Dr Hannah Power

Dr Hannah Power

Lecturer

School of Environmental and Life Sciences (Earth Sciences)

Drawing a line in the sand

The research of Dr Hannah Power, a recent finalist in the national search for the 2015 ASPIRE science prize, focuses primarily on the study of coastal processes and the geomorphology of sandy beaches.

Dr Hannah Power

THE SANDS OF TIME

The focal point of Dr Hannah Power's research is ocean waves, how they behave, and how they affect the movement of sediment.

This work underpins the effective management of sustainable coastal environments, through predicting beach erosion, and anticipating how beaches change with time.

Understanding how waves behave creates the capacity to model how water will act during both calm periods and major weather events such as tsunamis and storms.

In late 2014, Hannah, a lecturer in the School of Environmental and Life Sciences, received a grant from the NSW Ministry for Police and Emergency Services to undertake modeling related to tsunami attenuation in coastal waterways.

It is also her work in this area of coastal hazard risk reduction that saw Hannah chosen as one of the final three nominees in the search to identify Australia's best representative for the APEC Science Prize for Innovation, Research and Education (also known as the ASPIRE Prize).

TAKING A DIVE

Growing up in Sydney, with frequent holidays on the south coast of NSW, Hannah spent endless summer days swimming and body surfing.

It was learning to scuba dive on the Great Barrier Reef at age 14, however, which cemented her future.

"I always had an interest in science, but all of a sudden I became really interested in marine biology and marine ecology," Hannah recalls.

"So I enrolled in a marine science degree at the University of Sydney. In my second year I discovered that I really liked the numerical aspects of oceanography, more than I liked biology."

"I did intend to end up a marine scientist, but have ended up at the other end of the spectrum."

Hannah then completed her PhD with the Coastal Engineering Research Group at the University of Queensland, focusing on coastal processes. She came to Newcastle in 2013 after a stint working for the Government.

"I like that in the work I do now, things can be quantified for most part. Everything can be described and predicted numerically and that appeals to my personality," Hannah asserts.

ON THE CREST OF THE WAVE

It is the underlying physical processes, and how they affect our beaches, that informs the modeling capable of predicting long-term scale change.

"The modeling works by simulating as many of the processes and their complex interactions that we understand to predict the outcome of those processes and interactions over long time scales," Hannah explains.

Identifying the factors that lead to large runup events on a wave-by-wave basis is a current area of focus for Hannah.

Traditionally, wave process and modeling have been looked at from a time averaged perspective, which has its benefits but also limits.

In early 2015, Hannah made a major contribution to an emerging direction in her field by publishing a paper describing a new method of tracking an individual wave across a beach. This previously undeveloped method allows researchers to measure how a single wave evolves through time or, in other words, how it moves onto the beach.

Hannah has identified that a major hurdle to effective modeling of wave behaviour is a general lack of understanding of how waves behave on an individual, wave-by-wave basis.

CASTLES MADE OF SAND

Another core area in Hannah's research relates to the efficacy of coastal management systems through investigating the movement of sediment.

Hannah explains that beaches are dynamic systems, constantly changing and undergoing natural cycles of erosion and accretion, which can be clearly seen in South Eastern Australia. Sand shifts offshore in large storms but is returned over time in a system that generally has a net equilibrium.

Historically, planning decisions for building along the coastline have sometimes been made without the information and numerical models that we have today.   

Hannah points to areas such as Old Bar, Jimmy's Beach and Collaroy-Narrabeen Beach as examples of sites where buildings are now being affected by coastal erosion.

Sand nourishment projects, the building of rock revetment structures and councils securing at risk properties are all expensive actions invoked as short term salves to limit the danger to lives and assets posed by erosion cycles. 

Having previously studied the movement of sediment on coral reefs, and what forcing conditions created that motion, Hannah is looking to invest more time researching this aspect and its implications in other coastal systems.

WE'RE GOING TO NEED A BIGGER BOAT

It is her advanced modeling capabilities and expertise around coastal hazards that saw Hannah recently receive a grant to advise the NSW Police and Emergency Services on their tsunami evacuation plan.

Focusing specifically on inundation in rivers, harbours and estuaries, Hannah will use mathematical modeling to predict how the shape of the coastline and waterways will affect the attenuation of the wave as it propagates upstream.

Predicting how far inland a large wave could travel along existing waterways will inform how far upstream an evacuation plan would need to be activated.

"For example," Hannah explains, "in the Hunter River, we still see the signal from the ocean tide up at Maitland. But for a small tsunami, we don't currently know how far up we would need to evacuate."

"My project aims to fill this knowledge gap."

BACK TO THE BEACH

A passionate educator, Hannah currently teaches students across several faculties how to map data of a spatial nature through a Geographical Information Systems course. Pending approval from the faculty teaching committee, a new Coastal Environments and Processes course would begin in 2016.

The course, which would include a fieldwork component to be undertaken in the Pacific Palms region, would teach students about coastal systems, from beaches, to rocky coastlines, to muddy coastlines, through to coral reefs.

Hannah is typically understated in her assertion, "I think there will be reasonably high interest levels."

And before you ask, no, she doesn't surf.

"When I tell people I'm an academic, I teach at the university and I do research on beaches and waves, the question I tend to get asked is 'Do you surf?'"

She doesn't need to surf for recreation because her office is already at the beach, to the envy of many.

"When I was doing my honours degree I thought if I can get paid to go to the beach as a career, I have done well," she confesses.

"Last year I spent four weeks at the beach doing fieldwork, and I thought that was pretty good."

Dr Hannah Power

Drawing a line in the sand

The research of Dr Hannah Power focuses primarily on the study of coastal processes and the geomorphology of sandy beaches.

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Career Summary

Biography

Dr Hannah Power is a lecturer and coastal scientist in the Environmental and Climate Change Research Group (ECCRG) within the School of Environmental and Life Sciences. Hannah's primary research focuses on the study of coastal processes and geomorphology of sandy beaches. Of particular interest to Hannah are the hydrodynamics of waves after breaking and the implications this has for sediment transport and swash zone processes. Hannah's interests also extend to the processes and geomorphology of coral reef systems as well as beach erosion and coastal hazards such as storm surge and tsunami. Hannah has experience in coastal hydrodynamics, coastal and reef geomorphology, sediment transport, hydrodynamic modelling, statistical analysis, computer programming, remote sensing, and GIS/spatial analysis.

Research Expertise
- Coastal processes and geomorphology - Nearshore hydrodynamics and hydrodynamic modelling - Nearshore sediment transport - Geophysical signal processing - Image analysis - Parametric modelling - Geographic Information Systems - Oceanographic sampling equipment - Field experiments (design and implementation) in the coastal zone


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Science (Marine Science)(Honours), University of Sydney

Keywords

  • Coastal hazards
  • Coastal processes
  • Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
  • Geomorphology
  • Hydrodynamics
  • Remote sensing
  • Sediment transport

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
040503 Physical Oceanography 30
040699 Physical Geography and Environmental Geoscience not elsewhere classified 40
090599 Civil Engineering not elsewhere classified 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (20 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Baldock TE, Moura T, Power HE, 'Video-Based Remote Sensing of Surf Zone Conditions', IEEE Potentials, 36 35-41 (2017)

© 1988-2012 IEEE. Coastal engineers design harbors, coastal structures, and beach protection measures to guard infrastructure and communities located in coastal zones. The accura... [more]

© 1988-2012 IEEE. Coastal engineers design harbors, coastal structures, and beach protection measures to guard infrastructure and communities located in coastal zones. The accurate forecasting of coastal erosion and inundation is crucial for planning the protection of existing and new coastal zone infrastructure.

DOI 10.1109/MPOT.2016.2631018
2017 Atkinson AL, Power HE, Moura T, Hammond T, Callaghan DP, Baldock TE, 'Assessment of runup predictions by empirical models on non-truncated beaches on the south-east Australian coast', COASTAL ENGINEERING, 119 15-31 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.coastaleng.2016.10.001
Citations Web of Science - 1
2016 Power HE, Nielsen P, Hughes MG, Aagaard T, Baldock TE, 'Wave Height Distributions in the Surf Zone on Natural Beaches', JOURNAL OF COASTAL RESEARCH, 917-921 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.2112/SI75-184.1
2016 Wilson OA, Power HE, 'Tsunami Inundation Modelling in Estuaries: Sensitivity to Variation in Tide from an Emergency Management Perspective', JOURNAL OF COASTAL RESEARCH, 1262-1266 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.2112/SI75-253.1
Co-authors Olivia Wilson
2016 Van Leeuwen BR, McCarroll RJ, Brander RW, Turner IL, Power HE, Bradstreet AJ, 'Examining rip current escape strategies in non-traditional beach morphologies', Natural Hazards, 81 145-165 (2016) [C1]

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. Rip currents are a significant hazard on global surf beaches and are a factor in hundreds of drowning fatalities each year. Con... [more]

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. Rip currents are a significant hazard on global surf beaches and are a factor in hundreds of drowning fatalities each year. Contemporary rip current safety information often idealises rip currents as part of a Transver se Bar Rip (TBR) morphology with rip channels bound by shallow, shore-connected bars. Real-world conditions frequently differ from this model, with potential implications for rip current escape strategies promoted to, and undertaken by, the general public. This study describes outcomes of rip current escape strategies conducted at North Cronulla Beach, NSW, Australia, over two distinct morphologies; a mixed Low Tide Terrace/Transverse Bar Rip (LTT/TBR) and a Rhythmic Bar Beach (RBB) system lacking shore-connected bars. Swimmers attempted to escape by adopting one of three pre-determined strategies: Stay Afloat, Swim Parallel and Swim Onshore. A total of 100 escape attempts were conducted, with the RBB system experiencing longer duration (t¯¿=¿2.4¿min) escapes than the LTT system (t¯¿=¿0.8¿min). The RBB system was associated with a higher rate of action failure, particularly for Stay Afloat, due to a lack of shore connectivity of adjacent bars. Swim Parallel was of lower duration (t¯ RIP1 ¿=¿0.66, t¯ RIP2 ¿=¿2.68¿min) in both systems, but durations and distances to safety in the RBB system often exceeded swimming abilities of weaker bathers. Although Swim Onshore was more successful (t¯ RIP1 ¿=¿0.22, t¯ RIP2 ¿=¿1.65¿min) than Swim Parallel, promotion of such a strategy is strongly discouraged in conventional safety advice. Results suggest that contemporary rip current escape strategies may be inappropriate in non-TBR rip current systems and that alternative strategies should be considered, including Swim Onshore and a greater focus on preventative strategies, particularly in relation to bathers with limited swimming ability.

DOI 10.1007/s11069-015-2072-4
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2015 Harris DL, Vila-Concejo A, Webster JM, Power HE, 'Spatial variations in wave transformation and sediment entrainment on a coral reef sand apron', Marine Geology, 363 220-229 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Waves are the main hydrodynamic force acting on coral reefs and are crucial in driving the evolution of reef systems. Previous research has mainly focused on... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Waves are the main hydrodynamic force acting on coral reefs and are crucial in driving the evolution of reef systems. Previous research has mainly focused on wave breaking and transformation on the reef flat but often neglected the spatial variation of reformed wave characteristics once they have propagated into the back-reef environment. This study examines wave conditions on a reef flat and the adjacent back-reef sand apron specifically focusing on the transformation of wave height, period and spectra (including changes to long-period and incident wave height). The ability of reformed waves in the back-reef environment to entrain sediment is also investigated. Wave conditions were found to be distinctly different on the sand apron compared to the reef flat, with the majority of wave energy dissipated during initial breaking and transformation. Almost all incident waves are dissipated on the reef flat under a depth threshold of 0.5. m before reaching the back-reef with long-period motions dominating in the back-reef during these tidal stages. At higher tidal stages incident waves are capable of propagating into the back reef but they are very low energy with under 1% of all waves capable of entraining sediment. This suggests that higher energy events, such as high frequency storms, are required to significantly transport sediment and change reef geomorphology. Smaller scale spatial changes in wave height were observed on the sand apron that shows the influence of both cross- and along-reef attenuation processes. A distance parameter (X pd ) is introduced that combines the cross-reef distance from the reef crest (X d ) and the temporally specific along-reef distance from the first point of wave breaking on the reef rim (X p , where X pd =. X d +. X p ). X pd is shown to accurately describe the changes in wave height and sediment entrainment if deep water significant wave height, wave direction, and depth over the reef flat are known. The results in this study shows that wave conditions, sediment entrainment, and longer term trends in sediment characteristics can be predicted in back-reef environments from a few simple geomorphic inputs.

DOI 10.1016/j.margeo.2015.02.010
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2015 Power HE, Hughes MG, Baldock TE, 'A novel method for tracking individual waves in the surf zone', Coastal Engineering, 98 26-30 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. A new method to obtain information on individual waves as they travel shoreward is described. The wave-tracking method involves analysis of synchronous water... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. A new method to obtain information on individual waves as they travel shoreward is described. The wave-tracking method involves analysis of synchronous water level records obtained from a shore-normal transect of pressure transducers (PTs). The method is illustrated here using data from field deployments inside the surf zone, although the method could equally be applied outside the surf zone. As a wave travels shoreward along the instrument transect it appears in the PT records at a progressively later time. Serial cross-correlation techniques are used to shift each record in time so that each wave in the first record aligns approximately with the corresponding wave (if it exists) in subsequent records from along the transect. A local minima analysis [Power et al., 2010] is used to delimit individual waves in each record and then parameters of interest can be determined for each wave at each PT location. The wave tracking method provides the evolution of these parameters for a single wave as it travels to shore, and they can be analysed as a function of distance or local water depth. The utility of the method is illustrated with case studies including the evolution of wave height and the evolution of the ratio of wave height to water depth for surf zone waves.

DOI 10.1016/j.coastaleng.2015.01.006
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 Shannon AM, Power HE, Webster JM, Vila-Concejo A, 'Correction to Evolution of coral rubble deposits on a reef platform as detected by remote sensing [Temote sensing, 5, 2013, 1-18]', Remote Sensing, 6 2743-2744 (2014) [O1]
DOI 10.3390/rs6042743
2014 Hughes MG, Aagaard T, Baldock TE, Power HE, 'Spectral signatures for swash on reflective, intermediate and dissipative beaches', Marine Geology, 355 88-97 (2014) [C1]

In this paper we synthesise a large data set gathered from a wide variety of field deployments and integrate it with previously published results to identify the spectral signatur... [more]

In this paper we synthesise a large data set gathered from a wide variety of field deployments and integrate it with previously published results to identify the spectral signatures of swash from contrasting beach types. The field data set includes the full range of micro-tidal beach types (reflective, intermediate and dissipative), with beach gradients ranging from approximately 1:6 to 1:60 exposed to offshore significant wave heights of 0.5-3.0. m. The ratio of swash energy in the short-wave (f > 0.05. Hz) to long-wave (f < 0.05. Hz) frequency bands is found to be significantly different between the three beach types. Swash energy at short-wave frequencies is dominant on reflective and intermediate beaches and swash at long-wave frequencies is dominant on dissipative beaches; consistent with previously reported spectral signatures for the surf zone on these beach types. The available swash spectra were classified using an automated algorithm (CLARA) into five different classes. The ordered classes represent an evolution in the spectrum shape, described by a frequency downshifting of the energy peak from the short-wave into the long-wave frequency band and an increase in the long-wave swash energy level compared to a relatively minor variation in the short-wave swash energy level. A universally common feature of spectra from all beach-states was an f -4 energy roll-off in the short-wave frequency band. In contrast to the broadly uniform appearance of the short-wave frequency band, the appearance of the long wave frequency band was highly variable across the beach-states. We incorporate the results presented here and previously published observations into the morphodynamic beach-state model, and propose an ordered sequence of swash spectra under increasing and decreasing incident wave energy level. This extension of the beach-state model to include the swash zone leads to the following propositions for morphodynamic controls on the nature of the swash spectrum. (1) The short-wave part of the swash spectrum is relatively constant in form across all beach-states (f -4 energy roll-off) and the energy density per unit frequency is controlled by the beach face gradient alone. (2) The spectral bandwidth of the energy roll-off varies directly with offshore wave energy level and inversely with beach face gradient (or beach-state), in a manner consistent with the non-linear wave breaking criterion. (3) The infragravity part of the swash spectrum is highly variable in form across all beach-states and the energy level is related to the offshore wave energy level and surf zone morphology. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.margeo.2014.05.015
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
2014 McCarroll RJ, Brander RW, Turner IL, Power HE, Mortlock TR, 'Lagrangian observations of circulation on an embayed beach with headland rip currents', Marine Geology, 355 173-188 (2014) [C1]

This study describes the first comprehensive measurements of nearshore current patterns across the entire extent of an embayed beach bounded by headland rip currents. A field expe... [more]

This study describes the first comprehensive measurements of nearshore current patterns across the entire extent of an embayed beach bounded by headland rip currents. A field experiment at Whale Beach, NSW, Australia provides valuable insights into: (i) embayment-wide spatial and temporal flow behaviour; (ii) rates of cross- and alongshore water exchange; and (iii) the influence of geological control by headlands on morphology and circulation. Lagrangian flow data was obtained using 34 GPS drifters with 293 individual deployments, over a single ebbing tidal cycle during moderate-low energy (H s =1m) oblique wave forcing. In-situ wave and current data, and bathymetric data were also collected. Beach morphology was dominated by a large mid-beach rip channel with lesser headland rip channels. Mean flow rates were 0.6ms -1 in the mid-beach channel and 0.4ms -1 in the headland channels, with the majority of cross-shore water volume flux (~60%) through the central channel. A weak alongshore current O (0.1ms -1 ) was forced by the oblique offshore wave angle. Rip current velocities, flow variability, and rate of surfzone exits by Lagrangian drifters increased as water level decreased. Transient currents on a planar bar along the northern half of the beach, with mean speeds velocity standard deviation up to 0.2ms -1 , were not tidally modulated. Lagrangian time series were used to differentiate four current regimes (rip cell, rip head, planar bar and offshore low energy zone) based on mean velocity, velocity variability and degree of tidal modulation. An increase in surfzone exit rates by drifters was observed from south (upwave) to north (downwave), with exit rates per drifter deployment of 22% at the south headland rip, 65% at the mid-beach open rip, and 80% at the north headland rip. The high rate of drifter exits contrasts previous observations on open coast beaches. Observed flow behaviours are attributed to wave shadowing at the upwave (protected) end of the beach, and longshore currents forced by oblique waves deflected offshore at the downwave headland. These field observations are in good agreement with recent numerical modelling. A relationship between bathymetric variability and current intensity was determined, with cross-shore average mean velocity correlating with a parameterisation of bathymetric alongshore non-uniformity. This study demonstrates that flow behaviour and exchange rates can vary along the length of an embayed beach due to geological control. This research has implications for transport of organisms, nutrients and pollutants, is relevant to beach safety practitioners, and can be used in calibration of numerical models. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.margeo.2014.05.020
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
2014 Vila-Concejo A, Harris DL, Power HE, Shannon AM, Webster JM, 'Sediment transport and mixing depth on a coral reef sand apron', GEOMORPHOLOGY, 222 143-150 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.geomorph.2013.09.034
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 4
2014 Vila-Concejo A, Harris DL, Power HE, Shannon AM, Webster JM, 'Sediment transport and mixing depth on a coral reef sand apron', Geomorphology, 222 143-150 (2014) [C1]

This paper investigates the mechanics of sediment transport on a subtidal sand apron located on a coral reef environment. In this environment 100% of the sediment is carbonate bio... [more]

This paper investigates the mechanics of sediment transport on a subtidal sand apron located on a coral reef environment. In this environment 100% of the sediment is carbonate bioclasts generated in situ. The sand apron is located on the back reef and only affected by waves during high tides. It is commonly accepted in the literature that sand aprons are features that prograde lagoonwards and that most of the progradation occurs during high-energy events. Measurements of water depths, waves, currents and near bed suspended sediment concentrations (all at 10. Hz) on the sand apron were undertaken over a nine day intensive field campaign over both spring and neap tides; waves and tides were also measured in the lagoon. The topography and bathymetry of the sand apron were measured and mixing depth was obtained on three transects using depth of disturbance rods. We found that sediment transport on sand aprons is not solely restricted to high-energy events but occurs on a daily basis during spring tides. The main factor controlling the sediment transport was the water depth above the bed, with depths of 2-2.3. m allowing waves to promote the most sediment transport. This corresponds to a depth over the reef crest of 1.6-1.9. m. The second most important control was waves; transport was observed when H s on the apron was 0.1. m or greater. In contrast, current magnitude was not a controlling mechanism for sediment entrainment but did affect sediment transport. The morphology of the sand apron was shown to affect the direction of currents with the currents also expected to influence the morphology of the sand apron. The currents measured during this field campaign were aligned with a shallow channel in the sand apron. Mixing depths were small ( < 2.5. cm) yet they were larger than the values predicted by empirical formulae for gentle siliciclastic ocean beaches. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.geomorph.2013.09.034
Citations Scopus - 4
2014 Baldock TE, Grayson R, Torr B, Power HE, 'Flow convergence at the tip and edges of a viscous swash front - Experimental and analytical modeling', Coastal Engineering, 88 123-130 (2014) [C1]

The details of flow at the tip of a viscous swash front are important to describe the propagation of the wave, the bed shear and to estimate material transport rates and impact fo... [more]

The details of flow at the tip of a viscous swash front are important to describe the propagation of the wave, the bed shear and to estimate material transport rates and impact forces. This paper presents novel experimental data illustrating the convergence of fluid at swash fronts generated by dam-break flows. Very viscous fluids (detergents) were used to slow the flow sufficiently to enable video tracking of particles on the free surface and within the interior of the flow. The experiments were performed both up a slope and on a horizontal bed. The particle tracking shows that surface particles travel faster than the mean flow, converge on the swash tip and then rapidly decelerate, a process that will induce a high bed shear stress at the swash tip as observed in recent experiments. Particles also converge on the wall boundaries because of the no-slip condition. A simple analytical model is developed to estimate the ratio of the velocity of surface particles and the wave front. For laminar flows, this ratio is found to be 3/2, independent of the bed slope and flow depth, and is in good agreement with the experimental data. The same model approach suggests a ratio of 8/7 for turbulent flows. This flow convergence does not appear to be included in either analytical modeling of the tip region or in basal resistance laws for the swash front and would modify the momentum equation at the swash tip [c.f. Hogg and Pritchard, 2004] and the kinematic boundary condition at the shoreline. The flow convergence is consistent with observations of the behavior and build-up of buoyant debris at the leading edge of tsunami wave front and can be observed in natural swash flows on beaches. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.coastaleng.2014.02.008
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2013 Power HE, Baldock TE, Callaghan DP, Nielsen P, 'SURF ZONE STATES AND ENERGY DISSIPATION REGIMES - A SIMILARITY MODEL', COASTAL ENGINEERING JOURNAL, 55 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1142/S0578563413500034
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2013 Vila-Concejo A, Harris DL, Shannon AM, Webster JM, Power HE, 'Coral reef sediment dynamics: Evidence of sand-apron evolution on a daily and decadal scale', Journal of Coastal Research, 606-611 (2013) [E1]
DOI 10.2112/SI65-103
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2013 Shannon AM, Power HE, Webster JM, Vila-Concejo A, 'Evolution of Coral Rubble Deposits on a Reef Platform as Detected by Remote Sensing', REMOTE SENSING, 5 1-18 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/rs5010001
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
2012 Aagaard T, Hughes M, Baldock T, Greenwood B, Kroon A, Power H, 'Sediment transport processes and morphodynamics on a reflective beach under storm and non-storm conditions', MARINE GEOLOGY, 326 154-165 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.margeo.2012.09.004
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 16
2011 Power HE, Holman RA, Baldock TE, 'Swash zone boundary conditions derived from optical remote sensing of swash zone flow patterns', JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-OCEANS, 116 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1029/2010JC006724
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 10
2011 Baldock TE, Alsina JA, Caceres I, Vicinanza D, Contestabile P, Power H, Sanchez-Arcilla A, 'Large-scale experiments on beach profile evolution and surf and swash zone sediment transport induced by long waves, wave groups and random waves', COASTAL ENGINEERING, 58 214-227 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.coastaleng.2010.10.006
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 24
2010 Power HE, Hughes MG, Aagaard T, Baldock TE, 'Nearshore wave height variation in unsaturated surf', JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-OCEANS, 115 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1029/2009JC005758
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 12
Show 17 more journal articles

Conference (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Wilson OA, Power HE, Hanslow D, Sexton J, Mollison K, 'Tsunami inundation in New South Wales estuaries: Developing new attenuation rules', Australian Coasts and Ports 2015 Conference (2015) [E1]

This study aims to develop new attenuation rules for tsunamis in NSW estuaries. The results of the study will be presented in full at the 2015 Coasts and Ports conference in Auckl... [more]

This study aims to develop new attenuation rules for tsunamis in NSW estuaries. The results of the study will be presented in full at the 2015 Coasts and Ports conference in Auckland, New Zealand.

Co-authors Olivia Wilson
2015 Power HE, Clarke SL, Wilson O, Hubble TTCT, 'Tsunami hazard from submarine landslides: 3D inundation modelling in New South Wales, Australia', Australian Coasts and Ports 2015 Conference (2015) [E1]

This study has assessed the current state of knowledge regarding the potential for tsunami impact on the NSW coastline from submarine mass failure events. 2D modelling suggests th... [more]

This study has assessed the current state of knowledge regarding the potential for tsunami impact on the NSW coastline from submarine mass failure events. 2D modelling suggests that there is the potential for sizeable coastal flow depths, however, the lateral extent of the impact is not estimated using these methods. Preliminary 3D modelling results suggest that models are highly sensitive to model input factors resulting in significant variation in the initial sea surface waveform. This then results in varied inundation footprints. Full 3D modelling results will be presented at the conference.

Co-authors Olivia Wilson
2013 Power HE, Atkinson AL, Baldock TE, 'Wave runup on east Australian beaches: model accuracy and applicability', Mathematics of Planet Earth Australia 2013: The Conference (2013) [E3]
2013 Hughes MG, Aagaard T, Baldock TE, Power HE, 'Wave runup (swash) spectra on natural beaches: morphodynamic controls', 2013 Conference Papers (2013) [E1]
2013 Power HE, Atkinson AL, Hammond T, Baldock TE, 'Accuracy of wave runup formula on contrasting southeast Australian beaches', Coasts and Ports 2013: 21st Australasian Coastal and Ocean Engineering Conference and the 14th Australasian Port and Harbour Conference (2013) [E1]
Citations Scopus - 1
2011 Power HE, Baldock TE, 'Measurement and modelling of hydrodynamics at the surf-swash boundary', Proceedings of the IAHR World Congress (2011)
2010 Power HE, Baldock TE, Grayson R, Torr B, 'Wind wave run-up: Swash zone hydrodynamics and sediment transport', Proceedings of 17th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference (2010)
2010 Baldock TE, Grayson R, Torr B, Power HE, 'Flow convergence at the tip and edges of a viscous dam break wave', 17th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference 2010 (2010) [E1]
Citations Scopus - 1
2009 Power HE, Palmsten M, Holman RA, Baldock TE, 'REMOTE SENSING OF SWASH ZONE BOUNDARY CONDITIONS USING ARGUS', PROCEEDINGS OF COASTAL DYNAMICS 2009 (2009) [E1]
Show 6 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 7
Total funding $414,187

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20174 grants / $234,090

Understanding the submarine landslide hazard to NSW$177,427

Funding body: NSW Department of Justice

Funding body NSW Department of Justice
Project Team Doctor Hannah Power
Scheme State Emergency Management Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1600993
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Camera System for Figure Eight Rock Platform$27,354

Funding body: NSW Office of Environment and Heritage

Funding body NSW Office of Environment and Heritage
Project Team Doctor Hannah Power
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700019
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Coastal Engineering Research Field Station (CERFS)$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Rodger Tomlinson, Professor Thomas Baldock, Doctor Hannah Power, Mr Brian McRae, Ms Anna Hollingsworth
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1600501
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Drivers for intermittently poor water quality in Manihiki Lagoon, Cook Islands: Towards a mitigation strategy to support sustainable pearl aquaculture$9,309

Funding body: PADI Foundation

Funding body PADI Foundation
Project Team Doctor Hannah Power
Scheme PADI Foundation Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700236
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

20161 grants / $5,613

2016 International visit to University of Bath, UK$5,613

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Hannah Power, Professor Gerd Masselink
Scheme International Research Visiting Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1501036
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20151 grants / $164,764

Tsunami evacuation in estuaries and coastal rivers: improved guidelines and attenuation rules$164,764

Funding body: NSW Department of Justice

Funding body NSW Department of Justice
Project Team Doctor Hannah Power
Scheme State Emergency Management Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401333
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20141 grants / $9,720

Identifying new factors that affect coastal erosion$9,720

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project Team Doctor Hannah Power
Scheme Strategic Initiative Research Fund (SIRF)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1401043
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current3

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD2.5

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Tsunami Evacuation in Estuaries and Coastal Rivers: Developing New Attenuation Rules. PhD (Environmental Sc), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD The Role of Infragravity Waves in Surf and Swash Zone Dynamics PhD (Environmental Sc), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Tsunami Modelling in Australian Estuarine Environments PhD (Environmental Sc), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
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News

UON academics present vision for NSW

August 4, 2016

Some of the state’s 'best and brightest' young academics have presented ideas for the future of NSW to His Excellency General The Honourable David Hurley AC DSC (Ret’d), Governor of New South Wales, covering topics as wide ranging as citizen participation and the emergence of the 'caring' economy.

UON Young Scientist finalist in the ASPIRE Prize

May 25, 2015

The University of Newcastle's Dr Hannah Power was one of three finalists in the national search to find an Australian nominee for the APEC Science Prize for Innovation, Research and Education (also known as the ASPIRE Prize).

Dr Hannah Power

Position

Lecturer
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science

Focus area

Earth Sciences

Contact Details

Email hannah.power@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5606
Fax (02) 4921 6925

Office

Room G115
Building Geology Building.
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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