Dr Ian Van Altena

Dr Ian Van Altena

Lecturer

School of Environmental and Life Sciences (Chemistry)

Career Summary

Biography

Undergraduate: James Cook University, Australia. BSc Chemistry, from 1972. BSc (Hons) with Prof. John Coll 1975

(Post)Graduate: The University of Alberta, Canada. PhD (Chemistry), from 1976, with Prof. William Ayer: Secondary metabolites from fungi

Post-doctoral fellow: The University of British Columbia, Canada, from 1982, with Prof. Raymond Andersen: Siderophores from dinoflagellates

Senior Teaching Fellow: University of Adelaide, Australia, from 1985: Laboratory coordinator. Research: Marine Natural Products Chemistry and chemical ecology

Assistant Lecturer: University of Adelaide, Australia, 1991: Laboratory coordinator, lecturer. Research: Marine Natural Products Chemistry and chemical ecology

Lecturer: The University of Newcastle, Australia, from 1992. Research: Natural Products Chemistry and chemical ecology


Qualifications

  • PhD (Chemistry), University of Alberta - Canada
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), James Cook University
  • Bachelor of Science, James Cook University

Keywords

  • chemical ecology
  • compound identification by spectrometry
  • environmental chemistry
  • general chemistry
  • medicinal chemistry
  • natural products chemistry
  • organic chemistry

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
030401 Biologically Active Molecules 10
030502 Natural Products Chemistry 80
060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology) 10

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/1991 - 1/01/1992 Assistant Lecturer The University of Adelaide
Department of Organic Chemistry
Australia
1/01/1985 - 1/01/1991 Senior Teaching Fellow The University of Adelaide
Department of Organic Chemistry
Australia
1/06/1982 - 1/06/1984 Post-Doctoral Fellow University of British Columbia
Department of Oceanography
Canada

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
Treasurer - Natural Products Group, RACI Natural Products Group, RACI
Australia
Member - American Chemical Society American Chemical Society
United States
Member - Royal Society of Chemistry Royal Society of Chemistry
Australia
Member - Royal Australian Chemical Society Royal Australian Chemical Society
Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
CHEM1010 Introductory Chemistry I
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia
lecturer, coordinator 2/03/2002 - 13/11/2016
chem1020 Introductory Chemistry II
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia
coordinator 3/02/2002 - 13/12/2016
CHEM2310 Organic Chemistry II
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia
lecturer, tutor 3/03/2002 - 13/12/2016
CHEM3310 Advanced Organic Synthesis
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia
lecturer, demonstrator 2/03/2002 - 13/12/2016
CHEM2610 Environmental Chemistry II
Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle
lecturer, demonstrator 2/03/2002 - 13/12/2016
CHEM3550 Medicinal and Biological Chemistry
Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle
lecturer, demonstrator 25/07/2016 - 13/12/2016
CHEM3570 Spectroscopic Characterisation of Compounds
Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle
Lecturer, tutor 2/03/2002 - 13/12/2015
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (39 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Van TN, Vuong QV, Bowyer MC, Van Altena IA, Scarlett CJ, 'MICROWAVE-ASSISTED EXTRACTION FOR SAPONINS AND ANTIOXIDANT CAPACITY FROM XAO TAM PHAN (PARAMIGNYA TRIMERA) ROOT', JOURNAL OF FOOD PROCESSING AND PRESERVATION, 41 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/jfpp.12851
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong, Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett
2017 Bhuyan DJ, Vuong QV, Chalmers AC, van Altena IA, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Phytochemical, antibacterial and antifungal properties of an aqueous extract of Eucalyptus microcorys leaves', South African Journal of Botany, 112 180-185 (2017)

© 2017 SAAB Australia is home to over 800 different species of Eucalyptus and traditionally, many Eucalyptus species have been utilised to heal wounds and treat fungal infections... [more]

© 2017 SAAB Australia is home to over 800 different species of Eucalyptus and traditionally, many Eucalyptus species have been utilised to heal wounds and treat fungal infections by the Indigenous people of Australia. In view of this, our study was designed to investigate the phytochemical, antibacterial and antifungal properties of crude aqueous extract of E. microcorys leaves. The freeze-dried powdered extract was prepared and the phytochemical profile was studied by analysing the total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), proanthocyanidins, antioxidants and saponins. The TPC, TFC and proanthocyanidin values found were: 501.76¿±¿14.47¿mg of gallic acid equivalents per g, 61.53¿±¿0.83¿mg of rutin equivalents per g and 10.76¿±¿0.89¿mg of catechin equivalents per g, respectively. The antioxidant values expressed in mg trolox equivalents per g of extract (mg TE/g) were: ABTS¿=¿1073.13¿±¿10.73¿mg TE/g, DPPH¿=¿1035.44¿±¿65.54¿mg TE/g and CUPRAC¿=¿1524.30¿±¿66.43¿mg TE/g. The powdered extract was also evaluated for activity against three pathogenic bacterial strains (Escheric hia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Staphylococcus lugdunensis); and three fungal strains (Geotrichum candidum, Aspergillus brasiliensis and Candida albicans) using the disc diffusion method and 96 well plate-based method with resazurin dye. The extract exhibited clear zones of inhibition against the tested bacteria and fungi. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were demonstrated to be: A. brasiliensis¿=¿2.44¿µg/mL, G. candidum¿=¿4.88¿µg/mL, S. lugdunensis¿=¿78¿µg/mL, E. coli¿=¿156.25¿µg/mL, E. aerogenes¿=¿312.5¿µg/mL and C. albicans¿=¿1250¿µg/mL. These results reveal the significant potential of E. microcorys as a source of phenolics, antioxidants and antimicrobial agents and also highlight the necessity of further purification and characterisation of solitary bioactive compounds for their prospective applications in food, nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries.

DOI 10.1016/j.sajb.2017.05.030
Co-authors Anita Chalmers, Michael Bowyer, Vanquan Vuong, C Scarlett
2017 Bhuyan DJ, Vuong QV, Chalmers AC, van Altena IA, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Development of the ultrasonic conditions as an advanced technique for extraction of phenolic compounds from Eucalyptus robusta', SEPARATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 52 100-112 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/01496395.2016.1250777
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong, Anita Chalmers, Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett
2017 Bhuyan DJ, Vuong QV, Bond DR, Chalmers AC, van Altena IA, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Exploring the Least Studied Australian Eucalypt Genera: Corymbia and Angophora for Phytochemicals with Anticancer Activity against Pancreatic Malignancies.', Chem Biodivers, 14 (2017)
DOI 10.1002/cbdv.201600291
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Danielle Bond, Vanquan Vuong, C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer, Anita Chalmers
2017 Dang TT, van Vuong Q, Schreider MJ, Bowyer MC, van Altena IA, Scarlett CJ, 'Optimisation of ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions for phenolic content and antioxidant activities of the alga Hormosira banksii using response surface methodology', Journal of Applied Phycology, 1-13 (2017)

© 2017 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht This study aimed to optimise ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) conditions of the brown alga Hormosira banksii for total phenol... [more]

© 2017 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht This study aimed to optimise ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) conditions of the brown alga Hormosira banksii for total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activities including total antioxidant capacity (ABTS), DPPH free radical scavenging capacity (DPPH) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) using response surface methodology (RSM). Box¿Behnken design was employed to assess the effect of ultrasonic temperature, time and power on the TPC and antioxidant activities of the extracts. The results showed that RSM was an accurate and reliable method in predicting TPC and antioxidant activities (ABTS, DPPH and FRAP) of the extracts with R 2 values of 0.97, 0.96, 0.92 and 0.94, respectively. The ultrasonic temperature and time had the significant impact on TPC and antioxidant capacities. The optimal UAE conditions for the maximal values of TPC and antioxidant activities were of 30 °C, 60 min and power 60%, or 150 W. The values of TPC and antioxidant activities (ABTS, DPPH, FRAP) achieved under these parameters were 23.12 (mg GAE g -1 ), 85.64 (mg TE g -1 ), 47.24 (mg TE g -1 ) and 12.56 (mg TE g -1 ), respectively. UAE was found to be more efficient in comparison to conventional extraction, with shorter time for extraction and higher of TPC level and antioxidant activities. Therefore, ultrasonic-assisted extraction using RSM is effective for extraction and further isolation and purification of phenolic compounds from H. banksii. In addition, this alga could be a potential rich source of natural antioxidants applied in food and pharmaceutical fields.

DOI 10.1007/s10811-017-1162-y
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, Vanquan Vuong, C Scarlett
2017 Bhuyan DJ, Sakoff J, Bond DR, Predebon M, Vuong QV, Chalmers AC, et al., 'In vitro anticancer properties of selected Eucalyptus species.', In Vitro Cell Dev Biol Anim, 53 604-615 (2017)
DOI 10.1007/s11626-017-0149-y
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer, Jennette Sakoff, Vanquan Vuong, Anita Chalmers, Danielle Bond
2016 Zaleta-Pinet D, McCluskey A, Hall S, Brophy J, Ashhurst-Smith C, Sakoff J, Van Altena I, 'The Use of the Toxic Plant Myoporum montanum in a Traditional Australian Aboriginal Medicine', Australian Journal of Chemistry, 69 161-168 (2016) [C1]

© CSIRO 2016. Plants from the family Myoporaceae, which includes the genus Myoporum, are extremely prized by the Australian Aboriginal people for their medicinal properties. Leav... [more]

© CSIRO 2016. Plants from the family Myoporaceae, which includes the genus Myoporum, are extremely prized by the Australian Aboriginal people for their medicinal properties. Leaves from a plant, which was subsequently identified as Myoporum montanum, were provided for chemical investigation by representatives of an Aboriginal community from the Northern Tablelands district of northern New South Wales, Australia. Acetone extraction of the leaves provided a complex mixture of compounds including sesquiterpene hydrocarbons and more polar furanosesquiterpenes, which were identified by gas-liquid chromatography and retention indices (sesquiterpene hydrocarbons) and spectrometric techniques (furanosesquiterpenes). The major compounds found in a water extract were studied for their antibacterial activity using a disc diffusion assay and for their cell growth inhibition activity. The acetone extract contained sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (~30% of the total extract) in which the major compounds were germacrene-D and bicyclogermacrene. In addition, the extract contained five known toxic furanosesquiterpenes: myoporum ketol, (-)-10,11-dehydroisomyodesmone, (+)-10,11-dehydromyodesmone, 10,11-dehydromyoporum ketol, (-)-10,11-dehydromyoporone, and (±)-myoporone. An aqueous extract of the leaves, emulating the medicinal tea used by the Australian Aboriginal community, was found not to contain significant quantities of the sesquiterpene hydrocarbons and the most toxic furanosesquiterpenes. (±)-Myoporone and (-)-10,11-dehydromyoporone remained in the extract as well as a new furanosesquiterpene, 11-hydroxymyoporone. These three compounds were found to have significant antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis, and Moraxella catarrhalis but low cytotoxicity against a range of cancer cell lines and normal breast cells at 25µM.

DOI 10.1071/CH15586
Co-authors Adam Mccluskey, Jennette Sakoff, Sharron Hall
2016 Ragasa CY, Tan MCS, De Castro MEG, van Altena IA, 'Chemical constituents of phellinus gilvus (Schwein.) Pat.', Der Pharma Chemica, 8 222-225 (2016) [C1]

Chemical investigation of the dichloromethane extract of the fruiting bodies of Phellinus gilvus (Schwein.) Pat. has led to the isolation of ergosterol peroxide (1) and triacylgly... [more]

Chemical investigation of the dichloromethane extract of the fruiting bodies of Phellinus gilvus (Schwein.) Pat. has led to the isolation of ergosterol peroxide (1) and triacylglycerols (2). The structure of 1 was elucidated by extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and confirmed by comparison of its 13 C NMR data with literature data.

2016 Ragasa CY, Vivar JLA, De Los Reyes MM, van Altena IA, 'Secondary metabolites from Dracontomelon dao (Merr. & Rolfe)', Der Pharma Chemica, 8 257-260 (2016) [C1]

The dichloromethane extract of the leaves of Dracontomelon dao (Merr. & Rolfe) has led to the isolation of anacardic acid (1), ß-sitosteryl-3ß-glucopyranoside-6'-O-fatty acid ... [more]

The dichloromethane extract of the leaves of Dracontomelon dao (Merr. & Rolfe) has led to the isolation of anacardic acid (1), ß-sitosteryl-3ß-glucopyranoside-6'-O-fatty acid esters(2), ß-sitosterol (3), phytol (4), a mixture of phytyl fatty acid esters (5) and ß-sitosteryl fatty acid esters (6), chlorophyll a (7), squalene (8),long-chain fatty alcohols (9), and long-chain hydrocarbons (10). The structures of 1-10were identified by comparison of their NMR data with literature data.

2016 Ragasa CY, Macuha MR, De Los Reyes MM, Mandia EH, Van Altena IA, 'Chemical constituents of Ficus septica Burm. F.', International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, 8 1464-1469 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research. All rights reserved. Chemical investigation of the dichloromethane extracts of Ficus septica Burm.f. led to... [more]

© 2016, International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research. All rights reserved. Chemical investigation of the dichloromethane extracts of Ficus septica Burm.f. led to the isolation of ß-sitosteryl-3ß-glucopyranoside-6¿-O-fatty acid esters (1), a-amyrin fatty acid esters (2), and a mixture of ß-sitosterol (3a) and stigmasterol (3b) in a 5: 2 ratios from the twigs; and 3a, ß-amyrin (4), and long chain saturated fatty alcohols (5) from the leaves. The structures of 1-5 were identified by NMR spectroscopy.

Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Ragasa CY, Guardamano JD, Tan MCS, Ulep RA, van Altena IA, 'Isolation and structure elucidation of 9-hydroxy-10E, 12Z-octadecadienoic acid from Dioscorea luzonensis', Research Journal of Pharmaceutical, Biological and Chemical Sciences, 7 1233-1236 (2016) [C1]

Chemical investigation of the dichloromethane extract of Dioscorea luzonensis Schauer. led to the isolation of 9-hydroxy-10E,12Z-octadecadienoic acid or a-dimorphecolic acid (1) f... [more]

Chemical investigation of the dichloromethane extract of Dioscorea luzonensis Schauer. led to the isolation of 9-hydroxy-10E,12Z-octadecadienoic acid or a-dimorphecolic acid (1) from the skin of the tuber. The structure of 1 was elucidated by extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and confirmed by mass spectrometry.

2016 Dang TT, Vuong QV, Schreider MJ, Bowyer MC, Altena IAV, Scarlett CJ, 'The Effects of Drying on Physico-Chemical Properties and Antioxidant Capacity of the Brown Alga (Hormosira banksii (Turner) Decaisne)', Journal of Food Processing and Preservation, (2016)

© 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Hormosira banksii is a rich source of polyphenols, which can be utilized in the food or pharmaceutical industries. This study aimed to determine th... [more]

© 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Hormosira banksii is a rich source of polyphenols, which can be utilized in the food or pharmaceutical industries. This study aimed to determine the impact of six drying methods on properties of the alga H. banksii. Our data revealed that drying conditions significantly affected recovery yield, residual moisture, extraction yield, total phenolic content (TPC) as well as antioxidant capacity of H. banksii (P < 0.05). Optimal conditions for oven, vacuum and de-humidification were 40, 50 and 50C, respectively, and microwave power is 840 W. Under optimal conditions, H. banksii prepared by freeze, de-humidification and vacuum had significantly higher levels of TPC, total flavonoid content (TFC) and proanthocyanidins as well as possessing stronger antioxidant capacity in comparison with those prepared by sun, microwave and oven drying methods. As freeze drying is costly and time-consuming, de-humidification (50C, air in and out of 11.1 and 15.4%) and vacuum (50C, 10 psi) were recommended for drying H. banksii Practical Applications: Algae possess various antioxidants with potential benefits for health. Drying is considered as a method for preserving materials, transport with low costs and especially first step for extraction, isolation and purification of active compounds. Thus, it is important to investigate the effects of drying conditions on the properties of the dried alga H. banksii. From the findings, the different drying conditions significantly affected the phytochemical profile and antioxidant activity of the dried alga and the optimal drying conditions could be applied for preparation of dried H. banksii for further processing (extraction, fractionation and isolation of bioactive compounds) as well as potential industrial applications (as a reference for drying H. banksii and other algae).

DOI 10.1111/jfpp.13025
Co-authors C Scarlett, Vanquan Vuong, Michael Bowyer, Maria Schreider
2016 Nguyen VT, Pham NMQ, Vuong QV, Bowyer MC, van Altena IA, Scarlett CJ, 'Phytochemical retention and antioxidant capacity of xao tam phan (Paramignya trimera) root as prepared by different drying methods', Drying Technology, 34 324-334 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Xao tam phan (Paramignya trimera (Oliv.) Guillaum) has been used as an herbal medicine for the treatment of cancer or cancer-like diseases ... [more]

© 2016, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Xao tam phan (Paramignya trimera (Oliv.) Guillaum) has been used as an herbal medicine for the treatment of cancer or cancer-like diseases in recent years, particularly in Vietnam. Drying is an important step for preparation of dried materials for storage and further investigation; however, the effects of drying must be taken into account when processing samples, because this can have profound effects on the stability of phytochemical compounds and the biological activity of the dried P. trimera root. As such, this study assessed the effects of four different drying methods (conventional, hot air, vacuum, and microwave) on phytochemical retention and antioxidant capacity of P. trimera root, to identify an optimal drying method for P. trimera root. The results showed that the drying methods significantly affected phytochemical levels and antioxidant capacity of P. trimera root and that among the four drying methods tested, microwave drying (400¿W) had the highest levels of phytochemical compounds, with total phenolic, total flavonoid, proanthocyanidin, and saponin contents of 11.27¿mg GAE, 19.88¿mg RE, 3.98¿mg CE, and 267.15¿mg EE/gram of dried sample, respectively. Dried sample prepared using this method had antioxidant capacity comparable to that of other drying methods. In addition, this method had the shortest drying time (0.28¿h) and consumed the least energy (0.28¿kWh). Therefore, microwave drying should be considered for drying P. trimera root for further investigation and utilization.

DOI 10.1080/07373937.2015.1053566
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, Vanquan Vuong, C Scarlett
2016 Nguyen VT, Bowyer MC, Van Altena IA, Scarlett CJ, 'Optimisation of microwave-assisted extraction from Phyllanthus amarus for phenolic compounds-enriched extracts and antioxidant capacity', CHEMICAL PAPERS, 70 713-725 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1515/chempap-2016-0009
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer
2016 Ragasa CY, Batarra TC, Tan MCS, van Altena IA, 'Chemical constituents of Alstonia scholaris (L.) R. Br', Der Pharma Chemica, 8 193-196 (2016) [C1]

Chemical investigation of the dichloromethane extract of the leaves of Alstonia scholaris (L.) R. Br. has yielded mixtures of erythrodiol (1a), uvaol (1b), and betulin (1c) in a 1... [more]

Chemical investigation of the dichloromethane extract of the leaves of Alstonia scholaris (L.) R. Br. has yielded mixtures of erythrodiol (1a), uvaol (1b), and betulin (1c) in a 1:1:1 ratio, oleanolic acid and ursolic acid in a 2:1 ratio, ß-amyrin acetate (3b) and a-amyrin acetate (3b) in a 1:4 ratio, and ß-sitosterol (4a) and stigmasterol (4b) in a 3:2 ratio; squalene (5), ß-sitosteryl-3ß-glucopyranoside-6 's -O-fatty acid esters (6), and chlorophyll a (7). The structures of 1-7 were identified by comparison of their NMR data with literature data.

2016 Apostol PG, De Los Reyes MM, Van Altena IA, Ragasa CY, 'Chemical constituents of Melanolepis multiglandulosa (Reinw. Ex blume)', International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, 8 1663-1665 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research. All rights reserved. Chemical investigation of the dichloromethane extracts of Melanolepis multiglandulosa ... [more]

© 2016, International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research. All rights reserved. Chemical investigation of the dichloromethane extracts of Melanolepis multiglandulosa (Reinw. ex Blume) yielded taraxeryl fatty acid esters (1), squalene (2), (E)-3-alkenoic acids (3), ß-carotene (4), a mixture of ß-sitosterol (5a) and stigmasterol (5b), long-chain fatty alcohols (6), and long-chain hydrocarbons (7) from the leaves; and 7, triacylglycerols (8), and long-chain saturated fatty acid esters (9) from the twigs. The structures of 1-9 were identified by comparison of their NMR data with literature data.

2016 Borlagdan M, Aurigue FB, Van Altena IA, Ragasa CY, 'Triterpenes from Hoya paziae Kloppenb', Pharmacognosy Journal, 8 487-489 (2016) [C1]

Chemical investigation of the dichloromethane extracts of the stems of Hoya paziae Kloppenb. led to the isolation of taraxerol (1), taraxeryl acetate (2), and a mixture ?-amyrin a... [more]

Chemical investigation of the dichloromethane extracts of the stems of Hoya paziae Kloppenb. led to the isolation of taraxerol (1), taraxeryl acetate (2), and a mixture ?-amyrin acetate (3), and ß-amyrin acetate (4) in about 2.5:1 ratio. The structures of 1-4 were identified by comparison of their NMR data with those reported in the literature.

DOI 10.5530/pj.2016.5.13
Citations Scopus - 2
2016 Van TN, Hong NTP, Bowyer MC, van Altena IA, Scarlett CJ, 'Influence of solvents and novel extraction methods on bioactive compounds and antioxidant capacity of Phyllanthus amarus', CHEMICAL PAPERS, 70 556-566 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1515/chempap-2015-0240
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett
2016 Bhuyan D, Vuong QV, Chalmers A, van Altena I, Bowyer M, Scarlett C, 'Investigation of phytochemicals and antioxidant capacity of selected Eucalyptus species using conventional extraction', Chemical Papers, 70 567-575 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1515/chempap-2015-0237
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors C Scarlett, Anita Chalmers, Vanquan Vuong, Michael Bowyer
2016 Alimboyoguen AB, Cruz-De Castro KA, Van Altena IA, Ragasa CY, 'Triterpenes from Pittosporum resiniferum hemsl', International Journal of Toxicological and Pharmacological Research, 8 261-262 (2016) [C1]
2015 Nguyen VT, Bowyer MC, Vuong QV, Altena IAV, Scarlett CJ, 'Phytochemicals and antioxidant capacity of Xao tam phan (Paramignya trimera) root as affected by various solvents and extraction methods', Industrial Crops and Products, 67 192-200 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Xao tam phan (. Paramignya trimera (Oliv.) Guillaum) is a Vietnamese traditionally medicinal plant used in the treatment of numerous cancers. The preparation... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Xao tam phan (. Paramignya trimera (Oliv.) Guillaum) is a Vietnamese traditionally medicinal plant used in the treatment of numerous cancers. The preparation of Xao tam phan extracts including solvent type and extraction method have significant effects on extraction efficiency, phytochemical profile and biological activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of five various solvents (water, acetonitrile, methanol, ethyl acetate and hexane) and three different extraction methods (conventional, ultrasound-assisted and microwave-assisted) on phytochemical yield and antioxidant capacity of P. trimera root from Vietnam. The results indicate that methanol extracted the maximal yield of phytochemicals from P. trimera and exhibited the greatest antioxidant capacity, with eleven compounds were identified and quantified. Microwave-assisted extraction produced the maximal phytochemical yields (except for total flavonoids) and antioxidant capacity, when compared to conventional and ultrasound-assisted extractions. These data reveal that the use of methanol and microwave-assisted extraction are recommended for extraction of biologically active phytochemicals from P. trimera root for application in the nutraceutical and/or pharmaceutical industries.

DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2015.01.051
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett, Vanquan Vuong
2015 Bhuyan DJ, Quan VV, Chalmers AC, van Altena IA, Bowyer MC, Scarlett CJ, 'Microwave-assisted extraction of Eucalyptus robusta leaf for the optimal yield of total phenolic compounds', INDUSTRIAL CROPS AND PRODUCTS, 69 290-299 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2015.02.044
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 21
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer, Vanquan Vuong, Anita Chalmers
2015 Nguyen VT, Vuong QV, Bowyer MC, Altena IAV, Scarlett CJ, 'Effects of Different Drying Methods on Bioactive Compound Yield and Antioxidant Capacity of Phyllanthus amarus', Drying Technology, 33 1006-1017 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/07373937.2015.1013197
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 12
Co-authors C Scarlett, Michael Bowyer, Vanquan Vuong
2014 Zaleta-Pinet DA, Holland IP, Muñoz-Ochoa M, Murillo-Alvarez JI, Sakoff JA, van Altena IA, McCluskey A, 'Cytotoxic compounds from Laurencia pacifica.', Org Med Chem Lett, 4 8 (2014)
DOI 10.1186/s13588-014-0008-8
Co-authors Jennette Sakoff, Adam Mccluskey
2010 Laird DW, Bennett S, Bian B, Sauer B, Wright K, Hughes V, Van Altena IA, 'Chemical investigation of seven Australasian Cystophora species: New chemistry and taxonomic insights', Biochemical Systematics and Ecology, 38 187-194 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.bse.2009.12.010
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2009 McCann N, Phan DT, Attalla M, Puxty G, Fernandes D, Conway WO, et al., 'Molecular interactions between amine and carbonate species in aqueous solution: Kinetics and thermodynamics', Energy Procedia, 1 995-1002 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.egypro.2009.01.132
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Marcel Maeder, Geoffrey Lawrance
2009 Holland IP, McCluskey A, Sakoff JA, Gilbert J, Chau N, Robinson PJ, et al., 'Steroids from an Australian Sponge Psammoclema sp', Journal of Natural Products, 72 102-106 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/np800688f
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Jennette Sakoff, Adam Mccluskey
2007 Laird DW, Poole R, Wikstrom M, Van Altena IA, 'Pycnanthuquinone C, an unusual 6,6,5-tricyclic geranyltoluquinone from the Western Australian brown alga Cystophora harveyi', Journal of Natural Products, 70 671-674 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/np060566m
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
2006 Laird DW, Van Altena IA, 'Tetraprenyltoluquinols from the brown alga Cystophora fibrosa', Phytochemistry, 67 944-955 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.phytochem.2006.03.011
Citations Web of Science - 14
2006 Koysomboon S, Van Altena IA, Kato S, Chantrapromma K, 'Antimycobacterial flavonoids from Derris indica', Phytochemistry, 67 1034-1040 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.phytochem.2006.03.019
2003 Van Altena IA, Van Soest R, Roberge M, Andersen RJ, 'Trisphaerolide A, a Novel Polyketide from the Dominican Sponge Erylus trisphaerus', Journal of Natural Products, 561-563 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/np0205147
1999 Van Altena IA, Butler AJ, Dunne SJ, 'A new cyclized 9,11-secosterol enol-ether from the Australian sponge Euryspongia arenaria', Journal of Natural Products, 62 1154-1157 (1999) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 14
1998 Bian B, Van Altena IA, 'Four New Compounds from the Australian Brown Alga Cystophora brownii', Australian Journal of Chemistry, 51 1157-1165 (1998) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
1996 Butler AJ, Van Altena IA, Dunne SJ, 'Antifouling activity of fyso-platelet-activating factor extracted from australian sponge Crella incrustans', Journal of Chemical Ecology, 22 2041-2061 (1996)

Larvae of the ascidian Clavelina moluccensis do not settle in the field on the sponge Crella incrustans and are deterred from settling by crude chemical extracts of the sponge. Pr... [more]

Larvae of the ascidian Clavelina moluccensis do not settle in the field on the sponge Crella incrustans and are deterred from settling by crude chemical extracts of the sponge. Progressive refinement of extracts, guided by bioassays, led to the identification of lyso-platelet-activating factor (lyso-PAF) from the sponge, lyso-PAF is inhibitory in assays using ascidian, bryozoan, barnacle, and algal settlement and mussel byssal attachment. Its role in the field has not yet been demonstrated. © 1996 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

Citations Scopus - 15
1992 Van Altena IA, Steinberg PD, 'Are differences in the responses between North American and Australasian marine herbivores to phlorotannins due to differences in phlorotannin structure?', Biochemical Systematics and Ecology, 20 493-499 (1992)

Recent work indicates that the responses of marine hervibores to brown algal (Phaeophyta) phlorotannins (polyphloroglucinols) differ between herbivores from temperate North Americ... [more]

Recent work indicates that the responses of marine hervibores to brown algal (Phaeophyta) phlorotannins (polyphloroglucinols) differ between herbivores from temperate North America and Australasia. One possible explanation for this difference is that phlorotannins from algae from the two regions differ chemically, and hence affect hervibores differentially. We tested this idea by comparing 13 C NMR spectra, elemental analyses, and molecular weight distributions of pholorotannins from three species of Australasian brown algae with analogous published data from phlorotannins of North American phaeophytes. NMR spectra and the results of elemental analyses of algal phlorotannins from the two hemispheres were similar. Compounds from the Australasian algae generally had lower molecular weight distributions, although the number of species compared (two from each region) was small. We conclude that chemical differences among the compounds do not adequately explain the differences in their effects on hervibores from the two hemispheres. Several additional arguments are presented which further support this conclusion. © 1992.

DOI 10.1016/0305-1978(92)90003-V
Citations Scopus - 29
1991 Steinberg PD, Edyvane K, de Nys R, Birdsey R, van Altena IA, 'Lack of avoidance of phenolic-rich brown algae by tropical herbivorous fishes', Marine Biology, 109 335-343 (1991)

High levels of polyphloroglucinol phenolics in marine brown algae are usually interpreted as a defensive response to herbivory. However, tropical brown algae generally contain ver... [more]

High levels of polyphloroglucinol phenolics in marine brown algae are usually interpreted as a defensive response to herbivory. However, tropical brown algae generally contain very low levels of phenolics, even though herbivory in many tropical systems (e.g. coral reefs) is intense. This apparent paradox would be explained if polyphenolics did not deter tropical herbivores, in which case selection by herbivores for high levels of phenolics in tropical algae would be weak. To examine this hypothesis, in February 1989 we presented mixed assemblages of herbivorous fishes on the Great Barrier Reef with tropical, phenolic-poor brown algae (primarily Sargassum spp.) and closely related (conspecifics in one instance) phenolic-rich temperate species. Different species of brown algae were eaten at very different rates, but these differences were not correlated with variation in the phenolic levels among the plants. TLC and NMR analyses showed no evidence of other, non-polar, metabolites in these algae, with the exception of the temperate species Homoeostrichus sinclairii. Thus, variation in non-polar metabolites also did not explain the differences in susceptibility to herbivores among these algae. We conclude that the herbivorous fishes studied here were not deterred by phenolic-rich algae, which suggests that levels of phenolics in many tropical algae may generally be low due to their ineffectiveness as defences. However, alternative explanations for the pattern are possible, and these are discussed. © 1991 Springer-Verlag.

DOI 10.1007/BF01319401
Citations Scopus - 47
1989 van Altena IA, Miller DA, 'A study of the terpenoids of the sponge euryspongia sp.', Australian Journal of Chemistry, 42 2181-2190 (1989)

The metabolites of the sponge Euryspongia sp. (Dysideidae) were investigated. The sponge was shown to contain the previously unknown sesquiterpene epoxides (15) and (16), and thre... [more]

The metabolites of the sponge Euryspongia sp. (Dysideidae) were investigated. The sponge was shown to contain the previously unknown sesquiterpene epoxides (15) and (16), and three known compounds, dehydrodendrolasin (1), thiofurodysinin acetate (13) and thiofurodysin acetate (14). Based on the spectral data of (1) and the synthetic compounds (l'E)- and (1'Z)-3-(4', 8'-dimethylnon-1-enyl)furan (5) and (6), the structures of ¿the cis isomer of dehydrodendrolasin¿ (2), tetradehydrofurospongian-1 (3) and the related C 21 furanoterpene (4) should be reevaluated. © 1989 ASEG.

DOI 10.1071/CH9892181
Citations Scopus - 19
1988 van Altena IA, 'Terpenoids from the brown alga Cystophora moniliformis', Australian Journal of Chemistry, 41 49-56 (1988)

The alga Cystophora moniliformis contains two new bisnorsesquiterpenes, (5E, 9E)-5, 6-epoxy-6, 10, 14-trimethylpentadeca-9, 13-dien-2-one (3) and its cyclized derivative (4), and ... [more]

The alga Cystophora moniliformis contains two new bisnorsesquiterpenes, (5E, 9E)-5, 6-epoxy-6, 10, 14-trimethylpentadeca-9, 13-dien-2-one (3) and its cyclized derivative (4), and the (2E) and (2Z) isomers of geranylgeranal epoxide, (5) and (6), respectively. The structures of the new compounds were deduced by spectroscopic means. Geranylacetone (1) was the major metabolite present in the alga. © 1988 ASEG.

DOI 10.1071/CH9880049
Citations Scopus - 8
1978 Bowden BF, Coll JC, Liyanage N, Mitchell SJ, Stokie GJ, Van Altena IA, 'Studies of australian soft corals. iv: A novel bicyclic diterpene from lobophytum hedleyi', Australian Journal of Chemistry, 31 163-170 (1978)

A new bicyclic diterpene, (3E, 5E)-2-methyl-6-[(2'7R*, 4a'S*, 8a'R*)-4a'-methyl-8-methylene-trans-per- hydronaphthalen-2'-yl]hepta-3, 5-dien-2-ol (1), is reported as the major ter... [more]

A new bicyclic diterpene, (3E, 5E)-2-methyl-6-[(2'7R*, 4a'S*, 8a'R*)-4a'-methyl-8-methylene-trans-per- hydronaphthalen-2'-yl]hepta-3, 5-dien-2-ol (1), is reported as the major terpenoid component from Lobophytum hedleyi. It represents the first non-cembranoid diterpene to be reported from soft corals. A minor component in the coral is tentatively identified as the 7-hydroxy derivative of (1). Evidence for the structure of (1) is mainly spectroscopic but final proof rests on degradation and conversion into a known compound. © 1978, CSIRO. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1071/CH9780163
Citations Scopus - 9
Show 36 more journal articles

Conference (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Bond D, Turner A, Richmond R, Sadeqzadeh E, Vuong Q, Bhuyan D, et al., 'THE SEARCH FOR NOVEL TREATMENT AGENTS FOR PANCREATIC CANCER: TALES FROM THE LAND AND SEA', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Vanquan Vuong, Troy Gaston, Anita Chalmers, Jennette Sakoff, Michael Bowyer, Judith Weidenhofer, C Scarlett, Danielle Bond
2014 Sadeqzadeh E, Vuong QV, Goldsmith CD, Nguyen VT, Bhuyan DJ, Trung TD, et al., 'A NATURAL PRODUCT DRUG DISCOVERY PIPELINE FOR NOVEL PANCREATIC CANCER THERAPIES: A NEW CANCER RESEARCH HUB FOR THE HUNTER REGION OF NSW', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Anita Chalmers, Troy Gaston, Natalie Moltschaniwskyj, Rick Thorne, Judith Weidenhofer, Vanquan Vuong, Michael Bowyer, C Scarlett
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $202,778

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


19951 grants / $4,778

Computer Screen Projection in Small Classes. Applications in 3rd Year Chemometrics, 2nd Year Analytical Chemistry and 3rd Year Organic Chemistry Classes$4,778

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Marcel Maeder, Doctor Ian Van Altena
Scheme Teaching Committee Teaching Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 1995
Funding Finish 1995
GNo G0175880
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

19942 grants / $198,000

94 MECH C. High field NMR facilities$190,000

Funding body: Department of Education, Training & Youth Affairs

Funding body Department of Education, Training & Youth Affairs
Project Team Doctor Ian Van Altena
Scheme Mechanism C Infrastructure
Role Lead
Funding Start 1994
Funding Finish 1994
GNo G0174400
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

Identification of Novel Compounds from Marine Algae$8,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Ian Van Altena
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1994
Funding Finish 1994
GNo G0174782
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed8
Current5

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.55

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2014 PhD Brown Algae as a Source of Bioactive Compounds for Pancreatic Cancer Treatment PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Bioactive Compounds, Antioxidant and Cytotoxic Capacities of Two Vietnamese Medicinal Plants: Phyllanthus Amarus and Paramignya Trimera PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Phytochemicals Derived From Australian Eucalypts as Anticancer Agents for Pancreatic Malignancies PhD (Food Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2006 PhD Natural Products as a Source for Dynamin Inhibitors Chem Sc Not Elsewhere Classifd, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2005 PhD Marine Natural Products Chem Sc Not Elsewhere Classifd, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Studies in Marine Natural Products. 1. Dynamin 1 Screening of Sponges from Catherine Hill Bay. 2. Chemistry of Cystophora Xiphocarpa. 3. Investigation of "Paua Greening" of Haliotis Iris from New Zealand's Cook Strait PhD (Chemistry), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Drugs from Nature: 1. Dynamin I Inhibitors from Mexican Marine Algae; 2. Chemical Investigation of an Australian Aboriginal Traditional Remedy PhD (Chemistry), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2012 PhD 1. Dynamin-l Inhibitors from Sessile Marine Invertebrates; 2. Chemotaxonomy of Cystophora spp. PhD (Chemistry), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Marine Natural Products and Brown Macroalga Cystophora Moniliformis Chemistry PhD (Chemistry), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2012 PhD Disruption of Clathrin Mediated-Endocytosis through Small Molecule Inhibition of Dynamin and Clathrin PhD (Chemistry), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2011 Masters Novel Inhibitors of Clathrin Mediated Endocytosis M Philosophy (Chemistry), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2009 PhD Norcantharidin Analogues: PP1 and PP2A Inhibition and Potential Therapeutic Development PhD (Chemistry), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2005 PhD Chemotaxonomy of the brown algal genus Cyclophoria PhD (Chemistry), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
Edit

Dr Ian Van Altena

Position

Lecturer
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science

Focus area

Chemistry

Contact Details

Email ian.vanaltena@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5480
Fax (02) 4921 5472
Link Personal webpage

Office

Room C322
Building Chemistry Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
Edit