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Dr Ifte Ahmed

Senior Lecturer

School of Architecture and Built Environment

An Immersive approach to disaster resilience

Dr Ifte Ahmed believes that research should not be focussed solely on books at a desk, he takes a truly immersive approach to his research in disaster resilience. While he started on a traditional architectural path, Ifte soon moved onto a more interesting trajectory – disaster resilience and sustainable post-disaster housing systems.

Dr Ifte Ahmed

Mud-architecture attracted Ifte’s early interest as an architect, in fact, it spawned his first publication Up To The Waist In Mud, which explored the study of mud-architecture in Bangladesh. The book was published in 1994 and was the result of his Masters thesis from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Ifte’s academic career spans the continents – a Bachelor of Architecture from IIT, India, Master of Science in Architecture Studies from MIT in the US, and a PhD from Oxford Brookes University in the UK, so it’s not surprising that his research focus is global.

A strong theme of Ifte’s academic career is that research is not something that should be conducted in isolation. A hands-on approach to working alongside communities has informed Ifte’s research and knowledge throughout his career. Working with the Housing and Hazards group in Bangladesh while undertaking his PhD inspired Ifte to transition into the risk reduction field. While his original proposition was to explore low-income housing, he soon found that most of the housing in the country was built post-disaster and disaster impacts was a significant issue.

"Comparing housing built by agencies to that by communities themselves, the resilience and adaptive capacity of these communities became clear.”

Ifte stepped away from academia for a few years and immersed himself in the field. He’d done the research, and knew what the problems were, but wanted to actually get his hands dirty and do it. Ifte worked as Project Manager with the Asian Disaster Preparedness Center in Thailand, and managed disaster risk reduction programs in Vietnam, Sri Lanka, Philippines, Pakistan and Bangladesh. At the same time, he was also a trainer in regional and national training courses and developed training curricula too.

Ifte also worked as a Shelter Specialist with the United Nations Development Programme in Bangladesh, building over 16,000 houses in a post-flood reconstruction program. Working alongside women who were involved in a cash-for-work program, Ifte praises the program for its ‘participatory action’. Teams would go into villages and share their technical professional knowledge, and in turn, would be informed by the local’s Indigenous knowledge.

“That’s my basic approach in life,” Ifte says. “To merge, collaborate and come up with something where one group doesn’t dominate but basically everyone has their own viewpoint and multiple perspectives are merged to come up with something unique.”

A new design parameter: designed with disaster in mind

Natural disasters dominate the news cycle: from cyclones, to tsunamis to super-storms. But are modern houses built to withstand nature’s wrath? Ifte says that building codes are usually only updated in response to a natural disaster, not in preparation for one. “For example, after the Ash Wednesday fires (which was one of Australia’s costliest natural disasters) there was no change to building laws, everything went on as usual. However after the ‘Black Saturday’ bushfires in Victoria, the BAL system (Bushfire Attack Level) codes were enforced to protect homes in bushfire-prone zones.”

“Before building, homeowners need to have their area rated for a BAL before building. High levels mean that builders have to incorporate a certain amount of bushfire-resistant elements in the design. It can be costly, say up to $10 000, but what is $10 000 versus rebuilding costs of $500 000? It’s a very small investment in protection.”

Disaster resilience - a focus at UON

His appointment at the University of Newcastle (UON) in early 2016 is the next exciting step in Ifte’s career.  Working collaboratively with the Disaster and Development Research Group at UON has Ifte looking forward to the next challenge. “It’s a fast-growing field, it’s everywhere,” Ifte explains. “It’s an issue that people will have to deal with and it needs to be dealt with professionally – it can’t just be left up to the government.”

Ifte will spend time at UON dividing his time between teaching courses and researching with partners to develop building solutions to deal with both rapid-onset disasters such as earthquakes and storms or slow-onset such as flood and drought. “Drought is often forgotten,” says Ifte. “But it is very insidious and harmful and can cause massive damage on a global scale. Some countries go through a cycle of massive flooding, followed by drought.”

If there’s a challenge in architecture and disaster resilience, you can be certain that Ifte’s got it in his sights. The students at UON are lucky to work with such a collaborative and innovative leader in this fast-growing field. We’re facing global challenges that are being addressed right here in Newcastle at UON.

An Immersive approach to disaster resilience

Dr Ifte Ahmed believes that research should not be focussed solely on books at a desk, he takes a truly immersive approach to research in disaster resilience.

Read more

Career Summary

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Oxford Brookes University - UK
  • Bachelor of Architecture (Honours), Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur
  • Master of Science (Architecture Studies), Massachusetts Institute of Technology - USA

Keywords

  • Appropriate Construction Technology
  • Climate Change Adaptation
  • Community Engagement
  • Developmental Architecture
  • Disaster Risk Reduction
  • Post-Disaster Reconstruction
  • Resilience
  • Urban Built Enviroment
  • Vernacular Architecture

Languages

  • Bengali (Mother)
  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
200103 International and Development Communication 20
120201 Building Construction Management and Project Planning 30
040604 Natural Hazards 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Architecture and Built Environment
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2012 - 31/12/2015 Research Fellow

Conducting research primarily on post-disaster housing reconstruction.

RMIT University
School of Architecture and Design
Australia
1/01/2009 - 31/12/2009 Research Fellow (part-time)

Conducting research on post-tsunami resettlement in Sri Lanka and India.

Monash University
Monash Asia Institute
Australia
1/01/2009 - 31/12/2011 Research Fellow (part-time in 2009)

Conducting research primarily on urban climate change adaptation in the Asia-Pacific region.

RMIT University
Climate Change Adaptation Program
1/01/2008 - 31/12/2008 Coordinator - International Research Partnerships

Managing and coordinating research partnerships mainly in Vietnam.

RMIT University
Global Cities Research Institute
Australia
20/10/2007 - 31/12/2009 Visiting Academic

Research on post-disaster housing reconstruction, and teaching design studios on cyclone shelters and homeless centres.

University of Melbourne
Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2006 - 15/06/2007 Project Manager

Management of disaster risk reduction projects in Vietnam, Sri Lanka, Philippines, Pakistan and Bangladesh; also trainer in regional and national training courses and training curricula development.

Asian Disaster Preparedness Center
Urban Disaster Risk Management
Thailand
1/10/2004 - 31/12/2005 Shelter Specialist

Post flood reconstruction program of more than 16,000 houses and cash-for-work for women beneficiaries; also design of community centres for Chittagong Hill Tracts indigenous communities.

United Nations Development Programme
Disaster Management and Crisis Prevention Team
Bangladesh
1/06/1989 - 30/06/1991 Architect

Summers and postgraduate internship. Residential and commercial design projects.

Gumbinger Associates
United States
1/07/1987 - 30/06/1988 Architect

Remodelling and renovation of rural farmhouses.             

Peter Bartram
Germany

Teaching appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2016 - 17/06/2016 Lecturer

Teaching primarily in the Master of Disaster, Design and Development (MODDD) degree and also Landscape Architecture design studio on coastal climate change adaptation.

RMIT University
School of Architecture and Design
Australia
20/10/1992 - 31/12/2004 Associate Professor/ Assistant Professor/ Lecturer

Taught various courses to undergraduate and postgraduate students of the Faculty of Architecture and Urban & Regional Planning.

Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology
Department of Architecture
Bangladesh
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (12 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Marsh G, Ahmed KI, Donovan J, Barton S, Community Engagement in Post-Disaster Recovery, Routledge, London (2018)
2016 Ahmed KI, Drought Risk Assessment in the Province of Balochistan, Pakistan, United Nations Development Programme, Islamabad, 87 (2016)
2015 Charlesworth E, Ahmed I, Sustainable housing reconstruction: Designing resilient housing after natural disasters (2015)

© 2015 Esther Charlesworth and Iftekhar Ahmed. All rights reserved.Through 12 case studies from Australia, Bangladesh, Haiti, Sri Lanka, Vietnam and the USA, this book focuses on... [more]

© 2015 Esther Charlesworth and Iftekhar Ahmed. All rights reserved.Through 12 case studies from Australia, Bangladesh, Haiti, Sri Lanka, Vietnam and the USA, this book focuses on the housing reconstruction process after an earthquake, tsunami, cyclone, flood or fire. Design of post-disaster housing is not simply replacing the destroyed house but, as these case studies highlight, a means to not only build a safer house but also a more resilient community; not to simply return to the same condition as before the disaster, but an opportunity for building back better. The book explores two main themes: Housing reconstruction is most successful when involving the users in the design and construction process. Housing reconstruction is most effective when it is integrated with community infrastructure, services and the means to create real livelihoods. The case studies included in this book highlight work completed by different agencies and built environment professionals in diverse disaster-affected contexts. With a global acceleration of natural disasters, often linked to accelerating climate change, there is a critical demand for robust housing solutions for vulnerable communities. This book provides professionals, policy makers and community stakeholders working in the international development and disaster risk management sectors, with an evidence-based exploration of how to add real value through the design process in housing reconstruction. Herein then, the knowledge we need to build, an approach to improve our processes, a window to understanding the complex domain of post-disaster housing reconstruction.

DOI 10.4324/9781315735412
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Ahmed KI, The Vanishing Traces: Vernacular Housing in the Chittagong Hill Tracts., White Lotus Press, Banglamung, Thailand, 105 (2013)
2012 Ahmed KI, Fuengeld H, McEvoy D, Integrated Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change: Participatory Capacity and Vulnerability Analysis (PCVA) Toolkit, Oxfam Australia, Carlton, VIC (2012)
2008 Mallick FH, Ahmed KI, Kabir KH, Kabir MH, Improved Design and Construction of Rural Housing in Noakhali, IUCN, Bangladesh, 43 (2008)
2006 Ahmed KI, Integrated Flood Risk Management in Asia: A Primer, Asian Disaster Preparedness Center, Bangkok, 332 (2006)
2005 Ahmed KI, Disaster Risk Management in Asia: A Primer, Asian Disaster Preparedness Center, Bangkok, 286 (2005)
2004 Seraj SM, Ahmed KI, Building Safer Houses in Rural Bangladesh, Bangladesh University of Engineering & Technology and University of Exeter, Dhaka, 244 (2004)
2001 Ahmed KI, Low-Income Housing: Multi-Dimensional Research Perspectives, Grameen Trust, Dhaka (2001)
2000 Seraj SM, Hodgson RLP, Ahmed KI, Village Infrastructure to Cope with the Environment: Proceedings of the Third Housing & Hazards International Conference, BUET/University of Exeter, Dhaka/Exeter, 289 (2000)
1994 Ahmed KI, Up to the Waist in Mud Earth-Based Architecture in Rural Bangladesh, University Press Ltd, Dhaka, 153 (1994)
Show 9 more books

Chapter (13 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Ahmed KI, Ireton G, 'Rebuilding lessons from bushfire-affected communities in Victoria, Australia', Community Engagement in Post-Disaster Recovery, Routledge, London (2018)
2018 Ahmed KI, 'A partnership-based community engagement approach to recovery of flood-affected communities in Bangladesh', Community Engagement in Post-Disaster Recovery, Routledge, London (2018)
2014 Ahmed KI, Charlesworth E, 'Disaster Risk Reduction for Sustainable Development: The Case Study of Development Workshop France (DWF), Vietnam', Growing Sustainable Communities A Development Guide for Southeast Asia, Tilde University Press, Prahran, VIC (2014)
2014 Ahmed KI, Charlesworth E, 'Interview: Patama Roonrakwit - Community Architects for Shelter and Environment', Humanitarian Architecture 15 stories of architects working after disaster, Routledge, London 67-79 (2014)
2014 Ahmed KI, Charlesworth E, 'Housing and Resilience: Case Studies from Sri Lanka', Recovery from the Indian Ocean Tsunami A Ten-Year Journey, Springer, Tokyo 417-434 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/978-4-431-55117-1_27
2011 Ahmed KI, O'Brien D, 'Donor-Driven Housing, Owner-Driven Needs', Pressures and Distortions City Dwellers as Builders and Critics : Four Views, Oro Editions, New York (2011)
2011 Ahmed KI, O'Brien D, 'Resident Initiated Modification to Reconstruction Housing in Banda Aceh', Managing Urban Disaster Recovery Policy, Planning, Concepts and Cases, Crisis Response Publications, Crowthorne, UK (2011)
2011 Ahmed KI, 'Local Partnerships for Urban Poverty Alleviation Project, Bangladesh', Building Urban Safety Through Slum Upgrading, United Nations Human Settlements, Nairobi 65-77 (2011)
2003 Ahmed KI, 'Rural Architecture', National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh, Asiatic Society, Bangladesh (2003)
2002 Ahmed KI, Carter M, 'Keeping Ideas Alive: Communicating Building for Safety in Bangladesh', Communicating for Development Experience in the Urban Environment, ITDG Publishing, UK (2002)
1998 Ahmed KI, Mitchell M, 'The Traditional Dochala House', Lemonade Stand, Centre for Alternative Technology Publications, UK (1998)
1997 Ahmed KI, 'Architectural Research as Travelogue', Oxford School of Architecture: The First 70 Years, Oxford Brookes University, UK (1997)
1997 Ahmed ZN, Ahmed KI, 'Poverty Alleviation in Bangladesh: Any Scope for Architects?', Role of Engineers in Poverty Alleviation in Developing Countries, Palok, Dhaka (1997)
Show 10 more chapters

Journal article (40 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Ahmed KI, 'Housing and Resilience: Case Studies from the Cook Islands', International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, 7 489-500 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1108/IJDRBE-10-2015-0047
2016 Ahmed KI, Johnson G, 'A Diagnosis of Urban Poor Housing in Vietnam', Open House International, (2016)
2015 Ahmed I, Charlesworth ER, 'An evaluation framework for assessing resilience of post-disaster housing', International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, 6 300-312 (2015)

© 2015, Emerald Group Publishing Limited.Purpose ¿ The purpose of this paper is to discuss the utility of a tool for assessing resilience of housing. After disasters, maximum re... [more]

© 2015, Emerald Group Publishing Limited.Purpose ¿ The purpose of this paper is to discuss the utility of a tool for assessing resilience of housing. After disasters, maximum resources are often allocated for housing reconstruction, and most initiatives on disaster resilient housing have arisen after disasters. With widespread claims by agencies of having ¿built back better¿, it is important to establish an evaluation framework that allows understanding to what extent resilience has been successfully achieved in such housing projects. This paper discusses such a tool developed by the authors. Design/methodology/approach ¿ In a study commissioned by the Australian Shelter Reference Group, the authors have developed an evaluation tool for assessing resilience in housing and tested it in several housing reconstruction projects in the Asia-Pacific region. Various evaluation frameworks were reviewed to develop the tool. An approach derived from the log frame was adapted in alignment with other key approaches. The tool is practical and targeted for agency staff involved in housing projects, evaluators of housing reconstruction projects and communities to assess their housing in terms of resilience. It comprises three main stages of an assessment process with guided activities at each stage. Findings ¿ The tool was tested in the Cook Islands and Sri Lanka, and the key findings of the test assessments are presented to demonstrate the prospects of the tool. While the case study projects all indicated achievement of a level of resilience, problems were evident in terms of designs issues and external factors. Originality/value ¿ Such a tool has the potential to be used more widely through advocacy to prioritise resilience in post-disaster housing reconstruction.

DOI 10.1108/IJDRBE-11-2013-0042
Citations Scopus - 2
2014 Ahmed I, 'Factors in building resilience in urban slums of Dhaka, Bangladesh', 4TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON BUILDING RESILIENCE, INCORPORATING THE 3RD ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE ANDROID DISASTER RESILIENCE NETWORK, 18 745-753 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/S2212-5671(14)00998-8
Citations Web of Science - 2
2014 Ahmed KI, 'Special Issue: Post-Disaster Housing Reconstruction to Enable Resilient Communities', Open House International, 39 (2014)
2014 Ahmed I, Charlesworth E, 'Post-disaster housing reconstruction to enable resilient communities', Open House International, 39 2-6 (2014)
2014 Ireton G, Ahmed I, Charlesworth E, 'Reflections on residential rebuilding after the Victorian black saturday bushfires', Open House International, 39 70-76 (2014)

After the catastrophic 2009 bushfires in the state of Victoria, Australia, the State Government provided information and advice, short-term and temporary accommodation as well as ... [more]

After the catastrophic 2009 bushfires in the state of Victoria, Australia, the State Government provided information and advice, short-term and temporary accommodation as well as financial assistance to bushfire-affected communities. A tension developed between quickly rebuilding housing and re-establishing known social and economic networks versus a slower and more deliberative process that focuses on long-term community outcomes. Whilst there was a widespread assumption that quick rebuilding would be beneficial, resulting in immediate pressure to do so, it became evident that many people were not prepared to, or even did not want to rebuild. Thus it became important to provide time and support for people to consider their options away from the immediate pressures to rebuild that are often inherent in post-disaster recovery processes. This became known as "holding the space" and included the introduction of interim supports such as building temporary villages and other supports which enable people to achieve appropriate interim accommodation without having to rebuild immediately. However, even two years after the bushfires a significant proportion of people remained undecided whether they wanted to rebuild or not. The post-bushfire experience pointed to a number of lessons including the importance of appropriate timing of post-disaster activities, careful targeting of financial assistance, need for developing better and lower cost interim housing options and pre-impact planning. Given the complex nature of rebuilding following a disaster, design professionals should focus not just on the final house, but also look at housing options that blur the distinction between temporary and permanent. Their designs should be quick to build, offer a good quality of life, be affordable for most and be flexible in design for future use.

2014 O'Brien D, Ahmed I, 'Global and regional paradigms of reconstruction housing in Banda aceh', Open House International, 39 37-46 (2014)

This paper draws on research conducted after the 2004 Indian Ocean Earthquake and Tsunami in Aceh, Indonesia, where more than 100,000 houses were built by various agencies followi... [more]

This paper draws on research conducted after the 2004 Indian Ocean Earthquake and Tsunami in Aceh, Indonesia, where more than 100,000 houses were built by various agencies following the massive disaster. The research reveals that the residents in Aceh rarely see their reconstruction houses as 'complete' and modify these houses to suit their personal needs and aspirations. The relationships between the global and regional forces that drive reconstruction agency housing procurement and production are explored, and compared with the outcomes of user-initiated modifications to the houses. From the hundreds of houses reviewed, here four houses are discussed in detail, built by the Asian Development Bank, representing a global paradigm, and Bank Mandiri, representing a regional paradigm. These houses were modified and extended to varying degrees by their residents, exemplifying the ways in which reconstruction agencies, perhaps inadvertently, empowered residents by enabling them to improve their own housing. The outcomes of this transformation process underscore the advantages of a hybrid between global and regional styles, and the desire of the reconstruction housing residents to recapture some of the local housing culture and reflect regional housing characteristics.

2014 Islam H, Jollands M, Setunge S, Ahmed I, Haque N, 'Life cycle assessment and life cycle cost implications of wall assemblages designs', Energy and Buildings, 84 33-45 (2014)

This paper describes the life cycle assessment and life cycle cost analysis of a typical Australian house designs. It evaluates the effect of selected alternative wall assemblages... [more]

This paper describes the life cycle assessment and life cycle cost analysis of a typical Australian house designs. It evaluates the effect of selected alternative wall assemblages on environmental impacts and life cycle cost over the various life stages of buildings (i.e. construction, operations, maintenance and final disposal). A case study house was used as the base case for all the alternative wall assemblage designs. This paper also reports on alternative wall assemblage designs that were produced with variations in external wall cladding, insulation type and thickness, air gap thickness and position. Each design was varied such that it achieved a chosen star rating. Five exterior wall claddings were selected, typical of the Australian building industry. These claddings were brick, autoclave aerated concrete block, fibro-cement sheet, pine saw logs and weatherboard. The results were analyzed for the whole building on a whole life cycle basis in terms of economic and environmental impact. The implications of life cycle environmental impacts and life cycle costs were evaluated and the optimum assemblage design is reported using optimization algorithm. A set of best solution is found depending on factors: the model assumptions, range of environmental and economic indicators considered, and the chosen quantitative criteria.

DOI 10.1016/j.enbuild.2014.07.041
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
2014 Ahmed I, Johnson G, 'Urban safety and poverty in Dhaka, Bangladesh: Understanding the structural and institutional linkages', Australian Planner, 51 272-280 (2014)

Poverty and crime are significant problems in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Many of Dhaka's urban poor are forced to reside in informal settlements, which are typically characterised as 'bre... [more]

Poverty and crime are significant problems in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Many of Dhaka's urban poor are forced to reside in informal settlements, which are typically characterised as 'breeding grounds of evil'. Getting rid of informal settlements is widely seen as the best way of reducing crime. This paper argues this characterisation is misleading and that the processes that generate and perpetuate crime and safety issues in Dhaka are largely external to informal settlements. Drawing on interviews with residents of informal settlements as well as key stakeholders in government and non-government services, this paper suggests that crime and insecurity are perpetuated through a top-down process driven by the powerful through a chain of networks and institutional linkages that capitalise on the extreme vulnerability of the urban poor who live in informal settlements. The findings indicate that until attention is focused on the structural and institutional factors that support these networks, the opportunity for broader, sustainable social change in Dhaka is limited. © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

DOI 10.1080/07293682.2013.837833
2014 McEvoy D, Ahmed I, Trundle A, Sang LT, Diem NN, Suu LTT, et al., 'In support of urban adaptation: a participatory assessment process for secondary cities in Vietnam and Bangladesh', Climate and Development, 6 205-215 (2014)

Vietnam and Bangladesh are countries already impacted by weather-related extreme events. Scientific modelling projections indicate that climate change, and changes to climate vari... [more]

Vietnam and Bangladesh are countries already impacted by weather-related extreme events. Scientific modelling projections indicate that climate change, and changes to climate variability, will increase risks for both countries in the future. Targeting this challenging contemporary agenda, this paper reflects on the lessons learned from a collaborative research project, funded by the Asia Pacific Network for Global Change Research, which was carried out jointly in the Vietnamese city of Hu¿ and the Bangladeshi city of Satkhira. The focus on secondary cities was intentional as they face unique challenges - a combination of rapid growth and development, adverse climate-related impacts, and in many cases less institutional adaptive capacity than their primary city counterparts. Whilst numerous assessment tool kits already exist, these have typically been developed for rural or natural resource contexts. Therefore, the objective of this action research activity was to develop a flexible suite of participatory assessment tools and methodologies that were refined specifically for the urban context; as well as being easy to use by local practitioners at the city and neighbourhood scales. This paper summarizes the research and stakeholder engagement activity that was carried out before presenting the main findings from each of the case study cities (detailing both climate-related risks and potential adaptation options). This analysis is further extended to include a reflective critique of the assessment process, a comparative analysis of the activity carried out in the two case studies, and the 'South-South' learning process that occurred between project partners. Key findings are then distilled to put forward recommendations in support of climate change assessment activity in secondary cities across the Asia-Pacific region. © 2014 © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

DOI 10.1080/17565529.2014.886991
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 Ahmed I, McEvoy D, 'Post-tsunami resettlement in Sri Lanka and India: Site planning, infrastructure and services', International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, 5 53-65 (2014)

Purpose: After the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, major resettlement programmes were implemented in the affected countries including Sri Lanka and India. New settlements were built fr... [more]

Purpose: After the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, major resettlement programmes were implemented in the affected countries including Sri Lanka and India. New settlements were built from scratch on vacant land, which consisted of building new houses and provision of infrastructure and services. Some of these programmes in Sri Lanka and India were reviewed in an Australian Research Council (ARC) funded research and this paper presents and analyses some of the findings of the research. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach: The research is based on interviews of residents and representatives of agencies involved in planning and implementing the resettlement programmes, and on-site observations. The investigation examined critical aspects of settlement development including site planning, transport, drainage, water supply, sanitation, waste management and security. Findings: Very little site planning guidelines were available specifically for resettlement programmes; in both the case study countries, general planning guidelines were applied. Provision and management of infrastructure and services presents great challenges in developing countries as high capital investment and good technical skills for design, implementation and maintenance are required. Some of the resettlement schemes had the advantage of being centrally located and hence had access to schools, health centres and other facilities. However, others were in isolated locations and beneficiaries faced problems in accessing basic facilities. Drainage was a problem - most schemes did not have any surface drainage plan; low areas had not been elevated, slopes not levelled, and land not compacted before construction. Electricity and water supply had been provided in all the programmes, but conditions and quality varied. In many of the schemes, sanitation presented a problem. However, in Chennai, the sewage system worked well and this was one achievement all interview respondents praised. Solid waste management and security posed additional problems. Originality/value: In the global context of increasing frequency and intensity of disasters due to climate change, adequate planning and implementation of reconstruction and resettlement programmes has become more important than ever. In this regard, the lessons gained in this paper should be of value and can provide guidance to post-disaster resettlement programmes in developing countries. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

DOI 10.1108/IJDRBE-08-2012-0028
2014 Usamah M, Handmer J, Mitchell D, Ahmed I, 'Can the vulnerable be resilient? Co-existence of vulnerability and disaster resilience: Informal settlements in the Philippines', International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, 10 178-189 (2014)

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd.This paper explores the relationship between vulnerability and resilience in the context of informal settlements, using a case study of two barangays in a rur... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd.This paper explores the relationship between vulnerability and resilience in the context of informal settlements, using a case study of two barangays in a rural province in the Philippines. Central to the discussion in this paper is whether and how vulnerability and resilience can exist simultaneously. The authors first identify community vulnerability, which is explored through geographical, economic, and physical vulnerability. Another element involves land-related vulnerability characterised by unsustainable land use, poor urban planning, non-existence of building codes and weak land administration. Approximately sixty per cent of all properties in the case study areas are held in informal land tenures. Many of these informal settlers have established houses on land with a high hazard risk - for example, adjacent to rivers, on disused railway reserves and along road corridors. The result is they face the threat of eviction, and may have difficulty returning to their land after disasters.Qualitative analysis of households in the case study areas revealed that the strength of social relationships helps to reduce the vulnerability of the communities. A paradoxical relationship between vulnerability and resilience is evident. Strong community perceptions of their level of resilience to the impacts of disasters are supported by the social domains of the community. They have inbuilt resilience resulting from the perception of disasters as part of life, strong social bonds and government awareness of the validity of the informal settlements.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijdrr.2014.08.007
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2013 Cairns G, Ahmed I, Mullett J, Wright G, 'Scenario method and stakeholder engagement: Critical reflections on a climate change scenarios case study', Technological Forecasting and Social Change, 80 1-10 (2013)

Scenario method is presented in the literature as a means for engaging heterogeneous stakeholder groups to explore climate change futures and to inform policy and planning for ada... [more]

Scenario method is presented in the literature as a means for engaging heterogeneous stakeholder groups to explore climate change futures and to inform policy and planning for adaptation responses. We discuss a case study project investigating possible interactions between climate change impacts and a proposed major port expansion in Australia. The study engaged participants from the private sector, government and environmental groups, with input from college students from the local area. Semi-structured interviews and a scenario workshop were employed, creating individual space for expression of ideas, then a collaborative space for sharing these, exploring differences of perception and meaning, and developing a set of possible and plausible scenarios. Whilst the workshop resulted in consensus on key issues and proposed actions, intended to inform policy formation and planning, there was an unforeseen lack of short term follow up and of the groups working more closely together. We discuss the reasons for this through reflective critical analysis of both our own process and of contingent factors in the wider contextual environment. We conclude that the basic scenario approach is valuable, but does not itself act as a catalyst for effecting change when multiple agencies, interests and agendas and strong contingent factors are present. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.techfore.2012.08.005
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 14
2012 Ahmed KI, O'Brien D, 'Self-Initiatives and Transformations: Post-Tsunami Housing in Aceh, Indonesia', The International Journal of the Constructed Environment, 1 73-86 (2012)
2012 Ahmed I, 'The courtyard in rural homesteads of Bangladesh', Vernacular Architecture, 43 47-57 (2012)

In rural settlements of the floodplains in Bangladesh, an intrinsic element is the homestead. The homestead layout is defined by the courtyard, formed by the arrangement of dwelli... [more]

In rural settlements of the floodplains in Bangladesh, an intrinsic element is the homestead. The homestead layout is defined by the courtyard, formed by the arrangement of dwelling units and ancillary buildings around a rectangular open space. The courtyard has important physical and functional characteristics derived from local climatic requirements and living patterns. However, particularly in this predominantly Muslim society, the cultural norm of maintaining women's privacy is an important factor behind the development of this archetypal space. Nonetheless, other ethnic communities in the floodplains also often have courtyards, suggesting that it is a regional archetype. The archetypal courtyard is now subject to transformation due to social, economic and environmental changes. If this trend continues, it would signal the loss of an important and long-lasting regional expression that has resulted from the blending of culture, climate and nature. © The Vernacular Architecture Group 2012.

DOI 10.1179/0305547712Z.0000000005
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2012 McEvoy D, Ahmed I, Mullett J, 'The impact of the 2009 heat wave on Melbourne's critical infrastructure', Local Environment, 17 783-796 (2012)

The impact of the extreme heat wave that affected Melbourne, Australia, in two distinct phases in January and February 2009 was severe, with 374 (heat) and 173 (bushfire) excess d... [more]

The impact of the extreme heat wave that affected Melbourne, Australia, in two distinct phases in January and February 2009 was severe, with 374 (heat) and 173 (bushfire) excess deaths. Whilst the human health issues have been covered in detail in policy and academic arenas, much less attention has been paid to the adverse impacts on urban infrastructure. Analysis of this event, underpinned by participatory actor-based research, has shown that the impacts were experienced disproportionately across different infrastructure types. For water, telecommunications and airports, the impacts were relatively minor and the impact on rail transport and roads (and to a lesser extent, seaports) was of moderate significance, whereas research findings indicate that the electricity sector was found to be the most vulnerable. This paper focuses on the sectors that were worst impacted: electricity, rail and road transport. Commentary identifies the direct and indirect impacts of the heat event, including associated cascading effects, as well as considering actual and potential adaptation responses both before and after the event. Concluding, the authors reflect on the implications of the heat wave for urban resilience, emphasising the crucial importance of understanding the urban environment as a complex and interconnected system. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/13549839.2012.678320
Citations Scopus - 7
2012 Mulligan M, Ahmed I, Shaw J, Mercer D, Nadarajah Y, 'Lessons for long-term social recovery following the 2004 tsunami: Community, livelihoods, tourism and housing', Environmental Hazards, 11 38-51 (2012)

The Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004 galvanized world attention like no other natural disaster before. Unprecedented amounts of aid were given and a record number of international aid... [more]

The Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004 galvanized world attention like no other natural disaster before. Unprecedented amounts of aid were given and a record number of international aid agencies were involved in relief and recovery operations. Major reviews of the response to the disaster have suggested that the immediate relief effort was better than expected. However, weaknesses in the longer term recovery work were identified within months of the disaster and yet the same weaknesses were being confirmed four and five years later. Even though many studies have been published on the tsunami disaster there are still many lessons to be learnt, particularly in relation to social recovery as distinct from the restoration of destroyed or damaged infrastructure. This paper presents an overview of the findings of a study that was conducted over a period of four years across five different tsunami-affected local areas of Sri Lanka and southern India. The study focused on lessons to be learnt in relation to rebuilding community, restoring livelihoods, recreating an appropriate tourism industry and providing relevant housing and planned settlements for disaster survivors. The paper argues that 'build back better' is possible, but only if 'asset replacement' strategies are replaced by integrated physical and social planning to address local needs in culturally appropriate ways. Much of what the authors advocate may seem to be little more than 'common sense' and many of our findings echo those of many other post-tsunami evaluations. Yet patient and well-integrated approaches to disaster recovery are all too rare in a world that is experiencing so many natural disasters. Because the 2004 tsunami evoked an unprecedented global response it is important to ensure that the lessons of the recovery effort are clearly learnt and this paper aims to convert research findings into a clear strategy for long-term social recovery. © 2012 Taylor & Francis.

DOI 10.1080/17477891.2011.635186
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2011 Ahmed I, 'Lifestyle and affordability choices in traditional housing of old Dhaka', Open House International, 36 74-84 (2011)

Affordability and lifestyle choices in housing are critical to meet basic human needs for shelter, security and wellbeing. The meaning of a house for a particular group of people ... [more]

Affordability and lifestyle choices in housing are critical to meet basic human needs for shelter, security and wellbeing. The meaning of a house for a particular group of people and what is 'affordable' for a particular community is the critical issue. Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh, has greater population density and rate of expansion compared to almost any other mega cities of Asia. The historic core of the city known as old Dhaka is a combination of several traditional neighborhoods. Houses in these traditional neighborhoods are not only places to live, rather an integral unit of a social system, having a good mix of place of work and individual expression in living. They also show flexibility and adaptability (with more scope for personalization and individual life style choices) compared to the contemporary housing stock. One of the success factors in these traditional houses is the healthy mix of the income ranges to avoid a ghetto effect of low cost housing. The recent rapid urbanization has led to a discontinuity of the traditional housing form of old Dhaka, leading to a disintegration of the mix of lifestyle choices and affordability. Following popular market trends, they are often replaced by housing blocks in a higher density ignoring the need for a diverse mix. This paper studies the traditional housing of old Dhaka with two case study neighborhoods. Several elements of housing like the common price, materials and construction, space layout, scale, social space, facades, street interface, etc are selected for a qualitative study. Local residents interview, archival records, maps, Plans, figure-ground, aerial images are used to analyze, identify and demonstrate the elements that made them socio-culturally sustainable and affordable for the community. With the analysis, lessons from the traditional housing form that may contribute to the new housing in Dhaka are identified.

Citations Scopus - 1
2011 Ahmed I, 'An overview of post-disaster permanent housing reconstruction in developing countries', International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, 2 148-164 (2011)

Purpose: A set of guidelines widely agreed by the international humanitarian aid community, such as the Sphere Handbook, is currently lacking for permanent housing reconstruction ... [more]

Purpose: A set of guidelines widely agreed by the international humanitarian aid community, such as the Sphere Handbook, is currently lacking for permanent housing reconstruction in developing countries. The paper aims to address this gap by reviewing the field and presenting a set of selected examples that offer lessons for informing, developing and promoting wider good practice. Design/methodology/approach: An extensive literature review on post-disaster housing reconstruction in developing countries pointed to the significant impacts of disasters on housing in developing countries and the great challenges involved in the reconstruction process; it also allowed identifying efforts at framing good practice guidelines by humanitarian and other agencies. Findings: The paper finds that, while the review largely indicated the major challenges and shortcomings in the field, it also allowed identifying some examples of good practice and the reasons for their effectiveness. Originality/value: As argued here, there are a number of independent guidelines for post-disaster reconstruction in developing countries, but hardly any which are widely endorsed and can be followed by humanitarian agencies. The paper therefore draws together the key issues and examples of good practice as a basis for informing the development of guidelines. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

DOI 10.1108/17595901111149141
Citations Scopus - 12
2010 Ahmed KI, Shaw J, 'Calamity and Aftermath: The Sri Lanka Experience', Indian Ocean Digest, 26 (2010)
2010 Ahmed I, Sager J, Cuong LV, 'Sustainable low-income urban housing in Vietnam: Context and strategies', Open House International, 35 56-65 (2010)

This paper presents concepts important for understanding the potential of sustainable low-income housing in Vietnam, with a focus on key environmental, socio-economic, and cultura... [more]

This paper presents concepts important for understanding the potential of sustainable low-income housing in Vietnam, with a focus on key environmental, socio-economic, and cultural dimensions that bear on its housing sector. It examines challenges for sustainable urban development in Hanoi and HCMC, Vietnam's two main cities. Recognising the current challenges in balancing affordability and sustainability, the study explores Vietnam's lack of adequate and affordable housing and the problem of its urban slums. Synergistic strategies suitable for the Vietnamese context are then suggested for sustainable low-income housing in these two cities.

2009 Ahmed KI, Shaw J, Mulligan M, 'Rebuilding Sustainable Communities in the Wake of Disasters', Asia Currents, (2009)
2007 Ahmed KI, 'A Study of Costs and Improvement Potential of Housing of the Ultra-Poor in Bangladesh', Local Voice, 1 (2007)
2006 Ahmed KI, 'The Rural Bangladeshi Courtyard', BRAC University Journal, 3 9-15 (2006)
2006 Ahmed KI, 'Options for Flood Risk and Damage Reduction in Bangladesh [Book Review]', Asian Disaster Management News, 12 (2006)
2006 Ahmed KI, 'Post Disaster Building Damage Assessment', Asian Disaster Management News, 12 (2006)
2003 Ahmed KI, 'Quest for Regionalist Architecture in Bangladesh', Open House International, 28 5-14 (2003)
2002 Ahmed KI, 'MCR Tile in Bangladesh', Basin News, 24 (2002)
2001 Ahmed KI, 'Building Safer Houses in Flood-Prone Areas: Participatory Action Research on Low-Income Housing in Rural Bangladesh', Basin News, 22 (2001)
1999 Ahmed KI, Ruskulis O, 'Better Building Materials for Low-Income Settlements', Basin News, 17 (1999)
1998 Ahmed KI, 'Vernacular Architecture of Bangladesh', SELAVIP Newsletter, April (1998)
1998 Ahmed I, 'Crisis of natural building materials and institutionalised self-help housing: the case of Grameen Bank in Bangladesh', Habitat International, 22 355-374 (1998)

Traditional rural housing is largely based on the use of locally available natural resources as prime building materials, usually in a process of self-help building undertaken by ... [more]

Traditional rural housing is largely based on the use of locally available natural resources as prime building materials, usually in a process of self-help building undertaken by the community. Such housing is well adopted to a natural environment with widely available resources, and supports people's direct involvement in the construction of their dwellings. However, the advent of a cash economy and current scarcity of natural resources has greatly affected the self-help building process. In rural Bangladesh, affluent households are shifting to manufactured materials and skilled builders, and the quality of housing of low-income households is declining. For the latter, self-help is the only option, and recognition of this fact and of the increasing decline in the quality of their housing has prompted institutional intervention. This paper discusses the Grameen Bank's rural housing programme in Bangladesh which provides loans for manufactured building components for low-income rural households to build houses on a self-help basis. A review of this programme indicates some of its strengths and shortcomings in the context of scarcity of natural building materials and widespread poverty.

DOI 10.1016/S0197-3975(98)00012-5
Citations Scopus - 3
1996 Ahmed KI, 'Vernacular Architecture in Bangladesh and Future Directions for its Preservation and Upgrading', Architecture and Planning Journal, 2 (1996)
1995 Ahmed KI, 'Cartoons and the City: Socio-Political Commentary', EARTH, 2 (1995)
1995 Ahmed KI, 'Workshop on Orangi Pilot Project, Pakistan', EARTH, 2 (1995)
1995 Ahmed KI, 'Architecture of SAARC Nations [Book Review]', EARTH, 2 (1995)
1994 Ahmed KI, 'Earth Architecture of Bangladesh and Future Directions for its Conservation and Upgrading', Protibesh, 8 (1994)
1994 Ahmed KI, Rahman MM, 'Report on ¿Technical Conference on Tropical Urban Climates¿', STHAPATYA & NIRMAN, (1994)
1992 Ahmed KI, 'Cross-cultural Perspectives on the Preservation of Earthen Architecture', US/ICOMOS Newsletter, 7 (1992)
Show 37 more journal articles

Review (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Ahmed KI, Fien J, 'Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam (2010)
1997 Ahmed KI, 'Bangladesh; Bengalee; Namoshudra; Kitchen (1997)

Conference (24 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Ahmed I, 'Building Resilience of Urban Slums in Dhaka, Bangladesh', Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences (2016) [E1]
DOI 10.1016/j.sbspro.2016.04.023
2016 Ahmed KI, 'Safety and Security in Slum Upgrading Initiatives: The Case of LPUPAP, Bangladesh', 6th International Conference on Building Resilience (2016)
2016 Ahmed KI, 'Developing Disaster Resilient Rural Housing in Coastal Bangladesh', Sustainable Futures Conference on Architecture and Construction in the Global South (2016)
2012 O'Brien D, Ahmed KI, 'Stage Two and Beyond: Improving Residents' Capacity to Modify Reconstruction Agency Housing' (2012)
2011 Ahmed KI, McEvoy D, 'A Framework for Assessment of Climate Change Risks and Adaptation Options for Coastal Secondary Cities in the Asia-Pacific Region' (2011)
2010 Ahmed KI, McEvoy D, 'Post-Disaster Housing Reconstruction: Post-Occupancy Case Studies from Sri Lanka', Proceedings of the Australia and New Zealand Architectural Science Association (ANZAScA) 44th Annual Conference (2010)
2009 Ahmed KI, O'Brien D, 'Sustainable Organic Building Materials for Housing: The Case of Post-Disaster Reconstruction in Indonesia', Proceedings of the Australia and New Zealand Architectural Science Association (ANZAScA) 43rd Annual Conference (2009)
2009 Ahmed KI, Sager J, 'Toward Sustainable and Adaptive Built Environments in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam' (2009)
2009 Ahmed KI, Shaw J, 'Post-Disaster New Urban Development: The Case of Siribopura New Town, Sri Lanka' (2009)
2008 O'Brien D, Ahmed KI, Hes D, 'Housing Reconstruction in Aceh: Relationships Between House Type and Environmental Sustainability' (2008)
2008 Ahmed KI, 'Challenges and Opportunities of Post-Disaster Housing Reconstruction: The Asian Context' (2008)
2004 Ahmed KI, 'Costs and Improvement Potential of Housing of the Ultra-Poor in Bangladesh' (2004)
2003 Ahmed KI, Rasul I, Seraj SM, 'Bamboo Cultivation and Rural Housing in Bangladesh', Proceedings of the Second Annual Paper Meet and International Conference on Civil Engineering (2003)
2003 Ahmed KI, 'Constraints to Low-Income Communities in Building Adequate Housing' (2003)
2001 Ahmed KI, 'Participatory Action Research (PAR) on Building-for-Safety Options for Low-Income Rural Housing in Flood-Prone Areas: Project in Gopalganj', Proceedings of the First International Conference and Annual Paper Meet of IEB Civil Enginering Division (2001)
2000 Ahmed KI, 'Participatory Action Research on Low-Income Rural Housing in Flood-Prone Areas', Village Infrastructure to Cope with the Environment, Proceedings of the Third Housing and Hazards International Conference (2000)
2000 Rasul I, Ahmed KI, 'Bamboo Cultivation and Rural Housing in Bangladesh', Village infrastructure to cope with the environment : proceedings of the Third Housing & Hazards International Conferenc (2000)
2000 Ahmed KI, 'Participatory Action Research on Building Safer Houses in Flood-Prone Rural Areas of Bangladesh' (2000)
2000 Ahmed KI, Kabir KH, 'A Conceptual Review of Participatory Practice' (2000)
1999 Ahmed KI, 'Housing Loans - A Long-Term Obligation?' (1999)
1999 Ahmed KI, 'Post-Flood Investigations 1998 and an Action Agenda for Rural Housing in Bangladesh', Affordable village building technologies: Proceedings of the Second Dhaka Housing & Hazards International Seminar (1999)
1998 Ahmed KI, 'Review of an Apparently Sustainable Solution in a Peri-Urban Location in Bangladesh' (1998)
1997 Ahmed KI, Hodgson RLP, 'The Tiverton-Sundarban Link: A Case of Partnership at the Grassroots' (1997)
1996 Ahmed KI, 'Rural Housing: Crisis of Natural Resources and Institutional Intervention' (1996)
Show 21 more conferences

Report (33 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Ahmed KI, 'Housing Technical Report for the Feasibility Study and Proposal Writing for Strengthening National Adaptive Capacity through Climate Resilient Rural Housing in Coastal Bangladesh', United Nations Development Programme, 50 (2015)
2014 Ahmed KI, 'Bushfires and Housing: A Housing Reference Tool for At-Risk Communities', RMIT, 50 (2014)
2014 Ahmed KI, Charlesworth E, 'Urban Disaster Management Toolkit: An Assessment-Based Approach to World Vision's Disaster Management Dimensions', World Vision International, 47 (2014)
2013 Ahmed KI, 'Building Resilience of Urban Slum Settlements: A Multi-Sectoral Approach to Capacity Building', Habitat for Humanity Australia, 50 (2013)
2013 Ahmed KI, Rahman I, 'Early Recovery Response for Cyclone Aila Affected Most Vulnerable People of Khulna District in Bangladesh', BangladeshRed Crescent Society, 50 (2013)
2012 Charlesworth E, Ahmed KI, 'Scoping Study: Shelter and Disaster Risk Reduction in the Asia-Pacific Region', Shelter Reference Group, 50 (2012)
2012 McEvoy D, Ahmed KI, Trundle A, Sang LT, Diem NN, Suu LTT, et al., 'Assessment of Climate Change Risks and Adaptation Options for Secondary Cities in Southwestern Bangladesh and Central Viet Nam', Asia-Pacific Network (APN) for Global Change Research, Japan, 100 (2012)
2012 Ahmed KI, Gardener J, Mumtaz B, Claussen J, Ahmed I, Ray AS, Marshall RC, 'Mid-Term Review of the Urban Partnerships for Poverty Reduction (UPPR) Program', United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), 50 (2012)
2012 Charlesworth E, Ahmed KI, 'Literature Review: Disaster Resilient Shelter and Leading Practice', Shelter Reference Group, Australia, 50 (2012)
2012 Ahmed KI, 'Background Paper: Factors Pertaining to Building Resilience in Urban Settlements in Dhaka, Bangladesh', Habitat for Humanity Australia, 50 (2012)
2011 Ahmed KI, Fuengeld H, McEvoy D, 'Participatory Vulnerability and Capacity Assessment (PVCA) Toolkit for Integrating Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation', Oxfam, 50 (2011)
2010 Shaw J, Ahmed KI, 'Design and Delivery of Post-Disaster Housing Resettlement Programs: Case Studies from Sri Lanka and India', AusAID, 52 (2010)
2010 Reeves J, Foelz C, Grace P, Best P, Marcussen T, Mushtaq S, et al., 'Impacts and Adaptation Response of Infrastructure and Communities to Heatwaves: The Southern Australian Experience of 2009 - with Specific Reference to the Melbourne 2009 Heatwave', Queensland University of Technology, 152 (2010)
2010 Ahmed KI, 'Urban Safety for the Poor: The Case of Dhaka, Bangladesh', United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia Pacific (UNESCAP), 50 (2010)
2009 Ahmed KI, 'Infrastructure Scoping Study: Sustainable Built Environments in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City', Global Cities Research Institute, 50 (2009)
2009 Cairns G, Ahmed KI, 'Exploring the Relationship between Proposed Expansion of the Port of Hastings as Melbourne¿s Second Port and Climate Change Events and Impacts', Global Cities Research Institute, RMIT, 50 (2009)
2009 Cuong LV, Ahmed KI, Sager J, 'Sustainable Low-Income Housing in Hanoi and HCMC, Vietnam', Climate Change Adaptation Programme (CCAP), RMIT University and Vietnam Green Building Council (VGBC), 100 (2009)
2009 Ahmed KI, 'Assessment of Safety and Security Issues in Slum Upgrading Initiatives: Case Study of LPUPAP, Bangladesh', UN-Habitat, 50 (2009)
2009 Ahmed KI, Nautilus Institute Team, 'DPRK Humanitarian Building Energy Efficiency Training and Demonstration (BEET) Project: Fact Finding Mission to Pyongyang, DPRK', Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainability, 100 (2009)
2008 Ahmed KI, Urbis/DIG, 'Rapid Urban Diagnostic and Intervention Strategy for DIG in Dhaka, Bangladesh', Bill Gates Foundation, 100 (2008)
2008 Ahmed KI, 'Scoping Report on Kianh Foundation Day Care Centre, Hoi Anh, Vietnam', Architects Without Borders (AWF), 100 (2008)
2008 Wilderspin I, Barnham J, Gill G, Ahmed KI, Lockwood J, 'Evaluation of Disaster Risk Reduction Mainstreaming in DG ECHO's Humanitarian Actions', ECHO, 100 (2008)
2007 Ahmed KI, 'Emergency Telecommunications and Early Warning Systems for Disaster Preparedness in Chittagong, Bangladesh', ITU, 100 (2007)
2007 Ahmed KI, 'Urban Poor Housing in Bangladesh and Role of ACHR', ACHR, 50 (2007)
2006 Ahmed KI, 'Study on Good Urban Governance in Thailand in the Post-Tsunami Context', ADPC/USAID, 100 (2006)
2005 Ahmed KI, Kabir KH, 'A Study of Housing of Pahari Communities in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh', the Centre for Advanced Studies and Research (CASR), Bangladesh University of Engineering & Technology (BUET), 50 (2005)
2003 Ahmed KI, 'A Study of Costs and Improvement Potential of Housing of the Ultra-Poor in Bangladesh', Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC) Targeted Ultra-Poor Programme (TUP), Bangladesh, 100 (2003)
2002 Tod I, Ahmed KI, Marandy J, 'Report on Shelter, Water Supplies and Sanitation in the Programme Chars', UK Department for International Development (DFID), 60 (2002)
2001 Ahmed KI, 'Participatory Action Research (PAR) on Building for Safety Options for Low-Income Housing in Flood-Prone Rural Areas', Grameen Bank/Trust Program for Research on Poverty Alleviation (PRPA), Dhaka, - (2001)
2001 Ahmed KI, 'Participatory Action Research (PAR) on Building for Safety Options for Low-Income Rural Housing in Flood-Prone Areas: Study in Gopalganj', DFID, - (2001)
2001 Ahmed KI, 'Report on Housing & Hazards Forum Workshops', DFID, - (2001)
1998 Ahmed KI, Hodgson RLP, 'Guidelines for Post-Flood Rehabilitation of Village Infrastructure', Christian Aid, - (1998)
1995 Ahmed KI, 'Hollow Cylindrical Ferro-Cement Columns', Grameen Bank/Trust Program for Research on Poverty Alleviation (PRPA), - (1995)
Show 30 more reports

Thesis / Dissertation (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
1999 Ahmed KI, A micro-level view of low-income rural housing in Bangladesh, Oxford Brooke University (1999)
1991 Ahmed KI, Up to the waist in mud: the assessment and application of earth-derivative architecture in rural Bangladesh, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1991)
1986 Ahmed KI, Institutional and educational complex, Patuakhali, Bangladesh, Indian Institute of Technology - Kharagpur (1986)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $96,201

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20172 grants / $96,201

Critical Factors for Post-Disaster Educational Continuity in Urban Flood Impacts in South and South East Asia$84,201

Funding body: Save the Children

Funding body Save the Children
Project Team Doctor Jason Von Meding, Doctor Amanda Howard, Doctor Ifte Ahmed, Professor Humayun Kabir, Dr Hai Nam, Dr Indrajit Pal
Scheme Tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700629
Type Of Funding International - Non Competitive
Category 3IFB
UON Y

Building Capacity for Fijian Disaster Resilience: Developing Women Community Leaders$12,000

Funding body: Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

Funding body Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
Project Team Doctor Ifte Ahmed, Associate Professor Graham Brewer, Doctor Helen Giggins, Doctor Thayaparan Gajendran
Scheme Australian National Commission for UNESCO Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1601191
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.4

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Retrofitting Methods and Modelling Tools for Enhanced Energy Efficiency and Preservation of Historic Buildings in Australia PhD (Architecture), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 19
United Kingdom 2
Viet Nam 2
Bangladesh 1
Singapore 1
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News

New UN partnership for UON

December 19, 2016

The University of Newcastle (UON) has been welcomed as an institutional partner of UN-Habitat (United Nations Centre for Human Settlements).

Dr Ifte Ahmed

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Architecture and Built Environment
Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment

Contact Details

Email ifte.ahmed@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 6011

Office

Room A-G24
Location Callaghan campus
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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