of follow-up cancer care in the primary health care sector exist. However, GPs and patients across the included studies supported a greater GP role in follow-up cancer care. This included greater support for care coordination, screening, diagnosis and management of physical and psychological effects of cancer and its treatment, symptom and pain relief, health promotion, palliative care and continuing normal general health care provision. Conclusion: While there are variations in guidelines and practice of follow-up cancer care in the primary health care sector, GPs and patients across the reviewed studies supported a greater role by the GP. Implications for Cancer Survivors: Greater GP role in cancer care could improve the quality of patient care for cancer survivors. Better communication between the tertiary sector and GP across the cancer phases would enable clear delineation of roles.

DOI 10.1007/s11764-016-0545-4
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2016 Linger MW, van Driel ML, Hollingworth SA, Martin JH, 'Off-label use of tumour necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors and anakinra at an Australian tertiary hospital.', Intern Med J, (2016)
DOI 10.1111/imj.13247
2016 Meiklejohn JA, Adams J, Valery PC, Walpole ET, Martin JH, Williams HM, Garvey G, 'Health professional's perspectives of the barriers and enablers to cancer care for Indigenous Australians', European Journal of Cancer Care, 25 254-261 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.To investigate health professionals' perspectives about factors that impede or facilitate cancer care for Indigenous people. Semi-structured intervie... [more]

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.To investigate health professionals' perspectives about factors that impede or facilitate cancer care for Indigenous people. Semi-structured interviews with 22 health professionals involved in Indigenous cancer care. Data were interpreted using an inductive thematic analysis approach. Participants presented their perspectives on a number of barriers and enablers to Indigenous cancer care. Barriers were related to challenges with communication, the health system and coordination of care, issues around individual and community priorities and views of cancer treatment and health professional judgement. Enablers to cancer care were related to the importance of trust and rapport as well as health care system and support factors. The findings highlighted the need for recording of Indigenous status in medical records and a coordinated approach to the provision of evidence-based and culturally appropriate cancer care. This could go some way to improving Indigenous patient's engagement with tertiary cancer care services.

DOI 10.1111/ecc.12467
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2016 Lucas C, Byles J, Martin JH, 'Medicines optimisation in older people: Taking age and sex into account.', Maturitas, 93 114-120 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.maturitas.2016.06.021
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Julie Byles
2016 Martin J, Shenfield G, 'The hazards of rapid approval of new drugs', Australian Prescriber, 39 2-3 (2016)
DOI 10.18773/austprescr.2016.005
2016 Denaro C, Martin J, 'The challenge of costly drugs', Australian Prescriber, 39 72-74 (2016)
DOI 10.18773/austprescr.2016.037
2016 Moore SP, Soerjomataram I, Green AC, Garvey G, Martin J, Valery PC, 'Breast cancer diagnosis, patterns of care and burden of disease in Queensland, Australia (1998¿2004): does being Indigenous make a difference?', International Journal of Public Health, 61 435-442 (2016)

© 2015, Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+).Objectives: We compared patterns of care, comorbidity, disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) and survival in Indigenous and non-Ind... [more]

© 2015, Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+).Objectives: We compared patterns of care, comorbidity, disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) and survival in Indigenous and non-Indigenous women with breast cancer in Queensland, Australia (1998¿2004). Methods: A cohort study of Indigenous (n¿=¿110) and non-Indigenous women (n¿=¿105), frequency matched on age and remoteness. We used Pearson¿s Chi-squared analysis to compare proportions, hazard models to assess survival differences and calculated disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Results: Indigenous women were more likely to be socially disadvantaged (43 vs. 20¿%, p¿<¿0.01) have comorbidity (42 vs. 18¿% p¿<¿0.01), and have regional spread or distant metastasis (metastasis, 51 vs. 36¿%, p¿=¿0.02) than non-Indigenous women; there was no difference in treatment patterns. More Indigenous women died in the follow-up period (p¿=¿0.01). DALY¿s were 469 and 665 per 100,000 for Indigenous and non-Indigenous women, respectively, with a larger proportion of the burden attributed to premature death among the former (63 vs. 59¿%). Conclusions: Indigenous women with breast cancer received comparable treatment to their non-Indigenous counterparts. The higher proportion of DALYs related to early death in Indigenous women suggests higher fatality with breast cancer in this group. Later stage at diagnosis and higher comorbidity presence among Indigenous women reinforce the need for early detection and improved management of co-existing disease.

DOI 10.1007/s00038-015-0739-y
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 McDougall DAJ, Martin J, Playford EG, Green B, 'The Impact of Model-Misspecification on Model Based Personalised Dosing', AAPS Journal, 18 1244-1253 (2016)

© 2016, American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists.Model Based Personalised Dosing (MBPD) requires a population pharmacokinetic (PK) or pharmacodynamic model to determine ... [more]

© 2016, American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists.Model Based Personalised Dosing (MBPD) requires a population pharmacokinetic (PK) or pharmacodynamic model to determine the optimal dose of medication for an individual. Often several models are published, and the decision of which model is implemented in MBPD may have a large impact on its clinical utility. As quoted by Box, ¿all models are wrong, the practical question is how wrong can they be and still be useful¿. Voriconzole, a triazole antifungal and the example used in this manuscript, currently has nine population PK models published. To assess the impact of model-misspecification on MBPD, five structurally mis-specified models for voriconazole were developed. Intensive plasma concentrations were simulated for 100 virtual subjects. The dose adjustments required to reach a target exposure were determined by using the empirical Bayes estimates of the PK parameters under each of the mis-specified models. The predicted plasma concentrations and the probability of clinical outcomes, upon following the dose recommendations, were determined. Models that did not contain non-linear clearance performed poorly, with a median dose recommendation 155¿310¿mg higher than appropriate doses, when only one plasma concentration was available. Removal of body weight and CYP2C9 genotype as covariates had no clinically significant impact on outcomes. In summary, the removal of important structural components, such as non-linear clearance in the case of voriconazole, had a large impact on the clinical utility of MBPD. The removal of patient covariates, even highly influential covariates such as CYP2C9 genotype for voriconazole, had no clinical impact.

DOI 10.1208/s12248-016-9943-9
2016 Garvey G, Cunningham J, He VY, Janda M, Baade P, Sabesan S, et al., 'Health-related quality of life among Indigenous Australians diagnosed with cancer', QUALITY OF LIFE RESEARCH, 25 1999-2008 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11136-016-1233-6
Co-authors Michael Fay
2016 Petrie S, Barras M, Lust K, Fagermo N, Allen J, Martin JH, 'Evaluation of therapeutic enoxaparin in a pregnant population at a tertiary hospital', Internal Medicine Journal, 46 826-833 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Royal Australasian College of PhysiciansBackground: Therapeutic anticoagulation with enoxaparin in pregnancy is complex due to varying pharmacokinetics and the increasing ... [more]

© 2016 Royal Australasian College of PhysiciansBackground: Therapeutic anticoagulation with enoxaparin in pregnancy is complex due to varying pharmacokinetics and the increasing prevalence of obesity. There is limited evidence to support current dosing and monitoring strategies of enoxaparin in this population. Aim: To describe the current practice in therapeutic anticoagulation in the pregnant population at a tertiary institution. Methods: A retrospective study of pregnant women on therapeutic enoxaparin between January 2007 and December 2011. Results: Forty-four pregnant women requiring therapeutic anticoagulation were identified and divided into two groups, monitored with anti-factor Xa (AXA) concentrations and unmonitored. Fifty-five percent of monitored women were initiated on the recommended 1 mg/kg twice a day (bd) enoxaparin dose-strategy. Eighty-two percent of women were monitored; however, there was variability regarding the timing, frequency and subsequent dose adjustments from monitoring. Overall, as pregnancies progressed, there was both increasing dose adjustments and increasing frequency of monitoring. Fourteen women had a BMI over 30 kg/m2, and 13 of these women were monitored. Nine monitored obese women required doses less than 1 mg/kg/bd to maintain a therapeutic AXA level. Management appeared to be individualised. There were small numbers of toxicity events. Conclusion: Variation exists in dosing and monitoring practices for therapeutic enoxaparin in the pregnant population. Dosing obese patients using 1 mg/kg twice daily can lead to toxic AXA concentrations, and dose reductions are required to maintain a therapeutic range. A larger prospective study reviewing dose, AXA concentrations and outcome data is necessary to make dosing recommendations in this group.

DOI 10.1111/imj.13117
2016 Martin J, Bonomo YA, 'Medicinal cannabis in Australia: the missing links', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 204 371-373 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.5694/mja16.00234
2016 Fay MF, Head R, Sminia P, Dowson N, Cosgrove L, Rose SE, Martin JH, 'Valproate in Adjuvant Glioblastoma Treatment', Journal of Clinical Oncology, 34 3105-3107 (2016)
DOI 10.1200/JCO.2016.67.2162
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Michael Fay
2016 Hayward KL, Valery PC, Cottrell WN, Irvine KM, Horsfall LU, Tallis CJ, et al., 'Prevalence of medication discrepancies in patients with cirrhosis: a pilot study.', BMC gastroenterology, 16 114 (2016) [C1]
2016 Rundle-Thiele D, Head R, Cosgrove L, Martin JH, 'Repurposing some older drugs that cross the blood-brain barrier and have potential anticancer activity to provide new treatment options for glioblastoma', British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 81 199-209 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.Glioblastoma is a brain neoplasm with limited 5-year survival rates. Developments of new treatment regimens that improve patient surviv... [more]

© 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.Glioblastoma is a brain neoplasm with limited 5-year survival rates. Developments of new treatment regimens that improve patient survival in patients with glioblastoma are needed. It is likely that a number of existing drugs used in other conditions have potential anticancer effects that offer significant survival benefit to glioblastoma patients. Identification of such drugs could provide a novel treatment paradigm.

DOI 10.1111/bcp.12785
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2016 Hayward KL, Powell EE, Irvine KM, Martin JH, 'Can paracetamol (acetaminophen) be administered to patients with liver impairment?', British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 81 210-222 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.Although 60 years have passed since it became widely available on the therapeutic market, paracetamol dosage in patients with liver dis... [more]

© 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.Although 60 years have passed since it became widely available on the therapeutic market, paracetamol dosage in patients with liver disease remains a controversial subject. Fulminant hepatic failure has been a well documented consequence of paracetamol overdose since its introduction, while short and long term use have both been associated with elevation of liver transaminases, a surrogate marker for acute liver injury. From these reports it has been assumed that paracetamol use should be restricted or the dosage reduced in patients with chronic liver disease. We review the factors that have been purported to increase risk of hepatocellular injury from paracetamol and the pharmacokinetic alterations in different pathologies of chronic liver disease which may affect this risk. We postulate that inadvertent under-dosing may result in concentrations too low to enable efficacy. Specific research to improve the evidence base for prescribing paracetamol in patients with different aetiologies of chronic liver disease is needed.

DOI 10.1111/bcp.12802
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Goulooze SC, Galettis P, Boddy AV, Martin JH, 'Monte Carlo simulations of the clinical benefits from therapeutic drug monitoring of sunitinib in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumours', CANCER CHEMOTHERAPY AND PHARMACOLOGY, 78 209-216 (2016)
DOI 10.1007/s00280-016-3071-1
Co-authors Peter Galettis
2016 Hayward KL, Cottrell WN, Karmakar A, Patel PJ, Horsfall LU, Martin JH, et al., 'Medication adherence in outpatients with decompensated cirrhosis', JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY, 31 103-103 (2016)
2016 Schneider J, Galettis P, Williams M, Lucas C, Martin JH, 'Pill testing at music festivals: can we do more harm?', Intern Med J, 46 1249-1251 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/imj.13250
Co-authors Peter Galettis, Jennifer Schneider
2016 Martin JH, Bonomo Y, 'Medicinal cannabis in Australia: the missing links.', Med J Aust, 205 425 (2016)
2015 O'Hara K, Wright IMR, Schneider JJ, Jones AL, Martin JH, 'Pharmacokinetics in neonatal prescribing: Evidence base, paradigms and the future', British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 80 1281-1288 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.Paediatric patients, particularly preterm neonates, present many pharmacological challenges. Due to the difficulty in conducting clinic... [more]

© 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.Paediatric patients, particularly preterm neonates, present many pharmacological challenges. Due to the difficulty in conducting clinical trials in these populations dosing information is often extrapolated from adult populations. As the processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of drugs change throughout growth and development extrapolation presents risk of over or underestimating the doses required. Information about the development these processes, particularly drug metabolism pathways, is still limited with weight based dose adjustment presenting the best method of estimating pharmacokinetic changes due to growth and development. New innovations in pharmacokinetic research, such as population pharmacokinetic modelling, present unique opportunities to conduct clinical trials in these populations improving the safety and effectiveness of the drugs used. More research is required into this area to ensure the best outcomes for our most vulnerable patients.

DOI 10.1111/bcp.12741
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ian Wright, Jennifer Schneider
2015 Martin JH, Ferro A, 'From an evolutionary perspective, all 'new' antimicrobial targets are old: Time to think outside the box', British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 79 165-167 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/bcp.12385
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2015 Lim AE, Tate JR, Clarke D, Norris RL, Morris RG, Martin JH, 'Clinical Consequences of a Miscalibrated Digoxin Immunoassay', THERAPEUTIC DRUG MONITORING, 37 104-109 (2015) [C1]
2015 Diaz A, Moore SP, Martin JH, Green AC, Garvey G, Valery PC, 'Factors associated with cancer-specific and overall survival among indigenous and non-indigenous gynecologic cancer patients in Queensland, Australia: A matched cohort study', International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, 25 542-547 (2015) [C1]

Copyright © 2015 by IGCS and ESGO.Objective: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have a higher mortality rate due to gynecologic cancer compared with non-Indigenous women... [more]

Copyright © 2015 by IGCS and ESGO.Objective: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have a higher mortality rate due to gynecologic cancer compared with non-Indigenous women. For cervical cancer, Australian Indigenous women are less likely to survive 5 years following diagnoses than non-Indigenous women. This study investigates the factors associated with gynecologic cancer treatment and survival among Queensland indigenous and non-Indigenous women. Methods: Australian Indigenous women diagnosed with uterine, cervical, ovarian, or other gynecologic cancers during 1998-2004 in the public hospital system were included. They were frequency matched on age (±5 years), residential remoteness, and cancer type to a random sample of non-Indigenous women. One- and 5-year cancer-specific survival was examined according to Indigenous status using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: Indigenous women (n = 137) compared with non-Indigenous women (n = 120) were less likely to be diagnosed with localized disease (49% vs 65%, P = 0.02) and had more comorbidities (52% vs 21%, P < 0.001). Indigenous women were less likely to receive any cancer treatment compared with non-Indigenous women (91% vs 98%, P = 0.01), although when excluding those with metastatic cancer, there was no significant difference in uptake of treatment (95% vs 91%, respectively, P = 0.31). Among those who did undergo treatment, there was no difference in time to treatment (median difference 0.5 days, P = 0.98). Gynecologic cancer-specific survival differences between Indigenous and non-Indigenous women were most prominent in the first year following diagnosis (hazard ratio [HR], 1.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-3.38) and were no longer significant 5 years after diagnosis (HR, 1.47 [95% CI, 0.97-2.25]). For cervical cancer, crude 1-year survival was poorer for Indigenous women compared with non-Indigenous women (HR, 2.46 [95% CI, 1.03-5.90]), but was no different when adjusted for stage and treatment of cancer (HR, 1.00 [95% CI, 0.45-2.24]). Conclusions: Improving the early diagnosis of cervical cancer in Indigenous women may increase cancer-specific survival in the year following diagnosis.

DOI 10.1097/IGC.0000000000000375
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2015 Lindsay J, Dooley M, Martin J, Fay M, Kearney A, Khatun M, Barras M, 'The development and evaluation of an oncological palliative care deprescribing guideline: the 'OncPal deprescribing guideline'', SUPPORTIVE CARE IN CANCER, 23 71-78 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-014-2322-0
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Michael Fay
2015 Liu X, Vitetta L, Kostner K, Crompton D, Williams G, Brown WJ, et al., 'The effects of tai chi in centrally obese adults with depression symptoms', Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2015 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Xin Liu et al.This study examined the effects of Tai Chi, a low-impact mind-body movement therapy, on severity of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms in centrally obe... [more]

© 2015 Xin Liu et al.This study examined the effects of Tai Chi, a low-impact mind-body movement therapy, on severity of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms in centrally obese people with elevated depression symptoms. In total, 213 participants were randomized to a 24-week Tai Chi intervention program or a wait-list control group. Assessments were conducted at baseline and 12 and 24 weeks. Outcomes were severity of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms, leg strength, central obesity, and other measures of metabolic symptom. There were statistically significant between-group differences in favor of the Tai Chi group in depression (mean difference = -5.6 units, P < 0.001), anxiety (-2.3 units, P < 0.01), and stress (-3.6 units, P < 0.001) symptom scores and leg strength (1.1 units, P < 0.001) at 12 weeks. These changes were further improved or maintained in the Tai Chi group relative to the control group during the second 12 weeks of follow-up. Tai Chi appears to be beneficial for reducing severity of depression, anxiety, and stress and leg strength in centrally obese people with depression symptoms. More studies with longer follow-up are needed to confirm the findings. This trial is registered with ACTRN12613000010796.

DOI 10.1155/2015/879712
Citations Scopus - 3
2015 Martin JH, Henry D, Gray J, Day R, Bochner F, Ferro A, et al., 'Achieving the World Health Organization's vision for clinical pharmacology', British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, (2015) [C3]

© 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.Clinical pharmacology is a medical specialty whose practitioners teach, undertake research, frame policy, give information and advice a... [more]

© 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.Clinical pharmacology is a medical specialty whose practitioners teach, undertake research, frame policy, give information and advice about the actions and proper uses of medicines in humans and implement that knowledge in clinical practice. It involves a combination of several activities: drug discovery and development, training safe prescribers, providing objective and evidence-based therapeutic information to ethics, regulatory and pricing bodies, supporting patient care in an increasingly subspecialized arena where co-morbidities, polypharmacy, altered pharmacokinetics and drug interactions are common and developing and contributing to medicines policies for Governments. Clinical pharmacologists must advocate drug quality and they must also advocate for sustainability of the Discipline. However for this they need appropriate clinical service and training support. This Commentary discusses strategies to ensure the Discipline is supported by teaching, training and policy organizations, to communicate the full benefits of clinical pharmacology services, put a monetary value on clinical pharmacology services and to grow the clinical pharmacology workforce to support a growing clinical, academic and regulatory need.

DOI 10.1111/bcp.12803
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2015 Fay M, Head R, Martin J, 'Where is the radiobiology and pharmacology research to improve outcomes in glioblastoma?', Journal of Neuro-Oncology, (2015) [C1]

Personalized medicine has been helpful for drug development in diseases with single and relatively stable gene mutations. The benefit for complex solid tumours with heterogeneous ... [more]

Personalized medicine has been helpful for drug development in diseases with single and relatively stable gene mutations. The benefit for complex solid tumours with heterogeneous and changing genetic profiles is less clear. Whether it is efficient to continue diverting resources from combined biological and pharmacological approaches to trial new and existing genetic ¿targeted therapies¿ for brain tumours is unknown but of developing concern in resource constrained environments.

DOI 10.1007/s11060-015-1816-z
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Michael Fay
2015 Valery PC, Powell E, Moses N, Volk ML, McPhail SM, Clark PJ, Martin J, 'Systematic review: unmet supportive care needs in people diagnosed with chronic liver disease', BMJ OPEN, 5 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-007451
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2015 Rundle-Thiele D, Day B, Stringer B, Fay M, Martin J, Jeffree RL, et al., 'Using the apparent diffusion coefficient to identifying MGMT promoter methylation status early in glioblastoma: Importance of analytical method', Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences, 62 92-98 (2015) [C1]

© 2015.Introduction: Accurate knowledge of O<sup>6</sup>-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter subtype in patients with glioblastoma (GBM) is important for treatme... [more]

© 2015.Introduction: Accurate knowledge of O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter subtype in patients with glioblastoma (GBM) is important for treatment. However, this test is not always available. Pre-operative diffusion MRI (dMRI) can be used to probe tumour biology using the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC); however, its ability to act as a surrogate to predict MGMT status has shown mixed results. We investigated whether this was due to variations in the method used to analyse ADC. Methods: We undertook a retrospective study of 32 patients with GBM who had MGMT status measured. Matching pre-operative MRI data were used to calculate the ADC within contrast enhancing regions of tumour. The relationship between ADC and MGMT was examined using two published ADC methods. Results: A strong trend between a measure of 'minimum ADC' and methylation status was seen. An elevated minimum ADC was more likely in the methylated compared to the unmethylated MGMT group (U = 56, P = 0.0561). In contrast, utilising a two-mixture model histogram approach, a significant reduction in mean measure of the 'low ADC' component within the histogram was associated with an MGMT promoter methylation subtype (P < 0.0246). Conclusion: This study shows that within the same patient cohort, the method selected to analyse ADC measures has a significant bearing on the use of that metric as a surrogate marker of MGMT status. Thus for dMRI data to be clinically useful, consistent methods of data analysis need to be established prior to establishing any relationship with genetic or epigenetic profiling.

DOI 10.1002/jmrs.103
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Michael Fay
2015 Scott IA, Hilmer SN, Reeve E, Potter K, Couteur DL, Rigby D, et al., 'Reducing inappropriate polypharmacy: The process of deprescribing', JAMA Internal Medicine, 175 827-834 (2015) [C1]

© Copyright 2015 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.Inappropriate polypharmacy, especially in older people, imposes a substantial burden of adverse drug events, il... [more]

© Copyright 2015 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.Inappropriate polypharmacy, especially in older people, imposes a substantial burden of adverse drug events, ill health, disability, hospitalization, and even death. The single most important predictor of inappropriate prescribing and risk of adverse drug events in older patients is the number of prescribed drugs. Deprescribing is the process of tapering or stopping drugs, aimed at minimizing polypharmacy and improving patient outcomes. Evidence of efficacy for deprescribing is emerging from randomized trials and observational studies. A deprescribing protocol is proposed comprising 5 steps: (1) ascertain all drugs the patient is currently taking and the reasons for each one; (2) consider overall risk of drug-induced harm in individual patients in determining the required intensity of deprescribing intervention; (3) assess each drug in regard to its current or future benefit potential compared with current or future harm or burden potential; (4) prioritize drugs for discontinuation that have the lowest benefit-harm ratio and lowest likelihood of adverse withdrawal reactions or disease rebound syndromes; and (5) implement a discontinuation regimen and monitor patients closely for improvement in outcomes or onset of adverse effects. Whereas patient and prescriber barriers to deprescribing exist, resources and strategies are available that facilitate deliberate yet judicious deprescribing and deserve wider application.

DOI 10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.0324
Citations Scopus - 84Web of Science - 63
2015 McDougall DAJ, Martin J, Playford EG, Green B, 'Determination of a suitable voriconazole pharmacokinetic model for personalised dosing', Journal of Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics, 1-13 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Springer Science+Business Media New York Model based personalised dosing (MBPD) is a sophisticated form of individualised therapy, where a population pharmacokinetic (PK) ... [more]

© 2015 Springer Science+Business Media New York Model based personalised dosing (MBPD) is a sophisticated form of individualised therapy, where a population pharmacokinetic (PK) or pharmacodynamic model is utilised to estimate the dose required to reach a target exposure or effect. The choice of which model to implement in MBPD is a subjective decision. By choosing one model, information from the remaining models is ignored, as well as the rest of the literature base. This manuscript describes a methodology to develop a ¿hybrid¿ model for voriconazole that incorporated information from prior models in a biologically plausible manner. Voriconazole is a triazole antifungal with difficult to predict PK, although it does have a defined exposure¿response relationship. Nine population PK models of voriconazole were identified from the literature. The models differed significantly in structural components. The hybrid model contained a two-compartment disposition model with mixed linear and nonlinear time-dependent clearance. The parameters for the hybrid model were determined using simulation techniques. Validation of the hybrid model was assessed via visual predictive checks, which indicated the majority of the variability in the literature models was captured by the hybrid model. The predictive performance was assessed using four different sampling strategies of limited concentrations from ten richly PK sampled subjects to predict future concentrations. Overall, the hybrid model predicted future concentrations with good precision. Further prospective and retrospective validation of the hybrid model is required before it could be used in clinical practice.

DOI 10.1007/s10928-015-9462-9
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2015 Hosein AN, Lim YC, Day B, Stringer B, Rose S, Head R, et al., 'The effect of valproic acid in combination with irradiation and temozolomide on primary human glioblastoma cells', Journal of Neuro-Oncology, 122 263-271 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has nearly uniformly fatal with a median survival of less than 2¿years. While there have not been ... [more]

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has nearly uniformly fatal with a median survival of less than 2¿years. While there have not been any novel anti-GBM therapeutics approved for many years, there has been the gradual accumulation of clinical data suggesting that the widely used anti-convulsant agent, valproic acid (VPA) may significantly prolong survival in GBM patients. This pre-clinical study aimed to determine the potential clinical utility of VPA in the treatment of GBM. Primary GBM cells were treated with VPA as a monotherapy and in combination with temozolomide and irradiation. At clinically achievable concentrations, VPA was shown to be effective as a monotherapy agent in the five primary lines tested. VPA was then used as a sensitizing agent to in vitro radiation and showed significant augmentation of in vitro irradiation therapy. In addition, when VPA, radiation and temozolomide were combined an additive, rather than synergistic effect was noted. Gene expression profiling demonstrated close clustering of triple treated cells with VPA mono-treated cells while untreated cells clustered closer with TMZ-irradiation dual treated cells. These microarray data suggest a dominant role of VPA at the gene expression level when combining these different treatment options. Moreover, in an in vivo tumor transplantation model, we were able to demonstrate an increase in animal survival when cells were pre-treated with irradiation-VPA and when triple treated. These findings provide a significant rationale for the investigation of VPA in the treatment of GBM patients.

DOI 10.1007/s11060-014-1713-x
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Michael Fay
2015 Hubbard RE, Peel NM, Scott IA, Martin JH, Smith A, Pillans PI, et al., 'Polypharmacy among inpatients aged 70 years or older in Australia', Medical Journal of Australia, 202 373-378 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, Australasian Medical Publishing Co. Ltd. All rights reserved.Objectives: To investigate medication changes for older patients admitted to hospital and to explore associat... [more]

© 2015, Australasian Medical Publishing Co. Ltd. All rights reserved.Objectives: To investigate medication changes for older patients admitted to hospital and to explore associations between patient characteristics and polypharmacy. Design: Prospective cohort study. Participants and setting: Patients aged 70 years or older admitted to general medical units of 11 acute care hospitals in two Australian states between July 2005 and May 2010. All patients were assessed using the interRAI assessment system for acute care. Main outcome measures: Measures of physical, cognitive and psychosocial functioning; and number of regular prescribed medications categorised into three groups: non-polypharmacy (0¿4 drugs), polypharmacy (5¿9 drugs) and hyperpolypharmacy (_ 10 drugs). Results: Of 1220 patients who were recruited for the study, medication records at admission were available for 1216. Mean age was 81.3 years (SD, 6.8 years), and 659 patients (54.2%) were women. For the 1187 patients with complete medication records on admission and discharge, there was a small but statistically significant increase in mean number of regular medications per day between admission and discharge (7.1 v 7.6), while the prevalence of medications such as statins (459 [38.7%] v 457 [38.5%] patients), opioid analgesics (155 [13.1%] v 166 [14.0%] patients), antipsychotics (59 [5.0%] v 65 [5.5%] patients) and benzodiazepines (122 [10.3%] v 135 [11.4%] patients) did not change significantly. Being in a higher polypharmacy category was significantly associated with increase in comorbidities (odds ratio [OR], 1.27; 95% CI, 1.20¿1.34), presence of pain (OR, 1.31; 1.05¿1.64), dyspnoea (OR, 1.64; 1.30¿2.07) and dependence in terms of instrumental activities of daily living (OR, 1.70; 1.20¿2.41). Hyperpolypharmacy was observed in 290/1216 patients (23.8%) at admission and 336/1187 patients (28.3%) on discharge, and the proportion of preventive medication in the hyperpolypharmacy category at both points in time remained high (1209/3371 [35.9%] at admission v 1508/4117 [36.6%] at discharge). Conclusions: Polypharmacy is common among older people admitted to general medical units of Australian hospitals, with no clinically meaningful change to the number or classification (symptom control, prevention or both) of drugs made by treating physicians.

DOI 10.5694/mja13.00172
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 9
2015 Martin JH, Phillips E, Thomas D, Somogyi AA, 'Adding the 'medicines' back into personalized medicine to improve cancer treatment outcomes', British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 80 929-931 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/bcp.12690
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2014 Williams MM, Taylor PJ, Page CB, Martin JH, 'Clinical research in synthetic cannabinoids - do we need a national approach?', Med J Aust, 201 317-319 (2014) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
2014 Hollingworth SA, Ostini R, Michael D, Martin J, Susan T, 'Use of Ezetimibe in Australia', PHARMACOEPIDEMIOLOGY AND DRUG SAFETY, 23 130-131 (2014)
2014 Morais C, Small D, Vesey D, Martin JH, Johnson D, Gobe G, 'Fibronectin and transforming growth factor beta contribute to erythropoietin resistance and maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy', Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 444 332-337 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.bbrc.2014.01.047
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2014 Theile DE, Scott IA, Martin JH, Gavrilidis A, 'Enabling the success of academic health science centres in Australia: where is the leadership?', The Medical journal of Australia, 201 636-638 (2014) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 1
2014 Leung J, McKenzie S, Martin J, McLaughlin D, 'Effect of rurality on screening for breast cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing mammography', Rural and remote health, 14 2730 (2014)

INTRODUCTION: The lower breast cancer survival rate observed among rural women may be related to differences in screening access and utilization. We evaluated existing evidence fo... [more]

INTRODUCTION: The lower breast cancer survival rate observed among rural women may be related to differences in screening access and utilization. We evaluated existing evidence for rural and urban differences in mammography service use in adult women.METHODS: A systematic search was conducted on 4 April 2012 and updated on 1 November 2012, which yielded 28 studies for inclusion.RESULTS: The rural population was less likely to have mammographic breast screening, and this difference was consistent in various areas of the USA as well as across a number of other countries. Meta-analyses using random effects models showed that women residing in rural areas were less likely than urban women to have ever had a mammogram (odds ratio (OR)=0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.62-0.89) or to have an up-to-date mammogram (OR=0.59, 95%CI=0.49-0.70).CONCLUSIONS: Mammography is currently the best tool for the early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. The rural disadvantage this review has identified may contribute to the lower breast cancer survival among women living outside urban areas.

Citations Scopus - 11
2014 Lindsay J, Dooley M, Martin J, Fay M, Kearney A, Barras M, 'Reducing potentially inappropriate medications in palliative cancer patients: evidence to support deprescribing approaches', SUPPORTIVE CARE IN CANCER, 22 1113-1119 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/s00520-013-2098-7
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Michael Fay
2014 Leung J, McKenzie S, Martin JH, Dobson A, McLaughlin D, 'Longitudinal patterns of breast cancer screening: Mammography, clinical, and breast self-examinations in a rural and urban setting', Women's Health Issues, 24 e139-e146 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.whi.2013.11.005
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
2014 Carroll JP, Protani MM, Linda N, Cheng ME, Fay M, Saleem M, et al., 'Toxicity and tolerability of adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy in obese women', MEDICAL ONCOLOGY, 31 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/s12032-014-0881-z
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Michael Fay
2014 Fay MF, Martin JH, Rose S, 'New imaging techniques for more effective treatment in glioblastoma', Internal Medicine Journal, 44 5-6 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/imj.12331
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Michael Fay
2014 Martin JH, Coombes I, 'Mortality from common drug interactions systems, knowledge and clinical reasoning to optimise prescribing', Internal Medicine Journal, 44 621-624 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/imj.12473
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 Fagan KJ, Irvine KM, McWhinney BC, Fletcher LM, Horsfall LU, Johnson L, et al., 'Diagnostic sensitivity of carbohydrate deficient transferrin in heavy drinkers', BMC GASTROENTEROLOGY, 14 (2014)
DOI 10.1186/1471-230X-14-97
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
2014 Moore SP, Green AC, Bray F, Garvey G, Coory M, Martin J, Valery PC, 'Survival disparities in Australia: an analysis of patterns of care and comorbidities among indigenous and non-indigenous cancer patients', BMC CANCER, 14 (2014)
DOI 10.1186/1471-2407-14-517
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
2014 Chachay VS, Macdonald GA, Martin JH, Whitehead JP, O'Moore-Sullivan TM, Lee P, et al., 'Resveratrol Does Not Benefit Patients With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease', CLINICAL GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY, 12 2092-U383 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.cgh.2014.02.024
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 35
2014 Chachay VS, Macdonald GA, Martin JH, Whitehead JP, O'Moore-Sullivan TM, Lee P, et al., 'Resveratrol Does Not Benefit Patients With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease', Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 12 2092-2103 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 AGA Institute.Background & Aims: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), characterized by accumulation of hepatic triglycerides (steatosis), is associated with abdominal... [more]

© 2014 AGA Institute.Background & Aims: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), characterized by accumulation of hepatic triglycerides (steatosis), is associated with abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, and inflammation. Although weight loss via calorie restriction reduces features of NAFLD, there is no pharmacologic therapy. Resveratrol is a polyphenol that prevents high-energy diet-induced steatosis and insulin resistance in animals by up-regulating pathways that regulate energy metabolism. We performed a placebo-controlled trial to assess the effects of resveratrol in patients with NAFLD. Methods: Overweight or obese men diagnosed with NAFLD were recruited from hepatology outpatient clinics in Brisbane, Australia from 2011 through 2012. They were randomly assigned to groups given 3000 mg resveratrol (n= 10) or placebo (n= 10) daily for 8 weeks. Outcomes included insulin resistance (assessed by the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp), hepatic steatosis, and abdominal fat distribution (assessed by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging). Plasma markers of inflammation, as well as metabolic, hepatic, and antioxidant function, were measured; transcription of target genes was measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Resveratrol pharmacokinetics and safety were assessed. Results: Eight-week administration of resveratrol did not reduce insulin resistance, steatosis, or abdominal fat distribution when compared with baseline. No change was observed in plasma lipids or antioxidant activity. Levels of alanine and aspartate aminotransferases increased significantly among patients in the resveratrol group until week 6 when compared with the placebo group. Resveratrol did not significantly alter transcription of NQO1, PTP1B, IL6, or HO1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Resveratrol was well-tolerated. Conclusions: Eight weeks administration of resveratrol did not significantly improve any features of NAFLD, compared with placebo, but it increased hepatic stress, based on observed increases in levels of liver enzymes. Further studies are needed to determine whether agents that are purported to mimic calorie restriction, such as resveratrol, are safe and effective for complications of obesity. Clinical trials registration no: ACTRN12612001135808.

DOI 10.1016/j.cgh.2014.02.024
Citations Scopus - 56
2014 Sullivan CM, Staib A, Flores J, Aggarwal L, Scanlon A, Martin JH, Scott IA, 'Aiming to be NEAT: safely improving and sustaining access to emergency care in a tertiary referral hospital', AUSTRALIAN HEALTH REVIEW, 38 564-574 (2014)
DOI 10.1071/AH14083
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
2014 Arpon DR, Gandhi MK, Martin JH, 'A new frontier in haematology - combining pharmacokinetic with pharmacodynamic factors to improve choice and dose of drug', BRITISH JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, 78 274-281 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/bcp.12318
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2014 Jellis CL, Sacre JW, Wright J, Jenkins C, Haluska B, Jeffriess L, et al., 'Biomarker and imaging responses to spironolactone in subclinical diabetic cardiomyopathy', EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL-CARDIOVASCULAR IMAGING, 15 776-786 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/ehjci/jeu013
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2013 Martin JH, Fagan K, Irvine K, McWhinney B, Fletcher L, Horsfall L, et al., 'BMI but not aetiology or stage of liver disease affects the diagnostic sensitivity of carbohydrate deficient transferrin', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 37 1771-1778 (2013)
2013 Martin JH, 'Smoking and drug interactions', Australian Prescriber, 36 102-104 (2013)
2013 Martin JH, Chachay V, Prins J, Whitehead J, O'Moore-Sullivan T, Lee P, et al., 'Investigating the clinical effect of resveratrol in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trial', Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 28 78-79 (2013)
2013 Fagan KJ, Irvine KM, McWhinney BC, Fletcher LM, Horsfall LU, Johnson LA, et al., 'BMI But Not Stage or Etiology of Nonalcoholic Liver Disease Affects the Diagnostic Utility of Carbohydrate-Deficient Transferrin', ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH, 37 1771-1778 (2013)
DOI 10.1111/acer.12143
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2013 Forbes MP, Raj AS, Martin J, Lampe G, Powell EE, 'Khat-associated hepatitis', Medical Journal of Australia, 199 498-499 (2013)
DOI 10.5694/mja13.10951
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
2013 Putt MT, Udy AA, Jarrett P, Martin J, Hennig S, Salmon N, et al., 'Phenytoin loading doses in adult critical care patients: Does current practice achieve adequate drug levels?', Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, 41 602-609 (2013)

Phenytoin is regularly employed in the critically ill for prophylaxis against or treatment of seizure disorders. No prior studies have examined current dosing practices in an Aust... [more]

Phenytoin is regularly employed in the critically ill for prophylaxis against or treatment of seizure disorders. No prior studies have examined current dosing practices in an Australasian intensive care unit (ICU) setting. The aims of this study were to: a) describe the adequacy of contemporary dosing in respect to free and total serum phenytoin concentrations; b) identify factors associated with therapeutic drug concentrations; and c) examine the accuracy of predictive equations that estimate free concentrations in this setting. All patients receiving a loading dose of phenytoin in a tertiary-level ICU were eligible for enrolment; 53 patients were enrolled in the study. Serum samples to determine free and total phenytoin concentrations (measured by high performance liquid chromatography) were then drawn prior to the following dose. Free concentrations below the recommended target (<1 mg/l) were considered as suboptimal. The most common indication for phenytoin loading was traumatic brain injury (49%) and the mean administered dose was 14.5 (3.66) mg/kg. Twenty-six patients (49%) had suboptimal trough free concentrations, although this subgroup was significantly heavier and therefore received a lower per kilogram dose (12.8 [3.1] vs 16.3 [3.4] mg/kg, P=0.001). In multivariate analysis, larger weight adjusted doses (P=0.018), higher albumin concentration (P=0.034) and receiving phenytoin for an indication other than seizure (P=0.035), were associated with a greater likelihood of adequate concentrations. In conclusion, phenytoin dosing remains complex in critically ill patients, although lower per kilogram loading doses are strongly associated with free concentrations below the desired target.

Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Lucas C, Martin J, 'Smoking and drug interactions', Australian Prescriber, 36 102-104 (2013)

When patients enter hospital they may have to stop smoking abruptly if the hospital has a 'no smoking' policy. Abrupt smoking cessation can affect the metabolism of drugs. Cigaret... [more]

When patients enter hospital they may have to stop smoking abruptly if the hospital has a 'no smoking' policy. Abrupt smoking cessation can affect the metabolism of drugs. Cigarette smoking induces the activity of human cytochromes P450 (CYP) 1A2 and 2B6. These enzymes metabolise several clinically important drugs, including clozapine, olanzapine and methadone. Decreased CYP1A2 activity after smoking cessation increases the risk of adverse drug reactions, with reports of increased toxicity from clozapine and olanzapine. Predicting the required dose reduction of drugs metabolised by CYP1A2 after smoking cessation is challenging. Therapeutic drug monitoring should be used when possible. Nicotine replacement therapy does not influence CYP1A2 activity.

Citations Scopus - 6
2013 Thomas C, Martin J, Devic C, Bräuer-Krisch E, Diserbo M, Thariat J, Foray N, 'Impact of dose-rate on the low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and induced radioresistance (HRS/IRR) response', International Journal of Radiation Biology, 89 813-822 (2013)

Purpose: To ask whether dose-rate influences low-dose hyper- radiosensitivity and induced radioresistance (HRS/IRR) response in rat colon progressive (PRO) and regressive (REG) ce... [more]

Purpose: To ask whether dose-rate influences low-dose hyper- radiosensitivity and induced radioresistance (HRS/IRR) response in rat colon progressive (PRO) and regressive (REG) cells. Methods: Clonogenic survival was applied to tumorigenic PRO and non-tumorigenic REG cells irradiated with 60Co ¿-rays at 0.0025-500 mGy.min-1. Both clonogenic survival and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway involved in DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) repair assays were applied to PRO cells irradiated at 25 mGy.min-1 with 75 kV X-rays only. Results: Irrespective of dose-rates, marked HRS/IRR responses were observed in PRO but not in REG cells. For PRO cells, the doses at which HRS and IRR responses are maximal were dependent on dose-rate; conversely exposure times during which HRS and IRR responses are maximal (tHRSmax and tIRRmax) were independent of dose-rate. The tHRSmax and tIRRmax values were 23 ± 5 s and 66 ± 7 s (mean ± standard error of the mean [SEM], n = 7), in agreement with literature data. Repair data show that tHRSmax may correspond to exposure time during which NHEJ is deficient while tIRRmax may correspond to exposure time during which NHEJ is complete. Conclusion: HRS response may be maximal if exposure times are shorter than tHRSmax irrespective of dose, dose-rate and cellular model. Potential application of HRS response in radiotherapy is discussed. © 2013 Informa UK, Ltd.

DOI 10.3109/09553002.2013.800248
Citations Scopus - 8
2013 Chachay VS, Martin JH, Prins JB, Whitehead JP, O'Moore-Sullivan TM, Lee P, et al., 'Investigating the clinical effect of resveratrol in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: A randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trial', JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY, 28 78-79 (2013) [E3]
2013 Dimeski G, Silvester B, Ungerer J, Johnson L, Martin JH, 'Policy change to improve pathology turnaround time and reduce costs - Possible to do both?', Biochemia Medica, 23 296-302 (2013)

Background: Overcrowding and prolonged length of stay in emergency departments (ED) are increasing problems in hospitals. Rapid availability of all laboratory results has an impac... [more]

Background: Overcrowding and prolonged length of stay in emergency departments (ED) are increasing problems in hospitals. Rapid availability of all laboratory results has an impact on clinical decision-making, admissions or discharge decisions and resource utilisation. Increasing number of our urinary drugs of abuse (DOA) screens had a turnaround time (TAT) of up to 33 days after the discharge of the patient. Materials and methods: Following an audit and a consultation period with clinicians using the service, a policy change was implemented to reduce the use of gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GCMS): all requests would have a standard immunoassay (IA) test panel undertaken unless specifically they requested GCMS (including medico-legal) analysis. Results: Almost all of the clinicians interviewed had no understanding of the DOA screening or the difference in the information generated between a confirmatory GCMS urine toxicology screen and IA DOA panel. It appeared none of the patients surveyed in the audit would have had a different clinical decision made if a GCMS had not been undertaken. Post change audit showed only 4.3% of drug requests for IA also received a confirmatory GCMS testing. The estimated saving post change implementation was $127,000 (AU $) in test costs alone over a two year period. The TAT of GCMS results was reduced to 3-4 days. Conclusion: A laboratory-led behavioural change in test requesting is possible and sustainable provided the reason is clinically sound and accompanied by consultation and availability of advice by phone when requested on test requesting or interpretation. © Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

DOI 10.11613/BM.2013.035
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Scott IA, Gray LC, Martin JH, Pillans PI, Mitchell CA, 'Deciding when to stop: Towards evidence-based deprescribing of drugs in older populations', Evidence-Based Medicine, 18 121-124 (2013) [C3]

Minimising the harm from inappropriate prescribing in older populations is a major urgent concern for modern healthcare systems. In everyday encounters between prescribers and pat... [more]

Minimising the harm from inappropriate prescribing in older populations is a major urgent concern for modern healthcare systems. In everyday encounters between prescribers and patients, opportunities should be taken to identify patients at high risk of harm from polypharmacy and reappraise their need for specific drugs. Attempts to reconcile life expectancy, comorbidity burden, care goals and patient preferences with the benefits and harms of medications should be made in every patient at significant risk. Drugs identified by this process of reconciliation as conferring little or no benefit and/or excessive risk of harm should be candidates for discontinuation. Evidence supporting a structured approach to drug discontinuation (or deprescribing) is emerging, and while many barriers to deprescribing exist in routine practice, various enabling strategies can help overcome them.

DOI 10.1136/eb-2012-100930
Citations Scopus - 34
2013 Phillips LK, Peake JM, Zhang X, Hickman IJ, Briskey DR, Huang BE, et al., 'Postprandial total and HMW adiponectin following a high-fat meal in lean, obese and diabetic men', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION, 67 377-384 (2013)
DOI 10.1038/ejcn.2013.49
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2013 Hubbard RE, Peel NM, Scott IA, Martin JH, Pillans P, Gray LC, 'Polypharmacy among older inpatients in Australia', AUSTRALASIAN JOURNAL ON AGEING, 32 24-24 (2013)
2012 Martin JH, Valery PC, Moore SP, Coory M, Martin J, Garvey G, Green AC, 'Advanced stage at diagnosis and worse comorbidity explain overall survival disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous cancer patients in Queensland', Asia Pac J Clin Oncol, 8 212* (2012)
2012 Martin JH, Moore SP, Diaz A, Green AC, Garvey G, Coory M, Valery PC, 'Indigenous women with gynaecological cancers have poorer survival than non-Indigenous women: Explained by stage, comorbidity and treatment uptake', Asia Pac J Clin Oncol, 8 321 (2012)
2012 Martin JH, Moore S, Green A, Garvey G, Corry M, Valery P, 'Breast Cancer diagnosis and patterns of treatment: does being indigenous make a difference?', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, 8 304 (2012)
2012 Martin JH, Jellis C, Sacre J, Wright J, Jenkins C, Jeffriess L, et al., 'A Randomised Trial of Spironolactone use in Subclinical Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: Anti-Fibrotic Effects on Myocardial Structure and Function', Heart Lung and Circulation, 21 . (2012)
2012 Martin JH, Yamashiro Y, Gazarian M, Kling S, Nakamura H, Matsui A, et al., 'Drug Development: The Use of Unlicensed/Off-label Medicines in Pedatrics', J Clin Gastroenterol Nurt, 55 506-510 (2012)
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2012 Martin JH, Barras M, Yui NA, Kirkpatrick C, Kubler P, Norris R, 'Gentamicin Monitoring Practices in Teaching Hospitals ¿ Time to Undertake the Necessary Randomised Controlled Trial', J Clinic Toxicol, 2 146 (2012)
2012 Martin JH, Norris R, Barra M, 'Gentamicin Use ¿ More Clinical Outcome Evidence Needed', J Clinic Toxicol, 2 e110 (2012)
2012 Saleem M, Dimeski G, Kirkpatrick CM, Taylor PJ, Martin JH, 'Target Concentration Intervention in Oncology: Where Are We At?', THERAPEUTIC DRUG MONITORING, 34 257-265 (2012)
DOI 10.1097/FTD.0b013e3182557342
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 11
2012 Roberts JA, Norris R, Paterson DL, Martin JH, 'Therapeutic drug monitoring of antimicrobials', BRITISH JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, 73 27-36 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2125.2011.04080.x
Citations Scopus - 62Web of Science - 44
2012 Scott IA, Gray LC, Martin JH, Mitchell CA, 'Effects of a drug minimization guide on prescribing intentions in elderly persons with polypharmacy', Drugs and Aging, 29 659-667 (2012)

Background: While frameworks exist to assist clinicians in prescribing appropriately in older patients at risk of adverse drug reactions, their impact on prescribing is uncertain.... [more]

Background: While frameworks exist to assist clinicians in prescribing appropriately in older patients at risk of adverse drug reactions, their impact on prescribing is uncertain. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the effects of a ten-step drug minimization guide on clinician prescribing intentions involving a hypothetical older patient receiving multiple drugs. Methods: A total of 61 hospital clinicians were presented with clinical information about a hypothetical case: an 81-year-old female with 12 chronic diseases, receiving 19 different medications. On a standardized, anonymous form, each participant indicated, as a pre-test, which drugs they felt strongly inclined to discontinue or continue, and which drugs they were uncertain about. The ten-step guide was then presented and applied to the case, and participants repeated the drug selection process. Results: Sixty evaluable forms were analysed from 19 consultant physicians, 17 medical registrars, 7 interns/residents and 17 pharmacists. Among the entire cohort, the mean (-SD) number of drugs selected for discontinuation increased from 6.0 (-2.7) pre-test to 9.6 (-3.2) post-test (p < 0.001), with the greatest increases seen among consultant physicians (6.6 [-2.3] to 11.5 [-2.9], p < 0.001) and clinical pharmacists (5.3 [-2.6] to 8.9 [-2.2], p < 0.001). The number of drugs associated with uncertainty decreased from 3.7 (-2.9) pretest to 1.8 (-2.3) post-test (p < 0.001) for the whole cohort, with the greatest decreases seen among consultant physicians (4.8 [-2.6] to 1.8 [-2.5], p < 0.001) and clinical pharmacists (4.5 [-3.3] to 1.9 [-2.0], p = 0.003). Conclusion: This self-report study involving a hypothetical case provides evidence that a drug minimization guide may reduce inappropriate prescribing and uncertainty around drug indications. © 2012 Springer International Publishing AG. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.2165/11632600
Citations Scopus - 11
2012 Scott IA, Gray LC, Martin JH, Mitchell CA, 'Minimizing Inappropriate Medications in Older Populations: A 10-step Conceptual Framework', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE, 125 529-+ (2012)
DOI 10.1016/j.amjmed.2011.09.021
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 30
2012 Martin JH, Thelle DE, Ho KKY, Frazer IH, 'Diamantina Health Partners: integrating leadership in research, research translation, education and clinical care', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 196 237-239 (2012)
DOI 10.5694/mja11.11251
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2012 Martin JH, Coory MD, 'New medicines - urgent need to assess outcomes in special groups', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 196 433-433 (2012)
DOI 10.5694/mja12.10193
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2012 Carroll J, Protani M, Walpole E, Martin JH, 'Effect of obesity on toxicity in women treated with adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer: a systematic review', BREAST CANCER RESEARCH AND TREATMENT, 136 323-330 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/s10549-012-2213-3
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
2012 Martin JH, Saleem M, Looke D, 'Therapeutic drug monitoring to adjust dosing in morbid obesity - a new use for an old methodology', BRITISH JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, 73 685-690 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2125.2011.04159.x
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
2012 Scott IA, Gray LC, Martin JH, Mitchell CA, 'Effects of a Drug Minimization Guide on Prescribing Intentions in Elderly Persons with Polypharmacy', DRUGS & AGING, 29 659-667 (2012)
Citations Web of Science - 7
2012 Martin JH, Coory M, Baade P, 'Challenges of an ageing and dispersed population for delivering cancer services in Australia: more than just doctors needed', INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL, 42 349-351 (2012)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-5994.2012.02746.x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2012 Duley JA, Somogyi AA, Martin JH, 'The future of thiopurine pharmacogenomics', PHARMACOGENOMICS, 13 1549-1552 (2012)
DOI 10.2217/PGS.12.140
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2011 Martin JH, Jellis CL, Stanton T, Leano R, Marwick TH, 'Usefulness of at rest and exercise hemodynamics to detect subclinical myocardial disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus', American Journal of Cardiology, 107 615-621 (2011)
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 12
2011 Martin JH, Jacka C, Garvey G, Sabesan S, Ghandi M, Baxi S, et al., 'Closing the Divide in Indigenous cancer: Cancer brochures for Indigenous patients and their families', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, 7 147 (2011)
2011 Martin JH, Jellis C, Wrigh J, Kennedy D, Sacre J, Jenkins C, et al., 'Association of Imaging Markers of Myocardial Fibrosis with Metabolic and Functional Disturbances in Early Diabetic Cardiomyopathy', Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, 4 693-702 (2011)
Citations Scopus - 58Web of Science - 49
2011 Martin JH, Scott I, Mitchell C, Gray L, 'Optimising drug use in elderly populations ¿ pilot study of a drug minimization guide', Internal Medicine Journal, 41 14 (2011)
2011 Martin JH, Jellis C, Sacre JW, Haluska B, Jenkins C, Marwick TH, 'Myocardial Dysfunction and Metabolic Derangement in Type 2 Diabetes: Relationship with Procollagen Biomarkers of Myocardial Fibrosis', Journal American College of Cardiology, 57 860 (2011)
2011 Martin JH, Garvey G, Cunningham J, Valery PC, Condon J, Roder D, et al., 'Reducing the burden of cancer for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians: time for a coordinated, collaborative, priority-driven, Indigenous-led research program', Medical Journal of Australia, 194 530-531 (2011)
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
2011 Chachay VS, Kirkpatrick CMJ, Hickman IJ, Ferguson M, Prins JB, Martin JH, 'Resveratrol - pills to replace a healthy diet?', BRITISH JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, 72 27-38 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2125.2011.03966.x
Citations Scopus - 56Web of Science - 48
2011 Martin JH, Deacon CF, Gorrell MD, Prins JB, 'Incretin-based therapies - review of the physiology, pharmacology and emerging clinical experience', INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL, 41 299-307 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-5994.2011.02439.x
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 41
2011 McNeill GBS, Martin JH, 'How reliable is eGFR when calculating drug dosage in acute medical admissions?', INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL, 41 327-331 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-5994.2010.02307.x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2011 McGloughlin S, Roberts JA, O'Donoghue S, Martin J, Briscoe S, Lipman J, 'Ganciclovir pharmacokinetics and suggested dosing in continuous venovenous haemodiafiltration', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS, 37 90-92 (2011)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2010.10.003
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2011 Martin JH, Kubler P, 'Treatment for pulmonary hypertension in Australia: too far too fast?', INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL, 41 217-219 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-5994.2011.02437.x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2011 Martin JH, Fay MF, Udy A, Roberts J, Kirkpatrick C, Ungerer J, Lipman J, 'Pitfalls of using estimations of glomerular filtration rate in an intensive care population', INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL, 41 537-543 (2011)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-5994.2009.02160.x
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Michael Fay
2010 Jellis C, Sacre J, Martin J, Jenkins C, Haluska B, Marwick TH, 'Impaired Exercise Capacity in Diabetes: Procollagen Biomarkers Suggest Mechanism is Underlying Myocardial Fibrosis', CIRCULATION, 122 (2010)
2010 Poulsen M, Middleton M, McQuitty S, Ramsay J, Gogna K, Martin J, et al., 'Comparison of a Commonwealth-initiated regional radiation oncology facility in Toowoomba with a Queensland Health facility', Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology, 54 368-374 (2010) [C1]

The aim was to compare a private Commonwealth-initiated regional radiation oncology facility in Toowoomba with a Queensland Health facility (QHF) in Brisbane. The comparison conce... [more]

The aim was to compare a private Commonwealth-initiated regional radiation oncology facility in Toowoomba with a Queensland Health facility (QHF) in Brisbane. The comparison concentrated on staffing, case mix and operational budgets, but was not able to look at changes in access to services. Data were collected from the two facilities from January 2008 to June 2008 inclusive. A number of factors were compared, including case mix, staffing levels, delay times for treatment, research, training and treatment costs. The case mix between the two areas was similar with curative treatments making up just over half the work load in both centres and two-thirds the work being made up of cancers of breast and prostate. Staffing levels were leaner in Toowoomba, especially in the areas of nursing, administration and trial coordinators. Research activity was slightly higher in Toowoomba. The average medicare cost per treatment course was similar in both centres ($5000 per course). Total costs of an average treatment including patient, State and Commonwealth costs, showed a 30% difference in costing favouring Toowoomba. This regional radiation oncology centre has provided state-of-the-art cancer care that is close to home for patients living in the Darling Downs region. Both public and private patients have been treated with modest costs to the patient and significant savings to QH. The case mix is similar to the QHF, and there has been significant activity in clinical research. A paperless working environment is one factor that has allowed staffing levels to be reduced. Ongoing support from Governments are required if private facilities are to participate in important ongoing staff training. © 2010 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

DOI 10.1111/j.1754-9485.2010.02166.x
Co-authors Jarad Martin
2010 Martin JH, Norris R, Barras M, Roberts J, Morris R, Doogue M, Jones GRD, 'Guidelines Review - Therapeutic monitoring of vancomycin in adult patients: A consensus review of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and the Society of Infectious Diseases Pharmacists', Clinical Biochemist Reviews, 31 21-24 (2010)
2010 Martin JH, Avent M, Pattullo C, Dines A, Kubler P, 'Drug Use Evaluation Services in Australia and New Zealand: A Neglected Area of Research?', J Pharm Pract Res, 40 15-18 (2010)
2010 Martin JH, Jellis CL, Narula J, Markwick TH, 'Assessment of nonischemic myocardial fibrosis', J. Am. Coll. Cardiol, 56 89-97 (2010)
Citations Scopus - 91Web of Science - 82
2010 Martin JH, Jellis CL, Stanton T, Leano R, Markwick TH, 'Subclinical myocardial disease in type 2 diabetes: Mechanistic insights from resting and exercise haemodynamics', Heart Lung and Circulation, 19 S196 (2010)
2010 Avent ML, Pattullo C, Dines A, Martin J, Kubler P, 'Drug use evaluation services in Australia and New Zealand: A neglected area of research?', Journal of Pharmacy Practice and Research, 40 15-18 (2010)

Aim: To describe the drug use evaluation (DUE) models used in hospitals in Australia and New Zealand. Method: 18 hospitals in Australia and New Zealand were identified as having D... [more]

Aim: To describe the drug use evaluation (DUE) models used in hospitals in Australia and New Zealand. Method: 18 hospitals in Australia and New Zealand were identified as having DUE pharmacist positions and 15 were willing to participate in the survey. DUE pharmacists were surveyed about the DUE process, structure, service implementation and their job descriptions. Results: 47% (7/15) of DUE pharmacists reported to the Director of Pharmacy, 33% (5/15) to the Drug and Therapeutics Committee and 20% (3/15) to the Director of Clinical Pharmacology. 73% (11/15) of DUE pharmacists were located in the hospital's pharmacy department. On average, a 0.8 full-time equivalent (range 0.2 to 2.5) pharmacist was dedicated to DUE activities per hospital with an average of 0.2 full-time equivalent (range 0 to 0.8) assigned to clinical activities. 79% (12/15) of hospitals only funded DUE pharmacist positions; 7% (1/15) funded combined pharmacist and pharmacy technician positions; 7% (1/15) funded combined pharmacist and rotating pharmacy intern positions; and 7% (1/15) funded clinical pharmacologist, nurse and pharmacist positions. 20% (3/15) of hospitals had a DUE subcommittee to coordinate DUE activities. All of the hospitals reported their DUE results to the Drug and Therapeutics Committees. Conclusion: A variety of DUE models exist in hospitals in Australia and New Zealand. Successful DUE services had a multidisciplinary approach with support and collaboration from medical, pharmacy, nursing and administrative staff.

2010 Martin JH, Norris R, Barras M, Roberts J, Morris R, Doogue M, Jones GR, 'Therapeutic monitoring of vancomycin in adult patients: a consensus review of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and the Society Of Infectious Diseases Pharmacists.', The Clinical biochemist. Reviews, 31 21-24 (2010)
2010 Norris RL, Martin JH, Thompson E, Ray JE, Fullinfaw RO, Joyce D, et al., 'Current Status of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in Australia and New Zealand: A Need for Improved Assay Evaluation, Best Practice Guidelines, and Professional Development', THERAPEUTIC DRUG MONITORING, 32 615-623 (2010)
DOI 10.1097/FTD.0b013e3181ea3e8a
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
2010 Martin JH, Connelly KA, Boyle A, Kompa A, Zhang Y, Kelly D, et al., 'Effect of Atorvastatin on Cardiac Remodelling and Mortality in Rats Following Hyperglycemia and Myocardial Infarction', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY, 143 353-360 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ijcard.2009.03.098
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Andrew Boyle
2010 Phillips LK, Peake JM, Zhang X, Hickman IJ, Kolade O, Sacre JW, et al., 'The Effect of a High-Fat Meal on Postprandial Arterial Stiffness in Men with Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY & METABOLISM, 95 4455-4459 (2010)
DOI 10.1210/jc.2010-0413
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
2010 Protani M, Coory M, Martin JH, 'Effect of obesity on survival of women with breast cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis', BREAST CANCER RESEARCH AND TREATMENT, 123 627-635 (2010)
DOI 10.1007/s10549-010-0990-0
Citations Scopus - 310Web of Science - 270
2010 Hollingworth S, Duncan EL, Martin JH, 'Marked increase in proton pump inhibitors use in Australia', PHARMACOEPIDEMIOLOGY AND DRUG SAFETY, 19 1019-1024 (2010)
DOI 10.1002/pds.1969
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 25
2010 Doogue MP, Martin JH, 'Whither therapeutic drug monitoring?', INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL, 40 671-672 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-5994.2010.02336.x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2010 Jellis CL, Jenkins C, Leano R, Martin JH, Marwick TH, 'Reduced End-Systolic Pressure-Volume Ratio Response to Exercise A Marker of Subclinical Myocardial Disease in Type 2 Diabetes', CIRCULATION-CARDIOVASCULAR IMAGING, 3 443-449 (2010)
DOI 10.1161/CIRCIMAGING.109.934273
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2010 Scott KA, Martin JH, Inder WJ, 'Acidosis in the hospital setting: is metformin a common precipitant?', INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL, 40 342-346 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-5994.2009.01959.x
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
2010 Martin JH, Fay MF, 'Surrogate end-points in clinical practice: are we providing worse care?', INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL, 40 395-398 (2010)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-5994.2010.02248.x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Michael Fay
2010 'ESICM 2010 WEDNESDAY SESSIONS 13 October 2010', Intensive Care Medicine, 36 326-433 (2010)
DOI 10.1007/s00134-010-2001-7
2010 Siriwardane D, Woodman R, Hakendorf P, Martin JH, White GH, Ben-Tovim DI, Thompson CH, 'Stability of plasma creatinine concentrations in acute complex long-stay admissions to a general medical service', Clinical Medicine, Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of London, 10 540-543 (2010)

Assessment of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is essential for calculating safe dosages of renally cleared drugs. Formulae for estimating reliable GFRs assume that plasma creatin... [more]

Assessment of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is essential for calculating safe dosages of renally cleared drugs. Formulae for estimating reliable GFRs assume that plasma creatinine concentrations are stable. This study evaluates the variability of plasma creatinine (PCr) concentrations in patients admitted acutely to hospital. From 2,293 newly admitted patients, those in whom a subsequent clinically significant change (>20%) in PCr had occurred were identified. Median age was 81.1 years. Median baseline PCr was 90 umol/l (eGFR 60 ml/min). In total, 46.3% of the patients had a PCr that varied >20% from baseline three to seven days following admission. A 10-year increase in age increased the odds of a rise in PCr over the next week by 11.1% (odds ratio=1.11, 95% confidence interval=1.03, 1.20; p=0.007). Overall, baseline creatinine was a poor predictor of subsequent variation in PCr. GFR formulae for calculating renally-cleared drug dosages should be used with caution in elderly patients admitted acutely to hospital. © Royal College of Physicians, 2010. All rights reserved.

Citations Scopus - 5
2009 Howell S, Coory M, Martin J, Duckett S, 'Using routine inpatient data to identify patients at risk of hospital readmission', BMC HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, 9 (2009)
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-9-96
Citations Scopus - 45Web of Science - 37
2009 Martin JH, Mangiafico S, Kelly DJ, 'Role of statins in diabetes complications', Current Diabetes Reviews, 5 165-170 (2009)

Diabetes is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the Western world and it currently affects 35 million people in the US alone. Cardiovascular and renal complicati... [more]

Diabetes is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the Western world and it currently affects 35 million people in the US alone. Cardiovascular and renal complications of diabetes, Type I and II, account for much of this morbidity, and are now known to be the end result of a complex interplay of pathophysiological processes. These include haemodynamic and metabolic abnormalities such as endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, vasoconstriction, oxidation and fibrosis. For some time it has been difficult to elucidate whether these processes and subsequent dysfunction in organs such as the heart and kidney is due to processes that often coexist with diabetes, such as hypertension. However, it is now clear that there is a distinct pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic state in diabetes, which may in addition be complicated by synergistic disease processes. The use of statins in diabetes has been of interest for a while due to the known effect of statins on inflammatory and fibrotic pathways. This review covers the clinical evidence for the use of statins in diabetes, the major known pathophysiological processes that occur in diabetic organ disease and discusses the known and putative effects of statins on these pathways. It concludes with a brief discussion of some early and yet unpublished work regarding the addition of statin therapy to angiotensin inhibition therapy in diabetic disease. © 2009 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

DOI 10.2174/157339909788920901
Citations Scopus - 6
2009 Martin JH, 'Advances in anticoagulants', Australian Doctor, . (2009)
2009 Martin JH, Doogue M, Somogyi A, Miners J, 'Prescribing in liver disease. Letter in response to Australian Prescriber', Australian Prescriber, 32 32(2):32-35 & 32(5):120 (2009)
2009 Martin JH, Doogue M, 'Editorial ¿ Guidelines or external regulation?', Internal Medicine Journal, 39 789-791 (2009)
2009 Martin JH, Ghiculescu A, 'Rapidly Progressive Severe Amiodarone-induced Hypothyroidism in an Elderly Female', Journal of Pharmacy Practice and Research, 39 140-141 (2009)
2009 Martin JH, Morris R, Beer C, Doogue M, 'Doctors and the pharmaceutical industry: time for a national policy?', Medical Journal of Australia, 191 189-190 (2009)
2009 Doogue M, Martin J, 'Editorial: Guidelines or external regulation?', Internal Medicine Journal, 39 789-791 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-5994.2009.02050.x
2009 Brien JAE, Reeve J, Sweidan M, Jayasuriya P, Martin J, 'Drug interaction alerts in dispensing and prescribing software', Journal of Pharmacy Practice and Research, 39 81-82 (2009)
2009 Ghiculescu RA, Martin J, 'Rapidly progressive severe amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism in an elderly female', Journal of Pharmacy Practice and Research, 39 140-141 (2009)

Background: Amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism has been extensively reported in the Australian and international literature. However, amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism, although m... [more]

Background: Amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism has been extensively reported in the Australian and international literature. However, amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism, although much less common, is also seen in clinical practice. Aim: To describe a case of rapidly progressive severe amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism complicated by myxoedema, cognitive decline and peripheral neuropathy in an elderly female. Clinical Details: An elderly female presented with a 3 to 6 month history of fatigue, cold intolerance and constipation. Her medical history was significant for type 2 diabetes, ischaemic heart disease and moderate mitral regurgitation complicated by severe left atrial dilatation and chronic atrial fibrillation. Outcomes: Her amiodarone was stopped and thyroxine commenced at 25 microgram daily. One week after admission her energy levels had improved to the point where she could safely manage at home. 6 months after amiodarone cessation she was euthyroid on thyroxine replacement and remained in rate controlled atrial fibrillation. Conclusion: Prescribers are reminded of the risk of serious thyroid morbidity associated with amiodarone use. Current recommendations include evaluation of risk against benefit with prolonged amiodarone therapy and periodic screening for early toxicity.

2009 Martin JH, Fay MF, Ungerer JP, 'eGFR - use beyond the evidence', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 190 197-199 (2009)
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Michael Fay
2009 Sweidan M, Reeve JF, Brien J-AE, Jayasuriya P, Martin JH, Vernon GM, 'Quality of drug interaction alerts in prescribing and dispensing software', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 190 251-254 (2009)
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 30
2009 Martin JH, Beer C, Morris RG, Doogue MP, 'Doctors and the pharmaceutical industry: time for a national policy?', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 191 189-190 (2009)
2009 Sweidan M, Reeve JF, Brien J-AE, Jayasuriya P, Martin JH, Vernon GM, 'Quality of drug interaction alerts in prescribing and dispensing software REPLY', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 191 358-359 (2009)
2009 Martin JH, 'Pharmacogenetics of warfarin - is testing clinically indicated?', AUSTRALIAN PRESCRIBER, 32 76-80 (2009)
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2009 Doogue M, Martin J, Miners J, Somogyi A, 'Prescribing in liver disease', AUSTRALIAN PRESCRIBER, 32 120-120 (2009)
2009 Martin JH, Coory MD, Valery PC, Green AC, 'Association of diabetes with survival among cohorts of Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians with cancer', CANCER CAUSES & CONTROL, 20 355-360 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10552-008-9249-z
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
2009 Martin JH, Woods M, Mudge A, 'Old bugs new populations: an unusual presentation of pericarditis', INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL, 39 850-851 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-5994.2009.02079.x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2008 Martin J, 'Statins and Congestive Heart Failure', CURRENT ATHEROSCLEROSIS REPORTS, 10 369-376 (2008)
DOI 10.1007/s11883-008-0058-3
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2008 Martin JH, Norris RL, Morris RG, Ray JE, Fullinfaw RO, Ilett KF, et al., 'A survey of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in Australia and New Zealand', Clinical Biochemist Reviews, 29 Supp (iii) (2008)
2007 Kelly DJ, Zhang Y, Connelly K, Cox AJ, Martin J, Krum H, Gilbert RE, 'Tranilast attenuates diastolic dysfunction and structural injury in experimental diabetic cardiomyopathy', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY-HEART AND CIRCULATORY PHYSIOLOGY, 293 H2860-H2869 (2007)
DOI 10.1152/ajpheart.01167.2006
Citations Web of Science - 33
2007 Martin JH, Connelly K, Kelly D, Zhang Y, Prior D, Cox A, et al., 'Functional, structural and molecular aspects of diastolic heart failure in the diabetic (mRen202) 27 rat', Cardiovascular Research, 76 280-291 (2007)
2007 Martin JH, Krum H, 'Statins and clinical outcomes in heart failure', CLINICAL SCIENCE, 113 119-127 (2007)
DOI 10.1042/CS20070031
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 18
2007 Connelly KA, Kelly DJ, Martin JH, Zhang Y, Thai K, Krum H, Gilbert RE, 'Hyperglycaemia and an enhanced tissue RAS are necessary components in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiac microvascular complications, mediated via PKC beta isoform', EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, 28 550-550 (2007)
2005 Martin JH, Kelly DJ, Mifsud SA, Zhang Y, Cox AJ, See F, et al., 'Tranilast attenuates cardiac matrix deposition in experimental diabetes: role of transforming growth factor-B¿', Cardiovascular Research, 65 694-701 (2005)
2005 Martin JH, Denver R, Bailey M, Krum H, 'In Vitro inhibitory effects of atorvastatin on cardiac fibroblasts: implications for ventricular remodelling', Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, 32 697-701 (2005)
Citations Scopus - 54
2005 Martin JH, See F, Kompa A, Lewis DA, Krum H, 'Fibrosis as a Therapeutic Target Post-Myocardial Infarction. Current Pharmaceutical Design', Current Pharmaceutical Design, 11 477-487 (2005)
2003 Martin JH, Liew D, Krum H, 'Eplerenone (Pharmacia)', Curr Opin Investig Drugs, 4 316-322 (2003)
2003 Martin J, Krum H, 'Erratum: Cytochrome P450 drug interactions within the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor class. (Drug Safety (2003) 26:1 (13-21))', Drug Safety, 26 893 (2003)
2003 Martin J, Krum H, 'Cytochrome P450 drug interactions within the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor class - Are they clinically relevant?', DRUG SAFETY, 26 13-21 (2003)
DOI 10.2165/00002018-200326010-00002
Citations Scopus - 49Web of Science - 39
2003 Martin JH, Mourton SM, Nicholls MG, 'Severe hyperkalaemia with prescription of potassium-retaining agents in an elderly patient', New Zealand Medical Journal, 116 (2003)
Citations Scopus - 2
2002 Berakis A, Williams TJ, Naughton MT, Martin JH, Muhlmann M, Krum H, 'Altered sympathetic and parasympathetic activity in lung transplantation patients at rest and following autonomic perturbation', CHEST, 122 1192-1199 (2002)
DOI 10.1378/chest.122.4.1192
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
2001 Martin JH, Begg EJ, Kennedy MA, Roberts R, Barclay ML, 'Is cytochrome P4502C9 genotype associated with NSAID gastric ulceration?', BRITISH JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, 51 627-630 (2001)
DOI 10.1046/j.0306-5251.2001.01398.x
Citations Scopus - 46Web of Science - 42
2001 Martin JH, 'Cytochrome P450 drug interactions: are they clinically relevent?', Australian Prescriber, 24 10-12 (2001)
2001 Martin JH, 'Cytochrome P450 drug interactions', Australian Prescriber, 24 80-81 (2001)
2001 Martin JH, 'Eplerenone (GD Searle)', Current Opinion Invest Drugs, 2 521-524 (2001)
2001 Martin JH, Fay MF, 'Capecitabine', Current Therapeutics, 42 49-51 (2001)
Co-authors Michael Fay
2001 Martin JH, 'The Heart Failure Journal Club: a review of publications on heart failure in American Heart Journal', Eur J Heart Failure, 3 125-137 (2001)
2001 Martin JH, 'Diltiazem-mediated inhibition of sildenafil metabolism may promote nitrate-induced hypotension', Internal Medicine Journal, 31 374-374 (2001)
2001 Martin JH, 'Role of valsartan and other angiotensin receptor blocking agents in the management of cardiovascular disease', Pharmacological Research, 46 203-212 (2001)
Citations Scopus - 17
2000 Martin JH, 'Drug prices not the whole story', Medical Observer, Melbourne, 24-24 (2000)
2000 Martin JH, Begg EJ, 'Reference pricing - is it in the public interest?', New Zealand Medical Journal, 113 422-425 (2000)
Citations Scopus - 8
1999 Martin JH, Begg EJ, 'OC'S - emotional journalism?', GP Weekly, . (1999)
1995 Martin JH, Abbott G, 'Serum sickness-like illness and antimicrobials in children', New Zealand Medical Journal, 108 123-124 (1995)
Show 159 more journal articles

Review (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 , 'Reviewer', Essentials of Internal Medicine, 3rd Edition (2013)

Conference (63 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Aithal GP, Nicoletti P, Bjornsson E, Lucena MI, Andrade RJ, Grove J, et al., 'HLA-A*33:01 is strongly associated with drug-induced liver injury (DILI) due to terbinafine and several other unrelated compounds', HEPATOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
2015 Diaz A, Moore SP, Martin JH, Green AC, Garvey G, Valery PC, 'Comorbidities amongst Indigenous Cancer Patients: Impact on Treatment and Survival.', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY (2015)
2015 Diaz A, Moore SP, Martin JH, Green AC, Coory M, Garvey G, Valery PC, 'Early Diagnosis and Improved Treatment Uptake in the First Year may Reduce Survival Disparities between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and other Australian Women Diagnosed with Gynaecological Cancer', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY (2015)
2015 Fay M, Sakoff J, Martin J, Rose S, Crozier S, Boyd A, et al., 'EPHA2 ANTIBODY INCREASES SENSITIVITY OF U87 GLIOBLASTOMA CELLS TO IRRADIATION', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Jennette Sakoff, Michael Fay
2015 Goulooze S, Martin J, 'MONTE-CARLO SIMULATIONS OF THE CLINICAL BENEFITS FROM THERAPEUTIC DRUG MONITORING OF SUNITINIB IN PATIENTS WITH GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMOURS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
2015 Garg M, Galettis P, Goulooze S, Clingan P, Ranson M, Sakoff J, et al., 'THERAPEUTIC DRUG MONITORING FOR CANCER PATIENTS RECEIVING CHEMOTHERAPY', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Jennette Sakoff, Stephen Ackland, Peter Galettis
2014 Martin JH, Tam L, Meiklejohn J, Garvey G, Adams J, Walpole E, et al., 'Supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait people diagnosed with cancer to navigate the healthcare system', Abstracts COSA 2014 (2014) [E3]
2014 Tam L, Meiklejohn J, Garvey G, Martin J, Adams J, Walpole E, et al., 'SUPPORTING ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PEOPLE DIAGNOSED WITH CANCER TO NAVIGATE THE HEALTHCARE SYSTEM', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Michael Fay
2014 Linda N, Cheng M, Protani M, Martin J, Fay M, 'RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN OBESE WOMEN WITH BREAST CANCER, THEIR SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS AND COMORBIDITIES', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Michael Fay
2014 Cheng M, Linda N, Protani M, Carroll J, Fay M, Martin J, 'OBESITY A RISK FACTOR FOR CHEMOTHERAPY DOSE REDUCTION IN BREAST CANCER: A MULTI-CENTERED APPROACH', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Michael Fay
2013 Martin JH, Inder WJ, Thomas F, Sorbello J, Ho K, Torpy D, 'Cortisol status in patients with chronic non-malignant pain treated with opoids', Endocrine Reviews (2013) [E3]
2013 Martin JH, Hosein A, Lim Y, Day B, Stringer B, Rose S, et al., 'The use of valopric acid as an anti-glioma agent in combination with temozolomide and radiation', Proceedings of the 81st AANS Annual Scientific Meeting (2013) [E3]
2013 Martin JH, Hubbard R, Pillans P, Mitchell C, Scott I, Gray L, 'Polypharmacy among older inpatients in Australia', igital Ageing: A New Horizon for Health Care and Active Ageing (2013) [E3]
2012 Jellis CL, Wright J, Sacre J, Kennedy D, Jeffriess L, Fenwick J, et al., 'BACKSCATTER, T1 MAPPING OR PRO-COLLAGEN BIOMARKERS FOR NON-INVASIVE ASSESSMENT OF TREATMENT RESPONSE TO ANTI-FIBROTIC THERAPY IN SUBCLINICAL DIABETIC CARDIOMYOPATHY? A RANDOMIZED TRIAL', JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY (2012)
2012 Martin JH, Jellis C, Wright J, Scare J, Kennedy D, Haluska B, et al., 'Randomized trial of Spironolactone use in subclinical diabetic cardiomyopathy: anti-fibriotic effects on myocardial structure and function', Proceedings of ACC 2012 (2012) [E3]
2012 Lucas CJ, Kubler P, Martin J, 'Is the process for approval of high cost drugs for off-formulary use leading to clinically appropriate outcomes?' (2012)
2012 Martin JH, Jellis C, Sacre J, Jenkins C, Haluska B, Markwick T, 'Relationship of pro-collagen biomarkers of myocardial fibrosis with myocardial dysfunction and metabolic derangement in type 2 diabetes', Abstracts of ESC Congress 2012 (2012) [E3]
2012 Martin JH, Leung J, McLaughlin D, McKenzie S, Dobson A, 'Differences in breast cancer screening patters between women residing in rural and urban areas', Proceedings (2012) [E3]
2012 Martin JH, Valery PC, Moore SP, Coory M, Garvey G, Green AC, 'Advanced stage at diagnosis and worse comorbidity explain overall survival disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous cancer patients in Queensland', Proceedings of COSA 2012 (2012) [E3]
2012 Martin JH, 'Advanced stage at diagnosis and worse comorbidity explain overall survival disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous cancer patients in Queensland', Impact through translation: cancer research informing practice (2012) [E3]
2012 Martin JH, Jellis C, Wright J, Scare J, Kennedy D, Haluska B, et al., 'A randomized trial of anti-fibriotic therapy in subclinical diabetic cardiomyopathy: T1 mapping and pro-collagen biomarkers for non-invasive assessment of treatment response', Proceedings of American College of Cardiology (ACC) 61st Annual Scientific Session (2012) [E3]
2012 Martin JH, Skinner T, Scott I, 'Diagnostic errors in older patients: a systematic review of the incidences and causes of thirteen prevalent conditions', Proceedings of IMSANZ 2012 (2012) [E3]
2012 Martin JH, Skinner T, Scott I, 'Diagnostic errors in older patients: a systematic review of the incidences and causes of thirteen prevalent conditions', Proceedings of the 21st Annual RBWH Healthcare Symposium (2012) [E3]
2012 Martin JH, Chachay VS, Macdonald GA, O'Moore-Sullivan TM, Lee P, Franklin M, et al., 'A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigating the clinical effect of resveratrol in the management of obesity-related fatty liver disease', Proceedings of the International Postgraduate Symposium in Biomedical Sciences (2012) [E3]
2012 Martin JH, Lucas C, 'Is the process for approval of high cost drugs for off-formulary use leading to clinically appropriate and cost effective outcomes?', Proceedings of the Joint ASCEPT-APSA 2012 Conference (2012) [E3]
2012 Martin JH, Chachay VS, Macdonald GA, O'Moore-Sullivan TM, Lee P, Franklin M, et al., 'A randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trial investigating the clinical effect of resveratrol in the management of obesity-related fatty liver disease', Proceedings of Resveratrol 2012 (2012) [E3]
2010 Martin JH, Jellis C, Wright J, Sacre J, Kennedy D, Haluska B, et al., 'Non-invasive quantification of myocardial fibrosis in diabetic cardiomyopathy: T1 mapping or integrated backscatter?', European Heart Journal Supplements (2010) [E3]
2010 Martin JH, Putt MT, Roberts JA, Udy AA, Jarrett P, Salmon N, Lipman J, 'Assessment of adequacy of loading dose of phenytoin (PTN) in adult intensive care patients using population pharmacokinetics', ESICM 2010: Abstracts of Oral Presentations and Poster Sessions (2010) [E3]
2010 Phillips LK, Peake J, Zhang X, Hickman IJ, Huang BE, Simpson P, et al., 'The Effect of a High Fat Meal on Postprandial Arterial Stiffness in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes.', ENDOCRINE REVIEWS (2010)
2010 Martin JH, 'Subclinical myocardial disease in type 2 diabetes: mechanistic insights from resting and exercise haemodynamics', Heart, Lung and Circulation: Abstracts of the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (2010) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.hlc.2010.06.475
2010 Martin JH, Ah Yui N, Kirkpatrick C, Barras M, Kubler P, Norris R, 'Optimising gentamicin use in a tertiary hospital setting', Proceedings of ASCEPT 2010 (2010) [E3]
2010 Martin JH, Donovan P, Cardinal J, Salmon N, Kubler P, Norris R, 'Neutrophil gelatinous-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and cystatin C in acutely unwell general medical inpatients', Proceedings of ASCEPT 2010 (2010) [E3]
2010 Martin JH, McNeil G, 'Is MDRD GFR reliable when calculating drug dosage in acute medical admissions?', Proceedings of WCIM 2010 (2010)
2010 Putt MT, Roberts JA, Udy AA, Martin JH, Jarrett P, Salmon N, Lipman J, 'ASSESSMENT OF ADEQUACY OF LOADING DOSE OF PHENYTOIN (PTN) IN ADULT INTENSIVE CARE PATIENTS USING POPULATION PHARMACOKINETICS', INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE (2010)
2009 Martin JH, Howell S, Coory M, 'The sensitivity of a local algorithm to predict risk of hospital readmission', Proceedings of 6th Health Services and Policy Research Conference (2009)
2009 Martin JH, Toleman J, Kubler P, Pattulo C, Holman J, Paterson D, 'Drug use evaluation of ticarcillin with clavulonic acid at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital', Proceedings of ASCEPT 2009 (2009)
2009 Martin JH, 'Drug use evaluation of ceftriaxone at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital', Proceedings of ASCEPT 2009 (2009) [E3]
2009 Martin JH, McNeil G, 'Is MDRD GFR reliable when calculating drug dosage in acute medical admissions?', Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference of the Society of Acute Medicine (2009)
2009 Martin JH, Patullo C, Kubler P, Avent M, 'The establishment of a quality use of medicines service at a large teaching hospital', Proceedings of the Society of Hospital Pharmacists of Australia Conference (2009)
2009 Martin JH, Patullo C, Kubler P, Avent M, 'The role of a QUM pharmacist in improving patient outcomes', Proceedings of the Society of Hospital Pharmacists of Australia Conference (2009)
2009 Martin JH, Norris R, MorrisR, Thompson E, Ray J, Barras M, et al., 'A survey of therapeutic drug monitoring in Australasia', Therapeutic Drug Monitoring: Abstracts of the 11th International Congress of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring and Clinical Toxicology (2009) [E3]
2009 Norris R, Morris R, Thompson E, Ray J, Barras M, Jones G, Martin J, 'A Survey of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in Australasia', THERAPEUTIC DRUG MONITORING (2009)
2008 Martin JH, Sweidan M, Reeve J, Brien J, Jayasuriya P, Vernon G, 'A study of the quality of drug interaction decision support in prescribing and dispensing software', Abstracts of the National Medicines Symposium 2008 (2008)
2008 Martin JH, Norris R, Morris R, Ilett K, Barras M, Jones G, 'A survey of therapeutic drug monitoring in Australia and New Zealand - preliminary results', Proceedings of the Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists¿ 45th Annual Scientific Conference (2008) [E3]
2007 Martin JH, Choy SW, Desmond M, Lanteri M, Gock H, Hill P, 'An unusual cause of post-infectious glomerulonephritis', Nephrology (2007) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2007.00847.x
2007 Martin JH, Connelly K, Kelly D, Krum H, Gilbert R, Fennelly M, 'Functional, structural and molecular aspects of diastolic heart failure in the diabetic (MRen202) 27 rat', Cardiovascular Research (2007) [E1]
2007 Martin JH, Brien JE, Jayasuriya P, Vernon G, Sweidan M, Reeve J, 'Drug interaction decision support in clinical software - user beware!', Proceedings of the SEAWP-ASCEPT Joint Annual Scientific Meeting (2007)
2006 Martin JH, Connelly K, Boyle A, Kelly DJ, Kompa A, Zhang M, et al., 'Hyperglycemia has a detrimental effect on cardiac remodelling and mortality after myocardial infarction: benefit of statin therapy', EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL (2006)
Citations Web of Science - 1
2006 Martin JH, Connelly K, Boyle A, Kompa A, Zhang M, Kelly D, et al., 'Hyperglycemia has a detrimental effect on cardiac remodelling and mortality after myocardial infarction', Abstracts for the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand Annual Scientific Meeting (2006) [E3]
2006 Martin JH, Connelly K, Boyle A, Kompa A, Zhang M, Kelly D, et al., 'Hyperglycemia has a detrimental effect on cardiac remodelling and mortality after myocardial infaction: benefit of statin therapy', European Heart Journal (2006) [E3]
2004 Martin JH, 'Direct, dose-dependent antifibriotic effects of atorvastisin in human cardiac fibroblast cell culture', Journal of the American College of Cardiology (2004)
DOI 10.1016/S0735-1097(04)90679-1
2004 Martin JH, Kelly D, Misfud S, Zhang M, Krum H, Wilkinson-Berka J, Gilbert R, 'Tranilast dose-dependently attenuates extra-cellular matrix deposition in rats.', CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY (2004)
2003 Martin JH, Cantwell D, Denver R, Hannan R, Way K, Kompa A, Krum H, 'Does protein kinase C-ß (PKC-ß) inhibition directly reduce collagen production from cardiac fibroblasts?', Proceedings of HBPRCA 2003 (2003)
2003 Martin JH, Denver R, Pepe S, Krum H, 'Dose-dependent anti-inflammatory effects of atorvastatin in rat and human cell culture', Proceedings of the 2003 Congress of the European Society of Cardiology (2003)
2003 Martin JH, Kelly D, Mifsud S, Zhang Y, Krum H, Wilkinson-Berka J, Gilbert RE, 'Tranilast dose-dependent attenuates extra-cellular matrix deposition in rat myocardium', Proceedings of ASCEPT 2003 (2003)
2003 Martin JH, Harriss L, Windebank E, Brack J, Kamen P, Liew D, Krum H, 'Double-blind placebo-controlled, crossover study of effect of atorvastatin on autonomic function in patients with coronary artery disease', - (2003)
2003 Martin JH, 'Adverse reactions of cardiovascular drugs', - (2003)
2003 Martin JH, Denver R, Pepe S, Krum H, 'Dose-dependent and anti-fibriotic effects of atorvastatin in human cardiac fibroblast cell culture: a potential explanation for the beneficial, non-cholesterol effects of statins', - (2003)
2003 Martin JH, Denver R, Pepe S, Krum H, 'Direct, dose-dependent anti-fibrotic effects of atorvastatin in rat and human cardiac fibroblast cell culture', EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL (2003)
DOI 10.1016/S0195-668X(03)95164-5
2002 Martin JH, Denver R, Pepe S, Krum H, 'Dose-dependent anti-fibriotic effects of atorvastatin in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblast cell culture: a potential contributor to the anti-remodelling effects of HMGCoA reductase inhibitors', . (2002)
2002 Martin JH, Krum H, Berakis A, Williams T, Muhlmann M, 'Alteration in sympathetic and parasympathetic function in lung transplant patients at rest and after autonomic pertubation', Proceedings of HBPRCA 2002 (2002)
2001 Martin JH, Beckert L, Fontaine S, 'Involving medical registrars in teaching', Proceedings of ANZAME 2001 (2001)
1999 Martin JH, Begg EG, 'Reference pricing - what lessons can we learn?', . (1999)
Show 60 more conferences
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 36
Total funding $9,596,089

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20162 grants / $28,678

Profiling Human Cardiac Stem Cells$21,745

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust
Project Team Professor Andrew Boyle, Professor Jennifer Martin
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600704
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Effect of body size on chemotheraphy dose and blood concentrations in cancer$6,933

Funding body: Metro South Health

Funding body Metro South Health
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1601272
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20151 grants / $500,000

High resolution fourier transform mass spectrometry platform for the discovery of novel cancer biomarkers and drug targets using label-free and isobaric-tagged approaches for quantitative proteomics.$500,000

Funding body: Cancer Institute NSW

Funding body Cancer Institute NSW
Project Team Professor Xu Dong Zhang, Doctor Matt Dun, Professor Jennifer Martin, Professor Hubert Hondermarck, Laureate Professor John Aitken, Doctor Nikki Verrills, Doctor Pradeep Tanwar, Professor Rodney Scott, Professor Maria Kavallaris, Dr Darren Saunders
Scheme Research Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1500599
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20142 grants / $266,651

Targeting existing therapies with innovative technology platforms to improve survival in brain cancer$200,000

Funding body: Cancer Council Queensland

Funding body Cancer Council Queensland
Scheme Project grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Effect of obesity on exposure to breast cancer chemotherapy: still a need to 'cap' the dose?$66,651

Funding body: University of Queensland

Funding body University of Queensland
Project Team Professor Jennifer Martin, Doctor Peter Galettis
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1601146
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20134 grants / $685,596

Improving systems and quality of cancer care in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care settings$640,096

Funding body: National Health & Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health & Medical Research Council
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

University of Queensland Post Doctoral Scholarship for Women$37,500

Funding body: The University of Queensland

Funding body The University of Queensland
Scheme Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

The clinical pharmacology of valproate$6,000

Funding body: Deutsche Akademische Austauschdienst

Funding body Deutsche Akademische Austauschdienst
Scheme Discovery project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Clinical assessment of a predictive pharmacokinetic program for individualised vancomycin dosing in paediatrics$2,000

Funding body: Mater Hospitals, Brisbane

Funding body Mater Hospitals, Brisbane
Scheme Discovery project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20129 grants / $3,146,502

The diamantina individualised oncology care centre$2,000,000

Funding body: Australian Cancer Research Foundation

Funding body Australian Cancer Research Foundation
Project Team

M. Brown

Scheme Cancer Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Improving systems and quality of cancer care in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care settings$617,502

Funding body: National Health & Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health & Medical Research Council
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Effect of body size on chemotherapy dose and blood concentrations in cancer$150,000

Funding body: Princess Alexandra Hospital and District Health Service, QLD

Funding body Princess Alexandra Hospital and District Health Service, QLD
Scheme Early Career Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

The effect of valproate on surrogate markers of prognosis in glioblastoma multiforme$105,000

Funding body: Royal Brisbane Hospital

Funding body Royal Brisbane Hospital
Project Team

M. Fay; I. Jeffree; A. Boyd; S. Rose; S. Robertson

Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Indigenous community 'champion' project$79,000

Funding body: Cure Cancer Australia Foundation

Funding body Cure Cancer Australia Foundation
Project Team

Valery, P; Garvey, G; Walpole, E.

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Establishment of primary human liver cell isolation: a necessary model to understand hepatic disease$75,000

Funding body: Princess Alexandra Hospital and District Health Service, QLD

Funding body Princess Alexandra Hospital and District Health Service, QLD
Project Team

Elizabeth Powell

Scheme Foundation grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Effect of obesity on concentrations of breast cancer drugs and survival$75,000

Funding body: Princess Alexandra Hospital and District Health Service, QLD

Funding body Princess Alexandra Hospital and District Health Service, QLD
Scheme Foundation grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Are modern methods for aminoglycoside monitoring superior to existing approaches? a randomised controlled trial$35,000

Funding body: Royal Brisbane Hospital

Funding body Royal Brisbane Hospital
Project Team

M. Barris, I. Coombes, J. Roberts, D. Paterson

Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Optimising pain management with fentanyl in patients with cancer$10,000

Funding body: Griffith Health Institute

Funding body Griffith Health Institute
Scheme MBOD Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20112 grants / $766,814

A comparative study: patterns of care, comorbidities and quality of life of Indigenous and non-Indigenous people with lung, head & neck, breast or gynaecological cancers$691,814

Funding body: National Health & Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health & Medical Research Council
Scheme Discovery project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

A new prescribing technology for older patients$75,000

Funding body: Princess Alexandra Hospital and District Health Service, QLD

Funding body Princess Alexandra Hospital and District Health Service, QLD
Project Team

Ian Scott, Len Gray

Scheme Foundation grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20102 grants / $1,779,000

Health workforce Australia capital agreement$1,100,000

Funding body: Redlands / QEII Hospital

Funding body Redlands / QEII Hospital
Scheme Discovery project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Patterns of care, comorbidities and quality of life in Indigenous people with cancer$679,000

Funding body: National Health & Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health & Medical Research Council
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20092 grants / $74,848

Non-invasive cardiac imaging in the detection and assessment of subclinical diabetic heart disease$54,848

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team

C. Jellis

Scheme NSW Cardiovascular Research Network Research Development Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Relationship between obesity, chemotherapy dose and outcome in women with node positive breast cancer $20,000

Funding body: RBWH Clinical School, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Queensland (Australia)

Funding body RBWH Clinical School, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Queensland (Australia)
Scheme Discovery project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20082 grants / $40,000

The risk of cardiovascular disease post allogeneic bone marrow transplant: role of the peripheral blood mononuclear cell$30,000

Funding body: Clive & Vera Ramaciotti

Funding body Clive & Vera Ramaciotti
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Free phenytoin in severley unwell hospitalised populations$10,000

Funding body: Pathology Queensland

Funding body Pathology Queensland
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20071 grants / $40,000

Melbourne University Inter-faculty and Cross-disciplinary Steering Comittee Grant$40,000

Funding body: The University of Melbourne

Funding body The University of Melbourne
Project Team

Professor J. Prioetto

Scheme UMOSG Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20063 grants / $2,105,000

NHMRC Clinical Centre for Research and Excellence in Clinical Science in Diabetes$2,000,000

Funding body: National Health & Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health & Medical Research Council
Project Team

Prof. J. Best

Scheme Discovery project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

Investigation of peripheral blood monocyte and adipose tissue macrophage function in obese subjects undertaking bariatric surgery$55,000

Funding body: Pfizer (USA)

Funding body Pfizer (USA)
Scheme Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

The role of the macrophage in Type 2 diabetes$50,000

Funding body: Royal Australasian College of Physicians

Funding body Royal Australasian College of Physicians
Scheme Research Establishment Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20052 grants / $82,000

Melbourne University Early Career Grant$74,000

Funding body: The University of Melbourne Early Career Researcher Grant

Funding body The University of Melbourne Early Career Researcher Grant
Scheme The internal grant of the University of Melbourne
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

The role of the macrophage in the pathophysiology of diabetic and hypertensive cardiorenal disease$8,000

Funding body: St Vincent's Hospital Sydney

Funding body St Vincent's Hospital Sydney
Scheme Pilot Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20032 grants / $16,000

Australasian College of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacologists and Toxicologists Travel Prize$10,000

Funding body: Australasian College of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacologists and Toxicologists

Funding body Australasian College of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacologists and Toxicologists
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

CSANZ Travelling Fellowship$6,000

Funding body: Cardiac Society of Australia and NewZealand

Funding body Cardiac Society of Australia and NewZealand
Scheme Travelling Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20011 grants / $55,000

Cardio Vascular Lipid (CVL) Research Grant$55,000

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2001
Funding Finish 2001
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

19991 grants / $10,000

Cytochrome P450 2C9 genotype as a predictor for risk of peptic ulcer formation and complications with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs$10,000

Funding body: Christchurch Medical Research Foundation

Funding body Christchurch Medical Research Foundation
Scheme Discovery Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 1999
Funding Finish 1999
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current10

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.85

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Developmental and Environmental Determinants on Neonatal Pharmacology
PhD (Clinical Pharm), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Synthetic Cannabinoids in Humans
PhD (Clinical Pharm), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Dosing paracetemol in patients with chronic liver disease
Pharmacology, The University of Queensland
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Cardiotoxicity of Drugs in Overdose
PhD (Clinical Pharm), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 Unknown Pharmacovigilance of immunology medications
Pharmacology, University of Queensland
Co-Supervisor
2014 Masters Combined pharmacogenetics and kinetics in hematology
Pharmacology, University of Queensland
Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Effect of obesity on mortality in breast cancer
Pharmacology, University of Queensland
Principal Supervisor
2012 PhD Helping students structure knowledge for clinical use in PBL
Pharmacology, University of Queensland
Consultant Supervisor
2010 PhD Combined effect of diabetes and obesity on survival in cancer
Pharmacology, University of Queensland
Co-Supervisor
2010 PhD The role of resveratrol, a polyphenolic compound found in red grape skin, in the management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
Pharmacology, University of Queensland
Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 142
United States 15
United Kingdom 10
China 5
Germany 5
More...
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News

More to do before medicinal cannabis rollout

May 30, 2016

While there has been significant progress towards the mainstream use of medicinal cannabis over the past year, there are a number of missing links that need to be examined before it is rolled out as a therapeutic good, according to the authors of a Perspective published online today by the Medical Journal of Australia.

Deadly and illegal synthetic drugs

ABC 7.30: Potentially deadly and illegal synthetic drugs still available over the counter

February 23, 2016

Professor Jenny Martin and Michelle Williams are researchers in Clinical Phamacology and Toxicology at UON. They were recently featured on ABC's 7.30 explaining the dangers of illegal synthetic drugs, some of the surprising ingredients, and why one dose can be fatal.

UON researchers commence Medical Cannabis Trials

July 28, 2015

University of Newcastle researchers will undertake critical research as part of Australia's first medical cannabis trial, announced this morning by Premier Mike Baird and Minister for Medical Research Pru Goward.

Professor Jennifer Martin

Position

Chair of Clinical Pharmacology
School of Medicine and Public Health
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email jen.martin@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 1286
Fax (02) 4960 2088

Office

Room Calvary Mater Hospital, Newmed 2, Room 5.35
Building Newmed 2
Location Calvary Mater Hospital

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